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Sample records for antisense peptide nucleic

  1. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...... and sequence specificity. In an E. coli cell extract, efficient inhibition is observed when using PNA concentrations in the nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations are required for inhibition in growing cells. A mutant strain of E. coli that is more permeable to antibiotics also is more...... susceptible to antisense PNAs than the wild type. This chapter details methods for testing the antisense activities of PNA in E. coli. As an example of the specific antisense inhibition possible, we show the effects of an anti-beta-galactosidase PNA in comparison to control PNAs. With improvements in cell...

  2. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    peptides known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is attracting wide attention for a variety of biologically active molecules. CPP-mediated delivery is typically based on the covalent conjugation of the (therapeutic) cargo to CPPs, and is particularly relevant for the delivery of noncharged RNA...... interference agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and morpholino oligomers. Although chemical conjugation to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of PNAs, the bioavailability (and hence antisense activity) of CPP-PNA -conjugates is still highly limited by endocytotic entrapment...

  3. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugates as carriers for cellular delivery of antisense oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the merits of a novel delivery strategy for the antisense oligomers based on cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a carrier PNA with sequence complementary to part of the antisense oligomer. The effect of these carrier CPP-PNAs was evaluated by using antisense PNA targeting...... splicing correction of the mutated luciferase gene in the HeLa pLuc705 cell line, reporting cellular (nuclear) uptake of the antisense PNA via luciferase activity measurement. Carrier CPP-PNA constructs were studied in terms of construct modification (with octaarginine and/or decanoic acid) and carrier PNA...... length (to adjust binding affinity). In general, the carrier CPP-PNA constructs including the ones with decanoyl modification provided significant increase of the activity of unmodified antisense PNA as well as of antisense octaarginine-PNA conjugates. Antisense activity, and by inference cellular...

  4. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    and therefore mechanisms that promote endosomal escape (or avoid the endosomal route) are required for improving bioavailability. A variety of auxiliary agents (chloroquine, calcium ions, or lipophilic photosensitizers) has this effect, but improved, unaided delivery would be highly advantageous in...... particular for future in vivo applications. We find that simply conjugating a lipid domain (fatty acid) to the cationic peptide (a CatLip conjugate) increases the biological effect of the corresponding PNA (CatLip) conjugates in a luciferase cellular antisense assay up to 2 orders of magnitude. The effect...... increases with increasing length of the fatty acid (C8-C16) but in parallel also results in increased cellular toxicity, with decanoic acid being optimal. Furthermore, the relative enhancement is significantly higher for Tat peptide compared to oligoarginine. Confocal microscopy and chloroquine enhancement...

  5. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E;

    2012-01-01

    have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA...

  6. Cellular delivery and antisense effects of peptide nucleic acid conjugated to polyethyleneimine via disulfide linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Peter R; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    moiety) and further reacted this with a cysteine PNA. The level of modification was determined spectrophotometrically with high accuracy, and the PNA transfection efficiency of the conjugates was evaluated in an antisense luciferase splice-correction assay using HeLa pLuc705 cells. We find that PEI....... Finally, the method can be easily modified to allow for co-conjugation of other small molecules in a high-throughput screening assay that does not require a purification step....

  7. Comparative study on imaging of 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense peptide nucleic acid in tumor and inflammation animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of 99Tcm labeled survivin mRNA antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as an imaging agent in the specific diagnosis for carcinoma. Methods: Survivin mRNA antisense PNA was labeled directly with 99Tcm by the ligand-exchange method. Twenty nude mice with lung carcinoma A549 xenografts were randomly divided into 4 groups. Three groups were used for biodistribution study and one group was used for imaging study. Other twenty mice infected by staphylococcus aureus underwent the same procedure. The biodistribution and imaging of 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense PNA was studied at 1, 2 and 4 h respectively after the intravenous injection in nude mice bearing lung carcinoma A549 xenografts or inflammation models. SPSS 13.0 was used in the study and all data were analyzed by t test. Results: Biodistribution results showed that the highest radioactivity was found in the liver,and then in the kidney. Four hours after the administration of the imaging agent, the radioactivity ratios of target-to-non target (T/NT, tumor or inflammatory lesions to the contralateral regions) in tumor model group were significantly higher than those in inflammation model group (3.69 ± 1.13 vs 2.03 ± 0.47, t=3.01, P=0.02). Tumors were clearly visible in the tumor model groups at 0.5 h and still clearly seen at 4 h after the injection of antisense PNA. On the contrary,inflammatory lesions could not be seen clearly. Conclusion: 99Tcm labeled survivin mRNA antisense PNA can be used to distinguish tumor from inflammation and it may provide a new feasible method for specific tumor diagnosis. (authors)

  8. Preparation of 99Tcm labeled c-myc mRNA antisense peptide nucleic acid and its biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this work was to study a 99Tcm labeling method for c-myc mRNA antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fragments and the biodistribution of the labeled product in tumor- beating nude mice. Methods: A four amino acid sequence Gly-(D)-Ala-Gly-Gly [G-(D)-A-G-G] was used as a chelator. N-GAGG-Aba-GCATCGTCGCGG, a chelator-antisense PNA specific for the human c- myc oncogene mRNA initiation region, was synthesized, purified and characterized. N-GAGG-Aba-GCAT- GTCTGCGG, a chelator mismatched PNA, was synthesized and used as a control. G-(D)-A-G-G provided an N4 configuration for strong, efficient chelation of 99Tcm. The labeled PNA was identified with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The biodistribution was studied with nude mice bearing colon carcinoma and the percentage activity of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) was calculated. ASA 6.12 was used for data analysis. Results: The results of HPLC and paper chromatography confirmed that 99Tcm was joined to the PNA or the mismatched PNA with a high radiochemical purity (> 95%). Both were stable in vitro or incubated with human fresh serum and were excreted through urine. Results of biodistribution studies showed that the highest radioactivity levels were in the kidneys and spleen. The radioactivity of 99Tcm labeled antisense PNA in tumor was high whereas that of 99Tcm labeled mismatch PNA was very low [(1.11% ± 0.12)% ID/g and (0.14 ± 0.02)% ID/g, respectively; t=14.75, P99Tcm by the method presented in this paper, with good yield, radiochemical purity and stability. It was an efficient method to label antisense PNA with 99Tcm. The product seemed to be a potential tumor imaging agent. (authors)

  9. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. Targeted antisense radiotherapy and dose fractionation using a 177Lu-labeled anti-bcl-2 peptide nucleic acid-peptide conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The overall goal of these studies was to test the hypothesis that simultaneous down-regulation of a tumor survival gene and delivery of internally emitted cytotoxic radiation will be more effective than either treatment modality alone. The objectives were to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a 177Lu-labeled anti-bcl-2-PNA-Tyr3-octreotate antisense conjugate in a mouse model bearing human non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) tumor xenografts and to optimize targeted antisense radiotherapy by dose fractionation. Methods: In the initial therapy studies, tumor-bearing mice were given saline, nonradioactive DOTA-anti-bcl-2-PNA-Tyr3-octreotate, 177Lu-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate, 177Lu-DOTA-PNA-peptide alone, or 177Lu-DOTA-PNA-peptide followed by a chase dose of nonradioactive PNA-peptide. The MTD of 177Lu-DOTA-anti-bcl-2-PNA-Tyr3-octreotate was then determined. Subsequently single dose MTD and four weekly fractionated doses were directly compared, followed by histopathologic evaluation. Results: Antisense radiotherapy using 4.44 MBq of the 177Lu-DOTA-PNA-peptide followed by nonradioactive PNA-peptide was significantly more effective than other low dose treatment regimens. A dose of 18.5 MBq of 177Lu-DOTA-PNA-peptide was determined to be the approximate maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The median times to progression to a 1 cm3 tumor volume were 32 and 49 days for single dose MTD and fractionated dose (4 × 4.63 MBq) groups, respectively. Histopathology revealed metastases in the single dose groups, but not in the dose fractionation group. Conclusions: Targeted antisense radiotherapy using 177Lu-DOTA-anti-bcl-2-PNA-Tyr3-octreotate and DOTA-PNA-peptide conjugate effectively inhibited tumor progression in a mouse model of NHL. Furthermore, a dose fractionation regimen had a significant advantage over a single high dose, in terms of tumor growth inhibition and prevention of metastasis. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Down-regulating bcl-2, an anti

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  15. Optimization of Peptide Nucleic Acid Antisense Oligonucleotides for Local and Systemic Dystrophin Splice Correction in the mdx Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Haifang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew JA

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and ...

  16. Nucleic Acid Backbone Structure Variations: Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic analogues and mimics of the natural genetic material deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are potential gene therapeutic (antisense or antigene) drugs. One of these mimics, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), are chemically closer to peptides and proteins than to DNA, but nonetheless have retained many...... of the structural properties of DNA. These molecules have found applications as probes in genetic diagnostics and are also being developed into antisense (RNA (ribonucleic acid) interference) gene therapeutic drugs, targeting selected genes through sequence-specific recognition of (messenger or micro...

  17. Inhibiting the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro with antisense peptide nucleic acid conjugates targeting the ftsZ gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the potent effects of PNAs on bacterial growth and cell viability were mediated by the down-regulation or even knock-out of ftsZ gene expression. This highlights the utility of ftsZ as a promising target for the development of new antisense antibacterial agents to treat MRSA infections.

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids Complexes of Two Peptide Nucleic Acid Strands and One

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  19. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  20. Peptide nucleic acids and their potential applications in biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, O.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.; Nielsen, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are novel DNA mimics in which the sugar-phosphate backbone has been replaced with a backbone based on amino acids1-3. PNAs exhibit sequence-specific binding to DNA and RNA with higher affinities and specificities than unmodified DNA. They,are resistant to nuclease and...... protease attack in serum and cellular extracts and, thus, appear very promising as diagnostic and biomolecular probes, and possibly as antisense and antigene drugs....

