WorldWideScience

Sample records for antisigma particles

  1. Study ofe+e- to Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma^0,Sigma^0 anti-Sigma^0 using Initial State Radiation with BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2007-09-14

    We study the e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda gamma, Lambda anti-Sigma0 gamma, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 gamma processes using 230 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the BaBar detector at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. From the analysis of the baryon-antibaryon mass spectra the cross sections for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma0, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 are measured in the dibaryon mass range from threshold up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, and limits on the relative phase between Lambda form factors are obtained. We also measure the J/psi --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 and psi(2S) --> Lambda anti-Lambda branching fractions.

  2. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-26

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2-4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  3. An extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factor and anti-sigma factor control carotenoid biosynthesis in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, Nagarajan; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jos; Gross, Carol A; Tripathi, Anil K

    2008-07-01

    Strains Sp7 and Cd of Azospirillum brasilense, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, differ in synthesis of carotenoids. While colonies of strain Sp7 have a white-cream colour on plates, colonies of strain Cd are orange-pink coloured because of the synthesis of carotenoids. Screening of a mini-Tn5 mutant library of A. brasilense Sp7 revealed two orange-pink-coloured mutants that produced carotenoids. Cloning and sequencing of the Tn5 flanking region in both the carotenoid-producing mutants of Sp7 revealed insertion of Tn5 in an ORF encoding anti-sigma factor, a ChrR-like protein. The upstream region of the Tn5-mutated ORF contained another ORF that encoded an extra-cytoplasmic function (ECF)-class sigma factor (sigma(E), RpoE). When the nucleotide sequences of the corresponding ORFs from the carotenoid-producing strain Cd were analysed, the sequence of the Cd sigma(E) was identical to that of the carotenoid non-producing strain Sp7, but the Cd anti-sigma(E) ORF had a deletion that caused frame shifting and creation of a stop codon. This resulted in the premature termination of the protein, which was about 7 kDa smaller than the Sp7 anti-sigma(E). Cloning of Sp7 anti-sigma(E) in a broad-host-range expression vector and expression in A. brasilense Cd and in the anti-sigma(E) knockout mutant of A. brasilense Sp7 resulted in the inhibition of carotenoid synthesis. Similarly, cloning and overexpression of A. brasilense Sp7 sigma(E) in A. brasilense Sp7 resulted in the production of carotenoids. These observations clearly indicate that carotenoid synthesis in A. brasilense is controlled by sigma(E) with its cognate anti-sigma(E).

  4. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Paget

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1 that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4 that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  5. The flagellar-specific transcription factor, sigma28, is the Type III secretion chaperone for the flagellar-specific anti-sigma28 factor FlgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Phillip D; Karlinsey, Joyce E; Aldridge, Christine; Birchall, Christopher; Thompson, Danielle; Yagasaki, Jin; Hughes, Kelly T

    2006-08-15

    The sigma(28) protein is a member of the bacterial sigma(70)-family of transcription factors that directs RNA polymerase to flagellar late (class 3) promoters. The sigma(28) protein is regulated in response to flagellar assembly by the anti-sigma(28) factor FlgM. FlgM inhibits sigma(28)-dependent transcription of genes whose products are needed late in assembly until the flagellar basal motor structure, the hook-basal body (HBB), is constructed. A second function for the sigma(28) transcription factor has been discovered: sigma(28) facilitates the secretion of FlgM through the HBB, acting as the FlgM Type III secretion chaperone. Transcription-specific mutants in sigma(28) were isolated that remained competent for FlgM-facilitated secretion separating the transcription and secretion-facilitation activities of sigma (28). Conversely, we also describe the isolation of mutants in sigma(28) that are specific for FlgM-facilitated secretion. The data demonstrate that sigma(28) is the Type III secretion chaperone for its own anti-sigma factor FlgM. Thus, a novel role for a sigma(70)-family transcription factor is described.

  6. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: functional characterization of the ECF sigma factor CarQ and antisigma factor CarR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Douglas F; Whitworth, David E; Hodgson, David A

    2003-04-01

    Illumination of dark-grown Myxococcus xanthus with blue light leads to the induction of carotenoid synthesis. Central to this response is the activation of the light-inducible promoter, PcarQRS, and the transcription of three downstream genes, carQ, carR and carS. Sequence analysis predicted that CarQ is a member of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function) subfamily of RNA polymerase sigma factors, and that CarR is an inner membrane protein. Genetic analysis strongly implied that CarR is an antisigma factor that sequesters CarQ in a transcriptionally inactive complex. Using in vitro transcription run-off assays, we present biochemical evidence that CarQ functions as a bacterial sigma factor and is responsible for transcription initiation at PcarQRS. Similar experiments using the crtI promoter failed to implicate CarQ in direct transcription of the crtI gene. Experiments using the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between CarQ and CarR, providing evidence of a CarQ-CarR complex. The yeast two-hybrid system data also indicated that CarR is capable of oligomerization. Fractionation of M. xanthus membranes with the detergent sarkosyl showed that CarR was associated with the inner membrane. Furthermore, CarR was found to be unstable in illuminated stationary phase cells, providing a possible mechanism by which the CarR-CarQ complex is disrupted.

  7. The anti-sigma factor TcdC modulates hypervirulence in an epidemic BI/NAP1/027 clinical isolate of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen P Carter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are increasingly being recognised as a major patient safety issue. The modern hospital environment and associated health care practices have provided a niche for the rapid evolution of microbial pathogens that are well adapted to surviving and proliferating in this setting, after which they can infect susceptible patients. This is clearly the case for bacterial pathogens such as Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus (VRE species, both of which have acquired resistance to antimicrobial agents as well as enhanced survival and virulence properties that present serious therapeutic dilemmas for treating physicians. It has recently become apparent that the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium difficile also falls within this category. Since 2000, there has been a striking increase in C. difficile nosocomial infections worldwide, predominantly due to the emergence of epidemic or hypervirulent isolates that appear to possess extended antibiotic resistance and virulence properties. Various hypotheses have been proposed for the emergence of these strains, and for their persistence and increased virulence, but supportive experimental data are lacking. Here we describe a genetic approach using isogenic strains to identify a factor linked to the development of hypervirulence in C. difficile. This study provides evidence that a naturally occurring mutation in a negative regulator of toxin production, the anti-sigma factor TcdC, is an important factor in the development of hypervirulence in epidemic C. difficile isolates, presumably because the mutation leads to significantly increased toxin production, a contentious hypothesis until now. These results have important implications for C. difficile pathogenesis and virulence since they suggest that strains carrying a similar mutation have the inherent potential to develop a hypervirulent phenotype.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the operon encoding stress-responsive ECF sigma factor SigH and its anti-sigma factor RshA, and control of its regulatory network in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busche Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium used mainly for the industrial production of amino acids, is regulated by seven different sigma factors of RNA polymerase, including the stress-responsive ECF-sigma factor SigH. The sigH gene is located in a gene cluster together with the rshA gene, putatively encoding an anti-sigma factor. The aim of this study was to analyze the transcriptional regulation of the sigH and rshA gene cluster and the effects of RshA on the SigH regulon, in order to refine the model describing the role of SigH and RshA during stress response. Results Transcription analyses revealed that the sigH gene and rshA gene are cotranscribed from four sigH housekeeping promoters in C. glutamicum. In addition, a SigH-controlled rshA promoter was found to only drive the transcription of the rshA gene. To test the role of the putative anti-sigma factor gene rshA under normal growth conditions, a C. glutamicum rshA deletion strain was constructed and used for genome-wide transcription profiling with DNA microarrays. In total, 83 genes organized in 61 putative transcriptional units, including those previously detected using sigH mutant strains, exhibited increased transcript levels in the rshA deletion mutant compared to its parental strain. The genes encoding proteins related to disulphide stress response, heat stress proteins, components of the SOS-response to DNA damage and proteasome components were the most markedly upregulated gene groups. Altogether six SigH-dependent promoters upstream of the identified genes were determined by primer extension and a refined consensus promoter consisting of 45 original promoter sequences was constructed. Conclusions The rshA gene codes for an anti-sigma factor controlling the function of the stress-responsive sigma factor SigH in C. glutamicum. Transcription of rshA from a SigH-dependent promoter may serve to quickly

  9. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  10. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  11. Ultrafine particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Wierzbicka, Aneta;

    2013-01-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations (10-300 nm in size) were continuously measured over a period of ∼45 h in 56 residences of nonsmokers in Copenhagen, Denmark. The highest concentrations were measured when occupants were present and awake (geometric mean, GM: 22.3 × 103 cm-3), the lowest when...... the homes were vacant (GM: 6.1 × 103 cm-3) or the occupants were asleep (GM: 5.1 × 103 cm-3). Diary entries regarding occupancy and particle related activities were used to identify source events and apportion the daily integrated exposure among sources. Source events clearly resulted in increased PN...... concentrations and decreased average particle diameter. For a given event, elevated particle concentrations persisted for several hours after the emission of fresh particles ceased. The residential daily integrated PN exposure in the 56 homes ranged between 37 × 103 and 6.0 × 106 particles per cm3·h/day (GM: 3...

  12. Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, B R

    2008-01-01

    An essential introduction to particle physics, with coverage ranging from the basics through to the very latest developments, in an accessible and carefully structured text. Particle Physics: Third Edition is a revision of a highly regarded introduction to particle physics. In its two previous editions this book has proved to be an accessible and balanced introduction to modern particle physics, suitable for those students needed a more comprehensive introduction to the subject than provided by the 'compendium' style physics books. In the Third Edition the standard mod

  13. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  14. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated by the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the elusive Higgs Boson, interest in particle physics continues at a high level among scientists and the general public. This book includes theoretical aspects, with chapters outlining the generation model and a charged Higgs boson model as alternative scenarios to the Standard Model. An introduction is provided to postulated axion photon interactions and associated photon dispersion in magnetized media. The complexity of particle physics research requiring the synergistic combination of theory, hardware and computation is described in terms of the e-science paradigm. The book concludes with a chapter tackling potential radiation hazards associated with extremely weakly interacting neutrinos if produced in copious amounts with future high-energy muon-collider facilities.

  15. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  16. Particle astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, Lawrence M

    1997-01-01

    Astrophysics and cosmology provide fundamental testing grounds for many ideas in elementary particle physics, and include potential probes which are well beyond the range of current or even planned accelerators. In this series of 3 lectures, I will give and overview of existing constraints, and a discussion of the potential for the future. I will attempt whenever possible to demonstrate the connection between accelerator-based physics and astrophysicas/cosmology. The format of the kectures will be to examine observables from astrophysics, and explore how these can be used to constrain particle physics. Tentatively, lecture 1 will focus on the age and mass density of the universe and galaxy. Lecture 2 will focus on stars, stellar evolution, and the abundance of light elements. Lecture 3 will focus on various cosmic diffuse backgrounds, including possibly matter, photons, neutrinos and gravitational waves.

  17. Particle encapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2000-01-01

    Several engineering processes are powder based, ranging from food processing to engineering ceramic and composite production. In most of these processes, powders of different composition are mixed together in order to produce the final product, and this combining of powders of different density, shape, and surface properties is often very difficult. Mixtures may be quite inhomogeneous. This research focuses on a method of avoiding such problems, by coating individual particles of one material...

  18. Particle Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    * Assumes no prior knowledge* Adopts a modelling approach* Numerous tutorial problems, worked examples and exercises included* Elementary topics augmented by planetary motion and rotating framesThis text provides an invaluable introduction to mechanicsm confining attention to the motion of a particle. It begins with a full discussion of the foundations of the subject within the context of mathematical modelling before covering more advanced topics including the theory of planetary orbits and the use of rotating frames of reference. Truly introductory , the style adoped is perfect for those u

  19. Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Necia Grant; West, Geoffrey B.

    1988-06-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Framework: 1. Scale and dimension - From animals to quarks Geoffrey B. West; 2. Particle physics and the standard model Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky and Geoffrey B. West; QCD on a Cray: the masses of elementary particles Gerald Guralnik, Tony Warnock and Charles Zemach; Lecture Notes - From simple field theories to the standard model; 3. Toward a unified theory: an essay on the role of supergravity in the search for unification Richard C. Slansky; 4. Supersymmetry at 100 GeV Stuart Raby; 5. The family problem T. Goldman and Michael Martin Nieto; Part II. Experimental Developments: 6. Experiments to test unification schemes Gary H. Sanders; 7. The march toward higher energies S. Peter Rosen; LAMPF II and the High-Intensity Frontier Henry A. Thiessen; The SSC - An engineering challenge Mahlon T. Wilson; 8. Science underground - the search for rare events L. M. Simmons, Jr; Part III. Personal Perspectives: 9. Quarks and quirks among friends Peter A. Carruthers, Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky, Geoffrey B. West and George Zweig; Index.

  20. Particle kickers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    These devices are designed to provide a current pulse of 5000 Amps which will in turn generate a fast magnetic pulse that steers the incoming beam into the LHC. Today, the comprehensive upgrade of the LHC injection kicker system is entering its final stages. The upgraded system will ensure the LHC can be refilled without needing to wait for the kicker magnets to cool, thus enhancing the performance of the whole accelerator.   An upgraded kicker magnet in its vacuum tank, with an upgraded beam screen. The LHC is equipped with two kicker systems installed at the injection points (near points 2 and 8, see schematic diagram) where the particle beams coming from the SPS are injected into the accelerator’s orbit. Each system comprises four magnets and four pulse generators in which the field rises to 0.12 Tesla in less than 900 nanoseconds and for a duration of approximately 8 microseconds. Although the injection kickers only pulse 12 times to fill the LHC up with beam, the LHC beam circ...

  1. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge th

  2. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  3. Particle physics: Axions exposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2016-11-01

    Physicists are hunting for a particle called the axion that could solve two major puzzles in fundamental physics. An ambitious study calculates the expected mass of this particle, which might reshape the experimental searches. See Letter p.69

  4. Beyond the God particle

    CERN Document Server

    Lederman, Leon M

    2013-01-01

    On July 4, 2012, the long-sought Higgs Boson--aka "the God Particle"--was discovered at the world's largest particle accelerator, the LHC, in Geneva, Switzerland. On March 14, 2013, physicists at CERN confirmed it. This elusive subatomic particle forms a field that permeates the entire universe, creating the masses of the elementary particles that are the basic building blocks of everything in the known world--from viruses to elephants, from atoms to quasars.

  5. Massless interacting particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosyakov, B P [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Sarov, 607190 Nizhnii Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kosyakov@vniief.ru

    2008-11-21

    We show that classical electrodynamics of massless charged particles and the Yang-Mills theory of massless quarks do not experience rearranging their initial degrees of freedom into dressed particles and radiation. Massless particles do not radiate. We propose a conformally invariant version of the direct interparticle action theory for these systems.

  6. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  7. When is a Particle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drell, Sidney D.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

  8. The Particle Enigma

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2016-01-01

    The idea that particles are the basic constituents of all matter dates back to ancient times and formed the basis of physical thought well into modern times. The debate about whether light was a wave or a stream of particles also lasted until relatively recently. It was the advent of de Broglie's work and its implications that revolutionized the concept of an elementary particle -- but unfortunately did not banish the idea of a point particle despite its difficulties in both classical and quantum physics. Some of these problems are discussed in this essay, which covers chiral oscillations, Penrose's "zigzag" picture of particles satisfying the Dirac equation, and some ideas derived from string theory.

  9. Particle Accelerators in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  10. Particle separator scroll vanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastrina, F. A.; Mayer, J. C.; Pommer, L. M.

    1985-07-09

    An inlet particle separator for a gas turbine engine is provided with unique vanes distributed around an entrance to a particle collection chamber. The vanes are uniquely constructed to direct extraneous particles that enter the engine into the collection chamber and prevent the particles from rebounding back into the engine's air flow stream. The vanes are provided with several features to accomplish this function, including upstream faces that are sharply angled towards air flow stream direction to cause particles to bounce towards the collection chamber. In addition, throat regions between the vanes cause a localized air flow acceleration and a focusing of the particles that aid in directing the particles in a proper direction.

  11. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  12. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  13. LHCb unveils new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announces the observation of four “exotic” particles from its analysis of the LHC data.   The LHCb experimental cavern. On 28 June, the LHCb collaboration reported the observation of three new "exotic" particles and confirmation of the existence of a fourth one in data from the LHC. These particles each appear to be formed by four quarks (the fundamental constituents of the matter inside all the atoms of the universe): two quarks and two antiquarks (that is, a tetraquark). Due to their non-standard quark content, the newly observed particles have been included in the broad category of so-called exotic particles, although their exact theoretical interpretation is still under study.            The quark model, proposed by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964, is considered to be the most valid scheme for the classification of hadrons (all the composite particles) that has been fou...

  14. Methods for forming particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Robert V.; Zhang, Fengyan; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin

    2016-06-21

    Single source precursors or pre-copolymers of single source precursors are subjected to microwave radiation to form particles of a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Such particles may be formed in a wurtzite phase and may be converted to a chalcopyrite phase by, for example, exposure to heat. The particles in the wurtzite phase may have a substantially hexagonal shape that enables stacking into ordered layers. The particles in the wurtzite phase may be mixed with particles in the chalcopyrite phase (i.e., chalcopyrite nanoparticles) that may fill voids within the ordered layers of the particles in the wurtzite phase thus produce films with good coverage. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form layers of semiconductor materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods.

  15. Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  16. Massless interacting particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kosyakov, B P

    2007-01-01

    We show that classical electrodynamics of massless charged particles and the Yang--Mills--Wong theory of massless quarks do not experience rearranging their initial degrees of freedom into dressed particles and radiation. Massless particles do not radiate. We propose a version of the direct interparticle action theory for such systems, which offers promise as a useful tool in studying the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  17. Music of elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternheimer, J.

    1983-12-12

    This note offers a new point of view on particle masses. It is shown that they are distributed following a musical scale, the chromatic tempered scale -for stable particles- subdivided into microintervals including unstable particles. A theoretical explanation, based on causality, allows one also to calculate their global distribution along the mass scale, in agreement with experiment, and indicating the existence of ''musical'' laws in the vibratory organisation of matter.

  18. Bioactivation of particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinaud, Fabien (Berkeley, CA); King, David (San Francisco, CA); Weiss, Shimon (Los Angeles, CA)

    2011-08-16

    Particles are bioactivated by attaching bioactivation peptides to the particle surface. The bioactivation peptides are peptide-based compounds that impart one or more biologically important functions to the particles. Each bioactivation peptide includes a molecular or surface recognition part that binds with the surface of the particle and one or more functional parts. The surface recognition part includes an amino-end and a carboxy-end and is composed of one or more hydrophobic spacers and one or more binding clusters. The functional part(s) is attached to the surface recognition part at the amino-end and/or said carboxy-end.

  19. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  20. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  1. Particle Swarm Optimisation with Spatial Particle Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Vesterstrøm, Jakob Svaneborg; Riget, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce spatial extension to particles in the PSO model in order to overcome premature convergence in iterative optimisation. The standard PSO and the new model (SEPSO) are compared w.r.t. performance on well-studied benchmark problems. We show that the SEPSO indeed managed...

  2. Teaching particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hanley, P

    2000-01-01

    Particle physics attracts many students who hear of news from CERN or elsewhere in the media. This article examines which current A-level syllabuses include which bits of particle physics and surveys the many different types of resource available to teachers and students. (0 refs).

  3. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  4. Microchip Coulter particle counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik Darling; Blankenstein, Gert; Branebjerg, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a micro device employing the Coulter principle for counting and sizing of living cells and particles in liquid suspension. The microchip Coulter particle counter (μCPC) has been employed in a planar silicon structure covered with glass, which enables detailed observation during...

  5. Teaching German Modal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosler, Dietmar

    1982-01-01

    Believes modern linguistics has done little to explore German modal particles because by focusing on sentences as the basic category for linguistic thinking these words did not seem to matter. Describes model which gives students experience with these particles in meaningful communication. (Author/BK)

  6. Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter

    Energetic particles recorded in the Earth environment and in interplanetary space have a multitude of origins, i.e. acceleration and propagation histories. At early days practically all sufficiently energetic particles were considered to have come either from solar flares or from interstellar space. Later on, co-rotating interplanetary shocks, the termination shock of the supersonic solar wind, planetary bow shocks and magnetospheres, and also coronal mass ejections (CME) were recognized as energetic particle sources. It was also recognized that less energetic (suprathermal) particles of solar origin and pick-up ions have also a vital role in giving rise to energetic particles in interplanetary disturbances. The meaning of the term "solar energetic particles" (SEP) is now somewhat vague, but essentially it refers to particles produced in disturbances fairly directly related to solar processes. Variation of intensity fluctuations with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to extremes of time variation, i.e. to very quiet periods and to large events. While quiet-time fluxes are expected to shed light on some basic coronal processes, large events dominate the fluctuation characteristics of cumulated fluence, and the change of that fluctuation with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle may also provide important clues. Mainly ISEE-3 and long-term IMP-8 data will be invoked. Energetic and suprathermal particles that may never escape into interplanetary space may play an important part in heating the corona of the sun.

  7. Particle Physics Instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Riegler, Werner

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a series of three lectures aimed at giving an overview of basic particle detection principles, the interaction of particles with matter, the application of these principles in modern detector systems, as well techniques to read out detector signals in high-rate experiments.

  8. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  9. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  10. Apparatus for measuring particle properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, D.J.; Castaneda, J.N.; Grasser, T.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1998-08-11

    An apparatus is described for determining particle properties from detected light scattered by the particles. The apparatus uses a light beam with novel intensity characteristics to discriminate between particles that pass through the beam and those that pass through an edge of the beam. The apparatus can also discriminate between light scattered by one particle and light scattered by multiple particles. The particle`s size can be determined from the intensity of the light scattered. The particle`s velocity can be determined from the elapsed time between various intensities of the light scattered. 11 figs.

  11. Particle physics builds potential

    CERN Document Server

    Camporesi, Tiziano

    2004-01-01

    Surveys of the career prospects of particle physicists in Europe, such as that one carried out in 2000 at DELPHI, reveal that particle phycisists are much in demand. The findings are fairly independent of a student's nationality, despite the big differences in the education systems of different countries across the continent. According to the DELPHI survey, half of all physics students remain in an academic environment after graduation. For those particle physicists who leave academia, the DELPHI survey showed that about half find jobs in hi- tech industry. The bottom line is that a degree in physics offers very good job prospects and career opportunities. (Edited abstract).

  12. Universe of Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    The entire Universe is made up of particles. But where do they come from? What is the origin of the laws of nature? The permanent exhibition "Universe of Particles", installed on the ground floor of the Globe of Science and Innovation, invites you to discover CERN by taking you on a journey all the way back to the Big Bang. It will help you answer questions such as: What's the purpose of this research? How do you accelerate particles? How do you detect them? What are today's theories on matter and the Universe? How does this affect our daily life?

  13. Search for Hidden Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    The SHiP Experiment is a new general-purpose fixed target facility at the SPS to search for hidden particles as predicted by a very large number of recently elaborated models of Hidden Sectors which are capable of accommodating dark matter, neutrino oscillations, and the origin of the full baryon asymmetry in the Universe. Specifically, the experiment is aimed at searching for very weakly interacting long lived particles including Heavy Neutral Leptons - right-handed partners of the active neutrinos; light supersymmetric particles - sgoldstinos, etc.; scalar, axion and vector portals to the hidden sector. The high intensity of the SPS and in particular the large production of charm mesons with the 400 GeV beam allow accessing a wide variety of light long-lived exotic particles of such models and of SUSY. Moreover, the facility is ideally suited to study the interactions of tau neutrinos.

  14. Blog: the God particle

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Dateline video journalist Aaron Lewis this week reprots on the search to find the elusive "God particle", which, if found, could explain to scientists how everything in the world got its mass."(1/2 page)

  15. Modern particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079874

    2013-01-01

    Unique in its coverage of all aspects of modern particle physics, this textbook provides a clear connection between the theory and recent experimental results, including the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. It provides a comprehensive and self-contained description of the Standard Model of particle physics suitable for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students studying experimental particle physics. Physical theory is introduced in a straightforward manner with full mathematical derivations throughout. Fully-worked examples enable students to link the mathematical theory to results from modern particle physics experiments. End-of-chapter exercises, graded by difficulty, provide students with a deeper understanding of the subject. Online resources available at www.cambridge.org/MPP feature password-protected fully-worked solutions to problems for instructors, numerical solutions and hints to the problems for students and PowerPoint slides and JPEGs of figures from the book.

  16. Elementary particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Elementary particle physics is discussed. Status of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions; phenomena beyond the Standard Model; new accelerator projects; and possible contributions from non-accelerator experiments are examined.

  17. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Particle Accelerator Physics is an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. Part I gathers the basic tools, recalling the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part II is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed in Part III by the introduction and description of the main beam parameters. Part IV is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part V discusses the details of charged particle accleration. Part VI and Part VII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and the description of very intense beams. Part VIII is an exhaustive treatment of radiation from accelerated charges and introduces important sources of coherent radiation such as synchrotrons and free-electron lasers. Part IX collects the appendices gathering useful mathematical and physical formulae, parameters and units. Solutions to many end-of-chapter problems are give...

  18. Virtual particle therapy centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. This advanced technique requires a multi-disciplinary team working in a specialised centre. 3D animation: Nymus3D

  19. Elementary particle theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1984-12-01

    The present state of the art in elementary particle theory is reviewed. Topics include quantum electrodynamics, weak interactions, electroweak unification, quantum chromodynamics, and grand unified theories. 113 references. (WHK)

  20. Momentum particle swarm optimizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu; Qin Zheng; Wang Xianghua; He Xingshi

    2005-01-01

    The previous particle swarm optimizers lack direct mechanism to prevent particles beyond predefined search space, which results in invalid solutions in some special cases. A momentum factor is introduced into the original particle swarm optimizer to resolve this problem. Furthermore, in order to accelerate convergence, a new strategy about updating velocities is given. The resulting approach is mromentum-PSO which guarantees that particles are never beyond predefined search space without checking boundary in every iteration. In addition, linearly decreasing wight PSO (LDW-PSO) equipped with a boundary checking strategy is also discussed, which is denoted as LDWBC-PSO. LDW-PSO, LDWBC-PSO and momentum-PSO are compared in optimization on five test functions. The experimental results show that in some special cases LDW-PSO finds invalid solutions and LDWBC-PSO has poor performance, while momentum-PSO not only exhibits good performance but also reduces computational cost for updating velocities.

  1. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Franck Close

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  2. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NOνA”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  3. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  4. The Least Particle Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Robert

    2011-10-01

    The Least Particle Theory states that the universe was cast as a great sea of energy. MaX Planck declared a quantum of energy to be the least value in the universe. We declare the quantum of energy to be the least particle in the universe. Stephen Hawking declared quantum mechanics to be of no value in todays gross mechanics. That's like saying the number 1 has no place in mathematics.

  5. Masses of Fundamental Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2011-01-01

    Not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs scalar, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite model of quarks and leptons successfully. In addition, both of the two anomalies recently found by the CDF Collaboration are suggested to be taken as evidences for the substructure of the fundamental particles.

  6. Motion of Confined Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David E

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical evaluations of the motion of classical particles in Minkowski Space $\\mathbb{M}^{4}$ which are confined to the inside of a bag. In particular, we analyze the structure of the paths evolving from the breaking of the dilatation symmetry, the conformal symmetry and the combination of both together. The confining forces arise directly from the corresponding nonconserved currents. We demonstrate in our evaluations that these particles under certain initial conditions move toward the interior of the bag.

  7. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Paget, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4) that control ...

  8. Tortuosity of porous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrande, M; Bouchet, R; Denoyel, R

    2007-12-01

    Tortuosity is often used as an adjustable parameter in models of transfer properties through porous media. This parameter, not reducible to classical measured microstructural parameters like specific surface area, porosity, or pore size distribution, reflects the efficiency of percolation paths, which is linked to the topology of the material. The measurement of the effective conductivity of a bed of particles saturated with an electrolyte is a simple way to evaluate tortuosity. Nevertheless, it received only little attention because of the real difficulties in both getting reliable results and interpreting data. Notably, the discrimination between the contribution of interparticle and intraparticle porosities to the tortuosity is not resolved. To our knowledge, there is no model able to fit the experimental data of the tortuosity of a suspension, and a fortiori of a particle bed, in the whole porosity range. Only empirical expressions have been proposed, but they do not allow deriving intratortuosity of a porous particle. For a dilute system, Maxwell's equation predicts the effective conductivity of suspensions of spherical particles as a function of the bulk electrolyte conductivity and of particle conductivity. The intraparticle tortuosity can be derived from the particle conductivity obtained from the Maxwell equation applied to data at infinite dilution of particles. Then, by assuming that the Maxwell equation is a first-order approximation of the conductivity as a function of porosity, we propose an explicit relation of the tortuosity tau of a suspension of porous particles, obtained by conductivity measurement, as tau = tau(epsilon, epsilon(p), tau(p)), where epsilon is the total porosity of the suspension, tau(p) is the intraparticle tortuosity, and epsilon(p) is the particle porosity. This relationship fits the experimental data in the whole porosity range and can be used to determine tau(p) from an experiment at only one porosity. Finally, the obtained

  9. Particle segregation during explosive dispersal of binary particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David L.; Loiseau, Jason; Marr, Bradley J.; Goroshin, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles surrounding a spherical high explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. The shock-compacted particle layer typically fractures into discrete fragments which move radially outwards on ballistic trajectories. The fragments shed particles in their wakes forming jet-like structures. The tendency to form jets depends on the mass-ratio of the particles to explosive and the type of particles. Brittle or soft, ductile particles are more susceptible to forming jets during compaction and dispersal, whereas particles that are comprised of material with moderate hardness, high compressive strength and high toughness are much less prone to forming jets. Experiments have been carried out to determine the degree of particle segregation that occurs during the explosive dispersal of a uniform, binary mixture containing both "jetting" (silicon carbide) and "non-jetting" (steel) particles with various mass fractions of each particle type. During the dispersal of mixtures that contain predominantly non-jetting (steel) particles, the steel particles form a stable layer whereas the jetting (silicon carbide) particles rapidly segregate and form jets which are confined within the shell of steel particles. As the fraction of silicon carbide particles increases, the jet structures dominate the particle motion and the steel particles are entrained into the jet structures.

  10. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  11. Review of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrignani, C.; Particle Data Group; et al.

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders, Probability and Statistics. Among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation. The complete Review is published online in a journal and on the website of the Particle Data Group (http://pdg.lbl.gov). The printed PDG Book contains the Summary Tables and all review articles but no longer includes the detailed tables from the Particle Listings. A Booklet with the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the review articles is also available. Contents Abstract, Contributors, Highlights and Table of ContentsAcrobat PDF (150 KB) IntroductionAcrobat PDF (456 KB) Particle Physics Summary Tables Gauge and Higgs bosonsAcrobat PDF (155 KB) LeptonsAcrobat PDF (134 KB) QuarksAcrobat PDF (84 KB) MesonsAcrobat PDF (871 KB) BaryonsAcrobat PDF (300 KB) Searches (Supersymmetry, Compositeness, etc.)Acrobat PDF (91 KB) Tests of conservation lawsAcrobat PDF (330 KB) Reviews, Tables, and Plots Detailed contents for this sectionAcrobat PDF (37 KB) Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear PropertiesAcrobat PDF (278 KB) Standard Model and Related TopicsAcrobat PDF (7.3 MB) Astrophysics and CosmologyAcrobat PDF (2.7 MB) Experimental Methods and CollidersAcrobat PDF (3.8 MB) Mathematical Tools or Statistics, Monte Carlo, Group

  12. A relationship between maximum packing of particles and particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that the volume fraction of particles in a packed bed (i.e. maximum packing) depends on particle size. One explanation for this is based on the idea that particle adhesion is the primary factor. In this paper, however, it is shown that entrainment and immobilization of liquid by the particles can also account for the facts.

  13. Large Particle Titanate Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    This research project was aimed at developing a synthesis technique for producing large particle size monosodium titanate (MST) to benefit high level waste (HLW) processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two applications were targeted, first increasing the size of the powdered MST used in batch contact processing to improve the filtration performance of the material, and second preparing a form of MST suitable for deployment in a column configuration. Increasing the particle size should lead to improvements in filtration flux, and decreased frequency of filter cleaning leading to improved throughput. Deployment of MST in a column configuration would allow for movement from a batch process to a more continuous process. Modifications to the typical MST synthesis led to an increase in the average particle size. Filtration testing on dead-end filters showed improved filtration rates with the larger particle material; however, no improvement in filtration rate was realized on a crossflow filter. In order to produce materials suitable for column deployment several approaches were examined. First, attempts were made to coat zirconium oxide microspheres (196 µm) with a layer of MST. This proved largely unsuccessful. An alternate approach was then taken synthesizing a porous monolith of MST which could be used as a column. Several parameters were tested, and conditions were found that were able to produce a continuous structure versus an agglomeration of particles. This monolith material showed Sr uptake comparable to that of previously evaluated samples of engineered MST in batch contact testing.

  14. Particle physics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1986-10-01

    This series of lectures is about the role of particle physics in physical processes that occurred in the very early stages of the bug gang. Of particular interest is the role of particle physics in determining the evolution of the early Universe, and the effect of particle physics on the present structure of the Universe. The use of the big bang as a laboratory for placing limits on new particle physics theories will also be discussed. Section 1 reviews the standard cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis. Section 2 reviews the decoupling of weakly interacting particles in the early Universe, and discusses neutrino cosmology and the resulting limits that may be placed on the mass and lifetime of massive neutrinos. Section 3 discusses the evolution of the vacuum through phase transitions in the early Universe and the formation of topological defects in the transitions. Section 4 covers recent work on the generation of the baryon asymmetry by baryon-number violating reactions in Grand Unified Theories, and mentions some recent work on baryon number violation effects at the electroweak transition. Section 5 is devoted to theories of cosmic inflation. Finally, Section 6 is a discussion of the role of extra spatial dimensions in the evolution of the early Universe. 78 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    CERN Document Server

    Franck Close

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  16. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    This book by Helmut Wiedemann is a well-established, classic text, providing an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. The present 4th edition has been significantly revised, updated and expanded. The newly conceived Part I is an elementary introduction to the subject matter for undergraduate students. Part II gathers the basic tools in preparation of a more advanced treatment, summarizing the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part III is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed, in Part IV, by an introduction and description of the main beam parameters and including a new chapter on beam emittance and lattice design. Part V is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part VI then discusses the details of charged particle acceleration. Parts VII and VIII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and describe very intense bea...

  17. New particle data

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 edition of the Review of Particle Physics has been published. It appears in the July 1st edition of Physical Review D with the reference: K. Hagiwara et al., Physical Review D66, 010001 (2002). The printing of the Particle Physics Booklets is planned to be finished at the end of August, so copies are expected to arrive at CERN for distribution by mid-September. The full data are available at the Berkeley site, as well as at various other mirrors around the world. As for copies of the full Review, for which CERN is responsible for the distribution outside the Americas, the Far East and Australasia, the quantity has been reduced by 60% compared to the 2000 edition. It will thus no longer be possible for all individuals to have their personal copy. Priority will be given to ensure that copies are sent to all groups and institutes engaged in particle physics research.

  18. [Heavy particle radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozares, S; Mañeru, F; Pellejero, S

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation formed by heavy particles make it a highly useful tool for therapeutic use. Protons, helium nuclei or carbon ions are being successfully employed in radiotherapy installations throughout the world. This article sets out the physical and technological foundations that make these radiation particles suitable for attacking white volume, as well as the different ways of administering treatment. Next, the main clinical applications are described, which show the therapeutic advantages in some of the pathologies most widely employed in proton and hadron therapy centres at present. Under continuous study, the clinical use of heavy particles appears to be an enormously promising path of advance in comparison with classical technologies, both in tumour coverage and in reducing dosages in surrounding tissue.

  19. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  20. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  1. Astrophysical Weighted Particle Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburov, Evghenii

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents applications of weighted meshless scheme for conservation laws to the Euler equations and the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The divergence constraint of the latter is maintained to the truncation error by a new meshless divergence cleaning procedure. The physics of the interaction between the particles is described by an one-dimensional Riemann problem in a moving frame. As a result, necessary diffusion which is required to treat dissipative processes is added automatically. As a result, our scheme has no free parameters that controls the physics of inter-particle interaction, with the exception of the number of the interacting neighbours which control the resolution and accuracy. The resulting equations have the form similar to SPH equations, and therefore existing SPH codes can be used to implement the weighed particle scheme. The scheme is validated in several hydrodynamic and MHD test cases. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time the ability of a meshless MHD schem...

  2. Nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear and Particle Physics provides an introductory course on nuclear and particle physics for undergraduate and early-graduate students, which the author has taught for several years at the University of Zurich. It contains fundamentals on both nuclear and particle physics, giving emphasis to the discovery and history of developments in the field, and is experimentally/phenomenologically oriented. It contains detailed derivations of formulae such as 2–3 body phase space, the Weinberg-Salam model, and neutrino scattering. Originally published in German as Kern- und Teilchenphysik, several sections have been added to this new English version to cover modern topics, including updates on neutrinos, the Higgs boson, the top quark and bottom quark physics.

  3. The particle zoo

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079223

    2016-01-01

    What is everything really made of? If we split matter down into smaller and infinitesimally smaller pieces, where do we arrive? At the Particle Zoo - the extraordinary subatomic world of antimatter, neutrinos, strange-flavoured quarks and yetis, gravitons, ghosts and glueballs, mindboggling eleven-dimensional strings and the elusive Higgs boson itself. Be guided around this strangest of zoos by Gavin Hesketh, experimental particle physicist at humanity's greatest experiment, the Large Hadron Collider. Concisely and with a rare clarity, he demystifies how we are uncovering the inner workings of the universe and heading towards the next scientific revolution. Why are atoms so small? How did the Higgs boson save the universe? And is there a theory of everything? The Particle Zoo answers these and many other profound questions, and explains the big ideas of Quantum Physics, String Theory, The Big Bang and Dark Matter...and, ultimately, what we know about the true, fundamental nature of reality.

  4. Small particle heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.J.

    1978-06-01

    A dispersion of small absorbing particles forms an ideal system to collect radiant energy, transform it to heat, and efficiently transfer the heat to a surrounding fluid. If the heated fluid is a pressurized gas, it can be passed through an expansion turbine to create useful mechanical energy. The most obvious application of this technique is its use in a solar collection system. In this case, the incoming sunlight is used to heat a compressed gas in an engine utilizing a Brayton cycle. The solar collection system may utilize high concentration as provided by a central receiver or parabolic dish, medium concentration from a linear collector, or possibly no concentration using a flat plate collector, if precautions were taken to reduce the heat losses. The same concept may be applied generally to non-solar heat exchangers. These may be of the type used to heat a gas from a combustion source, or in general as a gas to gas heat exchanger. The latter application may be limited to rather high temperature. Each of the above applications is discussed. First, a description of the concept is applied to a solar central-tower system. The general principles are described, including the optical and physical characteristics of the particles, the confinement of the gas-particle mixture, and the system considerations; the latter include the amount and type of particles, the receiver efficiency and the generation of the particles. The same considerations are reviewed for applications to linear trough and flat plate receivers. Finally, the use of small particles in non-solar heat exchangers is considered.

  5. Energetic particle physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Zonca; G.Y. Fu; S.J. Wang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The confinement properties of energetic (EsslMeV) ions are a crucial aspect of burning plasmas since they are present both as fast particles generated via additional heating and current drive systems as well as charged fusion products. In the first case, successful plasma operations rely on the possibility of controlling plasma current and flow profiles via neutral beam injection (NBI) and plasma temperature profiles by both NBI and ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). In the second case, fusion alpha particles must provide a significant fraction of the local power density, which is ultimately necessary for the sustainment of the plasma burning.

  6. Our Particle Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Indumathi

    2017-03-01

    Ever since the discovery of the electron more than 100 yearsago, scientists have asked the questions –“what is our universemade of?” and “why is the universe the way it is?” Notlong before, it was found that these two questions are relatedto each other. The interactions of particles in the universedetermines its evolution, its very form, and existence. In thisarticle, we will trace the discovery of some of these particles,learn about their interactions, and try to understand theirproperties such as electric charge and mass.

  7. Particle and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Faessler, Amand

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, Volume 26 covers the significant advances in understanding the fundamentals of particle and nuclear physics. This volume is divided into four chapters, and begins with a brief overview of the various possible ideas beyond the standard model, the problem they address and their experimental tests. The next chapter deals with the basic physics of neutrino mass based on from a gauge theoretic point of view. This chapter considers the various extensions of the standard electroweak theory, along with their implications for neutrino physics. The discussio

  8. Cosmic particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The most popular mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays, which is thought to operate in supernova remnant shocks as well as at heliospheric shocks, is the diffusive shock acceleration, which is a Fermi mechanism based on normal diffusion. On the other hand, in the last few years it has been shown that the transport of plasma particles in the presence of electric and magnetic turbulence can be superdiffusive rather than normal diffusive. The term 'superdiffusive' refers to the mean square displacement of particle positions growing superlinearly with time, as compared to the normal linear growth. In particular, superdiffusion is characterized by a non Gaussian statistical process called Levy random walk. We show how diffusive shock acceleration is modified by superdiffusion, and how this yields new predictions for the cosmic ray spectral index, for the acceleration time, and for the spatial profile of energetic particles. A comparison with observations of particle acceleration at heliospheric shocks and at supernova remnant shocks is done. We discuss how superdiffusive shock acceleration allows to explain the observations of hard ion spectra at the solar wind termination shock detected by Voyager 2, of hard radio spectra due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated at supernova remnant shocks, and how it can help to explain the observations of 'thin rims' in the X-ray synchrotron emission.

  9. 'God' particle proves elusive

    CERN Document Server

    Radford, T

    2001-01-01

    For more than a decade, scientists at CERN have been hoping that a key theoretical particle called the Higgs boson, would turn up in a subatomic collision. Some of them are now though beginning to wonder if it has ever existed.

  10. ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AS SIGNS

    OpenAIRE

    Chiatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    C.S. Peirce’s semiotic approach admits the possibility of natural signic systems. This article explores the possible connection between the concept of elementary particle and the irreducible relations of Peircean semiotics. The potentialities and the limitations of a semiotic vision of elementary physical processes are addressed.

  11. Bullish on particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Turner, Michael Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Particle physics was, until recently, the flagship of U.S. physics. if not U.S. science. With ever larger "atom smasher" and such charismatic figures as J.R. Oppenheimer and Richard Feynamn, the field attracted the best and the brightest (1 page)

  12. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  13. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  14. Light within small particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iati, Maria Antonia [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Tecnologie Fisiche Avanzate, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31 - 98166 Messina (Italy)]. E-mail: maiati@unime.it; Saija, Rosalba [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Tecnologie Fisiche Avanzate, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31 - 98166 Messina (Italy); Giusto, Arianna [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Denti, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Tecnologie Fisiche Avanzate, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31 - 98166 Messina (Italy); Borghese, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Tecnologie Fisiche Avanzate, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone, 31 - 98166 Messina (Italy); Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare [Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Strada n.54, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (CA) (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    We calculate the energy density distribution in the ultraviolet within small spheres containing concentric cavities, aimed at simulating interstellar dust grains. We explore the dependence on chemical composition by progressively changing, in an arbitrary way, the refractive index of the sphere material. We conclude that a significant fraction of the energy of the impinging radiation is trapped throughout the particle interior.

  15. Search for charmed particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascoli, G.; Cooper, J.; Francis, W.; Holloway, L.; Kirk, T.; Koester, L.; Kruse, U.; Sard, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Loomis, A.; Sessoms, A.; Wilson, R.; /Harvard U.

    1975-10-01

    We propose to use the CCM spectrometer to carry out a sensitive search for charmed particles produced in strong interactions at a nominal beam energy of 150 GeV/c. We limit ourselves to production in the beam diffraction region for reasons of acceptance and reconstruction. We present results of a test run undertaken in April 1975 to demonstrate the feasibility of K{sub S}{sup 0} trigger, which we incorporate in the present proposal. Results of the test are combined with new insights which increase our sensitivity to charmed particle production by a large factor. We request a total of 2 x 10{sup 11} negative pions at a rate of 10{sup 6} per pulse. With this illumination we estimate that we can measure a large number of hadronic decay modes. We make estimates of enhancements in mass spectra from charmed particle production and decay and calculate expected backgrounds using data from existing experiments. With conservative assumptions about the charmed particle model, we calculate effects corresponding to ten or more standard deviations in our most favorable channels.

  16. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  17. Matter: the fundamental particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)

  18. Lord of the particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Loll, Anna-Cathrin

    2009-01-01

    "Rolf-Dieter Heuer is the new director general of the world's largest particle physics research center. Though the German physicist never expected to gain this influential position in Switzerland, it seems a natural step in his career trajectory" (1.5 pages)

  19. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  20. Two beautiful new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In beautiful agreement with the Standard Model, two new excited states (see below) of the Λb beauty particle have just been observed by the LHCb Collaboration. Similarly to protons and neutrons, Λb is composed of three quarks. In the Λb’s case, these are up, down and… beauty.   Although discovering new particles is increasingly looking like a routine exercise for the LHC experiments (see previous features), it is far from being an obvious performance, particularly when the mass of the particles is high. Created in the high-energy proton-proton collisions produced by the LHC, these new excited states of the Λb particle have been found to have a mass of, respectively, 5912 MeV/c2 and 5920 MeV/c2. In other words, they are over five times heavier than the proton or the neutron. Physicists only declare a discovery when data significantly show the relevant signal. In order to do that, they often have to analyse large samples of data. To ...

  1. Contextuality of identical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyński, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    There exist quantum phenomena that cannot be explained by noncontextual hidden-variable theories, yet the majority of them requires measurements that are performed on a single quantum system at a time. This fact constrains the phenomenon of contextuality to the microscopic domain. It is therefore natural to ask if quantum contextuality can be observed in measurements on collections of particles. Since particles in nature are identical, one can expect that such contextuality would be linked to bosonic and fermionic properties. Analysis of quantum contextuality in such scenarios would broaden our understanding of nonclassical effects in composite systems and perhaps would give us a hint on how to observe quantum phenomena in the macroscopic world. In this work I propose a generalization of quantum contextuality to the case of many identical particles. I show that a type of contextuality exhibited by a collection of particles (state dependent, state independent, or noncontextual) depends on their type and their number. I also discuss further properties of this generalization and identify major open questions.

  2. When is a particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drell, S.D.

    1978-06-01

    Particle physics, like poetry, no longer hews to its former rigid rules, hence the standard for accepting quarks as elementary consituents is less severe than the neutrino's was in the 1930's: in fact, we may never see a quark.

  3. Insights into particle cycling from thorium and particle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Phoebe J; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  4. Magnetic particle characterization-magnetophoretic mobility and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Boland, Eugene D; Todd, Paul W; Hanley, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of magnetic particles is useful for analysis and separation of labeled cells and magnetic particles. A particle velocimeter is used to directly measure the magnetophoretic mobility, size, and other parameters of magnetic particle suspensions. The instrument provides quantitative video analysis of particles and their motion. The trajectories of magnetic particles in an isodynamic magnetic field are recorded using a high-definition camera/microscope system for image collection. Image analysis software then converts the image data to the parameters of interest. The distribution of magnetophoretic mobility is determined by combining fast image analysis with velocimetry measurements. Particle size distributions have been characterized to provide a better understanding of sample quality. The results have been used in the development and operation of analyzer protocols for counting particle concentrations accurately and measuring magnetic susceptibility and size for simultaneous display for routine application to particle suspensions and magnetically labeled biological cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox is a library of evolutionary optimization tools developed in the MATLAB environment. The algorithms contained in the library include a genetic algorithm (GA), a single-objective particle swarm optimizer (SOPSO), and a multi-objective particle swarm optimizer (MOPSO). Development focused on both the SOPSO and MOPSO. A GA was included mainly for comparison purposes, and the particle swarm optimizers appeared to perform better for a wide variety of optimization problems. All algorithms are capable of performing unconstrained and constrained optimization. The particle swarm optimizers are capable of performing single and multi-objective optimization. The SOPSO and MOPSO algorithms are based on swarming theory and bird-flocking patterns to search the trade space for the optimal solution or optimal trade in competing objectives. The MOPSO generates Pareto fronts for objectives that are in competition. A GA, based on Darwin evolutionary theory, is also included in the library. The GA consists of individuals that form a population in the design space. The population mates to form offspring at new locations in the design space. These offspring contain traits from both of the parents. The algorithm is based on this combination of traits from parents to hopefully provide an improved solution than either of the original parents. As the algorithm progresses, individuals that hold these optimal traits will emerge as the optimal solutions. Due to the generic design of all optimization algorithms, each algorithm interfaces with a user-supplied objective function. This function serves as a "black-box" to the optimizers in which the only purpose of this function is to evaluate solutions provided by the optimizers. Hence, the user-supplied function can be numerical simulations, analytical functions, etc., since the specific detail of this function is of no concern to the optimizer. These algorithms were originally developed to support entry

  6. Particle physics in your pocket!

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN physicists, take out your smartphones! Two new particle physics applications for Android phones have been developed by a physicist from the University of Bern: “Particle Properties” and “Particle Physics Booklet 2010”.   “When I'm on shift, I enjoy looking at the online event displays,” says Igor Kreslo from the Laboratory for High Energy Physics at the University of Bern, the physicist who has developed the two particle physics applications for Android. “Sometimes very beautiful events appear, with many different particles. I like to discuss these displays with my students, just to develop their ability to identify particles. We try to find out which particle is which and how it might decay… I think that's the best way to teach students the phenomenology of particle physics.” When scientists study particle physics, they require some vital information, such as the decay branching ...

  7. Experimental Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Carl [Univ of South Carolina; Mishra, Sanjib R. [Univ of South Carolina; Petti, Roberto [Univ of South Carolina; Purohit, Milind V. [Univ of South Carolina

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the Ba

  8. Fundamentals of gas particle flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rudinger, G

    1980-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas-Particle Flow is an edited, updated, and expanded version of a number of lectures presented on the "Gas-Solid Suspensions” course organized by the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Materials presented in this book are mostly analytical in nature, but some experimental techniques are included. The book focuses on relaxation processes, including the viscous drag of single particles, drag in gas-particles flow, gas-particle heat transfer, equilibrium, and frozen flow. It also discusses the dynamics of single particles, such as particles in an arbitrary flow, in a r

  9. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden); Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, D‐38106 Braunschweig Germany (Germany); IJzendoorn, Leo J. van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, D ‐18119 Rostock (Germany); Gehrke, Nicole [nanoPET Pharma GmbH, D ‐10115 Berlin Germany (Germany); Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Christer, E-mail: christer.johansson@acreo.se [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  10. Optics of Biological Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, Alfons; Videen, Gorden

    2007-01-01

    This book covers the optics of single biological particles, both theory and experiment, with emphasis on Elastic Light Scattering and Fluorescence. It deals with the optics of bacteria (bio-aerosols), marine particles (selected phytoplankton communities) and red and white blood cells. Moreover, there are dedicated chapters on a general theory for scattering by a cell, and modelling and simulation of scattering by inhomogeneous biological cells. Finally, one chapter is dedicated to astro-biological signatures, discussing the possibilities for detecting non-terrestrial biological material. The volume has up-to-date discussions on new experimental and numerical techniques, and many examples of applications of these techniques in real-life systems, as used to detect and characterize e.g. biological warfare agents or human blood cells.

  11. A palette of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    From molecules to stars, much of the cosmic canvas can be painted in brushstrokes of primary color: the protons, neutrons, and electrons we know so well. But for meticulous detail, we have to dip into exotic hues - leptons, mesons, hadrons, quarks. Bringing particle physics to life as few authors can, Jeremy Bernstein here unveils nature in all its subatomic splendor. In this graceful account, Bernstein guides us through high-energy physics from the early twentieth century to the present, including such highlights as the newly discovered Higgs boson. Beginning with Ernest Rutherford's 1911 explanation of the nucleus, a model of atomic structure emerged that sufficed until the 1930s, when new particles began to be theorized and experimentally confirmed. In the postwar period, the subatomic world exploded in a blaze of unexpected findings leading to the theory of the quark, in all its strange and charmed variations. An eyewitness to developments at Harvard University and the Institute for Advanced Study in Prin...

  12. Cosmology and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  13. Research in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. We are active in seven principal areas which will be discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {bar p}p collisions; MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; and Muon detectors for the GEM Experiment.

  14. Particle detector spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  15. The Supersymmetric Particle Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V; Ohmann, P

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spectrum of supersymmetric particles predicted by grand unified theoretical (GUT) models where the electroweak symmetry breaking is accomplished radiatively. We evolve the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters according to the renormalization group equations (RGE). The minimization of the Higgs potential is conveniently described by means of tadpole diagrams. We present complete one-loop expressions for these minimization conditions, including contributions from the matter and the gauge sectors. We concentrate on the low $\\tan \\beta$ fixed point region (that provides a natural explanation of a large top quark mass) for which we find solutions to the RGE satisfying both experimental bounds and fine-tuning criteria. We also find that the constraint from the consideration of the lightest supersymmetric particle as the dark matter of the universe is accommodated in much of parameter space where the lightest neutralino is predominantly gaugino. The supersymmetric mass spectrum displays correlations...

  16. Ultralight particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-15

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  17. Particle Identification with BELLE

    CERN Document Server

    Satpathy, A

    1999-01-01

    The working principle and performance of the BELLE particle identification device (PID), based on a hybrid system consisting of an array of high precision scintillator Time of Flight and silica Aerogel Counters, is discussed. The performances achieved in the beam tests are satisfactory and Monte Carlo tests of meeting physics objectives of BELLE are promising. Prior to the real experiment which is expected to commence in spring 1999, the BELLE PID is taking cosmic ray data for calibration and fine tuning.

  18. DELPHI: First W particles

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the DELPHI detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. These are the first pair of W particles produced at LEP2, the high energy upgrade of LEP that took place in 1996. Both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, which are each seen as one of the four jets of hadrons in the detector.

  19. A Characteristic Particle Length

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that there are characteristic intervals associated with any particle that can be derived without reference to the speed of light $c$. Such intervals are inferred from zeros of wavefunctions which are solutions to the Schr\\"odinger equation. The characteristic length is $\\ell=\\beta^2\\hbar^2/(8Gm^3)$, where $\\beta=3.8\\dots$; this length might lead to observational effects on objects the size of a virus.

  20. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle

  1. The world of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, Brian

    1991-01-01

    What is our Universe made of? Where does it come from? Why does it behave as it does? We do not have all the answers to these questions but in recent years we have uncovered a lot of information about the Universe which surrounds us. This search has revealed that, beyond the evidence of our eyes, there is a seething world of tiny particles and messengers which pass between them...

  2. The particle suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Particles are supplied to the LHC by six accelerators inter-connected by several kilometres of transfer lines. This represents yet another complex chain of processes whereby particles are produced, bunched, synchronised and injected into the LHC at the precise moment it's ready to receive them. In other words, for collisions to be produced at the end of the chain, all the injectors must be in perfect working order.   Among all the questions asked by the many visitors to CERN, one in particular comes up time and time again: "Why don't you just connect the LHC directly to the proton source?" In other words, why do you need this whole chain of accelerators acting as an "injector" for the LHC? Before colliding inside the LHC, particles first have to pass through no fewer than six different accelerators: the 90 keV duoplasmatron source, the 750 keV RFQ, the 50 MeV Linac 2, the 1.4 GeV synchrotron injector ("PS Booster" or PSB), the 25 GeV Proton Sy...

  3. Evaluation of particle acceptance for space particle telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-Long; WANG Xiao-Lian; XU Zi-Zong

    2011-01-01

    The particle acceptance instead of the G-factors has been introduced for a particle telescope. The particle acceptance of a telescope module TEST is simulated by using the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo package.The results are presented and explained.

  4. Fracture in brittle matrix particle composites with varying particle content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, M.R.A. van; Mier, J.G.M. van

    1999-01-01

    Fracture in brittle matrix particle and fibre composites can be conveniently modelled by means of lattice models where the particle and/or fibre structure is incorporated directly in the model. The particles, fibres and matrix, as well as the interfacial transition zone are assumed to behave as a co

  5. Particle Theory & Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafi, Qaisar [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Barr, Steven [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Gaisser, Thomas [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Stanev, Todor [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-03-31

    1. Executive Summary (April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2015) Title: Particle Theory, Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Qaisar Shafi University of Delaware (Principal Investigator) Stephen M. Barr, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) Thomas K. Gaisser, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) Todor Stanev, University of Delaware (Co-Principal Investigator) The proposed research was carried out at the Bartol Research included Professors Qaisar Shafi Stephen Barr, Thomas K. Gaisser, and Todor Stanev, two postdoctoral fellows (Ilia Gogoladze and Liucheng Wang), and several graduate students. Five students of Qaisar Shafi completed their PhD during the period August 2011 - August 2014. Measures of the group’s high caliber performance during the 2012-2015 funding cycle included pub- lications in excellent refereed journals, contributions to working groups as well as white papers, and conference activities, which together provide an exceptional record of both individual performance as well as overall strength. Another important indicator of success is the outstanding quality of the past and current cohort of graduate students. The PhD students under our supervision regularly win the top departmental and university awards, and their publications records show excellence both in terms of quality and quantity. The topics covered under this grant cover the frontline research areas in today’s High Energy Theory & Phenomenology. For Professors Shafi and Barr they include LHC related topics including supersymmetry, collider physics, fl vor physics, dark matter physics, Higgs boson and seesaw physics, grand unifi and neutrino physics. The LHC two years ago discovered the Standard Model Higgs boson, thereby at least partially unlocking the secrets behind electroweak symmetry breaking. We remain optimistic that new and exciting physics will be found at LHC 14, which explain our focus on physics beyond the Standard Model. Professors Shafi continued his

  6. Particle accelerator; the Universe machine

    CERN Multimedia

    Yurkewicz, Katie

    2008-01-01

    "In summer 2008, scientists will switch on one of the largest machines in the world to search for the smallest of particle. CERN's Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator has the potential to chagne our understanding of the Universe."

  7. Soft particles feel the squeeze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    It's hard to fit in when you're different — especially if you're a large particle trying to squeeze into an array of smaller ones. But some soft, polymeric particles simply shrink to fit the space available.

  8. Charge of dust particles in a particle chain

    CERN Document Server

    Yousefi, Razieh; Matthews, Lorin Swint; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    Charged dust particles form structures which are extended in the vertical direction in the electrode sheath of a rf discharge when confined within a glass box. The charge on each particle as a function of height varies due to the changing plasma conditions and the wakefield of upstream particles. Here an analysis of the equilibrium state of chains of varying number of particles is analyzed to determine the charge on each particle within a vertically extended chain as well as the magnitude of the positive wakefield charge.

  9. Electrostatic interaction of soft particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Theories of the electrostatic interaction between two soft particles (i.e., particles covered with an ion-penetrable surface layer of polyelectrolytes) in an electrolyte solution are reviewed. Interactions of soft particles after contact of their surface layers are particularly discussed. Interaction in a salt-free medium and the discrete-charge effect are also treated.

  10. Schrodinger equation for classical particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, M; Pelc, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the hyperbolic Schredinger equation (HS). The solution of the HS for a particle in a box is obtained. It is shown that for particles with m greater of Mp the energy spectrum is independent of the mass of particle.

  11. Evaluation of particle acceptance for space particle telescope%Evaluation of particle acceptance for space particle telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云龙; 汪晓莲; 许咨宗

    2011-01-01

    The particle acceptance instead of the G-factors has been introduced for a particle telescope. The particle acceptance of a telescope module TEST is simulated by using the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo package. The results are presented and explained.

  12. Local particle-ghost symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    We study the quantization of systems with local particle-ghost symmetries. The systems contain ordinary particles including gauge bosons and their counterparts obeying different statistics. The particle-ghost symmetry is a kind of fermionic symmetry, different from the space-time supersymmetry and the BRST symmetry. Subsidiary conditions on states guarantee the unitarity of systems.

  13. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-17

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  14. ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE-PARTICLE FORCES IN ELECTRORHEOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO HE-PING; LIU ZHENG-YOU; LIU YOU-YAN

    2001-01-01

    The Rayleigh identity, based on a multipole expansion theory, is extended to analyse the forces between particles in an electrorheological system. The shear modulus for chains of particles arrayed on a square lattice is calculated. It is found that the modulus increases linearly with the ratio of dielectric constants of the dispersed particles to that of the continuous phase; as the ratio becomes larger, contrary to the expectations from a simple dipole approximation, the modulus would saturate. In the case of conducting particles, the modulus varies with the frequency of the applied field. In a limiting case of perfectly conducting particles, the conductivity is also considered. It is found that the particle-particle forces are extremely sensitive to their separations from each other.

  15. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R M; Graziani, F R; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2009-06-15

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known (section 3). The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (plane-waves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion (section 4). The third method is a hybrid MD/MC (molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions (section 5). The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc.(section 6). This approach is inspired by the Virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  16. Analysis of particle-wall interactions during particle free fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Reiyu; Liao, Wenyuan

    2005-08-01

    In this study, the vertical motion of a particle in a quiescent fluid falling toward a horizontal plane wall is analyzed, based on simplified models. Using the distance between the particle and wall as a parameter, the effects of various forces acting on the particle and the particle motion are examined. Without the colloidal and Brownian forces being included, the velocity of small particles is found to be approximately equal to the inverse of the drag force correction function used in this study as the particle approaches the near-wall region. Colloidal force is added to the particle equation of motion as the particle moves a distance comparable to its size. It is found that the particle might become suspended above or deposited onto the wall, depending on the Hamaker constant, the surface potentials of the particle and wall, and the thickness of the electrical double layer (EDL). For strong EDL repulsive force and weaker van der Waals (VDW) attractive force, the particle will become suspended above the wall at a distance at which the particle velocity is zero. This location is referred to as the equilibrium distance. The equilibrium distance is found to increase with increased in EDL thickness when a repulsive force barrier appears in the colloidal force interaction. For the weak EDL repulsive force and strong VDW attractive force case, the particle can become deposited onto the wall without the Brownian motion effect. The Brownian jump length was found to be very small. Many Brownian jumps would be required in a direction toward the wall for a suspended particle to become deposited.

  17. On particle oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Góźdź, Marek

    2013-01-01

    It has been firmly established, that neutrinos change their flavour during propagation. This feature is attributed to the fact, that each flavour eigenstate is a superposition of three mass eigenstates, which propagate with different frequencies. This picture, although widely accepted, is wrong in the simplest approach and requires quite sophisticated treatment based on the wave-packet description within quantum field theory. In this communication we present a novel, much simpler explanation and show, that oscillations among massive particles can be obtained in a natural way. We use the framework of quantum mechanics with time being a physical observable, not just a parameter.

  18. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  19. Physics of windblown particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Leach, Rodman; Marshall, John R.; White, Bruce; Iversen, James D.; Nickling, William G.; Gillette, Dale; Sorensen, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility proposed for the Space Station to investigate fundamental aspects of windblown particles is described. The experiments would take advantage of the environment afforded in earth orbit and would be an extension of research currently being conducted on the geology and physics of windblown sediments on earth, Mars, and Venus. Aeolian (wind) processes are reviewed in the planetary context, the scientific rational is given for specific experiments to be conducted, the experiment apparatus (the Carousel Wind Tunnel, or CWT) is described, and a plan presented for implementing the proposed research program.

  20. MICE Particle Identification System

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE, at the ISIS accelerator lo- cated at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is an essential step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. Muons are produced by pion decay in a superconducting solenoid and reach MICE with a range of emittances and momenta. The purity of the muon beam is ensured by a system of particle detectors we will briefly describe here.