  1. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker.......A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  2. Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  3. Enhanced cellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-peptide nucleic acid conjugates by photochemical internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been widely used for a cellular delivery of biologically relevant cargoes including antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). Although chemical conjugation of PNA to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of the PNAs, bioavailability...... (antisense activity) is still limited by endocytotic entrapment. We have shown that this low bioavailability can be greatly improved by combining CPP-PNA conjugate administration with a photochemical internalization technique using photosensitizers such as aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS(2a)) or...... cellular efficacy of CPP conjugates were evaluated by measuring luciferase activity as a result of splicing correction and was also confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of luciferase pre-mRNA....

  4. Screening of effective antisense peptide nucleic acids targeting gyrA from multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and their antimicrobial effects in vitro%多重耐药鲍曼不动杆菌gyrA基因高效反义肽核酸序列筛选及其体外抗菌活性观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧娟; 何云燕; 夏云; 王立朋; 梁树梅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To screen the effective antisense peptide nucleic acids targeting gyrA gene from multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,and to evaluate their antimicrobial effects in vitro.Methods Two RNA folding computer programs,Mfold and RNA structure 4.6,were used to predict the secondary structure of gyrA mRNA,and then 10 antisense oligonucleotides were designed based on free energy theory.The full length of gyrA mRNA was transcribed in vitro and labeled by digoxigenin-ll-uridine-5'-triphosphate.Dot blothybridization was used to screen the gyrA mRNA accessible sites which showed strong binding affinity to the antisense oligonucleotides.Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was synthesized based on the sequence of antisense oligonucleotide showing high affinity.Another PNA oligomer containing 6 mismatched nucleotides was used as a negative control.Both the 2 PNAs were conjugated to cell penetrating peptide (CPPs) (KFF)3 K to form peptide-PNA (PPNA).After the bacterial culture was treated with different concentrations of PPNA,OD600 and viable cell counts were measured to evaluate the growth inhibitory effect of the antisense oligonucleotide.Reverse transcript (RT)-PCR was applied to evaluate the level of gyrA expression.Results Of the 10 antisense oligonucleotides,5 showed binding affinity to gyrA mRNA and one of them showed strong binding affinity.PPNA designed based on the oligonucleotide significantly inhibited the growth of the bacterium and gyrA gene expression at a dose of 5 μmol/L,and exhibited anti-bactericidal effect at a dose of l0 μmol/L.Mismatched PPNA had no effect on the bacterial growth.Conclusion Combination of computer-aided prediction with dot blot hybridization is a high-flux and rapid way to screen effective antisense oligonucleotides in vitro.The screened anti-gyrA PPNA exerts significant inhibitory effect on the growth and gene expression in the bacterium in vitro.%目的 筛选出能与多重耐药鲍曼不动杆菌gyrA基因的mRNA紧密结合的

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of...

  6. Summarization on the synthesis and radionuclide-labeling of peptide nucleic acid for an oligonucleotide analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is one kind of antisense nucleic acid compounds and an oligonucleotide analogue that binds strongly to DNA and RNA in a sequence specific manner, has its unique advantages in the field of molecular diagnostics and treatment of diseases. Now, people gradually attach more importance to PNA. To optimize the application of PNA in genetic re- search and therapy, a great number of backbone modifications on the newly- type structures of PNA were synthesized to improve its physicochemical proper- ties, such as hybridization speciality, solubility in biofluid, or cell permeability. The modified PNA labeled with radionuclides, which can obtain the aim at specific target and minimal non-target trauma, has important role in research and application of tumorous genitherapy. Here a review on the basic synthesis idea and several primary synthetic methods of PNA analogs was given, and also correlative studies and expectation on the compounds belonging to PNA series labeled with radionuclides were included. (authors)

  7. Downregulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 cells by antisense oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acid (LNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Pfundheller, Henrik M; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Stenvang, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a nucleic acid analog with very high affinity to complementary RNA and a promising compound in the field of antisense research. The intracellular localization and quantitative uptake of oligonucleotides containing LNA were found to be equivalent to those of phosphorot......Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a nucleic acid analog with very high affinity to complementary RNA and a promising compound in the field of antisense research. The intracellular localization and quantitative uptake of oligonucleotides containing LNA were found to be equivalent to those of...

  8. RNA Interference-Guided Targeting of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Antisense Locked Nucleic Acid-Based Oligonucleotides Containing 8-oxo-dG Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Mutso, Margit; Nikonov, Andrei; Pihlak, Arno; Žusinaite, Eva; Viru, Liane; Selyutina, Anastasia; Reintamm, Tõnu; Kelve, Merike; Saarma, Mart; Karelson, Mati; Merits, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory potency of an antisense oligonucleotide depends critically on its design and the accessibility of its target site. Here, we used an RNA interference-guided approach to select antisense oligonucleotide target sites in the coding region of the highly structured hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. We modified the conventional design of an antisense oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues at its termini (LNA/DNA gapmer) by inserting 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-...

  9. Quality assurance of radiolabeled proteins, peptides and antisense oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals (RP) labeled with nonmetallic (I-123, C-11, F-18) and metallic radionuclides (Tc-99m, Ga-67, In-111) are used for diagnosis and therapy; they could be classified as blood flow markers, metabolic substrates, receptor ligands, peptide/proteins and antisense oligonucleotide analogs (I-123, In-111). For safety and efficacy of the test using these tracers, quality assurance (QA) of RP (Chemical, radionuclidic, radiochemical impurities, enantiomers, immunoreactivity, sterility, apyrogenicity, cell-viability) is required. This test is more critical for the RP under clinical investigations. FDA allows a maximum permissible limit of 10% of the injected radionuclide as impurity. Quality assurance of RP is carried out by thin-layer, size-exclusion and high pressure liquid chromatography. For therapeutic RP labeled with I-131 (β,γ), Re-186 (β,γ), Re-188 (β), Y-90 (β), Y-90 (β), At-211(α) and Bi-212 (α), etc., the level of chemical alterations/degradations, directly by energetic particles or indirectly by free-radicals, is higher for the α-,β- than γ-emitting RP and chemical alterations are time-dependent processes. Considering the adverse reactions (marrow-suppression), unnecessary radiation due to unbound tracers and impurities, QA of RP should be performed and impurities eliminated before RP administration

  10. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O; Egholm, M; Nordén, B

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...... of double helical DNA-like structures in solution....

  11. A Simple Three-Step Method for Design and Affinity Testing of New Antisense Peptides: An Example of Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Štambuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide–receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense–antisense (epitope–paratope peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines.

  12. Peptide nucleic acids arrest the growth of gastric cancer cells SGC7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宽; 张岂凡; 王锡山; 薛英威; 庞达; 傅松滨

    2004-01-01

    Background Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has many characteristics useful in molecular biology. This paper described an effective way to raise the cell ingestion rate of PNA so as to kill gastric cancer cells.Methods Heteroduplexes of PNAs and oligonucleotides, wrapped by Lipofectamine 2000, were used to infect SGC7901 cells. The inhibitive effect of heteroduplexes was evaluated by analyzing cell clone forming and cell growth rate. Telomerase activity of SGC7901 cells was detected by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) and silver staining assay.Results PNAs showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The percentage of proliferation inhibition was 99.4% after 7 days; the rate of cloning inhibition was 98.2% after 8 days;whereas for oligonucleotide groups, at the same concentration, the percentages were 50. 1% and 67. 5% respectively. Antisense PNA-DNA-Lipofectamine 2000 group (AP-D-L group) exhibited significantly different percentages from the control groups (P<0.05). The test result indicated that telomerase activity of the AP-D-L group was inhibited (P<0.05). At the same time, the impact on cell morphology was observed.Conclusions The results showed that PNAs are potent antisense reagents. The telomeraseassociated therapies are very promising for the treatment of malignant tumours.

  13. Peptide nucleic acid - an opportunity for bio-nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Anstätt, Philipp; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    DNA is a major player in the field of bio-nanotechnology and many interesting applications have been realized using this oligonucleotide. In contrast, the use of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is a non-natural, neutral analogue of DNA with superior hybridization strengths compared to DNA, is still in its infancy in bio-nanotechnology. However, as demonstrated in this short review using selected studies, promising examples demonstrating the tremendous opportunities that PNA can offer for bi...