  1. Fluid and particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  2. Plasma and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špatenka, Petr; Vacková, Tat'ana; Nováček, Vojtěch; Jeníková, Zdenka

    2016-12-01

    Plasma has been proved as a standard industrial method for surface treatment of solid bulk materials. Recently plasma has also been used in connection with production, treatment and functionalization of powder and granulate materials. Functionalization was originally developed for hydrophylization of hydrophobic surfaces of particles made from various materials. An industrial scale device with a capacity of several hundreds of tons per year based on plasma treatment will be presented. As examples of the applications are given plasma treated polyethylene powder dispersed in the water; and very good adhesion of polymer powders to metals or glass, which is promising for development of new generation of thermoplastic composites.

  3. Polarizabilities of nonreciprocal bianisotropic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mirmoosa, M S; Asadchy, V S; Simovski, C R; Tretyakov, S A

    2014-01-01

    For two electrically small nonreciprocal scatterers an analytical electromagnetic model of polarizabilities is developed. Both particles are bianisotropic: the so-called Tellegen-omega particle and moving-chiral particle. Analytical results are compared to the full-wave numerical simulations. Both models satisfy to main physical restrictions and leave no doubts in the possibility to realize these particles experimentally. This paper is a necessary step towards applications of nonreciprocal bianisotropic particles such as perfect electromagnetic isolators, twist polarizers, thin-sheet phase shifters, and other devices.

  4. Three-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ulery, J G

    2007-01-01

    Two-particle azimuthal correlations reveal broadened and softened away-side correlations. Several different physics mechanisms are possible: large angle gluon radiation, deflected jets, and conical flow or Cerenkov radiation. Three-particle correlations are investigated to try to discriminate these mechanisms. We present results on 3-particle azimuthal correlations between a trigger particle of 3particles of 1

  5. Particle physics -- Future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Quigg

    2001-11-29

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with the coming of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop our understanding of the problem of identity: what makes a neutrino a neutrino and a top quark a top quark. Here I have in mind the work of the B factories and the Tevatron collider on CP violation and the weak interactions of the b quark; the wonderfully sensitive experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, Fermilab, and Frascati on CP violation and rare decays of kaons; the prospect of definitive accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations and the nature of the neutrinos; and a host of new experiments on the sensitivity frontier. We might even learn to read experiment for clues about the dimensionality of spacetime. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow this rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear collider and a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment. I describe some of the great questions before us and the challenges of providing the instruments that will be needed to define them more fully and eventually to answer them.

  6. Stalking the ultimate particle

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you missed the ARTE programme entitled "L'Ultime Particule" broadcast in February, you have another chance to catch it in CERN's Main Auditorium on 13 March. "L'Ultime Particule" is a documentary by the French director Michel Andrieu that seeks to explain particle physics through a contemplative quest for the research physicists of matter of today and yesteryear. Invariably kitted out in a red parka and a soft hat, the programme's investigator scours the planet and the archives in search of the research physicists who are stalking the ultimate particle, the Higgs boson, in their quest to understand the structure of matter. Naturally enough, CERN is an important stage of his journey where Michel Andrieu and his team spent several days last year. Both from the physics and metaphysical points of view, "L'Ultime Particule" is worth seeing. The film's director, Michel Andrieu, will introduce his documentary and answer questions from the audience after the documentary has been shown. L'Ultime Particule by Mic...

  7. Decoupling of supersymmetric particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dobado, A; Peñaranda, S

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of a heavy supersymmetric spectrum at the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is considered and the decoupling from the low energy electroweak scale is analyzed in detail. The formal proof of decoupling of supersymmetric particles from low energy physics is stated in terms of the effective action for the particles of the Standard Model that results by integrating out all the sparticles in the limit where their masses are larger than the electroweak scale. The computation of the effective action for the standard electroweak gauge bosons W^{+-}, Z and \\gamma is performed by integrating out all the squarks, sleptons, charginos and neutralinos to one-loop. The Higgs sector is not considered in this paper. The large sparticle masses limit is also analyzed in detail. Explicit analytical formulae for the two-point functions of the electroweak gauge bosons to be valid in that limit are presented. Finally, the decoupling of sparticles in the S, T and U parameters is studied analitically. A discussion...

  8. On Particles and Primes

    CERN Document Server

    Knill, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Primes in the two complete associative normed division algebras C and H have affinities with structures seen in the standard model of particle physics. On the integers in the two algebras, there are two equivalence relations: a strong one, related to a U(1) and SU(3) symmetry allowing to permute and switch signs of the coordinates of the integers, as well as a weak relation with origins from units U(1),SU(2) in the algebra. Weak equivalence classes within the strong equivalence classes of odd primes in C case relate to leptons, the inert ones being neutrino like, and the split ones resembling electron-positron pairs. In the H case, for odd primes, the equivalence classes come in groups of two or three, leading to a caricature of hadrons featuring either mesons built by a quark pair or then baryons obtained by quark triplets. We can now list for every rational prime p all these particles and attach fractional charges to its constituents.

  9. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Philipps-University Marburg, Center for Radiology, Department of Radiation Therapy, Baldinger Strasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hochschulstrasse 3, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  10. Review of instrumentation for observational particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro, E-mail: suzuki@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.j [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka-Cho, Hida (Japan); Kamioka Satellite, Institute for the Mathematics and Physics of the Universe, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Particle experiments that do not use the accelerator beams (observational particle experiments) have become important subjects recently. We have reviewed the detector for the observational particle experiments.

  11. Analysis of particle kinematics in spheronization via particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Spheronization is a wide spread technique in pellet production for many pharmaceutical applications. Pellets produced by spheronization are characterized by a particularly spherical shape and narrow size distribution. The particle kinematic during spheronization is currently not well-understood. Therefore, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was implemented in the spheronization process to visualize the particle movement and to identify flow patterns, in order to explain the influence of various process parameters. The spheronization process of a common formulation was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the images were processed using particle image velocimetry software. A crosscorrelation approach was chosen to determine the particle velocity at the surface of the pellet bulk. Formulation and process parameters were varied systematically, and their influence on the particle velocity was investigated. The particle stream shows a torus-like shape with a twisted rope-like motion. It is remarkable that the overall particle velocity is approximately 10-fold lower than the tip speed of the friction plate. The velocity of the particle stream can be correlated to the water content of the pellets and the load of the spheronizer, while the rotation speed was not relevant. In conclusion, PIV was successfully applied to the spheronization process, and new insights into the particle velocity were obtained.

  12. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  13. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  14. Anomalous particle pinch in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miskane, F.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dezairi, A.; Saifaoui, D. [Faculte des Sciences Ain Chok, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2000-06-01

    The diffusion coefficient in phase space usually varies with the particle energy. A consequence is the dependence of the fluid particle flux on the temperature gradient. If the diffusion coefficient in phase space decreases with the energy in the bulk of the thermal distribution function, the particle thermodiffusion coefficient which links the particle flux to the temperature gradient is negative. This is a possible explanation for the inward particle pinch that is observed in tokamaks. A quasilinear theory shows that such a thermodiffusion is generic for a tokamak electrostatic turbulence at low frequency. This effect adds to the particle flux associated with the radial gradient of magnetic field. This behavior is illustrated with a perturbed electric potential, for which the trajectories of charged particle guiding centers are calculated. The diffusion coefficient of particles is computed and compared to the quasilinear theory, which predicts a divergence at low velocity. It is shown that at low velocity, the actual diffusion coefficient increases, but remains lower than the quasilinear value. Nevertheless, this differential diffusion between cold and fast particles leads to an inward flux of particles. (author)

  15. Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R.; Remcho, V.T.

    1996-03-01

    A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 {mu}m to 10 {mu}m. The method has been applied to separations of U0{sub 2} particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0{sub 2} and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO{sub 2} particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO{sub 2} particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0{sub 2}containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20.

  16. The Particle Cleanliness Validation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Ravizza, D.L.

    2001-12-21

    The Particle Cleanliness Validation System (PCVS) is a combination of a surface particle collection tool and a microscope based data, reduction system for determining the particle cleanliness of mechanical and optical surfaces at LLNL. Livermore is currently constructing the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a large 192 beam laser system for studying fusion physics. The laser is entirely enclosed. in aluminum and stainless steel vessels containing several environments; air, argon, and vacuum. It contains uncoated optics as well as hard dielectric coated and softer solgel coated optics which are, to varying degrees, sensitive to opaque particles, translucent particles, and molecular contamination. To quantify the particulate matter on structural surfaces during vendor cleaning and installation, a novel instrument has been developed to-both collect surface particles and to quantify the number and size distribution of these particles. The particles are collected on membrane filter paper which is ''swiped'' on a test surface for a proscribed distance to collect sufficient particles to significantly exceed the cleanliness of the filter paper. The swipe paper is then placed into a cassette for protection from further. contamination and transported to a microscope with x-y motorized stage and image analysis software, The surface of the swipe paper is scanned to determine both the background particle level of the paper, the cassette cover, and the portion of the paper which made contact with the test surface. The cumulative size distribution of the collected particles are displayed in size bins from 5 to 200 {micro}m. The quantity of particles exceeding 5 {micro}m is used to compute the IEST-STD-1246D cleanliness Level. Eight image analysis microscopes have been constructed for use with several dozen particle collection tools. About 30,000 cleanliness measurements have been taken to assure the clean construction and operation of the NIF laser system.

  17. Photothermal Single Particle Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Selmke, Markus; Cichos, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Photothermal microscopy has recently complemented single molecule fluorescence microscopy by the detection of individual nano-objects in absorption. Photothermal techniques gain their superior sensitivity by exploiting a heat induced refractive index change around the absorbing nano-object. Numerous new applications to nanoparticles, nanorods and even single molecules have been reported all refering to the fact that photothermal microscopy is an extinction measurement on a heat induced refractive index profile. Here, we show that the actual physical mechanism generating a photothermal signal from a single molecule/particle is fundamentally different from the assumed extinction measurement. Combining photothermal microscopy, light scattering microscopy as well as accurate Mie scattering calculations to single gold nanoparticles, we reveal that the detection mechanism is quantitatively explained by a nanolensing effect of the long range refractive index profile. Our results lay the foundation for future develop...

  18. The E(2) Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Subir

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been advocated [1] that for describing nature within the minimal symmetry requirement, certain subgroups of Lorentz group (along with translation invariance) may play a fundamental role, (instead of the full Poincare group). One such group is E(2) which induces a Lie algebraic Non-Commutative spacetime [4]. In this new kind of Non-Commutative phase space, (which however is not translation invariant in all directions), we construct a point particle action. Interestingly, contrary to some of the other Lie algebraic Non-Commutative spacetimes, no change in the Einstein dispersion relation $p^2=m^2$ is needed. The model is constructed by exploiting a dual canonical phase space following the scheme developed by us earlier [8].

  19. Particle thermophoresis in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parola, A; Piazza, R

    2004-11-01

    We present a microscopic description of thermophoretic phenomena in dilute suspensions of spherical colloids. The specific particle/solvent interfacial interactions generate a force density field F on the surrounding fluid which in turn gives rise to an "effective force" on the colloid. In our approach, such a force turns out to be solely related to the non-conservative anisotropic contribution to F brought forth by the thermal gradient. By adopting a Smoluchowski picture of colloid motion, we find a general expression for the Soret coefficient S(T), which we apply to the specific cases of neutral colloids in pure solvent and of Debye-Hückel systems. For the latter, our result for S(T) agrees with those obtained by previous hydrodynamic approaches.

  20. Cooled particle accelerator target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  1. Experimental particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, R. I.; Lane, C. E.

    1992-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics beyond the standard model and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large-area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low- and high-energy neutrinos; the Chooz experiment to search for reactor neutrino oscillations at a distance of 1 km from the source; a new proposal (the Perry experiment) to construct a one-kiloton liquid scintillator in the Fairport, Ohio underground facility IMB to study neutrino oscillations with a 13 km baseline; and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very-low-background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  2. Experiments in Particle Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boratav, M

    2004-07-01

    During the last decade, the field of what is currently called particle astrophysics (that I prefer to the shaky neologism astroparticle physics) has experienced a surprising growth. It is interesting to understand why the cosmic rays, the poor man's accelerator not no long ago, are becoming the object of scrutiny for a continuously growing community of theoreticians and experimentalists. In this article, we made an arbitrary choice of a small number of experiments to illustrate today's state of the art and the future perspectives in this domain. Our choice is based on three facts: the objects detected in each experiment are different, all the selected experiments are in their starting phase and all are spectacular for various reasons. Our aim is to convince the reader of the enormous discovery potential of these ongoing projects and share with him the excitement experienced by those involved in them. (Author) 37 refs.

  3. Particle processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshio, Sakka

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, there has been strong demand for the development of novel devices and equipment that support advanced industries including IT/semiconductors, the environment, energy and aerospace along with the achievement of higher efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Many studies have been conducted on the fabrication of innovative inorganic materials with novel individual properties and/or multifunctional properties including electrical, dielectric, thermal, optical, chemical and mechanical properties through the development of particle processing. The fundamental technologies that are key to realizing such materials are (i) the synthesis of nanoparticles with uniform composition and controlled crystallite size, (ii) the arrangement/assembly and controlled dispersion of nanoparticles with controlled particle size, (iii) the precise structural control at all levels from micrometer to nanometer order and (iv) the nanostructural design based on theoretical/experimental studies of the correlation between the local structure and the functions of interest. In particular, it is now understood that the application of an external stimulus, such as magnetic energy, electrical energy and/or stress, to a reaction field is effective in realizing advanced particle processing [1-3]. This special issue comprises 12 papers including three review papers. Among them, seven papers are concerned with phosphor particles, such as silicon, metals, Si3N4-related nitrides, rare-earth oxides, garnet oxides, rare-earth sulfur oxides and rare-earth hydroxides. In these papers, the effects of particle size, morphology, dispersion, surface states, dopant concentration and other factors on the optical properties of phosphor particles and their applications are discussed. These nanoparticles are classified as zero-dimensional materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene are well-known one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials, respectively. This special issue also

  4. Investigation of plasma particle interactions with variable particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In dusty plasmas, the dust particles are subjected to many forces of different origins. Both the gas and plasma directly affect the dust particles through electric fields, neutral drag, ion drag and thermophoretic forces, while the particles themselves interact with one another through a screened coulomb potential, which can be influenced by flowing ions. Recently, micron sized particles have been used as probes to analyze the electric fields in the plasma directly. A proper analysis of the resulting data requires a full understanding of the manner in which these forces couple to the dust particles. In most cases each of the forces exhibit unique characteristics, many of which are partially dependent on the particle size. In this study, five different particle sizes are used to investigate the forces resident in the sheath above the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell. The particles are tracked using a high-speed camera, yielding two-dimensional force maps allowing the force on the particles to be described as a polynomial series. It will be shown that the data collected can be analyzed to reveal information about the origins of the various forces. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  6. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  7. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  8. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  9. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  10. Cosmological Reflection of Particle Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Khlopov

    2016-01-01

    The standard model involves particle symmetry and the mechanism of its breaking. Modern cosmology is based on inflationary models with baryosynthesis and dark matter/energy, which involves physics beyond the standard model. Studies of the physical basis of modern cosmology combine direct searches for new physics at accelerators with its indirect non-accelerator probes, in which cosmological consequences of particle models play an important role. The cosmological reflection of particle symmetr...

  11. An Extended Particle Swarm Optimizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun-jie; XIN Zhan-hong

    2005-01-01

    An Extended Particle Swarm Optimizer (EPSO) is proposed in this paper. In this new algorithm, not only the local but also the global best position will impact the particle's velocity updating process. EPSO is an integration of Local Best paradigm (LBEST) and Global Best paradigm (GBEST) and it significantly enhances the performance of the conventional particle swarm optimizers. The experiment results have proved that EPSO deserves to be investigated.

  12. Quantitative wave-particle duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Tabish

    2016-07-01

    The complementary wave and particle character of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is here described not just as two extreme cases of wave and particle characteristics, but in terms of quantitative measures of these characteristics, known to follow a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of a closely related duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to the introductory student.

  13. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, William L

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  14. A particle-particle collision strategy for arbitrarily shaped particles at low Stokes numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghooghi, Mohsen; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    We present a collision strategy for particles with any general shape at low Stokes numbers. Conventional collision strategies rely upon a short -range repulsion force along particles centerline, which is a suitable choice for spherical particles and may not work for complex-shaped particles. In the present method, upon the collision of two particles, kinematics of particles are modified so that particles have zero relative velocity toward each other along the direction in which they have the minimum distance. The advantage of this novel technique is that it guaranties to prevent particles from overlapping without unrealistic bounce back at low Stokes numbers, which may occur if repulsive forces are used. This model is used to simulate sedimentation of many particles in a vertical channel and suspensions of non-spherical particles under simple shear flow. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund (PRF) Grant Number 53099-DNI9. The computational resources were partly provided by the Center for Computational Research (CCR) at the University at Buffalo.

  15. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S; Butler, James P

    2013-10-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. The particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic. Conversely, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drugs. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this article. A large portion of this article deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: (i) the physical characteristics of particles, (ii) particle behavior in gas flow, and (iii) gas-flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The article concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research.

  16. Improved Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter by Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Shun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF algorithm usually has better performance than the traditional particle filter (PF by utilizing conditional dependency relationships between parts of the state variables to estimate. By doing so, RBPF could not only improve the estimation precision but also reduce the overall computational complexity. However, the computational burden is still too high for many real-time applications. To improve the efficiency of RBPF, the particle swarm optimization (PSO is applied to drive all the particles to the regions where their likelihoods are high in the nonlinear area. So only a small number of particles are needed to participate in the required computation. The experimental results demonstrate that this novel algorithm is more efficient than the standard RBPF.

  17. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  18. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  19. Single Particle Difraction at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M.; Boutet, S.; Starodub, Dmitri; Decorwin-Martin, Philippe; /SLAC; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; /DESY; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; /Uppsala U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /Tofwerk AG, Thun

    2010-06-11

    Single-pulse coherent diffraction patterns have been collected from randomly injected single particles with a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of the object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. A diffraction pattern of a single particle will only be recorded when the particle arrival into the FEL interaction region coincides with FEL pulse arrival and detector integration. The properties of the experimental apparatus coinciding with these three events set the data acquisition rate. For our single particle FLASH diffraction imaging experiments: (1) an aerodynamic lens stack prepared a particle beam that consisted of particles moving at 150-200 m/s positioned randomly in space and time, (2) the 10 fs long FEL pulses were delivered at a fixed rate, and (3) the detector was set to integrate and readout once every two seconds. The effect of these experimental parameters on the rate of data acquisition using randomly injected particles will be discussed. Overall, the ultrashort FEL pulses do not set the limit of the data acquisition, more important is the effective interaction time of the particle crossing the FEL focus, the pulse sequence structure and the detector readout rate. Example diffraction patterns of randomly injected ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles in different orientations are presented. This is the first single particle diffraction data set of identical particles in different orientations collected on a shot-to-shot basis. This data set will be used to test algorithms for recovering 3D structure from single particle diffraction.

  20. Playing with particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Could the principles of particle physics ever be explained by a game? Could a deck of cards ever teach the Standard Model the way Monopoly teaches economics? According to players of the Quark Matter card game, the answer is an easy “yes!”.   Csaba Török and Judit Csörgő (second and third from left) at the award ceremony for the Eötvös University Innovation Contest. When he was only 17 years old, Hungarian student Csaba Török came up with the idea for the Quark Matter cards. “I wanted people to think of the Standard Model as fun – not just a serious, scientific theory,” says Csaba. “The cards can turn everyone into a pseudo-physicist.” He shared the idea with his friend Judit Csörgő and her physicist father, Tamás Csörgő, and together they went on to develop Quark Matter into the game it is today. Csaba and Judit were both members o...

  1. Particle acceleration mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, V

    2008-01-01

    We review the possible mechanisms for production of non-thermal electrons which are responsible for non-thermal radiation in clusters of galaxies. Our primary focus is on non-thermal Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering, that produce hard X-ray emission. We briefly review acceleration mechanisms and point out that in most astrophysical situations, and in particular for the intracluster medium, shocks, turbulence and plasma waves play a crucial role. We consider two scenarios for production of non-thermal radiation. The first is hard X-ray emission due to non-thermal Bremsstrahlung by nonrelativistic particles. Non-thermal tails are produced by accelerating electrons from the background plasma with an initial Maxwellian distribution. However, these tails are accompanied by significant heating and they are present for a short time of <10^6 yr, which is also the time that the tail will be thermalised. Such non-thermal tails, even if possible, can only explain the hard X-ray but not the radio emission...

  2. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations. Fifty candles for CERN, an international laboratory renowned for fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting exhibitions of plastic arts and performances entitled: Accelerated Particles. Several works will be exhibited and performed in two 'salons'. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts From Tues 12 October to Wed 3 November 2004 Tuesdays to Fridays: 16:00 to 19:00 Saturdays: 14:00 to 18:00 Exhibition open late on performance nights, entrance free Salon des particules: Musical and visual performances Tues 12 and Mon 25 October from 20:00 to 23:00 Preview evening for both events: Tues 12 October from 18:...

  3. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. The fiftieth anniversary of a world famous organization like CERN, an international laboratory specializing in fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting two "salons" consisting of an exhibition of plastic arts and evenings of music and visual arts performances with the collective title of "Accelerated Particles". Several works will be exhibited and performed. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts Until Wednesday 3 November 2004. Tuesdays to Fridays: 4.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. Saturdays: 2.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. Doors open late on the evening of the performances. Salon des ...

  4. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opelka, J.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Marmer, G.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Siskind, B.; Kikta, M.J.

    1979-12-01

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given.

  5. The ABCs of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biron, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    For lovers of rhymes and anthropomorphic Higgs bosons, Symmetry presents its first published board book, The ABCs of Particle Physics. Use it as an illustrated guide to basic particle- and astrophysics terms, or read it to your infant at bedtime, if you don’t mind their first word being “quark.”

  6. Particle production in Ekpyrotic scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. [Physics Department, McGill University,Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo,Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km. 60, Campus de São Mateus, CEP 29932-540,São Mateus, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Brandenberger, Robert [Physics Department, McGill University,Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Institute for Theoretical Studies, ETH Zürich,CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Ferreira, Elisa G.M.; Graef, L.L. [Physics Department, McGill University,Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2016-11-09

    We consider Parker particle production in the Ekpyrotic scenario (in particular in the New Ekpyrotic model) and show that the density of particles produced by the end of the phase of Ekpyrotic contraction can be sufficient to lead to a hot state of matter after the bounce. Hence, no separate reheating mechanism is necessary.

  7. Monte Carlo Particle Lists: MCPL

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Knudsen, Erik B; Willendrup, Peter; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    A binary format with lists of particle state information, for interchanging particles between various Monte Carlo simulation applications, is presented. Portable C code for file manipulation is made available to the scientific community, along with converters and plugins for several popular simulation packages.

  8. Particle sizes from sectional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new statistical method for obtaining information about particle size distributions from sectional data without specific assumptions about particle shape. The method utilizes recent advances in local stereology. We show how to estimate separately from sectional data the variance due t...

  9. Largest particle detector nearing completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Construction of another part of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the worl's largest particle accelerator at CERN in Switzerland, is nearing completion. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is oner of the LHC project's four large particle detectors. (1/2 page)

  10. Lagrangian multi-particle statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Beat; Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Combined measurements of the Lagrangian evolution of particle constellations and the coarse-grained velocity derivative tensor. partial derivative(u) over tilde (i) /partial derivative x(j) are presented. The data are obtained from three-dimensional particle tracking measurements in a quasi isotr...

  11. A Many Particle Adiabatic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    1999-01-01

    For a system of N charged particles moving in a homogeneous, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a many-particle adiabatic invariant constrains the collisional exchange of energy between the degrees of freedom perpendicular to and parallel to the magnetic field. A description of the phenomenon...

  12. Optomechanics of Levitated Dielectric Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhang-qi; Li, Tongcang

    2013-01-01

    We review recent works on optomechanics of optically trapped microspheres and nanoparticles in vacuum, which provide an ideal system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics and ultrasensitive force detection. An optically trapped particle in vacuum has an ultrahigh mechanical quality factor as it is well-isolated from the thermal environment. Its oscillation frequency can be tuned in real time by changing the power of the trapping laser. Furthermore, an optically trapped particle in vacuum may rotate freely, a unique property that does not exist in clamped mechanical oscillators. In this review, we will introduce the current status of optical trapping of dielectric particles in air and vacuum, Brownian motion of an optically trapped particle at room temperature, Feedback cooling and cavity cooling of the Brownian motion. We will also discuss about using optically trapped dielectric particles for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics and ultrasensitive force detection. Applications range from creating macr...

  13. Health effects of exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlava, T.; Uuppo, M.; Niemi, S.

    2013-11-01

    This report introduces general information about diesel particles and their health effects. The purpose of this report is to introduce particulate matter pollution and present some recent studies made regarding the health effects of particulate matter. The aim is not to go very deeply into the science, but instead to keep the text understandable for the average layman. Particulate matter is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. These small particles are made up of a number of components that include for example acids, such as nitrates and sulphates, as well as organic chemicals, metals and dust particles from the soil. Particulate matter comes from several sources, such as transportation emissions, industrial emissions, forest fires, cigarette smoke, volcanic ash and climate variations. Particles are divided into coarse particles with diameters less than 10 ..m, fine particles with diameters smaller than 2.5 ..m and ultra-fine particles with diameters less than 0.1 ..m. The particulate matter in diesel exhaust gas is a highly complex mixture of organic, inorganic, solid, volatile and partly volatile compounds. Many of these particles do not form until they reach the air. Many carcinogenic compounds have been found in diesel exhaust gas and it is considered carcinogenic to humans. Particulate matter can cause several health effects, such as premature death in persons with heart or lung disease, cancer, nonfatal heart attacks, irregular heartbeat, aggravated asthma, decreased lung function and an increase in respiratory symptoms, such as irritation of the airways, coughing or difficulty breathing. It is estimated that in Finland about 1300 people die prematurely due to particles and the economic loss in the EU due to the health effects of particles can be calculated in the billions. Ultra-fine particles are considered to be the most harmful to human health. Ultrafine particles usually make the most of their quantity and surface area

  14. Entanglement entropy in particle decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lello, Louis; Holman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The decay of a parent particle into two or more daughter particles results in an entangled quantum state, as a consequence of conservation laws in the decay process. We use the Wigner-Weisskopf formalism to construct an approximation to this state that evolves in time in a {\\em manifestly unitary} way. We then construct the entanglement entropy for one of the daughter particles by use of the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing out the unobserved states and follow its time evolution. We find that it grows over a time scale determined by the lifetime of the parent particle to a maximum, which when the width of the parent particle is narrow, describes the phase space distribution of maximally entangled Bell-like states.

  15. Nonlinear Particle Acceleration and Thermal Particles in GRB Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Donald C.; Ellison, Donald C.; Barkov, Maxim V.; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2017-02-01

    The standard model for GRB afterglow emission treats the accelerated electron population as a simple power law, N(E)\\propto {E}-p for p≳ 2. However, in standard Fermi shock acceleration, a substantial fraction of the swept-up particles do not enter the acceleration process at all. Additionally, if acceleration is efficient, then the nonlinear back-reaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure modifies the shape of the nonthermal tail of the particle spectra. Both of these modifications to the standard synchrotron afterglow impact the luminosity, spectra, and temporal variation of the afterglow. To examine the effects of including thermal particles and nonlinear particle acceleration on afterglow emission, we follow a hydrodynamical model for an afterglow jet and simulate acceleration at numerous points during the evolution. When thermal particles are included, we find that the electron population is at no time well fitted by a single power law, though the highest-energy electrons are; if the acceleration is efficient, then the power-law region is even smaller. Our model predicts hard–soft–hard spectral evolution at X-ray energies, as well as an uncoupled X-ray and optical light curve. Additionally, we show that including emission from thermal particles has drastic effects (increases by factors of 100 and 30, respectively) on the observed flux at optical and GeV energies. This enhancement of GeV emission makes afterglow detections by future γ-ray observatories, such as CTA, very likely.

  16. Tribological effects of particle concentration of an iron particle suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.C.Leung; P.L.Wong; C.Feng; W.A.Bullough

    2001-01-01

    The general friction and wear performance of an iron particulate suspension underboundary lubrication conditions are presented. The suspension is a mixture of 1-5 micrometerdiameter carbonyl iron particles with commercial hydraulic oil, which resembles typical compositionof magneto-rheological fluids. The investigation involves changing the particle concentration of thesuspension. The optimal concentration of the suspension from a tribological view point can be ob-served from the experimental results,which provides a reference to the design of the particle load-ing of magneto-rheological fluids.

  17. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  18. GPU-Enabled Particle-Particle Particle-Tree Scheme for Simulating Dense Stellar Cluster System

    CERN Document Server

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Makino, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of the ${\\rm P^3T}$ (Particle-Particle Particle-Tree) scheme for simulating dense stellar systems. In ${\\rm P^3T}$, the force experienced by a particle is split into short-range and long-range contributions. Short-range forces are evaluated by direct summation and integrated with the fourth order Hermite predictor-corrector method with the block timesteps. For long-range forces, we use a combination of the Barnes-Hut tree code and the leapfrog integrator. The tree part of our simulation environment is accelerated using graphical processing units (GPU), whereas the direct summation is carried out on the host CPU. Our code gives excellent performance and accuracy for star cluster simulations with a large number of particles even when the core size of the star cluster is small.

  19. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  20. Particle-wall tribology of slippery hydrogel particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewan, Heather M; Stokes, Jason R; Cloitre, Michel

    2017-02-22

    Slip is an important phenomenon that occurs during the flow of yield stress fluids like soft materials and pastes. Densely packed suspensions of hydrogel microparticles are used to show that slip is governed by the tribological interactions occurring between the samples and shearing surfaces. Both attractive/repulsive interactions between the dispersed particles and surface, as well as the viscoelasticity of the suspension, are found to play key roles in slip occurring within rheometric flows. We specifically discover that for two completely different sets of microgels, the sliding stress at which slip occurs scales with both the modulus of the particles and the bulk suspension modulus. This suggests that hysteresis losses within the viscoelastic particles contribute to friction forces and thus slip at the particle-surface tribo-contact. It is also found that slip during large amplitude oscillatory shear and steady shear flows share the same generic features.

  1. Particle multiplicities and particle ratios in excluded volume model

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, M

    2008-01-01

    One of the most surprising results is to find that a consistent description of all the experimental results on particle multiplicities and particle ratios obtained from the lowest AGS to the highest RHIC energies is possible within the framework of a thermal statistical model. We propose here a thermodynamically consistent excluded-volume model involving an interacting multi-component hadron gas. We find that the energy dependence of the total multiplicities of strange and non-strange hadrons obtained in this model agrees closely with the experimental results. It indicates that the freeze out volume of the fireball is uniformly the same for all the particles. We have also compared the variation of the particle ratios such as $/, /, K^{-}/K^{+}, \\bar{p}/p, \\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda, \\bar{\\Xi}/\\Xi, \\bar{\\Omega}/\\Omega, /, /, /$ and $/$ with respect to the center-of-mass energy as predicted by our model with the recent experimental data.

  2. Ultrafine particles in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, L M; Harrison, R M; Maynard, A D; Maynard, R L

    2003-01-01

    Following the recognition that airborne particulate matter, even at quite modest concentrations, has an adverse effect on human health, there has been an intense research effort to understand the mechanisms and quantify the effects. One feature that has shone through is the important role of ultrafine particles as a contributor to the adverse effects of airborne particles. In this volume, many of the most distinguished researchers in the field provide a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific and medical research on ultrafine particles. Contents: Measurements of Number, Mass and Size Distr

  3. "Buddha's Light" of Cumulative Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B; Potashnikova, Irina K

    2014-01-01

    We show analytically that in the cumulative particles production off nuclei multiple interactions lead to a glory-like backward focusing effect. Employing the small phase space method we arrived at a characteristic angular dependence of the production cross section $d\\sigma \\sim 1/ \\sqrt {\\pi - \\theta}$ near the strictly backward direction. This effect takes place for any number $n\\geq 3 $ of interactions of rescattered particle, either elastic or inelastic (with resonance excitations in intermediate states), when the final particle is produced near corresponding kinematical boundary. Such a behaviour of the cross section near the backward direction is in qualitative agreement with some of available data.

  4. Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3772 CPC is a compact, rugged, and full-featured instrument that detects airborne particles down to 10 nm in diameter, at an aerosol flow rate of 1.0 lpm, over a concentration range from 0 to 1x104 #/cc. This CPC is ideally suited for applications without high concentration measurements, such as basic aerosol research, filter and air-cleaner testing, particle counter calibrations, environmental monitoring, mobile aerosol studies, particle shedding and component testing, and atmospheric and climate studies.

  5. SPS experiments with light particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tenner, A G

    1977-01-01

    High energy physics during the last 20 years has utilized proton accelerators like the CERN PS. Now, however, fundamental questions can only be answered through experiments using beams of electrons, muons or neutrinos for the study of collisions between light particles or between light and heavy particles. The detection of light particles as the end products of interactions is also of great interest. The super protosynchrotron experimental programme which started in January 1977 is discussed with particular reference to the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). (2 refs).

  6. Cosmological Reflection of Particle Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The standard model involves particle symmetry and the mechanism of its breaking. Modern cosmology is based on inflationary models with baryosynthesis and dark matter/energy, which involves physics beyond the standard model. Studies of the physical basis of modern cosmology combine direct searches for new physics at accelerators with its indirect non-accelerator probes, in which cosmological consequences of particle models play an important role. The cosmological reflection of particle symmetry and the mechanisms of its breaking are the subject of the present review.

  7. Electrooptical Detection of Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds promise for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  8. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  9. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  10. Particle Creation in Bouncing Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Celani, Diogo C F; Vitenti, Sandro D P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate scalar particle creation in a set of bouncing models where the bounce occurs due to quantum cosmological effects described by the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The scalar field can be either conformally or minimally coupled to gravity, and it can be massive or massless, without self interaction. The analysis is made for models containing a single radiation fluid, and for the more realistic case of models containing the usual observed radiation and dust fluids, which can fit most of the observed features of our Universe, including an almost scale invariant power spectrum of scalar cosmological perturbations. In the conformal coupling case, the particle production is negligible. In the minimal coupling case, for massive particles, the results point to the same physical conclusion within observational constraints: particle production is most important at the bounce energy scale, and it is not sensitive neither to its mass nor whether there is dust in the background model. The only caveat is the case wh...

  11. Lectures on the new particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-18

    An attempt is made to discuss systematics of new particles and their spectroscopy in a simple manner. The main emphasis is on charm and SU(4), weak decays of charmed mesons, hadronic masses, and charmonium. (SDF)

  12. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Dubbers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case, and we present analytical point spread functions (PSF for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The “magnetic” PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests.

  13. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  14. Elementary Particles A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FranciscoMartnezFlores.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is shown the inexistence of neutrinos to define precisely the concept of relativistics mass under this scheme to elementarys particles as electron and interactions particles like photons correspond an electromagnetic and virtual mass. Nucleons protons and neutrons have real or inertial mass for being composite particles since inertia needs structure it is provided by an interactive network originated by strong and weak forces. This mass is building up atoms and all the material world under Classical Physics and Chemistrys laws.These actual masses may be considered as electromagnetic and virtual one thanks to its charge in order to establish the high energies level needed to obtain all particles physics elementary or not which are governed by the laws of Quantum Physics. With all this one may set up amore reasonable and understandable new Standard Model which being projected into Cosmological Model can get rid of some inconsistencies and concepts difficult to be admitted.

  15. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, S

    2009-01-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. ...

  16. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  17. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  18. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed [Breznay et al., PNAS 113, 280 (2016)] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the metallic phase discovered earlier [Mason and Kapitulnik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999)] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically-neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to an (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not requir...

  19. Study of heavy flavored particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, Bijan

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses progress on the following topics: time-of- flight system; charmed baryon production and decays; D decays to baryons; measurement of sigma plus particles magnetic moments; and strong interaction coupling. (LSP)

  20. Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Prosper, Harrison B

    2015-01-01

    These lectures introduce the basic ideas and practices of statistical analysis for particle physicists, using a real-world example to illustrate how the abstractions on which statistics is based are translated into practical application.

  1. Lunar Soil Particle Separator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Soil Particle Separator (LSPS) is an innovative method to beneficiate soil prior to in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The LSPS improves ISRU oxygen...

  2. Lunar Soil Particle Separator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Soil Particle Separator (LSPS) is an innovative method to beneficiate soil prior to in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The LSPS can improve ISRU oxygen...

  3. Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

  4. UA1: Z particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    A colour treated picture of the computer reconstruction of the real particle tracks emerging from a high energy proton-antiproton collision recorded in the UA1 detector at the SPS (converted to act as a collider). This picture shows the production of a Z particle that has decayed into a high energy electron and positron flying off in opposite directions (in yellow). The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  5. Particle creation in bouncing cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Diogo C. F.; Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate scalar particle creation in a set of bouncing models where the bounce occurs due to quantum cosmological effects described by the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The scalar field can be either conformally or minimally coupled to gravity, and it can be massive or massless, without self-interaction. The analysis is made for models containing a single radiation fluid and for the more realistic case of models containing the usual observed radiation and dust fluids, which can fit most of the observed features of our universe, including an almost scale invariant power spectrum of scalar cosmological perturbations. In the conformal coupling case, the particle production is negligible. In the minimal coupling case, for massive particles, the results point to the same physical conclusion within observational constraints: particle production is most important at the bounce energy scale, and it is not sensitive either to its mass or to whether there is dust in the background model. The only caveat is the case where the particle mass is larger than the bounce energy scale. On the other hand, the energy density of produced massive particles depend on their masses and the energy scale of the bounce. For very large masses and deep bounces, this energy density may overcome that of the background. In the case of massless particles, the energy density of produced particles can become comparable to the background energy density only for bounces occurring at energy scales comparable to the Planck scale or above, which lies beyond the scope of this paper: we expect that the simple Wheeler-DeWitt approach we are using should be valid only at scales a few orders of magnitude below the Planck energy. Nevertheless, in the case in which dust is present, there is an infrared divergence, which becomes important only for scales much larger than today's Hubble radius.

  6. Boson/Fermion Janus Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamically, bosons and fermions differ by their statistics only. A general entropy functional is proposed by superposition of entropic terms, typical for different quantum gases. The statistical properties of the corresponding Janus particles are derived by variation of the weight of the boson/fermion fraction. It is shown that di-bosons and anti-fermions separate in gas and liquid phases, while three-phase equilibrium appears for poly-boson/fermion Janus particles.

  7. Microfluidics - Sorting particles with light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter.......Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter....

  8. The Cosmology - Particle Physics Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Trodden, Mark(Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States)

    2006-01-01

    Modern cosmology poses deep and unavoidable questions for fundamental physics. In this plenary talk, delivered in slightly different forms at the {\\it Particles and Nuclei International Conference} (PANIC05) in Santa Fe, in October 2005, and at the {\\it CMB and Physics of the Early Universe International Conference}, on the island of Ischia, Italy, in April 2006, I discuss the broad connections between cosmology and particle physics, focusing on physics at the TeV scale, accessible at the nex...

  9. Transport methods for energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuHong-Lu; YangChui-Hsu

    1997-01-01

    In order to estimate radiation risk assessment for astronaut's radiation safety in space activities.transport codes for high energy particles have been created.Two of the transport methods,perturbation and Green function methods,for high energy particles are reviewed in this paper,and some of the calculated results with the perturbation method are presented.Finally,the low energy transport in the regard of the biological effects by low energy ions in also briefly discussed.

  10. UA1: W particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of the W particle in the UA1 detector from the October-December 1982 run of the proton-antiproton collider, producing a high transverse energy electron (arrowed). This particle is produced back-to-back with 'missing energy', indicative of the emission of an invisible neutrino. The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  11. Hybrid particles and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V; Rodriguez, Rene; Pak, Joshua J; Sun, Chivin

    2015-02-10

    Hybrid particles that comprise a coating surrounding a chalcopyrite material, the coating comprising a metal, a semiconductive material, or a polymer; a core comprising a chalcopyrite material and a shell comprising a functionalized chalcopyrite material, the shell enveloping the core; or a reaction product of a chalcopyrite material and at least one of a reagent, heat, and radiation. Methods of forming the hybrid particles are also disclosed.

  12. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter. As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across. It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Surgical smoke and ultrafine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Dennis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrocautery, laser tissue ablation, and ultrasonic scalpel tissue dissection all generate a 'surgical smoke' containing ultrafine ( Methods To measure the amount of generated particulates in 'surgical smoke' during different surgical procedures and to quantify the particle number concentration for operation room personnel a condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Inc. was applied. Results Electro-cauterization and argon plasma tissue coagulation induced the production of very high number concentration (> 100000 cm-3 of particles in the diameter range of 10 nm to 1 μm. The peak concentration was confined to the immediate local surrounding of the production side. In the presence of a very efficient air conditioning system the increment and decrement of ultrafine particle occurrence was a matter of seconds, with accumulation of lower particle number concentrations in the operation room for only a few minutes. Conclusion Our investigation showed a short term very high exposure to ultrafine particles for surgeons and close assisting operating personnel – alternating with longer periods of low exposure.

  14. Hot Particles Attract in a Cold Bath

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Controlling interactions out of thermodynamic equilibrium is crucial for designing addressable and functional self-organizing structures. These active interactions also underpin collective behavior in biological systems. Here we study a general setting of active particles in a bath of passive particles, and demonstrate a novel mechanism for long ranged attraction between active particles. The mechanism operates when the translational persistence length of the active particle motion is smaller than the particle diameter. In this limit, the system reduces to particles of higher diffusivity ("hot" particles) in a bath of particles with lower diffusivity ("cold" particles). This attractive interaction arises as a hot particle pushes cold particles away to create a large hole around itself, and the holes interact via a depletion-like attraction even though all particles have the same size. Although the mechanism occurs outside the parameter range of typical biological organisms, the mechanism could be realized in ...

  15. Open statistical issues in particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Many statistical issues arise in the analysis of Particle Physics experiments. We give a brief introduction to Particle Physics, before describing the techniques used by Particle Physicists for dealing with statistical problems, and also some of the open statistical questions.

  16. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  17. Fractal aggregation and breakup of fine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakup may exert a controlling influence on particle size distributions and particles either are fractured or are eroded particle-by-particle through shear. The shear-induced breakage of fine particles in turbulent conditions is investigated using Taylor-expansion moment method. Their equations have been derived in continuous form in terms of the number density function with particle volume. It suitable for future implementation in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

  18. Particles in water properties and processes

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, John

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Particles in the Aquatic Environment Colloidal Aspects PARTICLE SIZE AND RELATED PROPERTIES Particle Size and Shape Particle Size Distributions Particle Transport Light Scattering and Turbidity Measurement of Particle Size SURFACE CHARGE Origin of Surface Charge The Electrical Double Layer Electrokinetic Phenomena COLLOID INTERACTIONS AND COLLOID STABILITY Colloid Interactions - General Concepts van der Waals Interaction Electrical Double Layer Interaction Combined Interaction - DLVO Theory Non-DLVO Interactions AGGREGATION KINETICS Collision Frequency - Smoluchow

  19. Particle description of zero energy vacuum; 1, Virtual particles

    CERN Document Server

    Grandpeix, J Y

    2002-01-01

    First the "frame problem" is sketched: the motion of an isolated particle obeys a simple law in galilean frames, but how does the galilean character of the frame manifest itself at the place of the particle? A description of vacuum as a system of virtual particles will help to answer this question. For future application to such a description, the notion of global particle is defined and studied. To this end, a systematic use of the Fourier transformation on the Poincare group is needed. The state of a system of n free particles is represented by a statistical operator W, which defines an operator-valued measure on the n-th power of the dual of the Poincare group. The inverse Fourier-Stieltjes transform of that measure is called the characteristic function of the system; it is a function on the n-th power of the Poincare group. The main notion is that of global characteristic function: it is the restriction of the characteristic function to the diagonal subgroup ; it represents the state of the system, consid...

  20. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  1. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    We have shown that high concentrations of fine particles of the order of 2-7x10{sup -7} particles per cm{sup 3} are being formed in all the combustion units studied. There was a higher difference between the units in terms of particle mass concentrations. While the largest differences was found for gas-phase constituents (CO and THC) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In 5 out of 7 studied units, multi-cyclones were the only measure for flue-gas separation. The multicyclones had negligible effect on the particle number concentration and a small effect on the mass of particles smaller than 5 {mu}m. The separation efficiency was much higher for the electrostatic precipitators. The boiler load had a dramatic influence on the coarse mode concentration during combustion of forest residue. PM0.8-6 increased from below 5 mg/m{sup 3} to above 50 mg/m{sup 3} even at a moderate change in boiler load from medium to high. A similar but less pronounced trend was found during combustion of dry wood. PM0.8-PM6 increased from 12 to 23 mg/m{sup 3} when the load was changed from low to high. When increasing the load, the primary airflow taken through the grate is increased; this itself may lead to a higher potential of the air stream to carry coarse particles away from the combustion zone. Measurements with APS-instrument with higher time-resolution showed a corresponding increase in coarse mode number concentration with load. Additional factor influencing observed higher concentration of coarse mode during combustion of forest residues, could be relatively high ash content in this type of fuel (2.2 %) in comparison to dry wood (0.3 %) and pellets (0.5 %). With increasing load we also found a decrease in PM1 during combustion of forest residue. Whether this is caused by scavenging of volatilized material by the high coarse mode concentration or a result of a different amount of volatilized material available for formation of fine particles needs to be shown in future studies. The

  2. Electrostatic particle collection in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Damit, Brian; Wu, Chang-Yu; Sorloaica-Hickman, Nicoleta

    2011-09-01

    Lunar grains accumulate charges due to solar-based ionizing radiations, and the repelling action of like-charged particles causes the levitation of lunar dust. The lunar dust deposit on sensitive and costly surfaces of investigative equipment is a serious concern in lunar explorations. Inspired by electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), the Electrostatic Lunar Dust Collector (ELDC) was proposed for collecting already charged lunar dust particles to prevent the lunar dust threat. As the conditions for terrestrial counterparts are not valid in the lunar environment, equations developed for terrestrial devices yield incorrect predictions in lunar application. Hence, a mathematical model was developed for the ELDC operating in vacuum to determine its collection efficiency. The ratios of electrical energy over potential energy, kinetic energy over potential energy and the ratio of ELDC dimensions were identified to be the key dimensionless parameters. Sensitivity analyses of the relevant parameters showed that depending on ELDC orientation, smaller particles would be collected more easily at vertical orientation, whereas larger particles were easier to collect in a horizontal ELDC configuration. In the worst case scenario, the electrostatic field needed to be 10 times stronger in the vertical mode in order to adequately collect larger particles. The collection efficiency was very sensitive to surface potential of lunar dust and it reached the maximum when surface potential was between 30 and 120 V. Except for regions of the lunar day side with surface potential close to zero, providing 1 kV ( E = 20 kV m -1) with the ELDC was more than enough for collecting all the particles in the most critical orientation. The needed field strength was about 4000 times less than that for repelling 1-μm size particles already settled on the surfaces. The analysis shows that the ELDC offers a viable solution for lunar dust control due to its effectiveness, ease of cleaning and low voltage

  3. Schwarzschild black hole as particle accelerator of spinning particles

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavskii, O B

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that in the Schwarzschild background there exists direct counterpart of the Ba\\~{n}ados-Silk-West effect for spinning particles. This means that if two particles collide near the black hole horizon, their energy in the centre of mass frame can grow unbound. In doing so, the crucial role is played by so-called near-critical trajectories when particle's parameters are almost fine-tuned. Direct scenario of the collision under discussion is possible with restriction on the energy-to-mass ratio \\thinspace $E/m<\\frac{1}{2\\sqrt{3}}$ only. However, if one takes into account multiple scattering, this becomes possible for $E\\geq m$ as well.

  4. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, T.; Gaume, R.; Wisdom, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    Laser driven particle accelerators require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise electron-beam guiding so fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such next generation machines. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003[1] but with a variety of complications on the laser side. However, fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss the advantages such as the range of materials available and ways to implement them followed by some different test examples we been considered. One important goal is an integrated system that avoids having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  5. Neutral particle behaviour and particle confinement studies in Heliotron E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Matsuo, K.; Akazaki, M.; Maeda, M.; Sudo, S.; Kondo, K.; Motojima, O.; Sano, F.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of neutral-hydrogen density by laser fluorescence spectroscopy on Heliotron E revealed the anisotropy of its distribution in the poloidal cross section and the dependence of the anisotropy on the average electron density for the first time. This indicates the relative importance of the recycling of charged particles localized at divertor traces and that of charge-exchanged neutrals distributed over a surface. These results are used to calculate the global particle confinement time, which is to be correlated with the measurements of H/sub /alpha// emission intensity and the electron density fluctuations, the initial results of which are also shown. (orig.).

  6. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  7. Diffusion of active chiral particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Francisco J.

    2016-12-01

    The diffusion of chiral active Brownian particles in three-dimensional space is studied analytically, by consideration of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density of finding a particle at position x and moving along the direction v ̂ at time t , and numerically, by the use of Langevin dynamics simulations. The analysis is focused on the marginal probability density of finding a particle at a given location and at a given time (independently of its direction of motion), which is found from an infinite hierarchy of differential-recurrence relations for the coefficients that appear in the multipole expansion of the probability distribution, which contains the whole kinematic information. This approach allows the explicit calculation of the time dependence of the mean-squared displacement and the time dependence of the kurtosis of the marginal probability distribution, quantities from which the effective diffusion coefficient and the "shape" of the positions distribution are examined. Oscillations between two characteristic values were found in the time evolution of the kurtosis, namely, between the value that corresponds to a Gaussian and the one that corresponds to a distribution of spherical shell shape. In the case of an ensemble of particles, each one rotating around a uniformly distributed random axis, evidence is found of the so-called effect "anomalous, yet Brownian, diffusion," for which particles follow a non-Gaussian distribution for the positions yet the mean-squared displacement is a linear function of time.

  8. Extracting entanglement from identical particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, N; Cramer, M; Plenio, M B

    2014-04-18

    Identical particles and entanglement are both fundamental components of quantum mechanics. However, when identical particles are condensed in a single spatial mode, the standard notions of entanglement, based on clearly identifiable subsystems, break down. This has led many to conclude that such systems have limited value for quantum information tasks, compared to distinguishable particle systems. To the contrary, we show that any entanglement formally appearing amongst the identical particles, including entanglement due purely to symmetrization, can be extracted into an entangled state of independent modes, which can then be applied to any task. In fact, the entanglement of the mode system is in one-to-one correspondence with the entanglement between the inaccessible identical particles. This settles the long-standing debate about the resource capabilities of such states, in particular spin-squeezed states of Bose-Einstein condensates, while also revealing a new perspective on how and when entanglement is generated in passive optical networks. Our results thus reveal new fundamental connections between entanglement, squeezing, and indistinguishability.

  9. Electrophoresis of diffuse soft particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2006-04-11

    A theory is presented for the electrophoresis of diffuse soft particles in a steady dc electric field. The particles investigated consist of an uncharged impenetrable core and a charged diffuse polyelectrolytic shell, which is to some extent permeable to ions and solvent molecules. The diffuse character of the shell is defined by a gradual distribution of the density of polymer segments in the interspatial region separating the core from the bulk electrolyte solution. The hydrodynamic impact of the polymer chains on the electrophoretic motion of the particle is accounted for by a distribution of Stokes resistance centers. The numerical treatment of the electrostatics includes the possibility of partial dissociation of the hydrodynamically immobile ionogenic groups distributed throughout the shell as well as specific interaction between those sites with ions from the background electrolyte other than charge-determining ions. Electrophoretic mobilities are computed on the basis of an original numerical scheme allowing rigorous evaluation of the governing transport and electrostatic equations derived following the strategy reported by Ohshima, albeit within the restricted context of a discontinuous chain distribution. Attention is particularly paid to the influence of the type of distribution adopted on the electrophoretic mobility of the particle as a function of its size, charge, degree of permeability, and solution composition. The results are systematically compared with those obtained with a discontinuous representation of the interface. The theory constitutes a basis for interpreting electrophoretic mobilities of heterogeneous systems such as environmental or biological colloids or swollen/deswollen microgel particles.

  10. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  11. Isolation of technogenic magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catinon, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.catinon@gmail.com [Laboratoire LECA, UMR 5553, Equipe Pollution, Environnement, Ecotoxicologie et Ecoremédiation, Univ. J. Fourier, 38041 Grenoble (France); Ayrault, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.ayrault@lsce.ispl.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, UMR 8212, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ/IPSL, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Boudouma, Omar, E-mail: boudouma@ccr.jussieu.fr [Service du MEB, UFR928, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris VI (France); Bordier, Louise, E-mail: Louise.Bordier@lsce.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, UMR 8212, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ/IPSL, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Agnello, Gregory, E-mail: contact@evinrude.fr [Evinrude, Espace St Germain, 38200 Vienne (France); Reynaud, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.reynaud@ujf-grenoble.fr [Laboratoire LECA, UMR 5553, Equipe Pollution, Environnement, Ecotoxicologie et Ecoremédiation, Univ. J. Fourier, 38041 Grenoble (France); Tissut, Michel, E-mail: michel.tissut@ujf-grenoble.fr [Laboratoire LECA, UMR 5553, Equipe Pollution, Environnement, Ecotoxicologie et Ecoremédiation, Univ. J. Fourier, 38041 Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-01

    Technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) emitted by various industrial sources, such as smelting plants, end up after atmospheric transfer on the soil surface. In the present study, we characterised the origin and composition of such particles emitted by a large iron smelting plant and deposited on particular substrates, namely tombstones, which act as a very interesting and appropriate matrix when compared to soil, tree bark, lichens or attic dust. The isolation and subsequent description of TMPs require a critical step of separation between different components of the sample and the magnetic particles; here, we described an efficient protocol that fulfils such a requirement: it resorts to water suspension, sonication, repeated magnetic extraction, sedimentation, sieving and organic matter destruction at 550 °C in some instances. The isolated TMPs displayed a noticeable crystalline shape with variable compositions: a) pure iron oxides, b) iron + Cr, Ni or Zn, and c) a complex structure containing Ca, Si, Mg, and Mn. Using Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM–EDX), we obtained profiles of various and distinct magnetic particles, which allowed us to identify the source of the TMPs. - Highlights: • The developed method offers a low-cost approach of large-scale dry deposition. • Tombstones are excellent supports for sampling these atmospheric deposits. • Smelted elements crystallise after cooling, giving typical technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs). • Coupling microscopic and bulk analyses allows identifying TMP origin. • Magnetic TMPs issued from steel industry were separated by a new technique.

  12. Particle cosmology comes of age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.

    1987-12-01

    The application of modern ideas in particle physics to astrophysical and cosmological settings is a continuation of a fruitful tradition in astrophysics which began with the application of atomic physics, and then nuclear physics. In the past decade particle cosmology and particle astrophysics have been recognized as 'legitimate activities' by both particle physicists and astrophysicists and astronomers. During this time there has been a high level of theoretical activity producing much speculation about the earliest history of the Universe, as well as important and interesting astrophysical and cosmological constraints to particle physics theories. This period of intense theoretical activity has produced a number of ideas most worthy of careful consideration and scrutiny, and even more importantly, amenable to experimental/observational test. Among the ideas which are likely to be tested in the next decade are: the cosmological bound to the number of neutrino flavors, inflation, relic WIMPs as the dark matter, and MSW neutrino oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problems. 94 refs.

  13. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  14. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  15. The Accurate Particle Tracer Code

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The Accurate Particle Tracer (APT) code is designed for large-scale particle simulations on dynamical systems. Based on a large variety of advanced geometric algorithms, APT possesses long-term numerical accuracy and stability, which are critical for solving multi-scale and non-linear problems. Under the well-designed integrated and modularized framework, APT serves as a universal platform for researchers from different fields, such as plasma physics, accelerator physics, space science, fusion energy research, computational mathematics, software engineering, and high-performance computation. The APT code consists of seven main modules, including the I/O module, the initialization module, the particle pusher module, the parallelization module, the field configuration module, the external force-field module, and the extendible module. The I/O module, supported by Lua and Hdf5 projects, provides a user-friendly interface for both numerical simulation and data analysis. A series of new geometric numerical methods...

  16. Particle Systems and PDEs II

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Ana

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on mathematical problems concerning different applications in physics, engineering, chemistry and biology. It covers topics ranging from interacting particle systems to partial differential equations (PDEs), statistical mechanics and dynamical systems. The purpose of the second meeting on Particle Systems and PDEs was to bring together renowned researchers working actively in the respective fields, to discuss their topics of expertise and to present recent scientific results in both areas. Further, the meeting was intended to present the subject of interacting particle systems, its roots in and impacts on the field of physics, and its relation with PDEs to a vast and varied public, including young researchers. The book also includes the notes from two mini-courses presented at the conference, allowing readers who are less familiar with these areas of mathematics to more easily approach them. The contributions will be of interest to mathematicians, theoretical physicists and other researchers...

  17. Particle identification using clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, R; Löher, B; Savran, D; Silva, J; Pol, H Álvarez; Gil, D Cortina; Pietras, B; Bloch, T; Kröll, T; Nácher, E; Perea, Á; Tengblad, O; Bendel, M; Dierigl, M; Gernhäuser, R; Bleis, T Le; Winkel, M

    2013-01-01

    A method that uses fuzzy clustering algorithms to achieve particle identification based on pulse shape analysis is presented. The fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is used to compute mean (principal) pulse shapes induced by different particle species in an automatic and unsupervised fashion from a mixed set of data. A discrimination amplitude is proposed using these principal pulse shapes to identify the originating particle species of a detector pulse. Since this method does not make any assumptions about the specific features of the pulse shapes, it is very generic and suitable for multiple types of detectors. The method is applied to discriminate between photon- and proton-induced signals in CsI(Tl) scintillator detectors and the results are compared to the well-known integration method.

  18. QCD Radiation off Heavy Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Norrbin, E

    2001-01-01

    We study QCD radiation in decay processes involving heavy particles. As input, the first-order gluon emission rate is calculated in a number of reactions, and comparisons of the energy flow patterns show a non-negligible process dependence. To proceed further, the QCD parton shower language offers a convenient approach to include multi-gluon emission effects, and to describe exclusive event properties. An existing shower algorithm is extended to take into account the process-dependent mass, spin and parity effects, as given by the matrix element calculations. This allows an improved description of multiple gluon emission effects off b and t quarks, and also off nonstandard particles like squarks and gluinos. Phenomenological applications are presented for bottom production at LEP, Higgs particle decay to heavy flavours, top production and decay at linear colliders, and some simple supersymmetric processes.

  19. Characterization of monazite dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Juliao, Ligia; Santos, Maristela; Fernandes, Paulo; BBusch, Miliane; Nascimento, Sheila; Sousa, Wanderson [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: kenya@ird.gov.br; Pedrero, Zoyne; Leite, Carlos V. Barros [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cvbl@vdg.puc-rio.br

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate exposure of inhabitant of high background area to monazite airborne particles. The main deposit of mineral sands and the most important mineral processed plant is located in Buena village, a seashore village in the North of Rio de Janeiro state. The Buena inhabitants (about 300 persons) live around the plant. People living in regions with high concentration of monazite can be contaminated by ingestion of local foodstuff and inhalation of monazite airborne particles containing thorium. The elemental mass concentration, {sup 232} Th, {sup 228} Th and {sup 228} Ra concentrations in the respirable fraction of aerosols, MMAD (Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter) of airborne particles and {sup 232} Th, {sup 228} Th and {sup 228}Ra concentrations in feces samples of the Buena village inhabitant were determined. (author)

  20. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  1. Dispersion relations for unphysical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Generalized dispersion relations are discussed for unphysical particles, e.g. confined degrees of freedom that are not present in the physical spectra but can give rise to observable bound states. While in general the propagator of the unphysical particles can have complex poles and cannot be reconstructed from the knowledge of the imaginary part, under reasonable assumptions the missing piece of information is shown to be in the rational function that contains the poles and must be added to the integral representation. For pure Yang-Mills theory, the rational part and the spectral term are identified in the explicit analytical expressions provided by the massive expansion of the gluon propagator. The multi particle spectral term turns out to be very small and the simple rational part provides, from first principles, an approximate propagator that is equivalent to the tree-level result of simple phenomenological models like the refined Gribov-Zwanziger model.

  2. Dipsersion relations for unphysical particles

    CERN Document Server

    Siringo, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Generalized dispersion relations are discussed for unphysical particles, e.g. confined degrees of freedom that are not present in the physical spectra but can give rise to observable bound states. While in general the propagator of the unphysical particles can have complex poles and cannot be reconstructed from the knowledge of the imaginary part, under reasonable assumptions the missing piece of information is shown to be in the rational function that contains the poles and must be added to the integral representation. For pure Yang-Mills theory, the rational part and the spectral term are identified in the explicit analytical expressions provided by the massive expansion of the gluon propagator. The multi particle spectral term turns out to be very small and the simple rational part provides, from first principles, an approximate propagator that is equivalent to the tree-level result of simple phenomenological models like the refined Gribov-Zwanziger model.

  3. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  4. Microscopic Simulation of Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Heinrich

    Detailed computer simulations are indispensable tools for the development and optimization of modern particle detectors. The interaction of particles with the sensitive medium, giving rise to ionization or excitation of atoms, is stochastic by its nature. The transport of the resulting photons and charge carriers, which eventually generate the observed signal, is also subject to statistical fluctuations. Together with the readout electronics, these processes - which are ultimately governed by the atomic cross-sections for the respective interactions - pose a fundamental limit to the achievable detector performance. Conventional methods for calculating electron drift lines based on macroscopic transport coefficients used to provide an adequate description for traditional gas-based particle detectors such as wire chambers. However, they are not suitable for small-scale devices such as micropattern gas detectors, which have significantly gained importance in recent years. In this thesis, a novel approach, bas...

  5. Brownian motion of interacting particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerson, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    Guided by the descriptions which are used to describe noninteracting particles, it is argued that the generalized Smoluchowski equation, including the hydrodynamic interaction and corrections for ion cloud effects may be used to describe interacting particles for the temporal and spatial regimes probed by light beating spectroscopy. This equation is then used to find cumulants of decay of the intermediate scattering function. The generalized Smoluchowski equation is reduced to a simple diffusion equation. The resulting diffusion constant depends upon the interparticle forces and is reminiscent of some early descriptions for interacting systems. The generalized Smoluchowski equation is solved for the model system of a linear chain of colloidal particles interacting via nearest neighbor harmonic couplings. The results for the intermediate scattering function and the static structure factor are very reminiscent of corresponding measurements made for interacting colloidal systems. (GHT)

  6. On the Possible Trajectories of Spinning Particles. I. Free Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tarakanov, Alexander N

    2015-01-01

    By means of the method of moving Frenet-Serret frame the set of equations of motion is derived for spinning particle in an arbitrary external field, which is determined by potential depending from both position and the state of movement, as well as by two pseudo-vectors one of which is easily associated with external magnetic field, and another still remains undetermined. The equations give a possibility to describe the motion of both massive and massless particles with spin. All solutions of the equations of motion in the absence of external fields were found, and besides, we give more precise definition of a free object. It turns out that the massive particles always possess a longitudinal polarization. There are possible transversal motions of the following types: 1) oscillatory motion with proper frequency, 2) circular motion, and 3) complicated motion along rosette trajectories round the center of inertia with the velocity, varying in finite limits. Free massless particles can either fluctuate or move al...