  14. Effects of Peptide Nucleic Acids against Ki-67 Gene on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Renal Carcinoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effects of anti-sense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) targeting Ki-67gene on modulation of the proliferation and apoptosis of human renal carcinoma cell lines, human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0 cells were treated with anti-sense PNAs at different concentrations (1.0 μmol/L, 2.0 μmol/L, 10.0 μmol/L). The Ki-67 expression of 786-0 cells was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blot method respectively. The proliferation of 786-0 cells was studied by cell growth curves and 3H-thymidine incorporation. The apoptosis of 786-0 cells was detected by TUNEL assay. The control groups were treated with anti-sense oligonucleotide (ASODNs)targeting Ki-67 gene. Our results showed that the Ki-67 expression of 786-0 cells treated with anti-sense PNAs (16.9±0.7) was significantly inhibited as compared with that of the control groups (28.6±0.4) (P<0.01). The Ki-67 protein rate of 786-0 cells treated with anti-sense PNAs (42.1±2.2)was significantly reduced when compared with that of the control groups (83.6±1.4) (P<0.01). Proliferation of 786-0 cells treated with anti-sense PNAs (20.7±1.5) was significantly inhibited as compared with that of the control groups (58.6±1.4) (P<0.01). The apoptosis rate of 786-0 cells treated with anti-sense PNAs (28.7±2.3) was significantly increased higher compared with that of the control groups (13.8±1.0) (P<0.01). From these finds we are led to conclude that anti-sense PNAs targeting Ki-67 gene have stronger effects on the inhibition of the proliferation and induction of apoptosis of human renal carcinoma cells than ASODNs targeting Ki-67 gene. The strategies using anti-sense PNAs targeting Ki-67 gene may be a promising approach for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Exploiting Protected Maleimides to Modify Oligonucleotides, Peptides and Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Paris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  16. Logic gates and antisense DNA devices operating on a translator nucleic Acid scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyahovsky, Bella; Li, Yang; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2009-07-28

    A series of logic gates, "AND", "OR", and "XOR", are designed using a DNA scaffold that includes four "footholds" on which the logic operations are activated. Two of the footholds represent input-recognition strands, and these are blocked by complementary nucleic acids, whereas the other two footholds are blocked by nucleic acids that include the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme sequence. The logic gates are activated by either nucleic acid inputs that hybridize to the respective "footholds", or by low-molecular-weight inputs (adenosine monophosphate or cocaine) that yield the respective aptamer-substrate complexes. This results in the respective translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the footholds carrying the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme sequence, and the concomitant release of the respective DNAzyme. The released product-strands then self-assemble into the hemin/G-quadruplex-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme that biocatalyzes the formation of a colored product and provides an output signal for the different logic gates. The principle of the logic operation is, then, implemented as a possible paradigm for future nanomedicine. The nucleic acid inputs that bind to the blocked footholds result in the translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the respective footholds carrying the antithrombin aptamer. The released aptamer inhibits, then, the hydrolytic activity of thrombin. The system demonstrates the regulation of a biocatalytic reaction by a translator system activated on a DNA scaffold. PMID:19507821

  17. Formulation of nucleic acid with pH-responsive amphipathic peptides for pulmonary delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Wanling; 梁婉玲

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of many different diseases, but poor delivery limits their clinical application. A series of pH-responsive amphipathic peptides containing histidine or 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) derivatives, LAH and LADap peptides, were investigated in this study as nucleic acid carriers for the treatment of respiratory infectious disease. LAH and LADap peptides are cationic, amphipathic pH-responsive peptides. The major attractive ...

  18. Synthesis of New Chrial Building Blocks for Novel Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU,Jie; XU,Xiao-Yu; LIU,Ke-Liang

    2003-01-01

    N-Boc protected amino acids of analogues of peptide nucleic acid (PNA),which are a class of conformationally constrained building blocks based on 4-aminoproline backbone with chirality at 2-c and 4-c,have been synthesized.Those monomers can be used for the construction of novel peptide nucleic acid analogues.

  19. Detection of target DNA using fluorescent cationic polymer and peptide nucleic acid probes on solid support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Mario

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids detection using microarrays requires labelling of target nucleic acids with fluorophores or other reporter molecules prior to hybridization. Results Using surface-bound peptide nucleic acids (PNA probes and soluble fluorescent cationic polythiophenes, we show a simple and sensitive electrostatic approach to detect and identify unlabelled target nucleic acid on microarray. Conclusion This simple methodology opens exciting possibilities for applied genetic analysis for the diagnosis of infections, identification of genetic mutations, and forensic inquiries. This electrostatic strategy could also be used with other nucleic acid detection methods such as electrochemistry, silver staining, metallization, quantum dots, or electrochemical dyes.

  20. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide-Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    inhibition of P. aeruginosa strains PA01, PA14, and LESB58 at 1-2¿µM concentrations without any indication of bacterial membrane disruption (even at 20¿µM), and resulted in specific reduction of the targeted mRNA levels. One of the four compounds showed clear bactericidal activity while the other...

  1. Affinity capture of (Arg sup 8 )vasopressin-receptor complex using immobilized antisense peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Xian Lu; Aiyar, N.; Chaiken, I. (SmithKline Beecham, King of Prussia, PA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Solubilized noncovalent complexes of (Arg{sup 8})-vasopressin (AVP) with receptor proteins from rat liver membranes were isolated by selective binding to silica-immobilized antisense (AS) peptide. The affinity chromatographic support was prepared with a chemically synthesized AS peptide whose sequence is encoded by the AS DNA corresponding to the 20 amino-terminal residues of the AVP bovine neurophysin II biosynthetic precursor (pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1)), region that includes the AVP sequence at residues 1-9. The AS peptide-AVP interaction mechanism hypothesized, contact by hydropathic complementarity at multiple sites along the peptide chains, led to the prediction that AVP bound to its receptor would still have enough free surface to interact with immobilized AS peptide. To test this prediction of a three-way interaction, ({sup 3}H)AVP-receptor was obtained as a solubilized, partially purified fraction from rat liver membrane. Covalently crosslinked ({sup 3}H)AVP complex also was bound to the AS peptide column; binding was blocked by competition with unlabeled AVP in the elution buffer. Since the AVP-linked 31- and 38-kDa proteins have the same apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as found previously by photoaffinity labeling, the authors conclude that the AS peptide column has affinity-captured AVP-receptor complexes. The 15-kDa protein appears to be an active AVP-receptor fragment of one or both of the larger proteins. It is generally concluded that immobilized AS peptides may be useful to isolate peptide and protein receptor complexes in other systems as well.

  2. Templated Synthesis of Peptide Nucleic Acids via Sequence-Selective Base-Filling Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Liu, David Ruchien

    2009-01-01

    The templated synthesis of nucleic acids has previously been achieved through the backbone ligation of preformed nucleotide monomers or oligomers. In contrast, here we demonstrate templated nucleic acid synthesis using a base-filling approach in which individual bases are added to abasic sites of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Because nucleobase substrates in this approach are not self-reactive, a base-filling approach may reduce the formation of nontemplated reaction products. Using either re...

  3. Side chain modified peptide nucleic acids (PNA for knock-down of six3 in medaka embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorn Sebastian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic antisense molecules have an enormous potential for therapeutic applications in humans. The major aim of such strategies is to specifically interfere with gene function, thus modulating cellular pathways according to the therapeutic demands. Among the molecules which can block mRNA function in a sequence specific manner are peptide nucleic acids (PNA. They are highly stable and efficiently and selectively interact with RNA. However, some properties of non-modified aminoethyl glycine PNAs (aegPNA hamper their in vivo applications. Results We generated new backbone modifications of PNAs, which exhibit more hydrophilic properties. When we examined the activity and specificity of these novel phosphonic ester PNAs (pePNA molecules in medaka (Oryzias latipes embryos, high solubility and selective binding to mRNA was observed. In particular, mixing of the novel components with aegPNA components resulted in mixed PNAs with superior properties. Injection of mixed PNAs directed against the medaka six3 gene, which is important for eye and brain development, resulted in specific six3 phenotypes. Conclusions PNAs are well established as powerful antisense molecules. Modification of the backbone with phosphonic ester side chains further improves their properties and allows the efficient knock down of a single gene in fish embryos.

  4. Peptide nucleic acid: a new artificial biomacromolecular with great potential applications in molecular biology and biomedicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-ke; LU Zu-hong; HE Nong-yue

    2001-01-01

    @@ Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic that was originally developed by Peter E Nielsen in 1991 as a reagent for sequence-specific recognition of double stranded (ds) DNA by a conventional triple helix type principle.

  5. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  6. A locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide (LNA silences PCSK9 and enhances LDLR expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 is an important factor in the etiology of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and is also an attractive therapeutic target to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. PCSK9 accelerates the degradation of hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR and low levels of hepatic PCSK9 activity are associated with reduced levels of circulating LDL-cholesterol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study presents the first evidence for the efficacy of a locked nucleic acid (LNA antisense oligonucleotide (LNA ASO that targets both human and mouse PCSK9. We employed human hepatocytes derived cell lines HepG2 and HuH7 and a pancreatic mouse beta-TC3 cell line known to express high endogenous levels of PCSK9. LNA ASO efficiently reduced the mRNA and protein levels of PCSK9 with a concomitant increase in LDLR protein levels after transfection in these cells. In vivo efficacy of LNA ASO was further investigated in mice by tail vein intravenous administration of LNA ASO in saline solution. The level of PCSK9 mRNA was reduced by approximately 60%, an effect lasting more than 16 days. Hepatic LDLR protein levels were significantly up-regulated by 2.5-3 folds for at least 8 days and approximately 2 fold for 16 days. Finally, measurement of liver alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels revealed that long term LNA ASO treatment (7 weeks does not cause hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: LNA-mediated PCSK9 mRNA inhibition displayed potent reduction of PCSK9 in cell lines and mouse liver. Our data clearly revealed the efficacy and safety of LNA ASO in reducing PCSK9 levels, an approach that is now ready for testing in primates. The major significance and take home message of this work is the development of a novel and promising approach for human therapeutic intervention of the PCSK9 pathway and hence for reducing some of the cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic

  7. Dopamine-induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells: inhibition by nucleic acides antisense to the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human neuroblastoma NMB cells take up [3H]dopamine in a selective manner indicating that dopamine transporters are responsible for this uptake. These cells were therefore used as a model to study dopamine neurotoxicity, and to elucidate the role of dopamine transporters in controlling cell death. Treatment with 0.05-0.4 mM dopamine changed cells' morphology within 4 h, accompanied by retraction of processes, shrinkage, apoptosis-like atrophy, accumulation of apoptotic particles, DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cycloheximide inhibited dopamine's effect, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by dopamine was dependent upon protein synthesis. Dopamine cytotoxicity, monitored morphologically by flow cytometric analysis, and by lactate dehydrogenase released, was blocked by cocaine but not by the noradrenaline and serotonin uptake blockers desimipramine and imipramine, respectively. Attempting to inhibit dopamine transport and toxicity in a drug-free and highly selective way, three 18-mer dopamine transporter antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (numbers 1, 2 and 3) and a new plasmid vector expressing the entire rat dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation were prepared and tested. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Likewise, transient transfection of NMB cells with the plasmid expressing dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation partially blocked [3H]dopamine uptake. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 also decreased, dose-dependently, the toxic effect of dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine. Western blot analysis with newly prepared anti-human dopamine transporter antibodies showed that antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 decreased the transporter protein level. These studies contribute to better understand the mechanism of dopamine-induced apoptosis and neurotoxicity. (Copyright (c) 1996 Elsevier Science B