  7. An investigation of particles suspension using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazouki, Arman; Negrut, Dan

    2013-11-01

    This contribution outlines a method for the direct numerical simulation of rigid body suspensions in a Lagrangian-Lagrangian framework using extended Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (XSPH) method. The dynamics of the arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies is fully resolved via Boundary Condition Enforcing (BCE) markers and updated according to the general Newton-Euler equations of motion. The simulation tool, refered to herien as Chrono::Fluid, relies on a parallel implementation that runs on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards. The simulation results obtained for transient Poiseuille flow, migration of cylinder and sphere in Poiseuille flow, and distribution of particles at different cross sections of the laminar flow of dilute suspension were respectively within 0.1%, 1%, and 5% confidence interval of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It was shown that at low Reynolds number, Re = O(1), the radial migration (a) behaves non-monotonically as the particles relative distance (distance over diameter) increases from zero to two; and (b) decreases as the particle skewness and size increases. The scaling of Chrono::Fluid was demonstrated in conjunction with a suspension dynamics analysis in which the number of ellipsoids went up to 3e4. Financial support was provided in part by National Science Foundation grant NSF CMMI-084044.

  8. Novel particles or novel properties?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D.; Wolfendale, A.W

    1999-03-01

    There are several phenomena observed in cosmic rays which are still awaiting explanation. All of them have one common feature: they need an object which penetrates deep into the atmosphere. Two possibilities arise: either we are dealing with novel particles or known particles have novel properties. We prefer the latter and we suggest that the penetrating objects could be the fragments of heavy primary nuclei which acquire a high spin and a deformed shape after the first interaction. Exotic phenomena observed in high energy interactions, such as Centauro, aligned events, multiple photon emission and young atmospheric showers etc., can be explained within the framework of this picture.

  9. Nuclear physics and particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, G.

    2016-05-01

    The use of charged particles and nuclei in cancer therapy is one of the most successful cases of application of nuclear physics to medicine. The physical advantages in terms of precision and selectivity, combined with the biological properties of densely ionizing radiation, make charged particle approach an elective choice in a number of cases. Hadron therapy is in continuous development and nuclear physicists can give important contributions to this discipline. In this work some of the relevant aspects in nuclear physics will be reviewed, summarizing the most important directions of research and development.

  10. Research on particle imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Much instrumentation has been developed for imaging the trajectories of elementary particles produced in high energy collisions. Since 1968, gaseous detectors, beginning with multiwire chambers and drift chambers, have been used for the visualisation of particle trajectories and the imaging of X-rays, neutrons, hard gamma rays, beta rays and ultraviolet photons. This book commemorates the groundbreaking research leading to the evolution of such detectors carried out at CERN by Georges Charpak, Nobel Prizewinner for Physics in 1992. Besides collecting his key papers, the book also includes original linking commentary which sets his work in the context of other worldwide research.

  11. Nuclear physics and particle therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battistoni G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particles and nuclei in cancer therapy is one of the most successful cases of application of nuclear physics to medicine. The physical advantages in terms of precision and selectivity, combined with the biological properties of densely ionizing radiation, make charged particle approach an elective choice in a number of cases. Hadron therapy is in continuous development and nuclear physicists can give important contributions to this discipline. In this work some of the relevant aspects in nuclear physics will be reviewed, summarizing the most important directions of research and development.

  12. Frontiers of particle beam physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-11-01

    First, a review is given of various highly-developed techniques for particle handling which are, nevertheless, being vigorously advanced at the present time. These include soft superconductor radio frequency cavities, hard superconductor magnets, cooling rings for ions and anti-protons, and damping rings for electrons. Second, attention is focused upon novel devices for particle generation, acceleration, and focusing. These include relativistic klystrons and free electron laser power sources, binary power multipliers, photocathodes, switched-power linacs, plasma beat-wave accelerators, plasma wake-field accelerators, plasma lenses, plasma adiabatic focusers and plasma compensators. 12 refs.

  13. The Cosmology - Particle Physics Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Trodden, M

    2006-01-01

    Modern cosmology poses deep and unavoidable questions for fundamental physics. In this plenary talk, delivered in slightly different forms at the {\\it Particles and Nuclei International Conference} (PANIC05) in Santa Fe, in October 2005, and at the {\\it CMB and Physics of the Early Universe International Conference}, on the island of Ischia, Italy, in April 2006, I discuss the broad connections between cosmology and particle physics, focusing on physics at the TeV scale, accessible at the next and future generations of colliders

  14. BMS Particles in Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Oblak, Blagoje

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the group-theoretic aspects of three-dimensional quantum gravity on Anti-de Sitter and Minkowskian backgrounds. In particular we describe the relation between unitary representations of asymptotic symmetry groups and gravitational perturbations around a space-time metric. In the asymptotically flat case this leads to "BMS particles", representing standard relativistic particles dressed with gravitational degrees of freedom accounted for by coadjoint orbits of the Virasoro group. Their thermodynamics are described by BMS characters, which coincide with gravitational one-loop partition functions. We also extend these considerations to higher-spin theories and supergravity.

  15. Semiflexible particles in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Medillo, VI; Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-12-01

    The Lagrangian dynamics of semiflexible particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows is studied by means of analytically solvable stochastic models and direct numerical simulations. The stationary statistics of the bending angle shows a strong dependence on the dimension of the flow. In two-dimensional turbulence, particles are found in either a fully extended or a fully folded configuration; in three dimensions, the predominant configuration is the fully extended one. Such a sensitivity of the bending statistics on the dimensionality of the flow is peculiar to fluctuating flows and is not observed in laminar stretching flows.

  16. Particle propagation in cosmological backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We study the quantum propagation of particles in cosmological backgrounds, by considering a doublet of massive scalar fields propagating in an expanding universe, possibly filled with radiation. We focus on the dissipative effects related to the expansion rate. At first order, we recover the expected result that the decay rate is determined by the local temperature. Beyond linear order, the decay rate has an additional contribution governed by the expansion parameter. This latter contribution is present even for stable particles in the vacuum. Finally, we analyze the long time behaviour of the propagator and briefly discuss applications to the trans-Planckian question.

  17. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  18. Particle transport in 3He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hada

    Full Text Available Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths lW - P are calculated using the measured wave intensities, polarizations, and k directions. The values of lW - P are found to be ~ 5 times less than the value of lHe , the latter derived from He intensity and anisotropy time profiles. It is demonstrated by computer simulation that scattering rates through a 90° pitch angle are lower than that of other pitch angles, and that this is a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the lW - P and lHe values. At this time the scattering mechanism(s is unknown. We suggest a means where a direct comparison between the two l values could be made. Computer simulations indicate that although scattering through 90° is lower, it still occurs. Possibilities are either large pitch angle scattering through resonant interactions, or particle mirroring off of field compression regions. The largest solar proton events are analyzed to investigate the possibilities of local wave generation at 1 AU. In accordance with the results of a previous calculation (Gary et al., 1985 of beam stability, proton beams at 1 AU are found to be marginally stable. No evidence for substantial wave amplitude was found. Locally generated waves, if present, were less than 10-3 nT 2 Hz-1 at the leading

  19. Gravitational waves and spinning test particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, M

    2000-01-01

    The motion of a classical spinning test particle in the field of a weak plane gravitational wave is studied. It is found that the characteristic dimensions of the particle's orbit is sensitive to the ratio of the spin to the mass of the particle. The results are compared with the corresponding motion of a particle without spin.

  20. The role of particle-particle interactions in bubbling gas-fluidized beds of Geldart A particles: A discrete particle study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Junwu; Hoef, van der M.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Discrete particle simulations are by now well established as an effective tool to study the mechanics of complex gas-solid flows in gas-fluidized beds. In this study, a state-of-the-art discrete particle model is used to explore the role of particle-particle interactions in bubbling gas-fluidized be

  1. Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3776 Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC; pictured in Appendix A) is designed for researchers interested in airborne particles smaller than 20 nm. With sensitivity to particles down to 2.5 nm in diameter, this UCPC is ideally suited for atmospheric and climate research, particle formation and growth studies, combustion and engine exhaust research, and nanotechnology research.

  2. Electromagnetic Radiation and Motion of Real Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    2000-01-01

    Relativistically covariant equation of motion for real dust particle under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived. The particle is neutral in charge. Equation of motion is expressed in terms of particle's optical properties, standardly used in optics for stationary particles.

  3. Method of identifying defective particle coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark E.; Whiting, Carlton D.

    1986-01-01

    A method for identifying coated particles having defective coatings desig to retain therewithin a build-up of gaseous materials including: (a) Pulling a vacuum on the particles; (b) Backfilling the particles at atmospheric pressure with a liquid capable of wetting the exterior surface of the coated particles, said liquid being a compound which includes an element having an atomic number higher than the highest atomic number of any element in the composition which forms the exterior surface of the particle coating; (c) Drying the particles; and (d) Radiographing the particles. By television monitoring, examination of the radiographs is substantially enhanced.

  4. Particle astronomy and particle physics from the moon - The particle observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Promising experiments from the moon using particle detectors are discussed, noting the advantage of the large flux collecting power Pc offered by the remote, stable environment of a lunar base. An observatory class of particle experiments is presented, based upon proposals at NASA's recent Stanford workshop. They vary from neutrino astronomy, particle astrophysics, and cosmic ray experiments to space physics and fundamental physics experiments such as proton decay and 'table-top' arrays. This research is background-limited on earth, and it is awkward and unrealistic in earth orbit, but is particularly suited for the moon where Pc can be quite large and the instrumentation is not subject to atmospheric erosion as it is (for large t) in low earth orbit.

  5. Hygroscopic properties of Diesel engine soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Burtscher, H. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    The hygroscopic properties of combustion particles, freshly emitted from a Diesel engine were investigated. It was found that these particles start to grow by water condensation at a relative humidity (RH)>80%. The hygroscopicity of these particles was enhanced when the sulfur content of the fuel was increased or when the particles were artificially aged (i.e. particles were subjected to an ozone or UV pre-treatment). (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  6. Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, C. J. Solano; Hurtado, K.; Romero, C.

    2009-04-01

    This is a short review of Particle Physics and the most widely accepted theory, the Standard Model, with its questions and limitations. We also show a quick review of some of te theories beyonf the Standard Model. It is based in the introductory talk given the Third School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics held in Arequipa, Peru.

  7. Summer School on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the school is to give a detailed overview of particle physics from the basics of Standard Model phenomenology to the most important areas where significant progress has been achieved recently. This year the school will cover both the energy and the intensity frontiers, including lectures on experimental techniques for small scale experiments and on formal developments in quantum field theory.

  8. Glimpses of the god particle?

    CERN Multimedia

    Anantyaswamy, Anil

    2007-01-01

    Ïf the blips in the debris of the Tevatron particle smasher really are signs of the Higgs boson then it's not what we expected. It might mean that it's time to replace the standard model with a more complex picture of the universe." (3 pages)

  9. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin; Le Besnerais, Guy; Plyer, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels.

  10. Higgs particle searches at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Results on searches for the Higgs particle performed by the four LEP experiments are received in the framework of the Standard Model, Two Doublet Model, and Minimal Supersymmetric Model. The combined mass lower limit for the standard Higgs boson is 66 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95 % CL for a statistics of 14.6 Million hadronic Z decays. (authors). 24 refs.

  11. Nanomaterials vs Ambient Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Vicki; Miller, Mark R.; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A rich literature exists that has demonstrated adverse human health effects following exposure to ambient air particulate matter (PM), with strong support for an important role for ultrafine (nano-sized) particles. At present, relatively little human health or epidemiology data exists...

  12. Phase behavior of hard particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijneveldt, J.S. van; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    1995-01-01

    The phase behavior of hard particles and mixtures thereof is reviewed. Special attention is given to a lattice model consisting of hard hexagons and points on a triangular lattice. This model appears to have two disordered phases and an ordered phase.

  13. And then there were particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The appearance of particles dates back to a period physicists find embarrassing, one when the amount of energy active in the Universe was so enormous that they simply cannot descrit it. It is, however, possible to imagine the birth of the elementary building blocks that make up matter and energy."(1 page)

  14. Build Your Own Particle Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mehlhase, Sascha; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To support the outreach activities of ATLAS institutes and to grasp people’s attention in science exhibitions and during public events, a very detailed model of the experiment built entirely out of LEGO bricks as well as an outreach programme using LEGO bricks to get people to think about particle detectors and involve them into a conversation about particle physics in general have been created. A large LEGO model, consisting of about 9500 pieces, has been exported to more than 55 ATLAS institutes and has been used in numerous exhibitions to explain the proportion and composition of the experiment to the public. As part of the Build Your Own Particle Detector programme (byopd.org) more than 15 events have been conducted, either involving a competition to design and build the best particle detector from a random pile of pieces or to take part in the construction of one of the large models, as part of a full day outreach event. Recently, miniature models of all four main LHC experiments, that will be used at ...

  15. Method of manufacturing powder particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borra, J.P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of manufacturing a dry powder particle, preferably using electro-hydrodynamic spraying, wherein two oppositely charged aerosol streams are contacted. The invention allows for the manufacture of powders having various, controllable compositions and shapes. In particu

  16. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the symmetric point.

  17. Particle physics using nuclear targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferbel, T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of nuclear targets in particle physics is discussed and some recent results obtained in studies of hadronic interactions on nuclei summarized. In particular experimental findings on inclusive production and on coherent dissociation of mesons and baryons at high energies are presented. 41 references.

  18. Harmonic Oscillators and Elementary Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sobouti, Y

    2016-01-01

    Two dynamical systems with same symmetry should have features in common, and as far as their shared symmetry is concerned, one may represent the other. The three light quark constituents of the hadrons, a) have an approximate flavor SU(3) symmetry, b) have an exact color SU(3) symmetry, and c) as spin 1/2 particles, have a Lorentz SO(3,1) symmetry. So does a 3D harmonic oscillator. a) Its Hamiltonian has the SU(3) symmetry, breakable if the 3 fundamental modes of oscillation are not identical. b) The 3 directions of oscillation have the permutation symmetry. This enables one to create three copies of unbreakable SU(3) symmetry for each mode of the oscillation, and mimic the color of the elementary particles. And c) The Lagrangian of the 3D oscillator has the SO(3,1) symmetry. This can be employed to accommodate the spin of the particles. In this paper we draw up a one-to-one correspondence between the eigen modes of the Poisson bracket operator of the 3D oscillator and the flavor multiplets of the particles, ...

  19. Particle electric dipole-moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendlebury, J.M. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    The incentive to detect particle electric dipole-moments, as a window on time-reversal violation, remains undiminished. Efforts to improve the measurements for the neutron, the electron and some nuclei are still making rapid progress as more powerful experimental methods are brought to bear. A new measurement for the neutron at ILL is presented. (author). 7 refs.

  20. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.; Broderick, Thomas F.

    2011-10-11

    A novel class of flowable biomass feedstock particles with unusually large surface areas that can be manufactured in remarkably uniform sizes using low-energy comminution techniques. The feedstock particles are roughly parallelepiped in shape and characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially with the grain direction and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. The particles exhibit a disrupted grain structure with prominent end and surface checks that greatly enhances their skeletal surface area as compared to their envelope surface area. The L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers. The W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers. The L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top surfaces characterized by some surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The feedstock particles are manufactured from a variety of plant biomass materials including wood, crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  1. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  2. Of people, particles and prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31-36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  3. Build Your Own Particle Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mehlhase, Sascha; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To support the outreach activities of Atlas institutes and to grab people's attention in science exhibitions and during public events, we have created both a very detailed model of the experiment built entirely out of about Lego bricks as well as an outreach programme using Lego bricks to get people to think about particle detectors and involve them into a conversation about particle physics in general. A large Lego model, consisting of about 9500 pieces, has been 'exported' to more than 55 Atlas institutes and has been used in numerous exhibitions to explain the proportion and composition of the experiment to the public. As part of 'Build Your Own Particle Detector' programme (byopd.org) we conducted more than 15 events,either involving a competition to design and build the 'best' particle detector from a random pile of pieces or to take part in the construction of one of the large models, as part of a full day outreach event. Recently we've added miniature models of all four LHC experiments, that will be us...

  4. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Particle-particle, particle-scaling function algorithm for electrostatic problems in free boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelov, Alexey; Ghasemi, S Alireza; Goedecker, Stefan

    2007-07-14

    An algorithm for fast calculation of the Coulombic forces and energies of point particles with free boundary conditions is proposed. Its calculation time scales as N log N for N particles. This novel method has lower crossover point with the full O(N(2)) direct summation than the fast multipole method. The forces obtained by our algorithm are analytical derivatives of the energy which guarantees energy conservation during a molecular dynamics simulation. Our algorithm is very simple. A version of the code parallelized with the Message Passing Interface can be downloaded under the GNU General Public License from the website of our group.

  6. Research in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Andrew Paul [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); De, Kaushik [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Brandt, Andrew [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Farbin, Amir [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-02-02

    This report details the accomplishments and research results for the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington at the Energy and Intensity Frontiers. For the Energy Frontier we have made fundamental contributions in the search for supersymmetric particles, proposed to explain the stabilization of the mass of the Higgs Boson – the agent giving mass to all known particles. We have also made major contributions to the search for additional Higgs Bosons and to the planning for future searches. This work has been carried out in the context of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN (European Nuclear Research Laboratory) and for which we have made major contributions to computing and data distribution and processing, and have worked to calibrate the detector and prepare upgraded electronics for the future. Our other contribution to the Energy Frontier has been to the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, potentially hosted by Japan, and to the Silicon Detector Concept (SiD) in particular. We have lead the development of the SiD Concept and have worked on a new form of precise energy measurement for particles from the high energy collisions of electrons and positrons at the ILC. For the Intensity Frontier, we have worked to develop the concept of Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment(s) (LBNE) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Our contributions to detector development, neutrino beam studies, particle identification, software development will facilitate future studies of the oscillation of one type of neutrino into other type(s), establish the order of the neutrino masses, and, through an innovative new idea, allow us to create a beam of dark matter particles.

  7. Nuclear physics with polarized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2012-07-01

    The measurement of spin-polarization observables in reactions of nuclei and particles is of great utility and advantage when the effects of single-spin sub-states are to be investigated. Indeed, the unpolarized differential cross-section encompasses the averaging over the spin states of the particles, and thus loses details of the interaction process. This introductory text combines, in a single volume, course-based lecture notes on spin physics and on polarized-ion sources with the aim of providing a concise yet self-contained starting point for newcomers to the field, as well as for lecturers in search of suitable material for their courses and seminars. A significant part of the book is devoted to introducing the formal theory - a description of polarization and of nuclear reactions with polarized particles. The remainder of the text describes the physical basis of methods and devices necessary to perform experiments with polarized particles and to measure polarization and polarization effects in nuclear reactions. The book concludes with a brief review of modern applications in medicine and fusion energy research. For reasons of conciseness and of the pedagogical aims of this volume, examples are mainly taken from low-energy installations such as tandem Van de Graaff laboratories, although the emphasis of present research is shifting to medium- and high-energy nuclear physics. Consequently, this volume is restricted to describing non-relativistic processes and focuses on the energy range from astrophysical energies (a few keV) to tens of MeV. It is further restricted to polarimetry of hadronic particles. (orig.)

  8. Nanotechnology: Colourful Particles for Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.

    2015-07-01

    In 1857 Michael Faraday gave a well-attended lecture at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, in which he presented his pioneering experimental work that investigated the interaction of light with matter. Faraday’s study probed the fundamental properties of light as it was reflected and absorbed by progressively smaller particles. Very fine gold particles dispersed in liquid were shown to produce vivid colors not seen in larger particles. Faraday did not know he had created colloidal suspensions of quantum dots, but his insight correctly concluded that the distinct colors were somehow due to the minute size of the gold particles. This great experimental physicist had actually glimpsed a special condition where the particle’s quantum nature was expressed. This work set the future course for nanoscience and quantum theory, but it would take another 125 years before the physical basis of this phenomenon would be explained by quantum size effects. It is now known that when quantum dots are exposed to UV light, some of the electrons are excited as they gain energy, however they remain confined to discrete energy levels not observed in larger particles and solid materials. When the electrons relax and lose their energy, the quantum dot emits light at a specific color that varies with the size of the quantum dot. Bao and Bawendi have cleverly exploited the unique optical properties intrinsic to colloidal quantum dots to develop an innovative compact optical spectrometer that could be integrated with a smart phone camera or as a versatile miniature handheld sensing tool.

  9. Particle dispersion models and drag coefficients for particles in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, C. T.; Chung, J. N.; Troutt, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the concepts underlying particle dispersion due to turbulence are reviewed. The traditional approaches to particle dispersion in homogeneous, stationary turbulent fields are addressed, and recent work on particle dispersion in large scale turbulent structures is reviewed. The state of knowledge of particle drag coefficients in turbulent gas-particle flows is also reviewed.

  10. On the kernel and particle consistency in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Rendón, Otto; Vargas, Carlos A; Peña-Polo, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    The problem of consistency of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has demanded considerable attention in the past few years due to the ever increasing number of applications of the method in many areas of science and engineering. A loss of consistency leads to an inevitable loss of approximation accuracy. In this paper, we revisit the issue of SPH kernel and particle consistency and demonstrate that SPH has a limiting second-order convergence rate. Numerical experiments with suitably chosen test functions validate this conclusion. In particular, we find that when using the root mean square error as a model evaluation statistics, well-known corrective SPH schemes, which were thought to converge to second, or even higher order, are actually first-order accurate, or at best close to second order. We also find that observing the joint limit when $N\\to\\infty$, $h\\to 0$, and $n\\to\\infty$, as was recently proposed by Zhu et al., where $N$ is the total number of particles, $h$ is the smoothing length, and $n$ is th...

  11. On the Relation of Wave-Particle Interactions, Particle Dynamics, and Suprathermal Particle Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, Harald; Galvin, Antoinette; Farrugia, Charles; Klecker, Berndt; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Wave-particle interactions, ion acceleration, and magnetic turbulence are closely interlinked and the physical processes may occur on different scales. These scales range from the kinetic scale to the macro-scale (MHD-scale). These processes are likely universal and the same basic processes occur at the Earth's environment, at the Earth's bow shock, the solar wind, and around the heliosphere. Undoubtedly, the Earth's environment as well as the close interplanetary space are the best plasma environments to study these processes using satellite measurements. Recently, ACE, STEREO, IBEX and Voyager observations clearly showed that turbulence and wave-particle interactions and turbulence are extremely important in interplanetary space and in the heliosphere. Using data from STEREO, Wind, we have investigated the spectral properties of suprathermal ion distributions. The results show that spectral slopes are very variable and depend on the plasma properties. We have also performed 3D hybrid simulations and studied particle dynamics. These simulations show that the particle dynamics in the turbulent magnetic wave field is Levy-Flight like which leads to a kappa distribution, which is often found in various space environments. This result is very significant of future mission such as THOR and IMAP and current operating missions such as STEREO, IBEX, and MMS.

  12. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  13. ELECTROSTATICALLY SUPPORTED MIXING OF FINE GRAINED PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.-E.; Wirth; M.; Linsenbühler

    2005-01-01

    The processing of fine-grained particles with diameters between 1 and 10 microns is difficult due to strong van-der-Waals attraction forces. In order to improve the handling properties, the fine-grained particles, i.e. host-particles,are coated with various nanoparticles, i.e. guest-particles. The mixing of fine-grained powders is influenced by particle-particle interactions. If these forces are distinctively used, both interactive and ordered mixtures can be produced.These particle mixtures consist of composite-particles that have new physical properties. These modified properties d epend strongly on the coating process, the diameter- and mass-relationship of the guest- and the host-particles. The properties of the composite-particles can systematically be adjusted to the requirements of industrial applications. For example, a laboratory bubbling fluidized bed can be used to describe the conveying behavior of the functionalized host-particles. Applications for the functionalized particles are in the pharmaceutical and the powder coating industries,e.g. enhanced dry powder inhalers and thin lacquer films. The present research compares three different mixing/coating processes. The composite-particles are characterized by TEM, SEM and with their fluidization characteristics. The coating process itself is monitored by the electrostatic charge of the particles.

  14. Scattering in Relativistic Particle Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bievre, Stephan

    The problem of direct interaction in relativistic particle mechanics has been extensively studied and a variety of models has been proposed avoiding the conclusions of the so-called no-interaction theorems. In this thesis we study scattering in the relativistic two-body problem. We use our results to analyse gauge invariance in Hamiltonian constraint models and the uniqueness of the symplectic structure in manifestly covariant relativistic particle mechanics. We first present a general geometric framework that underlies approaches to relativistic particle mechanics. This permits a model-independent and geometric definition of the notions of asymptotic completeness and of Moller and scattering operators. Subsequent analysis of these concepts divides into two parts. First, we study the kinematic properties of the scattering transformation, i.e. those properties that arise solely from the invariance of the theory under the Poincare group. We classify all canonical (symplectic) scattering transformations on the relativistic phase space for two free particles in terms of a single function of the two invariants of the theory. We show how this function is determined by the center of mass time delay and scattering angle and vice versa. The second part of our analysis of the relativistic two-body scattering problem is devoted to the dynamical properties of the scattering process. Hence, we turn to two approaches to relativistic particle mechanics: the Hamiltonian constraint models and the manifestly covariant formalism. Using general geometric arguments, we prove "gauge invariance" of the scattering transformation in the Todorov -Komar Hamiltonian constraint model. We conclude that the scattering cross sections of the Todorov-Komar models have the same angular dependence as their non-relativistic counterpart, irrespective of a choice of gauge. This limits the physical relevance of those models. We present a physically non -trivial Hamiltonian constraint model, starting from

  15. Correlation studies on surface particle detection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronald V.; White, James C.

    1988-01-01

    The accurate determination of dust levels on optical surfaces is necessary to assess sensor system performance. A comparison study was made on several particle measurement methods including those based on direct imaging and light scattering. The effectiveness of removing the particles from the surface prior to determining particle size distributions was also assessed. These studies revealed that some methods, especially those requiring particle removal before analysis, are subject to large systematic errors affecting particle size distributions. Thus, an understanding of the particle measurement methods employed is necessary before any surface cleanliness or obstruction value assignments are accepted as true representations of an optical surface contamination condition.

  16. Multi-physics/scale simulations using particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    Particle simulations of continuum and discrete phenomena can be formulated by following the motion of interacting particles that carry the physical properties of the systems that is being approximated (continuum) or modeled (discrete) by the particles. We identify the common computational characteristics of particle methods and emphasize their key properties that enable the formulation of a novel, systematic framework for multiscale simulations, that can be applicable to the simulation of diverse physical problems. We present novel multiresolution particle methods for continuum (fluid/solid) simulations, using adaptive mesh refinement and wavelets, by relaxing the grid-free character of particle methods and discuss the coupling of scales in continuum-atomistic flow simulations.

  17. Matter and Interactions: a particle physics perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics matter and fields are completely separated. Matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case. Both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this paper we explain why particle physicists believe in such a picture, introducing the technique of Feynman diagrams starting from very basic and popular analogies with classical mechanics, making the physics of elementary particles comprehensible even to high school students, the only prerequisite being the knowledge of the conservation of mechanical energy.

  18. Particle Emissions from Domestic Gas Cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Livbjerg, Hans; Wagner, Ayten Yilmaz;

    2010-01-01

    The authors experimentally studied the formation of submicron particles from a domestic gas cooker in a compartment free from external particle sources. The effects of fuel (methane, natural gas, odorant-free natural gas), primary aeration, flow rate, and fuel sulphur content on particle emissions...... were investigated. The experiments confirmed reports from literature that blue burning flames of domestic gas cookers emit submicron particles. The particle number concentrations varied in the range 103-106 particles/cm3, depending on the fuel, flow rate, and primary air addition. The diameters...

  19. Preliminary Measurement of Lunar Particle Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Particle shape is a basic parameter and essential for many engineering applications. Very little data is published on the shape of lunar particles. An unpublished review found that even where the same samples were studied the results were contradictory, probably because of extremely small sample sizes. Other workers have made fundamental errors in algorithms. There are many ways to measure particle shape. One common approach is to examine the particles as intersected by a plain, such as a thin section. If discrete particles can be segmented from the image, programs such as ImageJ can readily obtain shape measurements for each particle.

  20. Britain honours its particle physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental particle physicists figure among the winners for 2004 of Britain's most prestigious prizes for physics, awarded by the Institute of Physics (IOP). The IOP's own Paul Dirac medal and prize, goes to this year to CERN's John Ellis for "his highly influential work on particle-physics phenomenology; in particular on the properties of gluons, the Higgs boson and the top quark". One of the institute's premier wards, it is made for outstanding contributions to theoretical (including mathematical and computational) physics. The Duddell medal and prize, in memory of William du Bois Duddell, the inventor of the electromagnetic oscillograph, is awarded for outstanding contributions to the advancement of knowledge through the application of physics, including the invention or design of scientific instruments or the discovery of materials used in their construction. It is shared this year by Geoff Hall, of Imperial College London, Alessandro Marchioro from CERN and Peter Sharp of the Rutherfor...

  1. Geometrical charged-particle optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-01-01

    This reference monograph covers all theoretical aspects of modern geometrical charged-particle optics. It is intended as a guide for researchers, who are involved in the design of electron optical instruments and beam-guiding systems for charged particles, and as a tutorial for graduate students seeking a comprehensive treatment. Procedures for calculating the properties of systems with arbitrarily curved axes are outlined in detail and methods are discussed for designing and optimizing special components such as aberration correctors, spectrometers, energy filters, monochromators, ion traps, electron mirrors and cathode lenses. Also addressed is the design of novel electron optical components enabling sub-Angstroem spatial resolution and sub-0.1eV energy resolution. Relativistic motion and spin precession of the electron is treated in a concise way by employing a covariant five-dimensional procedure.

  2. Particle Interferometry New Theoretical Results

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W

    1997-01-01

    By measuring hadronic single-particle spectra and two-particle correlations in heavy-ion collisions, the size and dynamical state of the collision fireball at freeze-out can be reconstructed. I discuss the relevant theoretical methods and their limitations. By applying the formalism to recent pion correlation data from Pb+Pb collisions at CERN we demonstrate that the collision zone has undergone strong transverse growth before freeze-out (by a factor 2-3 in each direction), and that it expands both longitudinally and transversally. From the thermal and flow energy density at freeze-out the energy density at the onset of transverse expansion can be estimated from conservation laws. It comfortably exceeds the critical value for the transition to color deconfined matter.

  3. DNA-Grafted Janus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ching; Lin, Keng-Hui; Juan, Wen-Tau

    2008-03-01

    Recently there have been advances in generating Janus microspheres whose two hemispheres have different chemical compositions [1-4]. The new types of particles open up possibilities for assembly of complex structures. Here we attach DNA molecules onto one side of Janus microspheres. The new type of colloidal particles resembles surfactant molecules and may give us interesting new structures.Reference: [1] Y. Lu, H. Xiong, X. Jiang, Y.Xia, M. Prentiss and G. M.Whitesides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 12724 (2003) [2] O.Cayre, V. N.Paunov and O. D. Velev, J. Mater. Chem. 13, 2445 (2003) [3] R. F. Shepherd, J. C. Conrad, S. K. Rhodes, D. R. Link, M. Marquez, D. A. Weitz and J. A. Lewis, Langmuir 22, 8618 (2006) [4] L. Hong, S. Jiang and S. Granick, Langmuir 22, 9495 (2006)

  4. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gary Don; Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott; Brown, Louanne Kay

    1998-06-09

    A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

  5. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  6. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  7. THOR Particle Processing Unit PPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federica Marcucci, Maria; Bruno, Roberto; Consolini, Giuseppe; D'Amicis, Raffaella; De Lauretis, Marcello; De Marco, Rossana; De Michelis, Paola; Francia, Patrizia; Laurenza, Monica; Materassi, Massimo; Vellante, Massimo; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. On board THOR, data collected by the Turbulent Electron Analyser, the Ion Mass Spectrum analyser and the Cold Solar Wind ion analyser instruments will be processed by a common digital processor unit, the Particle Processing Unit (PPU). PPU architecture will be based on the state of the art space flight processors and will be fully redundant, in order to efficiently and safely handle the data from the numerous sensors of the instruments suite. The approach of a common processing unit for particle instruments is very important for the enabling of an efficient management for correlative plasma measurements, also facilitating interoperation with other instruments on the spacecraft. Moreover, it permits technical and programmatic synergies giving the possibility to optimize and save spacecraft resources.