  8. Imaging oncogene expression in breast cancer with receptor specific peptides and peptide nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This year, breast cancer (BC) will attack approximately 210, 000 and will take the lives of 40,000 women in the U.S. Standard screening with breast self-examination and mammography, recommended to minimize BC morbidity, miss 10-20% (up to 40% in young women) of breast cancer. Moreover, if an abnormality is found, an invasive diagnostic procedure is required to determine if the breast contains hyperplasia, atypia, or cancer. Approximately 80% of invasive procedures detect a benign pathology. BC cells express a gene product, cell surface receptor VPAC1, so named because the endogenous growth hormones Vasoctive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) and Pituitary Adenylate Cylcase Activating Peptide (PACAP) bind to VPAC1 receptors with high affinity. VPAC1 receptors are overexpressed on 100% of human breast cancer cells. Cyclin D1 is a key regulator of the cell cycle and overexpressed in 50% to 80% of breast cells, whereas it is low or absent in normal breast tissues. The human breast cancer cell line MCF7 displays elevated levels of CCND1 mRNA, encoding cyclin D1, and an elevated level of IGF1R mRNA, encoding insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. We hypothesed that 99mTc or 64Cu labeled VIP analogues, or a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) chimera specific for IGFI receptor and CCND1 mRNA, will permit us to early image breast cancer by planar, SPECT or PET imaging. We synthesized, characterized and administered i.v. 99mTc-AcGly-D (Ala)-Gly-Glyaminobutanoyl- VIP (TP3654), 64Cu diaminodithiol-aminobutanoyl-VIP (TP3982), 99mTc- AcGly-D(Ala)-Gly-Gly-PNA-D(Cys-ser-lys-Cys) chimera (WT4185) and Cu-64-DOTAPNA- D(cys-ser-lys-cys) (WT4348). A 12mer, CTGGTGTTCCAT nucleic acid sequence served as the PNA and 3 or 4 mer mismatched PNAs as negative controls. Using 99mTc-TP3654 we have successfully imaged human breast cancers not detectable by current modalities. In athymic, nude mice bearing MCF-7 human breast cancer xenographs, Cu-64-TP3982 tumour uptake was 85 times greater than 99m

  9. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  10. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, there has been a considerable progress by using DMD animal models involving three types of antisense oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PMID:21686247

  11. Templated synthesis of peptide nucleic acids via sequence-selective base-filling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemstra, Jennifer M; Liu, David R

    2009-08-19

    The templated synthesis of nucleic acids has previously been achieved through the backbone ligation of preformed nucleotide monomers or oligomers. In contrast, here we demonstrate templated nucleic acid synthesis using a base-filling approach in which individual bases are added to abasic sites of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Because nucleobase substrates in this approach are not self-reactive, a base-filling approach may reduce the formation of nontemplated reaction products. Using either reductive amination or amine acylation chemistries, we observed efficient and selective addition of each of the four nucleobases to an abasic site in the middle of the PNA strand. We also describe the addition of single nucleobases to the end of a PNA strand through base filling, as well as the tandem addition of two bases to the middle of the PNA strand. These findings represent an experimental foundation for nonenzymatic information transfer through base filling. PMID:19722647

  12. Recognition of Double Stranded RNA by Guanidine-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids (GPNA)

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Pankaj; Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Rozners, Eriks

    2011-01-01

    Double helical RNA has become an attractive target for molecular recognition because many non-coding RNAs play important roles in control of gene expression. Recently, we discovered that short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) bind strongly and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA via triple helix formation. Herein we tested if the molecular recognition of RNA can be enhanced by α-guanidine modification of PNA. Our study was motivated by the discovery of Ly and co-worker...

  13. Well-defined Cationic Shell Crosslinked Nanoparticles for Efficient Delivery of DNA or Peptide Nucleic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ke; Fang, Huafeng; Gang SHEN; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    This mini-review highlights developments that have been made over the past year to advance the construction of well-defined nanoscale objects to serve as devices for cell transfection. Design of the nanoscale objects originated from biomimicry concepts, using histones as the model, to afford cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like (cSCK) nanoparticles. Packaging and delivery of plasmid DNA, oligonucleotides, and peptide nucleic acids were studied by dynamic light scattering, transmission elect...

  14. DNA-Templated Polymerization of Side-Chain-Functionalized Peptide Nucleic Acid Aldehydes

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiner, Ralph E.; Brudno, Yevgeny; Birnbaum, Michael E.; Liu, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The DNA-templated polymerization of synthetic building blocks provides a potential route to the laboratory evolution of sequence-defined polymers with structures and properties not necessarily limited to those of natural biopolymers. We previously reported the efficient and sequence-specific DNA-templated polymerization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) aldehydes. Here, we report the enzyme-free, DNA-templated polymerization of side-chain-functionalized PNA tetramer and pentamer aldehydes. We obs...

  15. End-labeling of peptide nucleic acid with osmium complex. Voltammetry at carbon and mercury electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Trefulka, Mojmír; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2009), s. 359-362. ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : peptide nucleic acid end-labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * electroactive labels Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.243, year: 2009

  16. Structural diversity of target-specific homopyrimidine peptide nucleic acid–dsDNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bentin, Thomas; Hansen, Georg I.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2006-01-01

    Sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA by homopyrimidine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers can occur by major groove triplex binding or by helix invasion via triplex P-loop formation. We have compared the binding of a decamer, a dodecamer and a pentadecamer thymine–cytosine homopyrimidine PNA oligomer to a sequence complementary homopurine target in duplex DNA using gel-shift and chemical probing analyses. We find that all three PNAs form stable triplex invasion complex...

  17. Question 1: Peptide Nucleic Acids and the Origin and Homochirality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  18. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    modifications, chimeric oligonucleotides, or peptide nucleic acids. Continued progress in this arena will require that many of the preclinical challenges confronting antisense development are satisfactory resolved. PMID:9129689

  19. Construction of Prokaryotic Expressing Vector of Antisense Nucleic Acid of LasR and Its Effect on the Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; ZHOU Junli; LI Jingming; LIAO Fang

    2007-01-01

    To construct a pUCP18/lasRantisense plasmid carrying the reversed gene and analyze its effect on the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosus, LasR gene was amplified from the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosus by PCR and reversely recombined with plasmid pUCP18. The recombinant pUCP18/lasRantisense was verified by enzyme digestion, PCR and sequencing. The biological effects of pUCP18/lasRantisense were examined by using RT-PCR, NAD method and the assay of pyocyanin. Our results showed that the expected full length lasR fragment (721 bp) was extended from Pseudomonas aeruginosus gene with PCR. And it is consistent with LasR gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in GenBank (No. NC_002516). The recombinant plasmid was successfully constructed and transferred into Pseudomonas aeruginosus. The antisense nucleic acid of LasR gene could reduce the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosus and might serve as a new target site for treatment purpose.

  20. Preparation of surfactant-stabilized gold nanoparticle-peptide nucleic acid conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duy, Janice, E-mail: janice.duy@umit.maine.ed [University of Maine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (United States); Connell, Laurie B. [University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences (United States); Eck, Wolfgang [University of Heidelberg, Applied Physical Chemistry (Germany); Collins, Scott D. [University of Maine, Department of Chemistry (United States); Smith, Rosemary L. [University of Maine, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A simple, two-step method of producing stable and functional peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-conjugated gold nanoparticles using a surfactant stabilization step is presented. PNA are DNA analogs with superior chemical stability and target discrimination, but their use in metallic nanoparticle systems has been limited by the difficulty of producing stable colloids of nanoparticle-PNA conjugates. In this work, the nonionic surfactant Tween 20 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate) was used to sterically shield gold surfaces prior to the addition of thiolated PNA, producing conjugates which remain dispersed in solution and retain the ability to hybridize to complementary nucleic acid sequences. The conjugates were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. PNA attachment to gold nanoparticles was confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay, while the ability of nanoparticle-bound PNA to hybridize to its complement was demonstrated using labeled DNA.

  1. Gene-Specific Effects of Antisense Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomer-Peptide Conjugates on Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Pure Culture and in Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas D Tilley; Hine, Orion S.; Kellogg, Jill A.; Hassinger, Jed N.; Weller, Dwight D.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Geller, Bruce L.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to improve efficacy of antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) by improving their uptake into bacterial cells. Four different bacterium-permeating peptides, RFFRFFRFFXB, RTRTRFLRRTXB, RXXRXXRXXB, and KFFKFFKFFKXB (X is 6-aminohexanoic acid and B is β-alanine), were separately coupled to two different PMOs that are complementary to regions near the start codons of a luciferase reporter gene (luc) and a gene required for viability (acpP). Luc peptide-PMOs targ...

  2. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and functi...

  3. Peptide nucleic acid-anthraquinone conjugates: strand invasion and photoinduced cleavage of duplex DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, B.; T. Koch; Frydenlund, H; Orum, H; Batz, H G; Schuster, G B

    1997-01-01

    A bis-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-anthraquinone imide (AQI) conjugate has been synthesized and shown to form strand invasion complexes with a duplex DNA target. The two arms of the bis-PNA each consist of five consecutive thymine residues and are linked by a flexible, hydrophilic spacer. Probing with potassium permanganate reveals that the bis-PNA complexes to duplex DNA at A5.T5sites with local displacement of the T5DNA strand. The 5 bp sequence targeted by the PNA is the shortest strand inva...

  4. Convenient and scalable synthesis of fmoc-protected Peptide nucleic Acid backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, Trevor A; Shah, Nirmal I; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  5. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    OpenAIRE

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this mo...

  6. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  7. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  8. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  9. Modulation of mdm2 pre-mRNA splicing by 9-aminoacridine-PNA (peptide nucleic acid) conjugates targeting intron-exon junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Eysturskard, Jonhard; Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing by antisense molecules is a promising mechanism of action for gene therapeutic drugs. In this study, we have examined the potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) 9-aminoacridine conjugates to modulate the pre-mRNA splicing of the mdm2 human...... cancer gene in JAR cells. METHODS: We screened 10 different 15 mer PNAs targeting intron2 at both the 5;- and the 3;-splice site for their effects on the splicing of mdm2 using RT-PCR analysis. We also tested a PNA (2512) targeting the 3;-splice site of intron3 with a complementarity of 4 bases to intron......3 and 11 bases to exon4 for its splicing modulation effect. This PNA2512 was further tested for the effects on the mdm2 protein level as well as for inhibition of cell growth in combination with the DNA damaging agent camptothecin (CPT). RESULTS: We show that several of these PNAs effectively...

  10. Antibacterial Peptide Nucleic Acid-Antimicrobial Peptide (PNA-AMP) Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anna Mette; Bonke, Gitte; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Yavari, Niloofar; Nielsen, Peter E.; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    )-Tat48-60, BF-2A-RXR, and drosocin-RXR are capable of transporting PNA effectively into E. coli (MICs of 1-4 μM). Importantly, presence of the inner-membrane peptide transporter SbmA was not required for antibacterial activity of PNA-AMP conjugates containing Pep-1-K, KLW-9,13-a, or drosocin-RXR (MICs...

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattawut Yotapan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  12. Targeted gene correction using psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin conjugates of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Gene correction activation effects of a small series of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA) covalently conjugated to the DNA interacting ligands psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin targeted proximal to a stop codon mutation in an EGFP reporter gene were studied. A 15-mer homopyrimidine....... Consistent with the extract experiments, treatment with adduct forming PNA conjugates (psoralen and chlorambucil) resulted in a decrease in background correction frequencies in transiently transfected cells, whereas unmodified PNA or the PNA-camptothecin conjugate had little or no effect. These results...... suggest that simple triplex forming PNAs have little effect on proximal gene correctional events whereas PNA conjugates capable of forming DNA adducts and interstrand crosslinks are strong inhibitors. Most interestingly the PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin enhanced repair in...

  13. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex......Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  14. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  15. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  16. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  17. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH. PMID:23391931

  18. Using Triple Helix Forming Peptide Nucleic Acids for Sequence-selective Recognition of Double-stranded RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple helix forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grov...

  19. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe, kit and procedure for specific detection of Helicobacter pylori and applications thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, N. F.; N. Guimarães; Figueiredo, C.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The current invention relates to the development of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the specific detection of Helicobacter pylori. These probes are used in a process based on molecular biology techniques, namely the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and can be applied in a variety of samples such as biopsies, blood, air, food, water and other environmental samples. Due to the physical and chemical characteristics inherent to their structure, these probes are able to provide a ...

  20. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable ...

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization method using a peptide nucleic acid probe for identification of Lactobacillus spp. in milk samples

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, António; Almeida, Carina; Carvalho, Ana; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; L. R. Rodrigues; Cerca, Nuno; Azevedo, N. F.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus species constitute one of the dominant and beneficial bacteria in our body and are used in developed countries as a microbial adjuvant. Identification of these probiotic bacteria is traditionally performed by culture-based techniques. However, such methods are very time-consuming and can give inaccurate results, especially when Lactobacillus is present in mixed bacterial complex communities. Our study aimed to accurately identify Lactobacillus spp. using a novel Peptide Nucleic ...

  2. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:26394062

  3. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Machado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI, from 64.3 to 95.0% and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%], demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis.

  4. Modulation of mdm2 pre-mRNA splicing by 9-aminoacridine-PNA (peptide nucleic acid) conjugates targeting intron-exon junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing by antisense molecules is a promising mechanism of action for gene therapeutic drugs. In this study, we have examined the potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) 9-aminoacridine conjugates to modulate the pre-mRNA splicing of the mdm2 human cancer gene in JAR cells. We screened 10 different 15 mer PNAs targeting intron2 at both the 5' - and the 3'-splice site for their effects on the splicing of mdm2 using RT-PCR analysis. We also tested a PNA (2512) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron3 with a complementarity of 4 bases to intron3 and 11 bases to exon4 for its splicing modulation effect. This PNA2512 was further tested for the effects on the mdm2 protein level as well as for inhibition of cell growth in combination with the DNA damaging agent camptothecin (CPT). We show that several of these PNAs effectively inhibit the splicing thereby producing a larger mRNA still containing intron2, while skipping of exon3 was not observed by any of these PNAs. The most effective PNA (PNA2406) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron2 had a complementarity of 4 bases to intron2 and 11 bases to exon3. PNA (2512) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron3 induced both splicing inhibition (intron3 skipping) and skipping of exon4. Furthermore, treatment of JAR cells with this PNA resulted in a reduction in the level of MDM2 protein and a concomitant increase in the level of tumor suppressor p53. In addition, a combination of this PNA with CPT inhibited cell growth more than CPT alone. We have identified several PNAs targeting the 5'- or 3'-splice sites in intron2 or the 3'-splice site of intron3 of mdm2 pre-mRNA which can inhibit splicing. Antisense targeting of splice junctions of mdm2 pre-mRNA may be a powerful method to evaluate the cellular function of MDM2 splice variants as well as a promising approach for discovery of mdm2 targeted anticancer drugs

  5. Efficiency of cellular delivery of antisense peptide nucleic acid by electroporation depends on charge and electroporation geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Mette; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit; Nielsen, Peter E;

    2011-01-01

    Electroporation is potentially a very powerful technique for both in vitro cellular and in vivo drug delivery, particularly relating to oligonucleotides and their analogs for genetic therapy. Using a sensitive and quantitative HeLa cell luciferase RNA interference mRNA splice correction assay wit...

  6. Novel approaches to tumor imaging in mice: pre targeting with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.Since targeting of tumour by conventional methods is not consistently favorable, we have considered pre targeting with separate administrations of anti tumour antibody and radiolabel. As an alternative to streptavidin and biotin for this application, we earlier considered single stranded peptide nucleic acid (PNA) bound to an irrelevant protein administered first and allowed to diffuse non specifically into tumour. This was followed later by the administration of 99 m Tc labeled complementary PNA. We now report on the first studies with PNA conjugated anti tumour antibody to allow specific binding. PNA was conjugated to the NRLU-10 IgG antibody while the complementary PNA (amine derivatized) was labeled with ((m Tc using MAG3. LS174T tumour-bearing nude mice received IV 200 ug of the PNA-antibody conjugate and 20 h later, received IV 100 ug (130 uCl) of 99m Tc- complementary PNA. Animals were imaged and sacrificed 5 h later. Because of rapid clearance, at sacrifice all tissue levels of 99 m Tc were low, the highest being kidneys at about 4%ID/gm. Tumour uptake was 0.55%ID/gm for the study animals vs. 0. 13 for controls and tumour/muscle ratios were 9.8 vs. 3.6 respectively. These values represent a 2.5-fold improvement in localization over the nonspecific study. The whole body images also reflected the superior targeting of study vs. control animals. We conclude that single-stranded PNAs should be a useful alternative to streptavidin and biotin for pre targeting studies

  7. Identification and characterization of high affinity antisense PNAs for the human unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA which is uniquely overexpressed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Huafeng; Yue, Xuan; Li, Xiaoxu; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that an MCF-7 tumor can be imaged in a mouse by PET with 64Cu-labeled Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) tethered to the permeation peptide Lys4 that recognize the uniquely overexpressed and very abundant upstream of N-ras or N-ras related gene (unr mRNA) expressed in these cells. Herein we describe how the high affinity antisense PNAs to the unr mRNA were identified and characterized. First, antisense binding sites on the unr mRNA were mapped by an reverse transcriptase rand...

  8. Short Peptide Nucleic Acids Bind Strongly to Homopurine Tract of Double Helical RNA at pH 5.5

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks

    2010-01-01

    The important role that non-coding RNA plays in cell biology makes it an attractive target for molecular recognition. However, the discovery of small molecules that bind double helical RNA selectively and may serve as biochemical probes and potential drug leads has been relatively slow. Herein, we show that peptide nucleic acids, as short as six nucleobases, bind very strongly (Ka > 107) and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA at pH 5.5. The isothermal titration c...

  9. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y;

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...... that provoke DNA repair. However, the use of these molecules for gene targeting requires homopurine tracts to facilitate triple helix formation. Alternatively, to achieve binding to mixed-sequence target sites for the induced gene correction, we have used pseudo-complementary PNAs (pcPNAs). Due to...

  10. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  11. Detection and identification of lactic acid bacteria in milk and industrial starter culture with fluorescently labeled rRNA-targeted peptide nucleic acid probes

    OpenAIRE

    Matte-Tailliez, Oriane; Quénée, Pascal; ÇIBIK, Recep; Van Opstal, Jacques; Dessevre, Fabrice; Firmesse, Olivier; Tailliez, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Détection et identification des bactéries lactiques dans le lait et les levains industriels par des sondes "peptide nucleic acids " fluorescentes ciblant l'ARNr. Une méthode rapide et simple pour détecter et identifier les bactéries lactiques en croissance, au niveau cellulaire, dans le lait ou les levains industriels a été développée. Elle repose sur la technique d'hybridation de sondes fluorescentes à l'ARN ribosomique présent dans les cellules entières. Les "peptide nucleic acids " (PNA), ...

  12. Role of SbmA in the Uptake of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Peptide Conjugates in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    -peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to...