  8. Geometrical charged-particle optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harald

    2012-01-01

    This second edition is an extended version of the first edition of Geometrical Charged-Particle Optics. The updated reference monograph is intended as a guide for researchers and graduate students who are seeking a comprehensive treatment of the design of instruments and beam-guiding systems of charged particles and their propagation in electromagnetic fields. Wave aspects are included in this edition for explaining electron holography, the Aharanov-Bohm effect and the resolution of electron microscopes limited by diffraction. Several methods for calculating the electromagnetic field are presented and procedures are outlined for calculating the properties of systems with arbitrarily curved axis. Detailed methods are presented for designing and optimizing special components such as aberration correctors, spectrometers, energy filters monochromators, ion traps, electron mirrors and cathode lenses. In particular, the optics of rotationally symmetric lenses, quadrupoles, and systems composed of these elements are...

  9. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  10. Particle Accelerators for PET radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost-effectively achie......The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost...... different manufacturers will be discussed the light of what is actually needed for a given PET site operation. Alternatives to the conventional cyclotron have been proposed and tested but have at present very limited use. These alternatives will be discussed, as well as the future possibilities of supplying...

  11. Optical monitoring of particle aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Methods for monitoring particle aggregation are briefly reviewed. Most of these techniques are based on some form of light scattering and may be greatly dependent on the optical properties of aggregates, which are not generally known. As fractal aggregates grow larger their density can become very low and this has important practical consequences for light scattering. For instance, the scattering coefficient may be much less than for solid objects, which means that the aggregates can appear much smaller than their actual size by a light transmission method. Also, for low-density objects, a high proportion of the scattered light energy is within a small angle of the incident beam, which may also be relevant for measurements with aggregates.Using the 'turbidity fluctuation' technique as an example, it is shown how the apparent size of hydroxide flocs depends mainly on the included impurity particles, rather than the hydroxide precipitate itself. Results using clay suspensions with hydrolyzing coagulants and under are discussed.

  12. Non-accelerator particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently engaged in construction of the MACRO detector, an Italian-American collaborative research instrument with a total particle acceptance of 10,000 m{sup 2}sr, which will perform a sensitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objective of the MACRO experiment are to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1, LMC X-4 and SN-1987A and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. We are also working on BOREX, a liquid scintillation solar neutrino experiment and GRANDE, a proposed very large area surface detector for astrophysical neutrinos, and on the development of new techniques for liquid scintillation detection.

  13. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G., E-mail: morlino@arcetri.astro.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non-linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non-linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration.

  14. Particle acceleration around SNR shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of particle acceleration theory around collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs). We show how non linear effects induced by the back reaction of accelerated particles onto the shock dynamics are of paramount importance to support the hipotesys that SNRs are the factories of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of magnetic field amplification and the presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. Special attention will be devoted to observational consequences of non linear effects on the multi-wavelength spectrum of SNRs, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Finally we also discuss how Balmer lines, detected from several young SNRs, can be used to estimate the shock dynamical properties and the efficiency of CR acceleration.

  15. Wind reduction by aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol particles are known to affect radiation, temperatures, stability, clouds, and precipitation, but their effects on spatially-distributed wind speed have not been examined to date. Here, it is found that aerosol particles, directly and through their enhancement of clouds, may reduce near-surface wind speeds below them by up to 8% locally. This reduction may explain a portion of observed ``disappearing winds'' in China, and it decreases the energy available for wind-turbine electricity. In California, slower winds reduce emissions of wind-driven soil dust and sea spray. Slower winds and cooler surface temperatures also reduce moisture advection and evaporation. These factors, along with the second indirect aerosol effect, may reduce California precipitation by 2-5%, contributing to a strain on water supply.

  16. Let's play hunt the particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Hogan, J

    2003-01-01

    A team at the LHC are running a competition using a simulated a set of 600,000 results that could conceivably be produced by the collider within a few days. The data describes particle debris created when beams of protons are fired at each other down the LHC's tunnels. The goal of the competition is to give the physicists practice at spotting the most significant or intriguing events that have been deliberately hidden within this data set (1/2 page).

  17. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  18. Particle Identification at Belle II

    CERN Document Server

    Sandilya, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the charged particle identification (PID) systems for the upcoming Belle II experiment. The time of propagation counter in the central region and the proximity focusing ring imaging Cherenkov counters with aerogel radiator in the forward region will be used as the PID devices. They are expected to provide a kaon identification efficiency of more than 94% at a low pion misidentification probability of 4%. The motivation for the upgrade, method, and status of both systems are discussed.

  19. Traveling Wave Magnetic Particle Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) ist eine noch sehr junge Technologie unter den nicht-invasiven tomographischen Verfahren. Seit der ersten Veröffentlichung 2005 wurden einige Scannertypen und Konzepte vorgestellt, welche durch die Messung des Antwortsignals von superparamagnetischen Eisennanopartikeln (SPIOs) auf wechselnde Magnetfelder ein dreidi-mensionales Bild ihrer Verteilung berechnen können. Durch die direkte Messung des Tracers handelt es sich beim MPI um eine sehr sensitive und hochsp...

  20. Gauge strata and particle generations

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    2000-01-01

    Phenomenological evidence suggests the existence of non-trivial background fields in the QCD vacuum. On the other hand SU(3) gauge theory possessses three different classes of both non-generic and non-trivial strata that may be used as classical backgrounds. It is suggested that this three-fold multiplicity of non-trivial vacua may be related to the existence of particle generations, which would then find an explanation in the framework of the standard model.

  1. Research in theoretical particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect. (LSP)

  2. Size definitions for particle sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The recommendations of an ad hoc working group appointed by Committee TC 146 of the International Standards Organization on size definitions for particle sampling are reported. The task of the group was to collect the various definitions of 'respirable dust' and to propose a practical definition on recommendations for handling standardization on this matter. One of two proposed cut-sizes in regard to division at the larynx will be adopted after a ballot.

  3. The Multiverse and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John F.

    2016-10-01

    The possibility of fundamental theories with very many ground states, each with different physical parameters, changes the way that we approach the major questions of particle physics. Most importantly, it raises the possibility that these different parameters could be realized in different domains in the larger universe. In this review, I survey the motivations for the multiverse and the impact of the idea of the multiverse on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  4. The Multiverse and Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Donoghue, John F

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of fundamental theories with very many ground states, each with different physical parameters, changes the way that we approach the major questions of particle physics. Most importantly, it raises the possibility that these different parameters could be realised in different domains in the larger universe. In this review, we survey the motivations for the multiverse and impact of the idea of the multiverse on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. Supersymmetry in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-05

    These lectures give a general introduction to supersymmetry, emphasizing its application to models of elementary particle physics at the 100 GeV energy scale. I discuss the following topics: the construction of supersymmetric Lagrangians with scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons, the structure and mass spectrum of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the measurement of the parameters of the MSSM at high-energy colliders, and the solutions that the MSSM gives to the problems of electroweak symmetry breaking and dark matter.

  6. Dissipative dynamics in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, R

    2003-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of dissipative dynamics and their properties in particle physics, dealing with neutral B-mesons, neutron interferometry and neutrino physics. Modified expressions for the relevant phenomenological quantities characterizing these systems are obtained. Moreover, the models presented in this work offer the possibility of direct tests of some basic properties of reduced dynamics (in particular the notion of complete positivity) since they represent concrete systems amenable to actual experiments.

  7. Particle Dispersion Behaviors of Dense Gas-Particle Flows in Bubble Fluidized Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Liu; Guohui Li; Sihao Lv

    2013-01-01

    An Euler-Euler two-fluid model incorporating a developed momentum transfer empirical coefficient is developed to study the particle dispersion behaviors of dense gas-particle flows in gas-fluidization reactor. In this model, the four-way couplings among gas-particles, particle-gas, and particle-particle collisions are fully considered based on kinetic theory of granular flows and an improved smooth continuous drag coefficient is utilized. Gas turbulent flow is solved by large eddy simulation....

  8. Structurally Coloured Secondary Particles Composed of Black and White Colloidal Particles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the colourful secondary particles formed by controlling the aggregation states of colloidal silica particles and the enhancement of the structural colouration of the secondary particles caused by adding black particles. We obtained glossy, partially structurally coloured secondary particles in the absence of NaCl, but matte, whitish secondary particles were obtained in the presence of NaCl. When a small amount of carbon black was incorporated into both types of seconda...

  9. Ultrasound particle sizing: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm J.W.Povey

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound spectrometry is one of very few methods that can size particles over the range 10 nm to 1 mm for optically opaque,undiluted materials.It has in-line,non-invasive capabilities which make it a serious contender for use in industrial process monitoring,with the potential for 100% inspection.In aqueous systems,it is more sensitive to nanoparticles than to particles in the micrometre range upwards because the scattering power varies as the inverse square of particle diameter,making it suitable for the detection of nanoparticles in concentrated,mixed systems.Future development of ultrasound spectrometers suitable for widespread laboratory and industrial use depends on meeting the challenges of complex data interpretation and the need for considerable know how.In this review we provide a brief account of ultrasound propagation and scattering theory which underlies the ultrasound spectrometer,describe several types of spectrometer and demonstrate its successful use in the characterization of colloidal silica,whole milk and protein solutions.

  10. Geneva University - Particle Physics Seminars

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2010-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél. (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 October 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Exotic hadrons, Light Higgs and Dark Forces at BABAR Dr. Bertrand Echenard / California Institute of Technology From spectroscopy to search new physics, B-factories have explored many exciting topics besides establishing CP-violation in B decays. We will review recent results on spectroscopy, exotic hadrons and search for light Higgs. Current searches for dark forces and GeV-scale dark matter particles will also be discussed. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : G. Pasztor Wednesday 20 October 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium The MINOS Experiment, Results and Future Plans Pro...

  11. Solving equations through particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, S.; Neuman, M.; Edström, P.; Olin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The present work evaluates a recently developed particle method (DFPM). The basic idea behind this method is to utilize a Newtonian system of interacting particles that through dissipation solves mathematical problems. We find that this second order dynamical system results in an algorithm that is among the best methods known. The present work studies large systems of linear equations. Of special interest is the wide eigenvalue spectrum. This case is common as the discretization of the continuous problem becomes dense. The convergence rate of DFPM is shown to be in parity with that of the conjugate gradient method, both analytically and through numerical examples. However, an advantage with DFPM is that it is cheaper per iteration. Another advantage is that it is not restricted to symmetric matrices only, as is the case for the conjugate gradient method. The convergence properties of DFPM are shown to be superior to the closely related approach utilizing only a first order dynamical system, and also to several other iterative methods in numerical linear algebra. The performance properties are understood and optimized by taking advantage of critically damped oscillators in classical mechanics. Just as in the case of the conjugate gradient method, a limitation is that all eigenvalues (spring constants) are required to be of the same sign. DFPM has no other limitation such as matrix structure or a spectral radius as is common among iterative methods. Examples are provided to test the particle algorithm's merits and also various performance comparisons with existent numerical algorithms are provided.

  12. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H [Federal Way, WA; Lanning, David N [Federal Way, WA; Broderick, Thomas F [Lake Forest Park, WA

    2012-04-17

    A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  13. Mesophase behaviour of polyhedral particles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Umang

    2011-02-13

    Translational and orientational excluded-volume fields encoded in particles with anisotropic shapes can lead to purely entropy-driven assembly of morphologies with specific order and symmetry. To elucidate this complex correlation, we carried out detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex space-filling polyhedrons, namely, truncated octahedrons, rhombic dodecahedrons, hexagonal prisms, cubes, gyrobifastigiums and triangular prisms. Simulations predict the formation of various new liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behaviour of polyhedral particles are proposed: high rotational symmetry is in general conducive to mesophase formation, with low anisotropy favouring plastic-solid behaviour and intermediate anisotropy (or high uniaxial anisotropy) favouring liquid-crystalline behaviour. It is also found that dynamical disorder is crucial in defining mesophase behaviour, and that the apparent kinetic barrier for the liquid-mesophase transition is much lower for liquid crystals (orientational order) than for plastic solids (translational order). © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Fundamentals of Cosmological Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu

    2012-01-01

    This current updated and expanded (this is an up-dated English translation of Prof. Khlopov's book "Osnovy kosmomikrofiziki", URSS, 2004) text reflects the large number of scientific advances, both theoretical and experimental, within the discipline of cosmic particle physics in the last 10 years. Some of the topics that have been added or updated include but are not limited to: HND or CMD+HND scenarios being implemented into sterile neutrino scenarios, the ramifications of extending the forms of dark matter with respect to our view of neutrinos, the origin of baryon matter and the need for nonbaryonic matter in current theories, problems the existence of dark matter raises with respect to cosmic particle physics and the relationship with (meta) stable (super) weakly interacting particles predicted by the extension of the standard model, restrictions on baryon and lepton photons, as well as problems associated with expansion, just to name a few. These and many other topics are readdressed in light of recent b...

  15. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle

  16. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lance; Ott, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Personal exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) can occur while people are cooking, driving, smoking, operating small appliances such as hair dryers, or eating out in restaurants. These exposures can often be higher than outdoor concentrations. For 3 years, portable monitors were employed in homes, cars, and restaurants. More than 300 measurement periods in several homes were documented, along with 25 h of driving two cars, and 22 visits to restaurants. Cooking on gas or electric stoves and electric toaster ovens was a major source of UFP, with peak personal exposures often exceeding 100,000 particles/cm³ and estimated emission rates in the neighborhood of 10¹² particles/min. Other common sources of high UFP exposures were cigarettes, a vented gas clothes dryer, an air popcorn popper, candles, an electric mixer, a toaster, a hair dryer, a curling iron, and a steam iron. Relatively low indoor UFP emissions were noted for a fireplace, several space heaters, and a laser printer. Driving resulted in moderate exposures averaging about 30,000 particles/cm³ in each of two cars driven on 17 trips on major highways on the East and West Coasts. Most of the restaurants visited maintained consistently high levels of 50,000-200,000 particles/cm³ for the entire length of the meal. The indoor/outdoor ratios of size-resolved UFP were much lower than for PM₂.₅ or PM₁₀, suggesting that outdoor UFP have difficulty in penetrating a home. This in turn implies that outdoor concentrations of UFP have only a moderate effect on personal exposures if indoor sources are present. A time-weighted scenario suggests that for typical suburban nonsmoker lifestyles, indoor sources provide about 47% and outdoor sources about 36% of total daily UFP exposure and in-vehicle exposures add the remainder (17%). However, the effect of one smoker in the home results in an overwhelming increase in the importance of indoor sources (77% of the total).

  17. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  18. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  19. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  20. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  1. Rotational diffusion of particles in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Colin R

    2013-01-01

    Through laboratory measurements, we compare the rotation of spherical and ellipsoidal particles in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. We find that the particles' angular velocity statistics are well described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process. This theoretical model predicts that the Lagrangian autocovariance of particles' angular velocity will decay exponentially. We measure the autocovariance using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) applied to particles whose size is within the inertial subrange of the ambient turbulence. The SPIV resolves the motion of points interior to the particles, from which we calculate the solid body rotation of the particles. This provides us with the angular velocity time series for individual particles. Through ensemble statistics, we determine the autocovariance of angular velocity and confirm that it matches the form predicted by an OU process. We can further use the autocovariance curve to quantify the turbulent rotational diffusivity.

  2. Particle-impact noise detector (PIND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R. J.; Jackson, D. E.; Leaf, W. D.; Meza, R. G.; Rader, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Package, in page assembly, is subjected to low-frequency vibration, and noise generated by particle impacts is picked up by transducer. Test procedure calls for three transverse shocks to be applied to page to dislodge any trapped particles.

  3. Final Report: Particle Physics Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karchin, Paul E.

    2011-09-01

    We describe recent progress in accelerator-based experiments in high-energy particle physics and progress in theoretical investigations in particle physics. We also describe future plans in these areas.

  4. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  5. Tuning particle focusing in inertial microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kaitlyn; Kahkeshani, Soroush; di Carlo, Dino; Roper, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Particles in microfluidic devices at finite Reynolds number are subject to two forces: (i) inertial focusing and (ii) particle-particle interactions. Although microfluidic chips exploit these forces to manipulate particles for particle/cell sorting and high throughput flow cytometry, the forces are not understood well enough to allow rational design of devices that can tune and attenuate particle focusing. We present a mathematical model addressing both inertial focusing and particle interactions, and we apply our model to various channel geometries to determine the balance of forces. In addition, we present experimental data that illustrate the accuracy of our model. We will address the following questions: Why do high aspect ratio channels favor two equilibrium positions? Why do particle chains form?

  6. Particles, Quarks, Leptons and Coloured Glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Explains the current situation in particle physics by reviewing the three major periods in the development of atomic theory. Outlines the current picture of fundamental particles and identifies five major problems with this model. (GS)

  7. DETACHMENT OF BACTERIOPHAGE FROM ITS CARRIER PARTICLES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetler, D M; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1931-05-20

    The active substance (phage) present in the lytic broth filtrate is distributed through the medium in the form of particles. These particles vary in size within broad limits. The average size of these particles as calculated on the basis of the rate of diffusion approximates 4.4 mmicro in radius. Fractionation by means of ultrafiltration permits partial separation of particles of different sizes. Under conditions of experiments here reported the particles varied in the radius size from 0.6 mmicro to 11.4 mmicro. The active agent apparently is not intimately identified with these particles. It is merely carried by them by adsorption, and under suitable experimental conditions it can be detached from the larger particles and redistributed on smaller particles of the medium.

  8. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  9. Current experiments in particle physics, 1996

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Laboratory. Berkeley; Lehár, F; Klioukhine, V I; Ryabov, Yu; Bilak, S V; Illarionova, N S; Khachaturov, B A; Strokovsky, E A; Hoffman, C M; Kettle, P R; Olin, A; Armstrong, F E

    1996-01-01

    Contains more than 1,800 experiments in elementary particle physics from the Experience database. Search and browse by author; title; experiment number or prefix; institution; date approved, started or completed; accelerator or detector; polarization, reaction, final state or particle; or by papers produced. Maintained at SLAC for the Particle Data Group. Supplies the information for Current Experiments in Particle Physics (LBL-91). Print version updated every second year.

  10. Idealization Second Quantization of Composite Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Duan-Lu; YU Si-Xia; SUN Chang-Pu

    2001-01-01

    A practical method is developed to deal with the second quantization of the many-body system containing the composite particles.In our treatment,the modes associated with composite particles are regarded approximately as independent ones compared with those of unbound particles.The field operators of the composite particles thus arise naturally in the second quantization Hamiltonian.To be emphasized,the second quantization Hamiltonian has the regular structures which correspond clearly to different physical processes.``

  11. Water condensation for submicronic particles abatement

    OpenAIRE

    Cozzolino, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    Control of particulate matter (PM) emissions from industrial processes is important for protection of human health and the environment. A promising technique for submicron PM abatement is by condensing water vapor onto the particles, which enhances particle growth and improves the performance of traditional particle collection devices. This thesis analyzes the flue gases cleaning process by means of activation heterogeneous water nucleation mechanism on particles surface as a function of work...

  12. Particles dispersion on fluid-liquid interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sathish Gurupatham; Bhavin Dalal; Md. Shahadat Hossain; Ian S. Fischer; Pushpendra Singh; Daniel D. Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the dispersion of particles on the fluid-liquid interface. In a previous study we have shown that when small particles,e.g.,flour,pollen,glass beads,etc.,contact an air-liquid interface,they disperse rapidly as ifthey were in an explosion. The rapid dispersion is due to the fact that the capillary force pulls particles into the interface causing them to accelerate to a large velocity. In this paper we show that motion of particles normal to the interface is inertia dominated: they oscillate vertically about their equilibrium position before coming to rest under viscous drag. This vertical motion of a particle causes a radially-outward lateral (secondary) flow on the interface that causes nearby particles to move away. The dispersion on a liquid-liquid interface,which is the primary focus of this study,was relatively weaker than on an air-liquid interface,and occurred over a longer period of time. When falling through an upper liquid the particles have a slower velocity than when falling through air because the liquid has a greater viscosity. Another difference for the liquid-liquid interface is that the separation of particles begins in the upper liquid before the particles reach the interface. The rate of dispersion depended on the size of the particles,the densities of the particle and liquids,the viscosities of the liquids involved,and the contact angle. For small particles,partial pinning and hysteresis of the three-phase contact line on the surface of the particle during adsorption on liquid-liquid interfaces was also important. The frequency of oscillation of particles about their floating equilibrium increased with decreasing particle size on both air-water and liquid-liquid interfaces,and the time to reach equilibrium decreased with decreasing particle size. These results are in agreement with our analysis.

  13. Fundamental Study of Single Biomass Particle Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of single biomass particle combustion. The effect of particle shape and size and operating conditions on biomass conversion characteristics were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental samples were divided in two groups: particles......) and varying oxygen concentrations in the 5 to 20% range. A one-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate all the intraparticle conversion processes (drying, recondensation, devolatilisation, char gasification/oxidation and heat/mass/momentum transfer) within single particles of different shapes...

  14. On the modification of particle dispersion in isotropic turbulence by free rotation of particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongnam; Lee, Changhoon

    2008-11-01

    Effect of a particle's spin is investigated numerically by considering the effect of lift occurring due to difference of rotations of a particle and of fluid such as the Saffman lift and Magnus force. These lift forces have been neglected in many previous works on particle-laden turbulence. The trajectory of particles can be changed by the lift forces, resulting in significant modification of the stochastic characteristics of heavy particles. Probability density functions and autocorrelations are examined of velocity, acceleration of solid particle and acceleration of fluid at the position of solid particle. Changes in velocity statistics are negligible but statistics related with acceleration are a little bit changed by particle's rotation. When a laden particle encounters with coherent structures during the motion, the particle's rotation might significantly affects the motion due to intermittently large fluid acceleration near coherent structures. The result can be used for development of stochastic model for particle dispersion. Detailed physical interpretation will be presented in the meeting.

  15. Core-shell particles at fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchcic, C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of particles as stabilizers for foams and emulsions. Applying hard particles for stabilization of fluid interface is referred to as Pickering stabilization. By using hard particles instead of surfactants and polymers, fluid interfaces can be effectively stabili

  16. Polyethylene glycol-grafted polystyrene particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, Fenghua; Engbers, Gerard H.M.; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Densely pegylated particles that can serve as a model system for artificial cells were prepared by covalently grafting amino polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight 3400 or 5000) onto carboxyl polystyrene particles (PS-COOH) using carbodiimide chemistry. PEG-modified particles (PS-PEG) were chara

  17. Preparation and application of streptavidin magnetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZhiFeng; ZHU HongLi; TANG YiTong; CUI Ting; GENG TingTing; CHEN Chao; CUI YaLi

    2007-01-01

    Two kinds of streptavidin magnetic particles, namely streptavidin GoldMag particles and streptavidin amino terminal particles were prepared by the methods of physical adsorption and covalent interaction respectively. The streptavidin coated on magnetic particle surface, crucial to many applications, was greatly influenced by the choice of the different buffer. Compared with Dynalbeads(r)M-270 streptavidin, the binding capacity for biotin of different streptavidin magnetic particles was determined by enzyme inhibition method, and the coupling capacity and activity of biotinylated oligonucleotide on their surface were also analyzed. The results indicated that the streptavidin GoldMag particle prepared by physical adsorption was stable in STE (NaCl-Tris-EDTA) buffer that was frequently used in nucleic acid hybridization and detection. The streptavidin amino terminal particles prepared by covalent interaction could be used both in STE buffer and PBS (phosphate buffered saline) buffer. The biotin binding capacity for 1 mg of streptavidin GoldMag particles and streptavidin amino terminal particles was 4950 and 5115 pmol respectively. The capacity of biotinylated oligonucleotide (24 bp) coupled on 1 mg of GoldMag and amino terminal magnetic particles was 2839 and 2978 pmol separately. These data were about 6-7 times higher than those of Dynabeads(r)M-270 streptavidin. The hybridization results with FITC-labeled complementary probe on magnetic particle surface demonstrated that the oligonucleotide coupled on streptavidin magnetic particles had high biological activity.

  18. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  19. Better track leads to new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Dutch researcher Thijs Cornelissen developed an algorithm to reconstruct the particle tracks and that is being used in a European research institute for particle physics. His method provides greater insights into the origine of particles that arise as a result of collisions." (1/2 page)

  20. Swedish Modal Particles in a Contrastive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijmer, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Presents a study based on the analysis of contrastive Swedish-English data on modal particles. The article maintains that the meaning of modal particles requires an analysis of their pragmatic aspects such as the relation between the interlocutors. The analysis most accurately accounting for the multifunctionality of the particles is based on a…

  1. Review of Particle Properties, 1984-1985

    CERN Document Server

    Particle Data Group. Berkeley; Cahn, R N; Rittenberg, Alan; Trippe, Thomas G; Yost, George P; Porter, F C; Hernández, J J; Montanet, Lucien; Hendrick, R E; Crawford, R L; Roos, Matts; Törnqvist, N A; Höhler, G; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Shimada, T; Losty, Michael J; Gopal, Gian P; Walck, C; Shrock, R E; Frosch, R; Roper, L D; Trower, W P; Armstrong, Betty

    1984-01-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of the Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group Phys. Lett. 111B, (1982). Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available.

  2. Digital Holographic Interferometry for Airborne Particle Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-19

    hologram and its extinction cross section, and a computational demonstration that holographic interferometry can resolve aerosol particle size ...holographic interferometry can resolve aerosol particle size evolution. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of...Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols workshop, Smolenice, Slovak Republic (2013). 7. Poster : Digital Holographic Imaging of Aerosol Particles In-Flight

  3. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  4. Particle spin in a turbulent shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.; Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    The translational and rotational motions of small spherical particles dilutely suspended in a turbulent channel flow have been investigated. Three different particle classes were studied in an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework to examine the effect of the response times on the particle statistics. The r

  5. What's A Pixel Particle Sensor Chip?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS particle physics experiment aided with collaboration ON Semiconductor was recently honored by the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), with an Industrial Award recognizing the company's contribution in supplying complex "Pixel Particle Sensor" chips for use in CERN's ATLAS particle physics experiment.

  6. Electroless plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Anton

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles by electroless techniques. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with each other for a time sufficient for such to occur.

  7. The dialogue between particle physics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-04-01

    In the last decade, a very close relationship has developed between particle physics and cosmology. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to the many scientific connections between the two fields. Before entering into the discussion of specific topics, it will first be shown that particle physics and cosmology are completely interdependent. 173 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Preparation and application of streptavidin magnetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two kinds of streptavidin magnetic particles,namely streptavidin GoldMag particles and streptavidin amino terminal particles were prepared by the methods of physical adsorption and covalent interaction respectively.The streptavidin coated on magnetic particle surface,crucial to many applications,was greatly influenced by the choice of the different buffer.Compared with DynalbeadsM-270 streptavidin, the binding capacity for biotin of different streptavidin magnetic particles was determined by enzyme inhibition method,and the coupling capacity and activity of biotinylated oligonucleotide on their sur- face were also analyzed.The results indicated that the streptavidin GoldMag particle prepared by physical adsorption was stable in STE(NaCl-Tris-EDTA)buffer that was frequently used in nucleic acid hybridization and detection.The streptavidin amino terminal particles prepared by covalent interaction could be used both in STE buffer and PBS(phosphate buffered saline)buffer.The biotin binding ca- pacity for 1 mg of streptavidin GoldMag particles and streptavidin amino terminal particles was 4950 and 5115 pmol respectively.The capacity of biotinylated oligonucleotide(24 bp)coupled on 1 mg of GoldMag and amino terminal magnetic particles was 2839 and 2978 pmol separately.These data were about 6-7 times higher than those of DynabeadsM-270 streptavidin.The hybridization results with FITC-labeled complementary probe on magnetic particle surface demonstrated that the oligonucleotide coupled on streptavidin magnetic particles had high biological activity.

  9. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  10. The CPLEAR particle identification detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Rozaki, E.; Sakeliou, L. (Univ. Athens (Greece)); Backenstoss, G.; Kuzminski, J.; Rickenbach, R.; Wildi, M. (Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Carlson, P.; Francis, D.; Jansson, K.; Jon-And, K.; Kerek, A.; Szilagyi, S. (Manne Siegbahn Inst. Stockholm (Sweden)); Carvalho, J.; Cobbaert, H.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Machado, E.; Onofre, A.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A. (Univ. Coimbra, LIP (Portugal) Technical Univ., Delft (Netherlands)); Charalambous, S.; Chardalas, M.; Dedoussis, S.; Touramanis, C. (Univ. Thessaloniki (Greece)); Fassnacht, P.; Pelucchi, F. (CPPM, Marseille (France) CSNSM, Orsay (France) P. Scherrer Inst., Villingen (Switzerland) DPhPe, CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Fetcher, W.; Gerber, H.J. (Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik, ETH Villingen (Switzerland)); Fuglesang, C.; Kesseler, G.; Montanet, F. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Go, A.; Lawry, T.; Miller, J.; Roberts, B.L.; Varner, G.; Warner, D.; Zimmerman, D. (Univ. Boston,; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1992-01-01

    The CPLEAR experiment will measure CP violation parameters in the neutral kaon system, using a low energy antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. One of its subdetectors, the Particle Identification Detector (PID), makes a fast separation of pions and kaons, which is essential for the experiment. This article describes the design of the PID and its performance during beam tests and during initial runs at LEAR. A pion rejection efficiency of 99.7% for the first level trigger (after 60 ns) is found in the relevant momentum region. (orig.).

  11. Energetic particles in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simnett, George M

    2017-01-01

    This monograph traces the development of our understanding of how and where energetic particles are accelerated in the heliosphere and how they may reach the Earth. Detailed data sets are presented which address these topics. The bulk of the observations are from spacecraft in or near the ecliptic plane. It is timely to present this subject now that Voyager-1 has entered the true interstellar medium. Since it seems unlikely that there will be a follow-on to the Voyager programme any time soon, the data we already have regarding the outer heliosphere are not going to be enhanced for at least 40 years.

  12. Synthesis of nanoscale antimony particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, L.; Dailly, A. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Schneider, R. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Synthese organometallique et Reactivite, UMR 7565 CNRS (France); Billaud, D., E-mail: Denis.Billaud@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Willmann, P. [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales, (France); Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C. [Universite Montpellier, Laboratoire des Agregats Moleculaires et Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR 5072 CNRS (France)

    2005-09-15

    For the search of new negative electrodes of Li-ion batteries, a low-temperature method has been developed for the preparation of nanoscale antimony particles which uses an alkoxide-activated sodium hydride as reducing agent of antimony pentachloride. X-ray diffraction and TEM studies confirm the obtaining of amorphous Sb nanoparticles dispersed in an organic matrix. {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopy gives evidence for the occurrence of interactions between antimony and the matrix. These interactions are modified by the washing treatments.