  13. Polyanionic Carboxyethyl Peptide Nucleic Acids (ce-PNAs: Synthesis and DNA Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Kirillova

    Full Text Available New polyanionic modifications of polyamide nucleic acid mimics were obtained. Thymine decamers were synthesized from respective chiral α- and γ-monomers, and their enantiomeric purity was assessed. Here, we present the decamer synthesis, purification and characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and an investigation of the hybridization properties of the decamers. We show that the modified γ-S-carboxyethyl-T10 PNA forms a stable triplex with polyadenine DNA.

  14. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.;

    1997-01-01

    We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs) was...

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acid with a Lysine Side Chain at the β-Position: Synthesis and Application for DNA Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Toru; Kuwata, Keiko; Imamura, Yasutada; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Takano, Masashi; Kittaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of new β-Lys peptide nucleic acid (PNA) monomers and their incorporation into a 10-residue PNA sequence. PNA containing β-Lys PNA units formed a stable hybrid duplex with DNA. However, incorporation of β-Lys PNA units caused destabilization of PNA-DNA duplexes to some extent. Electrostatic attractions between β-PNA and DNA could reduce this destabilization effect. Subsequently, bipyridine-conjugated β-Lys PNA was prepared and exhibited sequence selective cleavage of DNA. Based on the structures of the cleavage products and molecular modeling, we reasoned that bipyridine moiety locates within the minor groove of the PNA-DNA duplexes. The lysine side chain of β-PNA is a versatile handle for attaching various functional molecules. PMID:27373637

  16. Characterization of peptide-oligonucleotide heteroconjugates by mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, O N; Kulkarni, S; Aldrich, J V; Barofsky, D F

    1996-01-01

    Two peptide-oligothymidylic acids, prepared by joining an 11 residue synthetic peptide containing one internal carboxyl group (Asp side chain) to amino-linker-5'pdT6 and amino-linker-5'pdT10 oligonucleotides, were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) on a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer and by electrospray ionization (ESI) on a triple-quadrupole system. These synthetic compounds model peptide-nucleic acid heteroconjugates encountered in antisense research an...

  17. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe-based Real-time PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Respiratory Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Young Jin; Kim, Hwi Jun; Shin, Hee Bong; Nam, Hae Seon; Lee, Sang Han; Park, Joon Soo; Park, Kwi Sung; Baek, Kyoung Ah

    2012-01-01

    Background A peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based real-time PCR (PNAqPCR™ TB/NTM detection kit; PANAGENE, Korea) assay has been recently developed for the simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in clinical specimens. The study was aimed at evaluation of the performance of PNA probe-based real-time PCR in respiratory specimens. Methods To evaluate potential cross-reactivity, the extracted DNA specimens from Mycobacterium spec...

  18. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y.; Lonkar, Pallavi S.; Krause, Diane S.; Seidman, Michael M.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Nielsen, Peter E.; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the hu...

  19. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Hennrich, Ute; Nokihara, Kiyoshi; Beining, Marcel; Braun, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but also for the imaging of metabolic processes like the aberrant expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B (CtsB) gene and the activity of the resulting product associated with metastasis and invasiveness of malign tumors. Finally the objective is to merge imaging and therapy at the same level. The design of molecules which fulfil these responsibilities is pivotal and requires proper chemical methodologies. In this context our modified solid phase peptide chemistry using temperature shifts during synthesis is considered as an appropriate technology. We generated highly variable conjugates which consist of molecules useful as diagnostically and therapeutically active molecules. As an example the modular PNA products with the complementary sequence to the CtsB mRNA and additionally with a cathepsin B cleavage site had been prepared as functional modules for distinction of cell lines with different CtsB gene expression. After ligation to the modular peptide-based BioShuttle carrier, which was utilized to facilitate the delivery of the functional modules into the cells' cytoplasm, the modules were scrutinized. PMID:22211082

  20. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Pipkorn, Manfred Wiessler, Waldemar Waldeck, Ute Hennrich, Kiyoshi Nokihara, Marcel Beining, Klaus Braun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but also for the imaging of metabolic processes like the aberrant expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B (CtsB gene and the activity of the resulting product associated with metastasis and invasiveness of malign tumors. Finally the objective is to merge imaging and therapy at the same level. The design of molecules which fulfil these responsibilities is pivotal and requires proper chemical methodologies. In this context our modified solid phase peptide chemistry using temperature shifts during synthesis is considered as an appropriate technology. We generated highly variable conjugates which consist of molecules useful as diagnostically and therapeutically active molecules. As an example the modular PNA products with the complementary sequence to the CtsB mRNA and additionally with a cathepsin B cleavage site had been prepared as functional modules for distinction of cell lines with different CtsB gene expression. After ligation to the modular peptide-based BioShuttle carrier, which was utilized to facilitate the delivery of the functional modules into the cells' cytoplasm, the modules were scrutinized.

  1. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E; Glazer, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA-pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson-Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  2. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected. PMID:20535520

  3. Nanoparticles that deliver triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid molecules correct F508del CFTR in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark; Egan, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here we use triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep-sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in the nasal epithelium potential difference assay, consistent with corrected CFTR function. Also, gene correction is detected in the nasal and lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  4. 113Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zn2+ and Cd2+ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. 1H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The 113Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures

  5. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    OpenAIRE

    Topham, Christopher M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the bindin...

  6. Variable coordination of cotranscribed genes in Escherichia coli following antisense repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulyté Agne

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of bacterial genes belong to tight clusters and operons, which complicates gene functional studies using conventional knock-out methods. Antisense agents can down-regulate the expression of genes without disrupting the genome because they bind mRNA and block its expression. However, it is unclear how antisense inhibition affects expression from genes that are cotranscribed with the target. Results To examine the effects of antisense inhibition on cotranscribed genes, we constructed a plasmid expressing the two reporter genes gfp and DsRed as one transcriptional unit. Incubation with antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA targeted to the mRNA start codon region of either the upstream gfp or the downstream DsRed gene resulted in a complete expression discoordination from this artificial construct. The same approach was applied to the three cotranscribed genes in the endogenously expressed lac-operon (lacZ, Y and A and partial downstream expression coordination was seen when the lacZ start codon was targeted with antisense PNA. Targeting the lacY mRNA start codon region showed no effect on the upstream lacZ gene expression whereas expression from the downstream lacA gene was affected as strongly as the lacY gene. Determination of lacZ and lacY mRNA levels revealed a pattern of reduction that was similar to the Lac-proteins, indicating a relation between translation inhibition and mRNA degradation as a response to antisense PNA treatment. Conclusion The results show that antisense mediated repression of genes within operons affect cotranscribed genes to a variable degree. Target transcript stability appears to be closely related to inhibition of translation and presumably depends on translating ribosomes protecting the mRNA from intrinsic decay mechanisms. Therefore, for genes within operons and clusters it is likely that the nature of the target transcript will determine the inhibitory effects on cotranscribed genes

  7. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Toshifumi Yokota

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)...

  8. Fluorous Peptide Nucleic Acids: PNA Analogues with Fluorine in Backbone (γ-CF2-apg-PNA) Enhance Cellular Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellipilli, Satheesh; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2015-09-18

    Fluorous PNA analogues possessing fluorine as inherent part of aminopropylglycine (apg) backbone (γ-CF2-apg PNA) have been synthesized and evaluated for biophysical and cell penetrating properties. These form duplexes of higher thermal stability with cRNA than cDNA, although destabilized compared to duplexes of standard aeg-PNA. Cellular uptake of the fluorinated γ-CF2-apg PNAs in NIH 3T3 and HeLa cells was 2-3-fold higher compared to that of nonfluorinated apg PNA, with NIH 3T3 cells showing better permeability compared to HeLa cells. The backbone fluorinated PNAs, which are first in this class, when combined with other chemical modifications may have potential for future PNA-based antisense agents. PMID:26322827

  9. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S;

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian...... DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent...... cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor...

  10. Identification and characterization of high affinity antisense PNAs for the human unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA which is uniquely overexpressed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huafeng; Yue, Xuan; Li, Xiaoxu; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that an MCF-7 tumor can be imaged in a mouse by PET with 64Cu-labeled Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) tethered to the permeation peptide Lys4 that recognize the uniquely overexpressed and very abundant upstream of N-ras or N-ras related gene (unr mRNA) expressed in these cells. Herein we describe how the high affinity antisense PNAs to the unr mRNA were identified and characterized. First, antisense binding sites on the unr mRNA were mapped by an reverse transcriptase random oligonucleotide library (RT-ROL) method that we have improved, and by a serial analysis of antisense binding sites (SAABS) method that we have developed which is similar to another recently described method. The relative binding affinities of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the antisense binding sites were then qualitatively ranked by a new Dynabead-based dot blot assay. Dissociation constants for a subset of the ODNs were determined by a new Dynabead-based solution assay and were found to be 300 pM for the best binders in 1 M salt. PNAs corresponding to the ODNs with the highest affinities were synthesized with an N-terminal CysTyr and C-terminal Lys4 sequence. Dissociation constants of these hybrid PNAs were determined by the Dynabead-based solution assay to be about 10 pM for the highest affinity binders. PMID:16314303

  11. A FRET-enabled molecular peptide beacon with a significant red shift for the ratiometric detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Debabrata; Jiang, Juanjuan; Ehlers, Martin; Wu, Junchen; Schmuck, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    A cationic molecular peptide beacon NAP1 functionalized with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-pair at its ends allows the ratiometric detection of ds-DNA with a preference for AT rich sequences. NAP1 most likely binds in a folded form into the minor groove of ds-DNA, which results in a remarkable change in its fluorescence properties. As NAP1 exhibits quite low cytotoxicity, it can also be used for imaging of nuclear DNA in cells. PMID:27071707

  12. Preparation of 99Tcm labeled survivin mRNA antisense PNA and gene imaging in nude mice bearing lung carcinoma A549 xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prepare the 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA)and investigate its value as a gene imaging agent in tumor bearing mice and early diagnosis in tumor. Methods: Survivin mRNA antisense PNA and mismatch PNA were synthesized. Four amino acids (Gly- (D)Ala-Gly-Gly) and Aba (4-aminobutyric acid) were linked to the 5' end of PNA. Gly- (D)Ala-Gly-Gly served as a chelating moiety for strong chelation of 99Tcm and Aba acted as a spacer to minimize the steric hindrance. PNAs were labeled with 99Tcm by the ligand-exchange method. The labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were measured by HPLC and ITLC methods. There were five BALB/c nude mice bearing human lung carcinoma (A549) in each of antisense PNA and mismatch PNA groups. Gene imaging of 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense and mismatch PNAs were performed at 1, 2 and 4 h post the injection, respectively, and the T/NT ratio was measured by the method of ROI. The statistical comparisons of average values were performed with the two-group t-test for independent sample by SPSS 13.0. Results: The product kept stable in vitro. The labeling efficiency of 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense PNA was (95.48 ±1.92)% and more than 85% after the incubation for 24 h in serum. The radiochemical purity was >95%. The labeling efficiency of mismatch PNA was similar to the antisense PNA. 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense PNA was especially uptaken by tumor lesion, and its accumulation reached the top at 4 h post the injection. T/NT ratios at 1, 2, and 4 h were 2.70 ± 0.28, 3.44 ± 0.35,4.21 ± 0.63, respectively. In the comparison, the T/NT ratio of 99Tcm-survivin mRNA mismatch PNA at 4 h (3.12 ±0.50) was significantly lower (t=2.918, P=0.019). Conclusions: 99Tcm-survivin mRNA antisense PNA has high labeling efficiency,good stability and no need of purification. Its characteristic of especial uptake by tumor lesion provides the potential value in early diagnosis of tumor. (authors)

  13. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  14. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines. PMID:27430566

  15. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselotte Hardy

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1% and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96% of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis.

  16. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  17. Interaction of α-Melanocortin and Its Pentapeptide Antisense LVKAT: Effects on Hepatoprotection in Male CBA Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paško Konjevoda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code defines nucleotide patterns that code for individual amino acids and their complementary, i.e., antisense, pairs. Peptides specified by the complementary mRNAs often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. Applications of this genetic code property in biomedicine are related to the modulation of peptide and hormone biological function, selective immunomodulation, modeling of discontinuous and linear epitopes, modeling of mimotopes, paratopes and antibody mimetics, peptide vaccine development, peptidomimetic and drug design. We have investigated sense-antisense peptide interactions and related modulation of the peptide function by modulating the effects of a-MSH on hepatoprotection with its antisense peptide LVKAT. First, transcription of complementary mRNA sequence of a-MSH in 3’→5’ direction was used to design antisense peptide to the central motif that serves as a-MSH pharmacophore for melanocortin receptors. Second, tryptophan spectrofluorometric titration was applied to evaluate the binding of a-MSH and its central pharmacophore motif to the antisense peptide, and it was concluded that this procedure represents a simple and efficient method to evaluate sense-antisense peptide interaction in vitro. Third, we showed that antisense peptide LVKAT abolished potent hepatoprotective effects of a-MSH in vivo.

  18. Chemical Modifications of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers Enhance Their Efficacy against Ebola Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, Dana L.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Warren, Travis K.; Lovejoy, Candace; Hassinger, Jed N.; Ruthel, Gordon; Blouch, Robert E; Moulton, Hong M; Weller, Dwight D.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Bavari, Sina

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) are uncharged nucleic acid-like molecules designed to inactivate the expression of specific genes via the antisense-based steric hindrance of mRNA translation. PMOs have been successful at knocking out viral gene expression and replication in the case of acute viral infections in animal models and have been well tolerated in human clinical trials. We propose that antisense PMOs represent a promising class of therapeutic agents that may be useful ...

  19. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) for the detection of bacteria: The effect of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rui; Santos, Rita S; Madureira, Pedro; Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-05-20

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique widely used for the detection and characterization of microbial populations. FISH is affected by a wide variety of abiotic and biotic variables and the way they interact with each other. This is translated into a wide variability of FISH procedures found in the literature. The aim of this work is to systematically study the effects of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration in the FISH protocol, using a general peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the Eubacteria domain. For this, response surface methodology was used to optimize these 3 PNA-FISH parameters for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive species (Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus). The obtained results show that a probe concentration higher than 300nM is favorable for both groups. Interestingly, a clear distinction between the two groups regarding the optimal pH and dextran sulfate concentration was found: a high pH (approx. 10), combined with lower dextran sulfate concentration (approx. 2% [w/v]) for Gram-negative species and near-neutral pH (approx. 8), together with higher dextran sulfate concentrations (approx. 10% [w/v]) for Gram-positive species. This behavior seems to result from an interplay between pH and dextran sulfate and their ability to influence probe concentration and diffusion towards the rRNA target. This study shows that, for an optimum hybridization protocol, dextran sulfate and pH should be adjusted according to the target bacteria. PMID:27021959

  20. Stimuli-Responsive Codelivery of Oligonucleotides and Drugs by Self-Assembled Peptide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigg, Severin J; Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Duskey, Jason T; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-03-14

    Ever more emerging combined treatments exploiting synergistic effects of drug combinations demand smart, responsive codelivery carriers to reveal their full potential. In this study, a multifunctional stimuli-responsive amphiphilic peptide was designed and synthesized to self-assemble into nanoparticles capable of co-bearing and -releasing hydrophobic drugs and antisense oligonucleotides for combined therapies. The rational design was based on a hydrophobic l-tryptophan-d-leucine repeating unit derived from a truncated sequence of gramicidin A (gT), to entrap hydrophobic cargo, which is combined with a hydrophilic moiety of histidines to provide electrostatic affinity to nucleotides. Stimuli-responsiveness was implemented by linking the hydrophobic and hydrophilic sequence through an artificial amino acid bearing a disulfide functional group (H3SSgT). Stimuli-responsive peptides self-assembled in spherical nanoparticles in sizes (100-200 nm) generally considered as preferable for drug delivery applications. Responsive peptide nanoparticles revealed notable nucleotide condensing abilities while maintaining the ability to load hydrophobic cargo. The disulfide cleavage site introduced in the peptide sequence induced responsiveness to physiological concentrations of reducing agent, serving to release the incorporated molecules. Furthermore, the peptide nanoparticles, singly loaded or coloaded with boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and/or antisense oligonucleotides, were efficiently taken up by cells. Such amphiphilic peptides that led to noncytotoxic, reduction-responsive nanoparticles capable of codelivering hydrophobic and nucleic acid payloads simultaneously provide potential toward combined treatment strategies to exploit synergistic effects. PMID:26871486

  1. Structural compatibility of novel nucleotide modifications with shortened linkages designed for antigene/antisense therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanuš, J.; Němeček, D.; Štěpánek, J.; Turpin, P. Y.; Králíková, Šárka; Bok, J.; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 35, - (2004), s. 418-425. ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/1166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : nucleic acid * oligonucleotide * antisense Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.996, year: 2004

  2. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels; Hansen, Henrik; Persson, Hans Egon Robert; Møller, Dorte Marianne; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Ørum, Henrik; Straarup, Ellen Marie; Koch, Troels

    2012-01-01

    locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50...

  3. Translational inhibition of CTX M extended spectrum β-lactamase in clinical strains of Escherichia coli by synthetic antisense oligonucleotides partially restores sensitivity to cefotaxime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benedict Readman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25 mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO and a 13 mer polyamide (peptide nucleic acid (PNA were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and –17 to –5 respectively close to the translational initiation site of the extended spectrum β lactamase resistance genes of CTX M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell free translation transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a blaCTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0 - 40 nM. The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (KFF3K and both significantly (P<0.05 increased sensitivity to cefotaxime in a dose dependent manner (0 - 40 nM in field isolates harbouring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine Dalgarno region of blaCTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates.

  4. Translational Inhibition of CTX-M Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase in Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli by Synthetic Antisense Oligonucleotides Partially Restores Sensitivity to Cefotaxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readman, John B; Dickson, George; Coldham, Nick G

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson-Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25-mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) and a 13-mer polyamide (peptide) nucleic acid (PNA) were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and -17 to -5, respectively) close to the translational initiation site of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance genes of CTX-M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β-lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell-free translation-transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a bla CTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up-regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime (CTX) in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0-40 nM). The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (CPP; (KFF)3K) and both significantly (P < 0.05) increased sensitivity to CTX in a dose dependent manner (0-40 nM) in field and clinical isolates harboring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine-Dalgarno region of bla CTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates. PMID:27047482

  5. Morpholinos: Antisense and Sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Martin; De Robertis, Edward M; Wallingford, John B; Niehrs, Christof

    2015-10-26

    For over 15 years, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) have allowed developmental biologists to make key discoveries regarding developmental mechanisms in numerous model organisms. Recently, serious concerns have been raised as to the specificity of MO effects, and it has been recommended to discontinue their usage, despite the long experience of the scientific community with the MO tool in thousands of studies. Reviewing the many advantages afforded by MOs, we conclude that adequately controlled MOs should continue to be accepted as generic loss-of-function approach, as otherwise progress in developmental biology will greatly suffer. PMID:26506304

  6. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  7. Sense antisense DNA strand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldogkói, Z; Kaliman, A V; Murvai, J; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that alphaherpesviruses express latency associated transcripts (LATs) from the antisense strand of immediate-early (IE) genes of the viral genome. It has been suggested that LATs containing extended open reading frames (ORFs), might be translated into (a) protein product(s). We found that a salient feature of some herpesvirus DNAs is a high GC preference at the third codon positions. The consequence of this feature is that the probability of a stop-codon appearing at two of the six reading frames of the DNA strand is very low. Therefore, the presence of an extended ORF does not necessarily mean that it is relevant to real translation. PMID:7810418

  8. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Topham, Christopher [University of Heidelberg

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  9. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  10. Exploitation of a Very Small Peptide Nucleic Acid as a New Inhibitor of miR-509-3p Involved in the Regulation of Cystic Fibrosis Disease-Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felice Amato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational techniques, and in particular molecular dynamics (MD simulations, have been successfully used as a complementary technique to predict and analyse the structural behaviour of nucleic acids, including peptide nucleic acid- (PNA- RNA hybrids. This study shows that a 7-base long PNA complementary to the seed region of miR-509-3p, one of the miRNAs involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of the CFTR disease-gene of Cystic Fibrosis, and bearing suitable functionalization at its N- and C-ends aimed at improving its resistance to nucleases and cellular uptake, is able to revert the expression of the luciferase gene containing the 3′UTR of the gene in A549 human lung cancer cells, in agreement with the MD results that pointed at the formation of a stable RNA/PNA heteroduplex notwithstanding the short sequence of the latter. The here reported results widen the interest towards the use of small PNAs as effective anti-miRNA agents.