  13. Light scattering by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hulst, H C van de

    1981-01-01

    ""A must for researchers using the techniques of light scattering."" ? S. C. Snowdon, Journal of the Franklin InstituteThe measurement of light scattering of independent, homogeneous particles has many useful applications in physical chemistry, meteorology and astronomy. There is, however, a sizeable gap between the abstract formulae related to electromagnetic-wave-scattering phenomena, and the computation of reliable figures and curves. Dr. van de Hulst's book enables researchers to bridge that gap. The product of twelve years of work, it is an exhaustive study of light-scattering properties

  14. Scattering behaviour of Janus particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, H

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer synthesis has produced so-called Janus micelles: tailor-made copolymer structures in which the blocks constitute separate moieties. We present expressions for the form factors, P(Q), and the radii of gyration, R sub g , of Janus particles with spherical and cylindrical morphology and check their validity by comparison to simulated scattering data, calculated from Monte Carlo generations of the pair-distance distribution function, p(r). The effect of block incompatibilities on the scattering is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  15. Reactive particles in random flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károlyi, György; Tél, Tamás; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Grebogi, Celso

    2004-04-30

    We study the dynamics of chemically or biologically active particles advected by open flows of chaotic time dependence, which can be modeled by a random time dependence of the parameters on a stroboscopic map. We develop a general theory for reactions in such random flows, and derive the reaction equation for this case. We show that there is a singular enhancement of the reaction in random flows, and this enhancement is increased as compared to the nonrandom case. We verify our theory in a model flow generated by four point vortices moving chaotically.

  16. Summer Workshop on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chamseddine, A H; Nath, Pran

    1984-01-01

    These lectures give an elementary introduction to the important recent developments of the applications of N=1 supergravity to the construction of unified models of elementary particle interactions. Topics covered include couplings of supergravity with matter, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the super-higgs effect, construction of supergravity unified models, and the phenomenon of SU(2) x U(1) electroweak-symmetry breaking by supergravity. Experimental consequences of N-1 supergravity unified theory, in particular, the possible supersymmetric decays of the W ± and Z 0 bosons, are also discus

  17. Nonlinear dynamics in particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Dilão, Rui

    1996-01-01

    This book is an introductory course to accelerator physics at the level of graduate students. It has been written for a large audience which includes users of accelerator facilities, accelerator physicists and engineers, and undergraduates aiming to learn the basic principles of construction, operation and applications of accelerators.The new concepts of dynamical systems developed in the last twenty years give the theoretical setting to analyse the stability of particle beams in accelerator. In this book a common language to both accelerator physics and dynamical systems is integrated and dev

  18. Particle Deposition onto Enclosure Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-20

    3.1 Brownian Diffusion 7 3.2 Turbulent Diffusion 7 3.3 Drag Force 8 3.4 Gravitational Settling 10 3.5 Thermophoresis 10 3.6 Electrostatic...the surface by mechanisms such as Brownian/turbulent diffu- sion, gravitational settling, thermophoresis , inertial drift, and electrostatic...and 3.05 x 10_1 cm/s, respectively. 3.5 Thermophoresis In the presence of a temperature gradient, aerosol particles are driven from the high to low

  19. Stokesian swimmers and active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2015-01-01

    The net steady state flow pattern of a distorting sphere is studied in the framework of the bilinear theory of swimming at low Reynolds number. It is argued that the starting point of a theory of interacting active particles should be based on such a calculation, since any arbitrarily chosen steady state flow pattern is not necessarily the result of a swimming motion. Furthermore, it is stressed that as a rule the phase of stroke is relevant in hydrodynamic interactions, so that the net flow pattern must be used with caution.

  20. Spinning particles coupled to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hojman, Sergio A

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental work has determined that free falling $^{87}$Rb atoms on Earth, with vertically aligned spins, follow geodesics, thus apparently ruling out spin--gravitation interactions. It is showed that while some spinning matter models coupled to gravitation referenced to in that work seem to be ruled out by the experiment, those same experimental results confirm theoretical results derived from a Lagrangian description of spinning particles coupled to gravity constructed over forty years ago. A proposal to carry out (similar but) different experiments which will help to test the validity of the Universality of Free Fall as opposed to the correctness of the aforementioned Lagrangian theory, is presented.

  1. ) Composites Containing Nanoparticles and Larger Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaraja, S.; Nath, S. K.; Ray, S.

    2014-07-01

    The composites reinforced with nanoparticles result in improved strength and ductility while those containing coarser particles of micron size have limited ductility. The present study investigates the outcome of mechanical properties in a composite reinforced simultaneously with coarse and fine particles. High energy milling of manganese dioxide particles with excess of aluminum powder ensures that nanoparticles generated, either of MnO2 or alumina, are mostly separate and surrounded by aluminum particles. The milled powder when added to aluminum alloy melt, the excess aluminum particles will melt leaving behind separate oxide nanoparticles without significant agglomeration. Different amounts of milled powder mix have been stirred into molten aluminum alloy where nanoparticles of MnO2 react with melt to form alumina. The resulting slurry is cast into composites, which also contains coarser (nearly micron size) alumina particles formed by internal oxidation of the melt during processing. The microstructure of the composites shows good distribution of both the size categories of particles without significant clustering. The oxide particles are primarily γ-alumina in a matrix of aluminum-magnesium-manganese alloy containing some iron picked up from the stirrer. These composites fail during tensile test by ductile fracture due to debonding of coarser particles. The presence of nanoparticles along with coarser particles in a composite improves both strength and ductility considerably, presumably due to delay in debonding of coarser particles to higher stress because of reduced mismatch in extension caused by increased strain hardening in presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The composites containing only coarser oxide particles show limited strength and ductility attributed to early debonding of particles at a relatively lower stress due to larger mismatch in extension between matrix and larger particles. Higher addition of powder mix beyond a limit, however

  2. DISPERSION OF CYLINDRICAL PARTICLES IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhen-yu; LIN Jian-zhong

    2004-01-01

    With consideration of the Stokes drag and virtual mass force, the equations for mean and fluctuating velocities in rotation and translation were given for rigid cylindrical particles moving in a turbulent flow. Then the rotational and translational dispersion coefficients of particle were derived. The relationships between the dispersion coefficients and flow length scale as well as particle characteristic parameters were analyzed. The resulting dispersion coefficients were proved to decrease as the particle length increases. The conclusions are helpful for the further research on the motion of cylindrical particles in turbulent flows.

  3. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiotte, R. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: rlambiot@ulb.ac.be; Salazar, J.M. [Universite De Bougogne-LRRS UMR-5613 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, 9 Av. Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jmarcos@u-bourgogne.fr; Brenig, L. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: lbrenig@ulb.ac.be

    2005-08-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations.

  4. Review of Particle Physics, 2004-2005

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, Simon; Olive, Keith A; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Amsler, Claude; Asner, David M; Babu, K S; Barnett, Richard Michael; Beringer, J; Burchat, Patricia R; Carone, Christopher D; Caso, Carlo; Conforto, Gianni; Dahl, Orin; D'Ambrosio, G; Doser, Michael; Feng, Jonathan L; Gherghetta, Tony; Gibbons, Lawrence; Goodman, Maury; Grab, C; Groom, Donald E; Gurtu, Atul; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Hikasa, Ken Ichi; Honscheid, Klaus; Jawahery, Hassan; Kolda, Christopher; Kwon Young Joon; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Manohar, Aneesh Vasant; March-Russell, John David; Masoni, Alberto; Miquel, Ramon; Mönig, Klaus; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kenzo; Navas, Sergio; Pape, Luc; Patrignani, Claudia; Piepke, Andreas; Raffelt, Georg G; Roos, Matts; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Terning, John; Törnqvist, N A; Trippe, Thomas G; Vogel, Petr; Wohl, Charles G; Workman, Ronald L; Yao Wei Ming; Zyla, Piotr; Armstrong, Betty; Gee, Paul S; Harper, Gail; Lugovsky, Kirill Slava; Lugovsky, S B; Lugovsky, V S; Rom, A; Artuso, Marina; Barberio, Elisabetta; Battaglia, Marco; Bichsel, H; Biebel, Otmar; Bloch, Philippe; Cahn, Robert N; Casper, D; Cattai, Ariella; Chivukula, R Sekhar; Cowan, Glen; Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume; Desler, Kai; Dobbs, M A; Drees, Manuel; Edwards, A; Edwards, Donald A; Elvira, V D; Erler, Jens; Ezhela, Vladimir V; Fetscher, Wulf; Fields, B D; Foster, Brian; Froidevaux, Daniel; Fukugita, Masataka; Gaisser, Thomas K; Garren, Lynn; Gerber, Hans Jürg; Gerbier, G; Gilman, Frederick J; Haber, Howard E; Hagmann, Christian; Hewett, Joanne L; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hogan, Craig J; Höhler, Gerhard; Igo-Kemenes, Peter Miklos; Jackson, John David; Johnson, Kurtis F; Karlen, Dean A; Kayser, Boris; Kirkby, D; Klein, Spencer R; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Knowles, Ian G; Kreitz, Pat; Kuyanov, Yu V; Lahav, O; Langacker, Paul; Liddle, Andrew R; Littenberg, Laurence S; Manley, D Mark; Narain, M; Nason, Paolo; Nir, Yosef; Peacock, John A; Quinn, Helen R; Raby, Stuart A; Ratcliff, B N; Razuvaev, E A; Renk, Burkhard; Rolandi, Luigi; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenberg, Leslie J; Sachrajda, Christopher T C; Sakai, Y; Sanda, A I; Sarkar, S; Schmitt, Michael; Schneider, Olivier; Scott, Douglas; Seligman, William G; Shaevitz, Michael H; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn; Smoot, George F; Spanier, Stefan; Spieler, Helmuth; Spooner, N J C; Srednicki, Mark A; Stahl, Achim; Stanev, Todor; Suzuki, Mahiko; Tkachenko, N P; Trilling, George H; Valencia, German; Van Bibber, Karl; Vincter, Manuella G; Ward, D R; Webber, Bryan R; Whalley, Michael; Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Womersley, John William; Woody, Craig L; Zenin, O V; Zhu Ren Yuan

    2004-01-01

    The Review of Particle Physics and the abbreviated version, the Particle Physics Booklet, are reviews of the field of Particle Physics. This complete Review includes a compilation/evaluation of data on particle properties, called the "Particle Listings". These Listings include 1726 new measurements from 512 papers, in addition to the 20200 measurements from 5903 papers that first appeared in previous editions. The Review and the Booklet are published in even numbered years. This edition is an updating through December 2003 (and, in some areas, well into 2004).

  5. Minimal relativistic three-particle equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, J.

    1981-07-01

    A minimal self-consistent set of covariant and unitary three-particle equations is presented. Numerical results are obtained for three-particle bound states, elastic scattering and rearrangement of bound pairs with a third particle, and amplitudes for breakup into states of three free particles. The mathematical form of the three-particle bound state equations is explored; constraints are set upon the range of eigenvalues and number of eigenstates of these one parameter equations. The behavior of the number of eigenstates as the two-body binding energy decreases to zero in a covariant context generalizes results previously obtained non-relativistically by V. Efimov.

  6. On the Possible Trajectories of Particles with Spin. II. Particles in the Stationary Homogeneous Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Tarakanov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of spinning particles in the stationary homogeneous magnetic field is considered and all types of trajectories for massive and massless particles are found. It is shown that spin of particles in a magnetic field is always arranged parallel or antiparallel to the field. Helicity $e$ plays a role of electric charge. The oscillation frequency of massless particle in a magnetic field increases.

  7. Shock driven multiphase flow with particle evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Jeevan; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    The computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase system with particle evaporation is presented. The particle evaporation modifies the evolution of the interface due to the addition of the vapor phase to the gas. The effects can be quantitatively measured by studying various gas parameters like density, temperature, vorticity and particle properties like diameter and temperature. In addition, the size distribution of particles also modifies the development of instability as the larger size particles damp the evolution of interface in comparison to the smaller size particles. The simulation results are presented to study these effects using FLASH developed at the FLASH Center at the University of Chicago. The capabilities of FLASH for particle modeling were extended using the Particle in Cell (PIC) technique for coupling of mass, momentum, and energy between the particle and carrier gas. A seeded cylinder of gas with particles having either a single radius or a distribution of radii was studied. The enstrophy production and destruction mechanisms were explored to understand the reason for change in vorticity with particle size.

  8. Particle formation in ambient MALDI plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musapelo, Thabiso; Murray, Kermit K

    2011-09-01

    The ablated particle count and size distribution of four solid matrix materials commonly used for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) combined with a light scattering aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). The two particle sizing instruments allowed size measurements in the range from 10 nm to 20 μm. The four solid matrixes investigated were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-nitroaniline (NA), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapic acid (SA). A thin film of the matrix was deposited on a stainless steel target using the dried droplet method and was irradiated with a 337 nm nitrogen laser at atmospheric pressure. The target was rotated during the measurement. A large number of nanoparticles were produced, and average particle diameters ranged from 40 to 170 nm depending on the matrix and the laser fluence. These particles are attributed to agglomeration of smaller particles and clusters and/or hydrodynamic sputtering of melted matrix. A coarse particle component of the distribution was observed with diameters between 500 nm and 2 μm. The coarse particles were significantly lower in number but had a total mass that was comparable to that of the nanoparticles. The coarse particles are attributed to matrix melting and spallation. Two of the compounds, CHCA and SA, had a third particle size distribution component in the range of 10 to 30 nm, which is attributed to the direct ejection of clusters.

  9. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  10. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth's climate, public health, air quality, and hydrological and carbon cycles. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemical composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. We suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events.

  11. Traffic of indistinguishable particles in complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qing-Kuan; Zhu Jian-Yang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we apply a simple walk mechanism to the study of the traffic of many indistinguishable particles in complex networks. The network with particles stands for a particle system,and every vertex in the network stands for a quantum state with the corresponding energy determined by the vertex degree. Although the particles are indistinguishable,the quantum states can be distinguished. When the many indistinguishable particles walk randomly in the system for a long enough time and the system reaches dynamic equilibrium,we find that under different restrictive conditions the particle distributions satisfy different forms,including the Bose-Einstein distribution,the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the non-Fermi distribution (as we temporarily call it). As for the Bose-Einstein distribution,we find that only if the particle density is larger than zero,with increasing particle density,do more and more particles condense in the lowest energy level. While the particle density is very low,the particle distribution transforms from the quantum statistical form to the classically statistical form,I.e.,transforms from the Bose distribution or the Fermi distribution to the Boltzmann distribution. The numerical results fit well with the analytical predictions.

  12. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  13. Cosmic Rays and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.; Engel, Ralph; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. Cosmic rays; 2. Cosmic ray data; 3. Particle physics; 4. Hadronic interactions and accelerator data; 5. Cascade equations; 6. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos; 7. Neutrino masses and oscillations; 8. Muons and neutrinos underground; 9. Cosmic rays in the Galaxy; 10. Extragalactic propagation of cosmic rays; 11. Astrophysical - rays and neutrinos; 12. Acceleration; 13. Supernovae in the Milky Way; 14. Astrophysical accelerators and beam dumps; 15. Electromagnetic cascades; 16. Extensive air showers; 17. Very high energy cosmic rays; 18. Neutrino astronomy; A.1. Units, constants and definitions; A.2. References to flux measurements; A.3. Particle flux, density, and interaction cross section; A.4. Fundamentals of scattering theory; A.5. Regge amplitude; A.6. Glauber model of nuclear cross sections; A.7. Earth's atmosphere; A.8. Longitudinal development of air showers; A.9. Secondary positrons and electrons; A.10. Liouville's theorem and cosmic ray propagation; A.11. Cosmology and distances measures; A.12. The Hillas splitting algorithm; References; Index.

  14. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  15. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-12-31

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  16. Particle penetration and radiation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sigmund, Peter

    This book, which has evolved from the author’s lectures at the University of Copenhagen and the University of Southern Denmark, draws on his experience as an active researcher in the interaction of charged particles with matter over more than forty years. The emphasis is on the theoretical description of fundamental phenomena, and much attention has been given to classic topics such as: Rutherford scattering; the theory of particle stopping as developed by Bohr, Bethe, Bloch and Lindhard; the statistical description of energy loss as developed by Bohr, Bothe, Williams and Landau; and numerous more recent developments. An attempt has been made to provide at least one complete derivation of a theoretical description for all central aspects. The presentation is intended to respect the ideas of the original authors, but much effort has been invested in establishing a unified and appealing notation consistent with present-day standards. It is intended that this volume will satisfy a long-standing need for a text...

  17. Geneva University - Particle Physics seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Geneva 4 Tel. (022) 379 62 73 Fax (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 8 June 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium A Novel Experiment for the Search muon -> eee Prof. Andre Schoening, University of Heidelberg The absence of lepton-flavor changing processes, like the non-observation of the radiative decay mu -> e gamma, has been a miracle since the dawn of the Standard Model of Particle Physics and lead to the introduction of the concept of lepton family numbers. Several experiments in the last decade have shown clear evidence for neutrino oscillations. The neutrino mixing angles measured are known to be large. However, the discovery of lepton flavor violating (LFV) effects in the charged lepton sector is yet owing. After motivating the search for LFV in general I will discuss the physics potential of a search m...

  18. Method for producing size selected particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumdick, Gregory K.; Shin, Young Ho; Takeya, Kaname

    2016-09-20

    The invention provides a system for preparing specific sized particles, the system comprising a continuous stir tank reactor adapted to receive reactants; a centrifugal dispenser positioned downstream from the reactor and in fluid communication with the reactor; a particle separator positioned downstream of the dispenser; and a solution stream return conduit positioned between the separator and the reactor. Also provided is a method for preparing specific sized particles, the method comprising introducing reagent into a continuous stir reaction tank and allowing the reagents to react to produce product liquor containing particles; contacting the liquor particles with a centrifugal force for a time sufficient to generate particles of a predetermined size and morphology; and returning unused reagents and particles of a non-predetermined size to the tank.

  19. Flow of particle suspensions through porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.; Harouaka, A.

    1982-06-22

    A new attempt is made to study the mechanisms of particle invasions into porous media. The following subjects are described: A critical survey of the literature indicating that the mechanism of particle invasions is not known in sufficient detail. The pros and cons of existing particle measuring devices are briefly described. Results from a new laboratory study on particle characterizations are given. The results of the laboratory studies on the flow of particle suspensions through porous media (up to 200 md) are discussed. The effects of flow rate and particle concentrations on the amount of damage (i.e., permeability impairment) and depth of penetration (from core inlet towards outlet) are particularly emphasized. Filter methods (e.g., using millipore filter) cannot be used to determine particle invasions into porous medium. Any predictions of the injection problems based on millipore (or any other filter) measurements are useless and should be discarded.

  20. Cristobalite and Hematite Particles in Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopani, Martin; Kopaniova, A; Trnka, M; Caplovicova, M; Rychly, B; Jakubovsky, J

    2016-11-01

    Foreign substances get into the internal environment of living bodies and accumulate in various organs. Cristobalite and hematite particles in the glial cells of pons cerebri of human brain with diagnosis of Behhet disease with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive microanalysis (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with diffraction were identified. SEM with EDX revealed the matter of irregular micrometer-sized particles sometimes forming polyhedrons with fibrilar or stratified structure. It was found in some particles Ti, Fe, and Zn. Some particles contained Cu. TEM and electron diffraction showed particles of cristobalite and hematite. The presence of the particles can be a result of environmental effect, disruption of normal metabolism, and transformation of physiologically iron-ferrihydrite into more stable form-hematite. From the size of particles can be drawn the long-term accumulation of elements in glial cells.

  1. Indoor Particle Contamination in Airlaid Papermaking Workshop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junjie; WANG Meng; PEI Jingjing

    2006-01-01

    An onsite testing based on eight-site air sampling was carried out in an airlaid papermaking workshop in Tianjin, China. By theoretical calculation, super absorbent polymer (SAP) size and its existent state in indoor static airflow were obtained. SAP content in the sampled air was test ed through chemical analysis method and found to be 3.0-7.2 times that of the human health limit in production areas. The concentrations of total suspending particles (TSP) and respirable particles were achieved by weighing. Particles of the most concern differ for varied function areas. Particles smaller than 10 μm are mostly produced in the main production process, and 73%-90% particles generated in packing areas are larger than 10 μm. SAP raw material particles can easily changed to suspending form by inevitable extrusion and frication. Correlation between respirable particles andTSP agrees well with that in atmospheric environment.

  2. PNEUMATIC CONVEYING OF BIOMASS PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping; Cui

    2006-01-01

    Processes involving biomass are of growing interest, but handling and conveying biomass particles are challenging due to the unusual physical properties of biomass particles. This paper reviews recent work on pneumatic conveying of biomass particles, especially agricultural particles and pulp fibres. Experimental work has been mainly carried out to determine a range of parameters, such as pressure drop, particle velocity, flow regime and electrostatic charging for both horizontal and vertical conveying. Models ranging from empirical to CFD models are also being developed. Difficulties in representing turbulence and interactions among biomass particles and between the particles and fluid have so far limited the success of advanced modeling. Further work is needed to improve understanding of multiphase biomass pneumatic conveying and to assist in the development of biomass energy and conversion processes.

  3. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  4. Acceleration of Particles in Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles in balanced and imbalanced Alfv\\'{e}nic turbulence, relevant to the solar-wind problem. These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and non-resonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behaviour is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  5. Kerr Naked Singularities as Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Patil, Mandar

    2011-01-01

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by Kerr naked singularities. We consider a collision between particles dropped in from infinity at rest, which follow geodesic motion in the equatorial plane, with angular momentum of one of the particles in an appropriate finite range of values. The absence of an event horizon and the repulsive nature of angular momentum makes it possible for the initially infalling particle to turn back as an outgoing particle and then collide with another infalling particle. When these particles collide at a location close to what would have been the event horizon in the extremal Kerr blackhole case, the center of mass energy of collision turns out to be arbitrarily large depending on how close is the Kerr naked singularity to extremality. We briefly discuss the possible astrophysical consequences of this process and suggest that the fast rotating Kerr configurations could provide a good cosmic laboratory to probe ultra-high-energy physics.

  6. Particle acceleration at a reconnecting magnetic separator

    CERN Document Server

    Threlfall, J; Parnell, C E; Oskoui, S Eradat

    2014-01-01

    While the exact acceleration mechanism of energetic particles during solar flares is (as yet) unknown, magnetic reconnection plays a key role both in the release of stored magnetic energy of the solar corona and the magnetic restructuring during a flare. Recent work has shown that special field lines, called separators, are common sites of reconnection in 3D numerical experiments. To date, 3D separator reconnection sites have received little attention as particle accelerators. We investigate the effectiveness of separator reconnection as a particle acceleration mechanism for electrons and protons. We study the particle acceleration using a relativistic guiding-centre particle code in a time-dependent kinematic model of magnetic reconnection at a separator. The effect upon particle behaviour of initial position, pitch angle and initial kinetic energy are examined in detail, both for specific (single) particle examples and for large distributions of initial conditions. The separator reconnection model contains ...

  7. Soft Gels with Ordered Iron Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuxian; Liu, Bo; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    For a number of years we and others have investigated electrorheological (ER) gel systems comprising low-modulus elastomers mixed with various particles. Unlike ER fluids, the particles in gels do not change relative positions, thus creating model systems that can be used to check equilibrium theories of ER response. To make such materials, a magnetic field was used to align iron particles during the cure of a liquid silicone prepolymer in a sheet mold. Particle chains were made with as little as 0.5% particles, and aligned at angles from 0 to 45° to the normal. The gap between the particles was controlled by swelling the crosslinked material with additional prepolymer. The dependence of the ER effect on particle structuring in these materials was investigated experimentally using rheometry and dielectrometry. Also investigated were the properties of these materials as transducers and actuators.

  8. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples...... with very different porosities (4% and 26%). The three-dimensional pore systems derived from the tomograms were imported into DPD simulations and filled with spherical particles of variable diameter and with an optional attractive interaction to the pore surfaces. We found that diffusion significantly...... decreased to as much as 60% when particle size increased from 1% to 35% of the average pore diameter. When particles were attracted to the pore surfaces, even very small particles, diffusion was drastically inhibited, by as much as a factor of 100. Thus, the size of particles and their interaction...

  9. Void coalescence within periodic clusters of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C. I. A.; Worswick, M. J.; Pilkey, A. K.; Lloyd, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of particle clustering on void damage rates in a ductile material under triaxial loading conditions is examined using three-dimensional finite element analysis. An infinite material containing a regular distribution of clustered particles is modelled using a unit cell approach. Three discrete particles are introduced into each unit cell while a secondary population of small particles within the surrounding matrix is represented using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) constitutive equations. Deformation strain states characteristic of sheet metal forming are considered; that is, deep drawing, plane strain and biaxial stretching. Uniaxial tensile stress states with varying levels of superimposed hydrostatic tension are also examined. The orientation of a particle cluster with respect to the direction of major principal loading is shown to significantly influence failure strains. Coalescence of voids within a first-order particle cluster (consisting of three particles) is a stable event while collapse of inter-cluster ligaments leads to imminent material collapse through void-sheeting.

  10. Multiplex single particle analysis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, D; Romeo, G; Causa, F; De Santo, I; Netti, P A

    2014-10-21

    A straightforward way to measure separated micrometric sized particles in microfluidic flow is reported. The light scattering profile (LSP) of each single particle is fully characterized by using a CMOS-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus, ranging from 2° up to 30°. To ensure controlled particle passage through the incident laser, a viscoelastic 3D alignment effect by viscoelastic induced particle migration has been implemented in a simple and cost-effective microfluidic device. Different polystyrene particle sizes are measured in microfluidic flows and the obtained scattering signatures are matched with the Lorenz-Mie based scattering theory. The results confirm the possibility of using this apparatus for real multiplex particle analyses in microfluidic particle flows.

  11. ADSORPTION OF NANO-PARTICLES ON BUBBLE SURFACE IN NANO-PARTICLE SUSPENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buxuan Wang; Chunhui Li; Xiaofeng Peng

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of nano-particles on bubble surface is discussed for saturated boiling on thin wire of nano-particle suspensions. Owing to the decrease of surface tension for suspensions, the nano-particles tend to adsorb on the bubble surface to decrease the Gibbs free energy for stability, and meanwhile the velocity of nano-particles would be smaller than that of bubble growth. The long-range van der Waals force existing between "water particles" and nano-particles is considered the attractive force between the nano-particles and the bubble surface. Thus, the nano-particles would attach on the bubble surface if the particle-surface distance is smaller than its critical value. The distribution of nano-particles on the bubble surface and in the adjacent region is also investigated.

  12. An Instrument to Measure Aircraft Sulfate Particle Emissions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft particle emissions contribute a modest, but growing, portion of the overall particle emissions budget. Characterizing aircraft particle emissions is...

  13. Integral equation study of particle confinement effects in a polymer/particle mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, D; Trokhymchuk, A; Kalyuzhnyi, Y; Gee, R; Lacevic, N

    2007-05-09

    Integral equation theory techniques are applied to evaluate the structuring of the polymer when large solid particles are embedded into a bulk polymer melt. The formalism presented here is applied to obtain an insight into the filler particle aggregation tendency. We find that with the employed polymer-particle interaction model it is very unlikely that the particles will aggregate. We believe that in such a system aggregation and clustering can occur when the filler particles are dressed by tightly bound polymer layers.

  14. Investigations in Elementary Particle Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, Thomas J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Kephart, Thomas W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Scherrer, Robert J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-07-02

    The research interests of our three Co-PI’s complement each other very well. Kephart works mainly on models of particle unification in four or higher dimensions, on aspects of gravity such as inflation, black-holes, and the very early Universe, and on applications of knot theory and topology to various physical systems (including gluon dynamics). Scherrer works mainly on aspects of the intermediate-aged Universe, including dark matter and dark energy, and particle physics in the early Universe. Weiler works mainly on neutrino physics, dark matter signatures, and extreme particle-astrophysics in the late Universe, including origins of the highest-energy cosmic-rays and gamma-rays, and the future potential of neutrino astrophysics. Kephart and Weiler have lately devoted some research attention to the LHC and its reach for probing physics beyond the Standard Model. During the 3-year funding period, our grant supported one postdoc (Chiu Man Ho) and partially supported two students, Peter Denton and Lingjun Fu. Chiu Man collaborated with all three of the Co-PI’s during the 3-year funding period and published 16 refereed papers. Chiu Man has gone on to a postdoc with Steve Hsu at Michigan State University. Denton and Fu will both receive their PhDs during the 2014-15 academic year. The total number of our papers published in refereed journals by the three co-PIs during the period of this grant (2011-present) is 54. The total number of talks given by the group members during this time period, including seminars, colloquia, and conference presentations, is 47. Some details of the accomplishments of our DOE funded researchers during the grant period include Weiler being named a Simons Fellow in 2013. He presented an invited TEDx talk in 2012. His paper on closed timelike curves (2013) garnered a great deal of national publicity. Scherrer’s paper on the “little rip” (2011) fostered a new area of cosmological research, and the name “little rip” has now entered

  15. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  16. Turbulent resuspension of small nondeformable particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, M.; Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Rutgers-the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst.]|[Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1998-08-01

    An energy-balance resuspension model is modified and applied to the resuspension of a monolayer of nondeformable spherical particles. The particle-surface adhesive force is calculated from a microscopic model based on the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential. Pairwise additivity of intermolecular interactions is assumed and elastic flattening of the particles is neglected. From the resulting particle-surface interaction potential the natural frequency of vibration of a particle on a surface and the depth of the potential well are calculated. The particle resuspension rate is calculated using the results of a previously developed energy-balance model, where the influence of fluid flow on the bound particle motion is recognized. The effect of surface roughness is included by introducing an effective particle radius that results in log-normally distributed adhesive forces. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental results for the resuspension of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles from stainless steel surfaces. Particle resuspension due to turbulent fluid flow is important in the interaction of the atmosphere with various surfaces and in numerous industrial processes. For example, in the nuclear industry, fission-product aerosols released during a postulated severe accident in a Light Water Reactor may deposit and resuspend repeatedly in the vessel circuit and containment.

  17. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  18. Interactions between Janus particles and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles interact with cell membranes is of great importance in drug/gene delivery. In this paper, we investigate the interactions between Janus particles and membranes by using dissipative particle dynamics, and find that there exist two different modes (i.e., insertion and engulfment) in the Janus particle-membrane interactions. The initial orientation and properties of Janus particles have an important impact on the interactions. When the hydrophilic part of the particle is close to the membrane or the particle has a larger section area and higher hydrophilic coverage, the particle is more likely to be engulfed by the membrane. We also provide insights into the interactions between Janus particles and membranes containing lipid rafts, and find that a Janus particle could easily detach from a membrane after it is engulfed by the raft. The present study suggests a potential way to translocate Janus particles through membranes, which may give some significant suggestions on future nanoparticle design for drug delivery.

  19. Shock Interaction with Random Spherical Particle Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Salari, Kambiz; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we present results on fully resolved simulations of shock interaction with randomly distributed bed of particles. Multiple simulations were carried out by varying the number of particles to isolate the effect of volume fraction. Major focus of these simulations was to understand 1) the effect of the shockwave and volume fraction on the forces experienced by the particles, 2) the effect of particles on the shock wave, and 3) fluid mediated particle-particle interactions. Peak drag force for particles at different volume fractions show a downward trend as the depth of the bed increased. This can be attributed to dissipation of energy as the shockwave travels through the bed of particles. One of the fascinating observations from these simulations was the fluctuations in different quantities due to presence of multiple particles and their random distribution. These are large simulations with hundreds of particles resulting in large amount of data. We present statistical analysis of the data and make relevant observations. Average pressure in the computational domain is computed to characterize the strengths of the reflected and transmitted waves. We also present flow field contour plots to support our observations. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  1. Ratcheted electrophoresis of Brownian particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Mikołaj; Bishop, Kyle J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The realization of nanoscale machines requires efficient methods by which to rectify unbiased perturbations to perform useful functions in the presence of significant thermal noise. The performance of such Brownian motors often depends sensitively on their operating conditions—in particular, on the relative rates of diffusive and deterministic motions. In this letter, we present a type of Brownian motor that uses contact charge electrophoresis of a colloidal particle within a ratcheted channel to achieve directed transport or perform useful work against an applied load. We analyze the stochastic dynamics of this model ratchet to show that it functions under any operating condition—even in the limit of strong thermal noise and in contrast to existing ratchets. The theoretical results presented here suggest that ratcheted electrophoresis could provide a basis for electrochemically powered, nanoscale machines capable of transport and actuation of nanoscale components.

  2. Phosphorous doping a semiconductor particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gary Don; Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott

    1999-07-20

    A method (10) of phosphorus doping a semiconductor particle using ammonium phosphate. A p-doped silicon sphere is mixed with a diluted solution of ammonium phosphate having a predetermined concentration. These spheres are dried (16, 18), with the phosphorus then being diffused (20) into the sphere to create either a shallow or deep p-n junction. A good PSG glass layer is formed on the surface of the sphere during the diffusion process. A subsequent segregation anneal process is utilized to strip metal impurities from near the p-n junction into the glass layer. A subsequent HF strip procedure is then utilized to removed the PSG layer. Ammonium phosphate is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirement.

  3. Phosphorus doping a semiconductor particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, G.D.; Reynolds, J.S.

    1999-07-20

    A method of phosphorus doping a semiconductor particle using ammonium phosphate is disclosed. A p-doped silicon sphere is mixed with a diluted solution of ammonium phosphate having a predetermined concentration. These spheres are dried with the phosphorus then being diffused into the sphere to create either a shallow or deep p-n junction. A good PSG glass layer is formed on the surface of the sphere during the diffusion process. A subsequent segregation anneal process is utilized to strip metal impurities from near the p-n junction into the glass layer. A subsequent HF strip procedure is then utilized to removed the PSG layer. Ammonium phosphate is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirement. 1 fig.

  4. Strange Particle Production at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Timmins, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    We report STAR measurements of mid-rapidity yields for the $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $K^{0}_{S}$, $\\Xi^{-}$, $\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, $\\Omega^{-}$, and $\\bar{\\Omega}^{+}$ particles in Cu+Cu and Au+Au $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV collisions. We show that at a given number of participating nucleons, bulk strangeness production is higher in Cu+Cu collisions compared to Au+Au collisions at the same center of mass energy, counter to predictions from the Canonical formalism. We compare both the Cu+Cu and Au+Au yields to AMPT and EPOS predictions, and find they reproduce key qualitative aspects of the data. Finally, we investigate other scaling parameters and find bulk strangeness production for both the measured data and theoretical predictions, scales better with the number participants that undergo more than one collision.

  5. Relational Entropic Dynamics of Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ipek, Selman

    2016-01-01

    The general framework of entropic dynamics is used to formulate a relational quantum dynamics. The main new idea is to use tools of information geometry to develop an entropic measure of the mismatch between successive configurations of a system. This leads to an entropic version of the classical best matching technique developed by J. Barbour and collaborators. The procedure is illustrated in the simple case of a system of N particles with global translational symmetry. The generalization to other symmetries whether global (rotational invariance) or local (gauge invariance) is straightforward. The entropic best matching allows a quantum implementation Mach's principles of spatial and temporal relationalism and provides the foundation for a method of handling gauge theories in an informational framework.

  6. Non-accelerator particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Non-accelerator particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, R. I.; Lane, C. E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector, to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos. The NuIMB project seeks to: refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and to develop technology for improved liquid scintillators, very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments, and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  8. Non-accelerator particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-08-01

    The goals of this research were the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We have worked on the MACRO experiment, which is employing a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos; the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments using a one kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  9. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  10. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Kenneth W. (Park Ridge, IL); Delayen, Jean R. (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium.

  11. Characterisation of TRISO fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez H, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Carretera Saltillo-Monterrey Km 13.5, 25900 Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila (Mexico); Yang, D., E-mail: eddie.lopez@cinvestav.edu.mx [The Academy of Armoured Forces Engineering, Science and Technology on Remanufacturing Laboratory, 100072 Beijing (China)

    2012-10-15

    The TRISO (tri structural isotropic) coated fuel particle is a key component contributing to the inherent safety of the High Temperature Reactor. A uranium kernel is coated with three layers of pyrolytic carbon and one of silicon carbide. The purpose of these coatings is to work as a miniature fission product containment vessel capable of enclosing all important radio nuclei under normal and off-normal reactor operating conditions. Due to the importance of these coatings, is of great interest to establish characterisation techniques capable of providing a detailed description of their microstructure and physical properties. Here we describe the use of Raman spectroscopy and two modulator generalised ellipsometry to study the anisotropy and thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon coatings, as well as the stoichiometry of the silicon carbide coatings and fibres. (Author)

  12. [Health significance of inhaled particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillissen, A; Gessner, C; Hammerschmidt, S; Hoheisel, G; Wirtz, H

    2006-03-24

    Particulates refer to particles, dust, dirt, soot and aerosol mists that has suspended in the surrounding air. They may consist of solids of various forms including fibres or liquids. Long term exposure to silicon dioxide containing dusts (crystalline silica: quartz, tridymite, cristobalite, coesite, stishovite) may cause pneumoconiosis in the form of acute or/either chronic silicosis. Asbestos refers to a divers family of crystalline hydrated fibrous siliates typically exhibiting a greater tha 3:1 length ot diameter ratio. It is subdivided into serpentine (Chrysotile) and amphibole (crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite, tremolite, actinolite). Exposure to asbestos fibres may cause lung fibrosis and promote cancer of the lung or the pleura. Besides the induction of malignant diseases dust exposure may result in obstructive as well as restrictive lung diseases which may be compensate in case of the recognition as a occupational diseases. Other occupational exposures leading to pneumoconiosis are caused be talc, or metals including aluminium containing dusts. Also the group of man-made mineral (MMMFs) or vitreous fibres (MMVFs), including glass wool, rock wool, slag wool, glass filaments, microfibres, refractory ceramic fibres are bioactive under certain experimental conditions. Although it has been shown that MMMFs may cause malignancies when injected intraperitoneally in high quantities in rodents, inhalation trials and human studies could not reproduce these results in the same precision. Fine particles (particulate matter = PM) comprise one of the most widespread and harmful air pollutants in the industrialized world. PM may cause worsening of asthma and other respiratory diseases, reduce lung function development in children, potentially increased the risk of premature death in the elderly and enhance mortality from cardiac diseases. Because of the small size PM2.5 is seen to be even more hazardous than PM10.

  13. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watanabe, Takehito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Particles laying motionless at the bed of rivers, lakes and estuaries can be put into motion when the shear stress exerted by the flow on the particles exceeds the critical shear stress. When these particles start their motion they can either remain suspended by long periods of time (suspended load) or move close to the bed (bed load). Particles are transported as bed load in three different modes: Sliding, rolling and saltation. Saltation is usually described as the bouncing motion of sediment particles in a layer a few particle diameters thick. The amount of particles and the bed-load mode in which they move depend on the particle size and density, and the flow intensity, usually quantified by the shear velocity. The bottom shear stress in natural streams will most likely be large enough to set saltation as the most important bed-load transport mechanism among all three modes. Thus, studying the saltation process is crucial for the overall understanding of bed-load transport. Particularly, numerical simulations of this process have been providing important insight regarding the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in it. Several processes occur when particles are saltating near the bed: i) Particles collide with the bed, ii) they "fly" between collisions with the bed, as a result of their interaction with the fluid flow, iii) and they collide among themselves. These processes can be simulated using a three-dimensional Eulerian-Lagrangian model. In order to mimic these processes we have experimented with an averaged turbulent flow field represented by the logarithmic law of the wall, and with a more involved approach in which a computed turbulent velocity field for a flat plate was used as a surrogate of the three-dimensional turbulent conditions present close to stream beds. Since flat-plate and open-channel boundary layers are essentially different, a dynamic similarity analysis was performed showing that the highly-resolved three

  15. Interplay of particle shape and suspension properties: a study of cube-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audus, Debra J; Hassan, Ahmed M; Garboczi, Edward J; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-05-01

    With advances in anisotropic particle synthesis, particle shape is now a feasible parameter for tuning suspension properties. However, there is a need to determine how these newly synthesized particles affect suspension properties and a need to solve the inverse problem of inferring the particle shape from property measurements. Either way, accurate suspension property predictions are required. Towards this end, we calculated a set of dilute suspension properties for a family of cube-like particles that smoothly interpolate between spheres and cubes. Using three conceptually different methods, we numerically computed the electrical properties of particle suspensions, including the intrinsic conductivity of perfect conductors and insulators. We also considered hydrodynamic properties relevant to particle solutions including the hydrodynamic radius, the intrinsic viscosity and the intrinsic solvent diffusivity. Additionally, we determined the second osmotic virial coefficient using analytic expressions along with numerical integration. As the particles became more cube-like, we found that all of the properties investigated become more sensitive to particle shape.

  16. Particle-fluid interaction forces as the source of acceleration PDF invariance in particle size

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The conditions allowing particle suspension in turbulent flow are of interest in many applications, but understanding them is complicated both by the nature of turbulence and by the interaction of flow with particles. Observations on small particles indicate an invariance of acceleration PDFs of small particles independent of size. We show to be true the postulated role of particle/fluid interaction forces in maintaining suspension. The 3D-PTV method, applied for two particle phases (tracers and inertial particles) simultaneously, was used to obtain velocity and acceleration data, and through the use of the particle's equation of motion the magnitude of forces representing either the flow or the particle interaction were derived and compared. The invariance of PDFs is shown to extend to the component forces, and lift forces are shown to be significant.

  17. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  18. Baryogenesis via Particle-Antiparticle Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Ipek, Seyda

    2016-01-01

    CP violation, which is crucial for producing the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, is enhanced in particle-antiparticle oscillations. We study particle-antiparticle oscillations (of a particle with mass O(100 GeV)) with CP violation in the early Universe in the presence of interactions with O(ab-fb) cross-sections. We show that, if baryon-number-violating interactions exist, a baryon asymmetry can be produced via out-of-equilibrium decays of oscillating particles. As a concrete example we study a $U(1)_R$-symmetric, R-parity-violating SUSY model with pseudo-Dirac gauginos, which undergo particle-antiparticle oscillations. Taking bino to be the lightest $U(1)_R$-symmetric particle, and assuming it decays via baryon-number-violating interactions, we show that bino-antibino oscillations can produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  19. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Bowen, Warwick P

    2009-01-01

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper we show that quadrant detection is non-optimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacy of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that an order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  20. Physalis: a New Method for Particle Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shu; Oguz, Hasan; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2000-11-01

    A new computational method for the full Navier-Stokes viscous flow past cylinders and spheres is described and illustrated with preliminary results. Since, in the rest frame, the velocity vanishes on the particle, the Stokes equations apply in the immediate neighborhood of the surface. The analytic solutions of these equations available for both spheres and cylinders permit to effectively remove the particle, the effect of which is replaced by a consistency condition on the nodes of the computational grid that surround the particle. This condition is satisfied iteratively by a method that solves the field equations over the entire computational domain disregarding the presence of the particles, so that fast solvers can be used. The procedure eliminates the geometrical complexity of multi-particle simulations and permits to simulate disperse flows containing a large number of particles with a moderate computatonal cost. Supported by DOE and Japanese MESSC.

  1. Particles formation in an expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescoute, E.; Hallo, L.; Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Stenz, C. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA, CNRS-CEA, 33 - Talence (France); Hebert, D.; Chevalier, J.M.; Rullier, J.L.; Palmier, S. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France)

    2009-08-15

    Interaction of a laser beam with a target generates a high velocity expanding plasma plume, solid debris and liquid nano- and micro-particles. They are produced from plasma recombination and vapor condensation and can be deposited on optical elements located nearby the target. Two distinct kinds of particles were observed depending on the temperature achieved in the plasma plume: large micrometer-size fragments for temperatures lower than the critical temperature, and very small nanometer-size particles for higher temperatures. The paper presents experimental observations of fragments and nano-particles in plasma plumes and a comparison with models. A good agreement has been found for nano-particle sizes and distributions. This simple modeling can also be used for nuclei production in the nanosecond time scale. Our estimates show that particle size can be correlated to laser wavelength and fluences.

  2. Synthesis of Nano-Particles in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue

    energy expression.Furthermore, the model is validated by comparison with experimental data of the flame synthesis of titania by combustion of TiCl4 previously presented by Pratsinis et al. (1996).The combination of particle dynamics and CFD simulations has proved to be an efficient method......The scope of this work is to investigate the synthesis of aluminum oxide particles in flames from the combustion of an aluminum alkoxide precursor.A general introduction to particles formation in the gas phase is presented with emphasis on the mechanisms that control the particle morphology after...... for the analysis of particle formation in flames. Good results for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. Therefore, the method should be useful as a tool for the optimization and/or design of flame processes for particle production....

  3. Modeling of magnetic particle suspensions for simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the book is to highlight the modeling of magnetic particles with different shapes and magnetic properties, to provide graduate students and young researchers information on the theoretical aspects and actual techniques for the treatment of magnetic particles in particle-based simulations. In simulation, we focus on the Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, lattice Boltzmann and stochastic rotation dynamics (multi-particle collision dynamics) methods. The latter two simulation methods can simulate both the particle motion and the ambient flow field simultaneously. In general, specialized knowledge can only be obtained in an effective manner under the supervision of an expert. The present book is written to play such a role for readers who wish to develop the skill of modeling magnetic particles and develop a computer simulation program using their own ability. This book is therefore a self-learning book for graduate students and young researchers. Armed with this knowledge,...

  4. Particle size characterization by ultrasonic attenuation spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxu Su; Minghua Xue; Xiaoshu Cai; Zhitao Shang; Feng Xu

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to extracting information from signals of broadband ultrasonic attenuation spectrum for effective utilization in particle size characterization. The single particle scattering model and the coupled-phase model are formulated simultaneously, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is established, and a convergence criterion for calculation is quantified. Demonsa'ation inversion by the optimum regularization factor method is carded out to yield typical numerical results for discussion. With the experimental set-up developed by the Institute of Particle and Two-Phase Flow Measurement (IPTFM) at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, sand sediment particle size is measured by attenuation spectrum and analyzed using the above inversion algorithm and theoretical models. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, results are compared with those obtained by microscopy.

  5. Particle Merging Algorithm for PIC Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Vranic, Marija; Martins, Joana L; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2014-01-01

    Particle-in-cell merging algorithms aim to resample dynamically the six-dimensional phase space occupied by particles without distorting substantially the physical description of the system. Whereas various approaches have been proposed in previous works, none of them seemed to be able to conserve fully charge, momentum, energy and their associated distributions. We describe here an alternative algorithm based on the coalescence of N massive or massless particles, considered to be close enough in phase space, into two new macro-particles. The local conservation of charge, momentum and energy are ensured by the resolution of a system of scalar equations. Various simulation comparisons have been carried out with and without the merging algorithm, from classical plasma physics problems to extreme scenarios where quantum electrodynamics is taken into account, showing in addition to the conservation of local quantities, the good reproducibility of the particle distributions. In case where the number of particles o...

  6. Particle Behavior at Anisotropically Curved Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnnis, Kathleen; Zeng, Chuan; Davidovitch, Benny; Dinsmore, Anthony; Russell, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    A particle bound to an anisotropically curved liquid interface, such as a cylinder or catenoid, cannot maintain a constant contact angle without deforming the interface. Theory suggests that the particles will experience a force that depends on the interfacial shape and migrate to minimize the total interfacial energy. To test these predictions, particles were deposited on top of liquid semi-cylinders of ionic liquid or melted polystyrene confined on chemically patterned surfaces. Particles were also deposited on liquid catenoid structures created by placing a melted polymer film under an electric field. The location of the particles on these structures was observed by optical, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy. The implications for the directed assembly of particles and stability of Pickering emulsions are also discussed.

  7. Morphology of retorted oil shale particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.C.; Mahajan, O.P.

    The formation of two distinct coked particle morphotypes, namely exfoliated and peripheral, during oil shale retorting and their implications toward the coking mechanism are discussed. Rapid heating causes swelling, exfoliation, and formation of a matrix of veinlets and cracks; these changes lead to uniform coking within the particle body. In contrast, slow heating produces the peripheral morphotype with a low coke density at the center and a high coke density at the periphery. The difference in the coking morphology of the two particle types has been explained on the basis of kerogen pyrolysis kinetics. Of the two morphotypes, peripheral coke makes the particles stronger and more resistant to size attrition. In addition to the formation of coke in the particle body of the two morphotypes, coke is also formed on the outer surface of both the particle types. It has been concluded that more coke is produced from the secondary decomposition reactions than directly from the kerogen itself. 25 references, 8 figures.

  8. Avalanche of particles in evaporating coffee drops

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Snoeijer, Jacco; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    The pioneering work of Deegan et al. [Nature 389, (1997)] showed how a drying sessile droplet suspension of particles presents a maximum evaporating flux at its contact line which drags liquid and particles creating the well known coffee stain ring. In this Fluid Dynamics Video, measurements using micro Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking clearly show an avalanche of particles being dragged in the last moments, for vanishing contact angles and droplet height. This explains the different characteristic packing of the particles in the layers of the ring: the outer one resembles a crystalline array, while the inner one looks more like a jammed granular fluid. Using the basic hydrodynamic model used by Deegan et al. [Phys. Rev. E 62, (2000)] it will be shown how the liquid radial velocity diverges as the droplet life comes to an end, yielding a good comparison with the experimental data.

  9. Rotational Diffusion of Particles in Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, Evan; Meyer, Colin; Byron, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    We experimentally compare the rotation of spherical and ellipsoidal particles in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. We find that the particle orientation is well described by a Gaussian diffusion process. This theoretical model would predict that the Lagrangian autocorrelation function for angular velocity is a negative exponential. We measure this Lagrangian autocorrelation function using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) applied to particles whose size is within the inertial subrange of the ambient turbulence. The SPIV resolves 3 velocity components in a nearly 2-dimensional planar volume, which we use as inputs for a nonlinear optimization to quantify the solid body rotation of the particles. This provides us the angular velocity timeseries for individual particles. Through ensemble statistics, we determine the Lagrangian autocorrelation function of angular velocity, from which we can quantify the turbulent rotational diffusivity and its behavior between the extremes of short-term non-Fickian transport and long-term Fickian diffusion.

  10. Electromagnetic Radiation and Motion of a Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    2003-01-01

    A relativistically covariant equation of motion for arbitrarily shaped dust particle under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived. Thermal emission is considered, also. The particle is neutral in charge. The equation of motion is expressed in terms of particle's optical properties, standardly used in optics of stationary particles. Orbital motion and osculating orbital elements are discussed. Simple analytical equations for secular changes of osculating orbital elements are derived in detail for the special case known as the Poynting-Robertson effect -- both cases are considered: i) central acceleration is given by gravity and radial component of radiation pressure independent on particle's velocity, and, ii) central acceleration is given by gravity and the radiation force corresponds to the disturbing force. The latter case yields results which may be compared with secular orbital evolution in terms of orbital elements for arbitrarily shaped dust particle. Secular changes of orbital elements taki...

  11. An introduction to particle dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    What is the dark matter that fills the Universe and binds together galaxies? How was it produced? What are its interactions and particle properties?The paradigm of dark matter is one of the key developments at the interface of cosmology and elementary particle physics. It is also one of the foundations of the standard cosmological model. This book presents the state of the art in building and testing particle models for dark matter. Each chapter gives an analysis of questions, research directions, and methods within the field. More than 200 problems are included to challenge and stimulate the reader's knowledge and provide guidance in the practical implementation of the numerous 'tools of the trade' presented. Appendices summarize the basics of cosmology and particle physics needed for any quantitative understanding of particle models for dark matter.This interdisciplinary textbook is essential reading for anyone interested in the microscopic nature of dark matter as it manifests itself in particle physics ex...

  12. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  13. Laser Pulse Heating of Spherical Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Luk'Yanchuk, Boris S.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of spherical metal particles with the sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. We employ the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem and solve the heat-transfer equation to determine the maximum temperature rise at the particle surface as a function of optical and thermometric parameters of the problem. Primary attention is paid to the case when the thermal diffusivity of the particle is much larger than that of the environment, as it is in the case of metal particles in fluids. We show that, in this case, for any given duration of the laser pulse, the maximum temperature rise as a function of the particle size reaches a maximum at a certain finite size of the particle. We suggest simple approximate analytical expressions for this dependence, which cover the entire parameter range of the problem and agree well with direct numerical simulations.

  14. Radiation Reaction for a Charged Brownian Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, A A

    2002-01-01

    As it is known a model of a charged particle with finite size is a good tool to consider the effects of self- action and backreaction, caused by electromagnetic radiation. In this work the "size" of a charged particle is induced by its stochastic Brownian vibration. Appropriate equation of particle's motion with radiation force is derived. It is shown that the solutions of this equation correctly describe the effects of radiation reaction.

  15. Some ethical questions in particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Authors will discuss a few ethical questions in today's particle physics: high costs and purported dangers of Big Science projects, relevance of fundamental research for society and the way particle physicists fill their duty to communicate with the public. Examples will be given including the story of a possible mini-black hole creation at CERN and two outreach activities for high school students, International Particle Physics Masterclasses and Cascade competition.

  16. Multi-particle dynamical systems and polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, Maria V.; Kudryashov, Nikolai A.

    2016-05-01

    Polynomial dynamical systems describing interacting particles in the plane are studied. A method replacing integration of a polynomial multi-particle dynamical system by finding polynomial solutions of partial differential equations is introduced. The method enables one to integrate a wide class of polynomial multi-particle dynamical systems. The general solutions of certain dynamical systems related to linear second-order partial differential equations are found. As a by-product of our results, new families of orthogonal polynomials are derived.

  17. The review-of-particle-properties system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Thomas G.

    1984-08-01

    The Berkeley Particle Data Group is engaged in a major modernization of its primary project, the Review of Particle Properties, a compilation of experimental data on elementary particles. The goal of this modernization is to develop an integrated system for data storage, manipulation, interactive access and publication using modern techniques for database management, text processing and phototypesetting. The existing system and the plans for modernization are described. The group's other projects and the computer systems used are also discussed.

  18. Bayesian Particle Tracking of Traffic Flows

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian particle filter for tracking traffic flows that is capable of capturing non-linearities and discontinuities present in flow dynamics. Our model includes a hidden state variable that captures sudden regime shifts between traffic free flow, breakdown and recovery. We develop an efficient particle learning algorithm for real time on-line inference of states and parameters. This requires a two step approach, first, resampling the current particles, with a mixture predictive ...

  19. Bayesian target tracking based on particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    For being able to deal with the nonlinear or non-Gaussian problems, particle filters have been studied by many researchers. Based on particle filter, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) proposal function is applied to Bayesian target tracking. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, the resampling step, etc novel techniques are also introduced into Bayesian target tracking. And the simulation results confirm the improved particle filter with these techniques outperforms the basic one.

  20. An Owner's Guide to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, T.J.; Pearce, F. R.; Thomas, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    We present a practical guide to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (\\SPH) and its application to astrophysical problems. Although remarkably robust, \\SPH\\ must be used with care if the results are to be meaningful since the accuracy of \\SPH\\ is sensitive to the arrangement of the particles and the form of the smoothing kernel. In particular, the initial conditions for any \\SPH\\ simulation must consist of particles in dynamic equilibrium. We describe some of the numerical difficulties that may be...

  1. Study on Picking Single Micro Uranium Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; ZHANG; Yan; ZHAO; Yong-gang; LU; Jie

    2012-01-01

    <正>From isotopic ratio of a single particle, plenty of information can be inferred, such as its forming process, origin and so on. These information are essential and wildly used for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensic and geology. To evaluate the capability of the measurement of isotopic ratio in individual particle by secondary ion mass spectrometry, particles of five different diameters (1, 5, 10, 20, 50 μm) were picked by micromanipulator system.

  2. Rectification Efficiency of Two Harmonically Coupled Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lian-Xiu

    2009-01-01

    @@ Transportation properties of two harmonically coupled particles moving in a flashing or rocking ratchet potential are investigated in terms of Langevin simulation. The efficiency for rectification of non-equilibrium fluctuation is calculated by using a new definition. The results show that both the average current and efficiency of two coupled particles in the flashing ratchet are larger than that of a single particle and these quantities are non-monotonous functions of the potential remaining time.

  3. Particles separation in a cyclone device cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilevsky Michail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of the methods for calculating the efficiency for particles separation in these devices is the subject of article. Finding data show that the particles are discharged from the central zone to periphery by diffusive transport in the zone of high centripetal accelerations. It is found that the central zone is the ejection effect zone on the paraxial flow and intense discharge particle zone. The concentrations distribution and distribution of fractional efficiencies are presented.

  4. Modern String Theory and Particle Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetic, M.

    2015-01-01

    String theory, as the prime candidate for quantum unification of particle physics and gravity, sheds light on important fundamental questions such as the microscopic structure of black holes and the geometric origin of particle physics. We review these developments such as the introduction of extended objects - Dirichlet branes - and highlight the important geometric role of these objects in deriving particle physics from string theory. We also highlight recent progress made in deriving partic...

  5. PREPARATION OF SPHERICAL URANIUM DIOXIDE PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, R.P. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1963-04-30

    This patent relates to the preparation of high-density, spherical UO/sub 2/ particles 80 to 150 microns in diameter. Sinterable UO/sub 2/ powder is wetted with 3 to 5 weight per cent water and tumbled for at least 48 hours. The resulting spherical particles are then sintered. The sintered particles are useful in dispersion-type fuel elements for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  6. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkens, Bart, E-mail: blipkens@wne.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Western New England University, Springfield, Massachusetts, 01119 (United States); Ilinskii, Yurii A., E-mail: ilinskii@gmail.com; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A., E-mail: zheniazabolotskaya@gmail.com [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713–8029 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  7. Diffusion of oriented particles in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, René [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Centre for Nonlinear Studies, Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Prehl, Janett [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Herrmann, Heiko [Centre for Nonlinear Studies, Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Hoffmann, Karl Heinz, E-mail: hoffmann@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-11-29

    Diffusion of particles in porous media often shows subdiffusive behavior. Here, we analyze the dynamics of particles exhibiting an orientation. The features we focus on are geometrical restrictions and the dynamical consequences of the interactions between the local surrounding structure and the particle orientation. This interaction can lead to particles getting temporarily stuck in parts of the structure. Modeling this interaction by a particular random walk dynamics on fractal structures we find that the random walk dimension is not affected while the diffusion constant shows a variety of interesting and surprising features.

  8. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, 19W Memorial Dr, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Mohapatra, S. [Dynalene Inc., 5250W Coplay Rd, Whitehall, Pennsylvania 18052 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  9. Biosensors based on directed assembly of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2009-02-03

    A sensor system for detecting an effector or cofactor comprises (a) a nucleic acid enzyme; (b) a substrate for the nucleic acid enzyme, comprising a first polynucleotide; (c) a first set of particles comprising a second polynucleotide at least partially complementary to the substrate, where the polynucleotide is attached to the particles at its 3' terminus; and (d) a second set of particles comprising a third polynucleotide at least partially complementary to the substrate, where the polynucleotide is attached to the particles at its 5' terminus.

  10. Micromagnetic simulation of a ferromagnetic particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntallis N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the magnetic behaviour of a ferromagnetic particle has been investigated by means of micromagnetic modelling, using the Finite Element Method. The simulations were performed on an ellipsoidal particle with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy by varying the anisotropy constant, the shape and dimensions of the particle. The results indicate the critical particle size for different reversal modes. Above a critical size the formation and motion of domain walls is clearly observed. The associated nucleation and coercive fields are estimated from the demagnetization curves.

  11. Constrained Traffic of Particles on Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-Kuan; ZHU Jian-Yang

    2011-01-01

    We study the traffic of particles on complex networks under constraints. The constraints we propose are the different interactions between particles and the limited capability of node holding particles. We give the grand partition function of the system and find the distributions of particles at the dynamically balanced point.Then,we investigate the internal relations among the theories of classical statistics,quantum statistics and the zero range process.Finally,we find the finite temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation.Numerical results verify our theoretical expectations.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  13. Charged particles constrained to a curved surface

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We study the motion of charged particles constrained to arbitrary two-dimensional curved surfaces but interacting in three-dimensional space via the Coulomb potential. To speed-up the interaction calculations, we use the parallel compute capability of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) of todays graphics boards. The particles and the curved surfaces are shown using the Open Graphics Library (OpenGL). The paper is intended to give graduate students, who have basic experiences with electrostatics and differential geometry, a deeper understanding in charged particle interactions and a short introduction how to handle a many particle system using parallel computing on a single home computer

  14. Further Problems with Integral Spin Charged Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the Lagrangian density of quantum theories of electrically charged particles is analyzed. It is pointed out that a well known and self-consistent expression exists for the electromagnetic interactions of a spin-1/2 Dirac particle. On the other hand, using the Noether theorem, it is shown that no such expression exists for the spin-0 Klein-Gordon charged particle as well as for the W spin-1 particle. It is also explained why effective expressions used in practical analysis of collider data cannot be a part of a self-consistent theory. The results cast doubt on the validity of the electroweak theory.

  15. Particle Filter for Estimation and Tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-zhen WANG; Zeng-shun ZHAO; Xiao-wei AN; Shu-xia TIAN

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the particle filter technique has been widely used in tracking, estimation and navigation. In this paper, the authors described several practical filters including the general practical, the extended Kaman practical, and the unscented particle filters. And they explained the degeneracy problem in the practical filter process, and introduced some solved methods. Finally they demonstrated the estimation of different particle filters in non-liner and non-Gaussian situation respectively. The result proved the unscented particle filter had the best performance.

  16. Granular dampers: does particle shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtavakoli, Hamzeh; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    By means of particle-based numerical simulations using the discrete element method, we address the question of how the performance of granular dampers is affected by the shape of the granular particles. In consistence with previous experiments performed with nearly spherical particles we find that independently of the particles’ shape, the granular system is characterized by a gas-like regime for small amplitudes of the container’s oscillation and by a collect-and-collide regime for large amplitude forcing. Both regimes are separated by an optimal operation mode—the critical amplitude of the damping oscillation for which the energy dissipation is maximal—which is independent of the particle shape for given conditions of particle mass, material properties and number of particles. However, in the gas-like regime, we find that spherical particles lead to more efficient energy dissipation compared to complex shaped particles of the same mass. In this regime, a dependence on the damper’s efficiency on the particle shape is found.

  17. Unbound particles in dark matter halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Loeb, Abraham; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2013-06-13

    We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

  18. Particle Mesh Hydrodynamics for Astrophysics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We present a particle method for the simulation of three dimensional compressible hydrodynamics based on a hybrid Particle-Mesh discretization of the governing equations. The method is rooted on the regularization of particle locations as in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The rSPH method was recently introduced to remedy problems associated with the distortion of computational elements in SPH, by periodically re-initializing the particle positions and by using high order interpolation kernels. In the PMH formulation, the particles solely handle the convective part of the compressible Euler equations. The particle quantities are then interpolated onto a mesh, where the pressure terms are computed. PMH, like SPH, is free of the convection CFL condition while at the same time it is more efficient as derivatives are computed on a mesh rather than particle-particle interactions. PMH does not detract from the adaptive character of SPH and allows for control of its accuracy. We present simulations of a benchmark astrophysics problem demonstrating the capabilities of this approach.

  19. Observing thermomagnetic stability of nonideal magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    The thermomagnetic behavior of remanence-induced magnetite (Fe3O4) particles in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range (similar to 0.1-10 mu m), which dominate the magnetic signature of many rock lithologies, is investigated using off-axis electron holography. Construction of magnetic induction...... of the Fe3O4 grain, in this instance, remains thermally stable close to its unblocking temperature and exhibits a similar in-plane remanent state upon cooling; i.e., the particle is effectively behaving like a uniaxial single-domain particle to temperatures near T-C. Such particles are thought to be robust...

  20. Orientation specific deposition of mesoporous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kjellman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a protocol for a facile orientation specific deposition of plate-like mesoporous SBA-15 silica particles onto a surface (mesopores oriented normal to surface. A drop of an aqueous dispersion of particles is placed on the surface and water vaporizes under controlled relative humidity. Three requirements are essential for uniform coverage: particle dispersion should not contain aggregates, a weak attraction between particles and surface is needed, and evaporation rate should be low. Aggregates are removed by stirring/sonication. Weak attraction is realized by introducing cationic groups to the surface. Insight into the mechanisms of the so-called coffee stain effect is also provided.