  11. Amplification-Free Detection of Circulating microRNA Biomarkers from Body Fluids Based on Fluorogenic Oligonucleotide-Templated Reaction between Engineered Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes: Application to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Gavin A D; Shibakawa, Akifumi; Patel, Hinesh; Sita-Lumsden, Ailsa; Zivi, Andrea; Rama, Nona; Bevan, Charlotte L; Ladame, Sylvain

    2016-08-16

    Highly abundant in cells, microRNAs (or miRs) play a key role as regulators of gene expression. A proportion of them are also detectable in biofluids making them ideal noninvasive biomarkers for pathologies in which miR levels are aberrantly expressed, such as cancer. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are engineered uncharged oligonucleotide analogues capable of hybridizing to complementary nucleic acids with high affinity and high specificity. Herein, novel PNA-based fluorogenic biosensors have been designed and synthesized that target miR biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa). The sensing strategy is based on oligonucleotide-templated reactions where the only miR of interest serves as a matrix to catalyze an otherwise highly unfavorable fluorogenic reaction. Validated in vitro using synthetic RNAs, these newly developed biosensors were then shown to detect endogenous concentrations of miR in human blood samples without the need for any amplification step and with minimal sample processing. This low-cost, quantitative, and versatile sensing technology has been technically validated using gold-standard RT-qPCR. Compared to RT-qPCR however, this enzyme-free, isothermal blood test is amenable to incorporation into low-cost portable devices and could therefore be suitable for widespread public screening. PMID:27498854

  12. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  13. Unlocked nucleic acid - an RNA modification with broad potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    DNA duplexes, quadruplexes or i-motifs. Moreover, UNA monomers were found to be compatible with RNase H activity, a property which is important for single stranded antisense constructs. Notably, UNA monomers can be applied in the design of superior siRNAs, combining potent gene silencing and......The first unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomer was described more than a decade ago, but only recent reports have revealed the true potential applications of this acyclic RNA mimic. UNA monomers enable the modulation of the thermodynamic stability of various nucleic acid structures such as RNA and...

  14. Biomimetic High Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles For Nucleic Acid Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Helfand, Brian T.; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A.; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2011-01-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy which combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, t...

  15. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  16. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  18. Nucleic acid detection assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Imaging Functional Nucleic Acid Delivery to Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Roger L; Hickerson, Robyn P; González-González, Emilio; Flores, Manuel A; Speaker, Tycho P; Rogers, Faye A; Milstone, Leonard M; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic skin diseases arise from well-defined single gene mutations, and in some cases a single point mutation. As the target cells are superficial, these diseases are ideally suited for treatment by nucleic acid-based therapies as well as monitoring through a variety of noninvasive imaging technologies. Despite the accessibility of the skin, there remain formidable barriers for functional delivery of nucleic acids to the target cells within the dermis and epidermis. These barriers include the stratum corneum and the layered structure of the skin, as well as more locally, the cellular, endosomal and nuclear membranes. A wide range of technologies for traversing these barriers has been described and moderate success has been reported for several approaches. The lessons learned from these studies include the need for combinations of approaches to facilitate nucleic acid delivery across these skin barriers and then functional delivery across the cellular and nuclear membranes for expression (e.g., reporter genes, DNA oligonucleotides or shRNA) or into the cytoplasm for regulation (e.g., siRNA, miRNA, antisense oligos). The tools for topical delivery that have been evaluated include chemical, physical and electrical methods, and the development and testing of each of these approaches has been greatly enabled by imaging tools. These techniques allow delivery and real time monitoring of reporter genes, therapeutic nucleic acids and also triplex nucleic acids for gene editing. Optical imaging is comprised of a number of modalities based on properties of light-tissue interaction (e.g., scattering, autofluorescence, and reflectance), the interaction of light with specific molecules (e.g., absorbtion, fluorescence), or enzymatic reactions that produce light (bioluminescence). Optical imaging technologies operate over a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic and if necessary, nanoscopic, and thus can be used to assess nucleic acid delivery to organs, regions, cells

  1. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Johans J.; Edwardson, Thomas G.; Conway, Justin W.; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into `gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing.Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable

  2. Nucleic acid detection kits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  3. Antisense approaches in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Gleave, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    Patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer have limited treatment options and new therapies are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in prostate cancer progression have identified many potential therapeutic gene targets that are involved in apoptosis, growth factors, cell signalling and the androgen receptor (AR). Antisense oligonucleotides are short sequences of synthetic modified DNA that are designed to be complimentary to a selected gene's mRNA and thereby specifically inhibit expression of that gene. The antisense approach continues to hold promise as a therapeutic modality to target genes involved in cancer progression, especially those in which the gene products are not amenable to small molecule inhibition or antibodies. The current status and future direction of a number of antisense oligonucleotides targeting several genes, including BCL-2, BCL-XL, clusterin, the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family, MDM2, protein kinase C-alpha, c-raf, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and the AR, that have potential clinical use in prostate cancer are reviewed. PMID:15174974

  4. Decoy oligodeoxyribonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids-DNA chimeras targeting nuclear factor kappa-B: inhibition of IL-8 gene expression in cystic fibrosis cells infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica; Bezzerri, Valentino; Nicolis, Elena; Lampronti, Ilaria; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina; Mancini, Irene; Tamanini, Anna; Cabrini, Giulio

    2010-12-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by a deep inflammatory process, with production and release of cytokines and chemokines, among which interleukin 8 (IL-8) represents one of the most important. Accordingly, there is a growing interest in developing therapies against IL-8, with the aim of reducing the excessive inflammatory response in the airways of CF patients. Since transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a critical role in IL-8 expression, the transcription factor decoy (TFD) strategy might be of interest. TFD is based on biomolecules mimicking the target sites of transcription factors (TFs) and able to interfere with TF activity when delivered to target cells. Here, we review the inhibitory effects of decoy oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) on expression of IL-8 gene and secretion of IL-8 by cystic fibrosis cells infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, the effects of decoy molecules based on peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are discussed. In this respect PNA-DNA-PNA (PDP) chimeras are interesting: (a) unlike PNAs, they can be complexed with liposomes and microspheres; (b) unlike oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), they are resistant to DNAses, serum and cytoplasmic extracts; (c) unlike PNA/PNA and PNA/DNA hybrids, they are potent decoy molecules. Interestingly, PDP/PDP NF-kappaB decoy chimeras inhibit accumulation of pro-inflammatory mRNAs (including IL-8 mRNA) in P. aeruginosa infected IB3-1, cells reproducing the effects of decoy oligonucleotides. The effects of PDP/PDP chimeras, unlike ODN-based decoys, are observed even in absence of protection with lipofectamine. Since IL-8 is pivotal in pro-inflammatory processes affecting cystic fibrosis, inhibition of its functions might have a clinical relevance. PMID:20615393

  5. Furan oxidation based cross-linking: a new approach for the study and targeting of nucleic acid and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrette, L L G; Gyssels, E; De Laet, N; Madder, A

    2016-01-28

    Furan mediated nucleic acid cross-linking, initially developed for DNA interstrand duplex cross-linking, has matured into a versatile tool for the study of protein and nucleic acid interactions, ready to face its applications. The methodology was initially developed for easy and clean chemical generation of DNA interstrand cross-linked duplexes, but has been further expanded for use with other probes, targets and triggers, now allowing mild biologically significant cross-linking with potential therapeutic benefit. It was shown that the methodology could be repurposed for RNA interstrand cross-linking, which is very relevant in today's antisense approaches or miRNA target identification endeavors. This further illustrates the furan oxidation method's generality and mildness, especially when using red light for oxidation. A complementary antigene approach has been explored through duplex targeting with furan modified triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and DNA binding proteins. Also targeting of peptides and proteins by furan-modified DNA and peptides has been explored. Thorough methodology examination exploring variable reaction conditions in combination with a series of different furan-modified building blocks and application of different activation signals resulted in a detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved and factors influencing the yield and selectivity of the reaction. In order to draw the bigger picture of the scope and limitations of furan-oxidation cross-linking, we here provide a unique side by side comparison and discussion of our published data, supplemented with unpublished results, providing a clear performance report of the currently established furan toolbox and its application potential in various biomacromolecular complexes. PMID:26679922

  6. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  7. Functional correction by antisense therapy of a splicing mutation in the GALT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Lourenço, Sílvia; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, antisense therapy has emerged as an increasingly important therapeutic approach to tackle several genetic disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Intronic mutations activating cryptic splice sites are particularly amenable to antisense therapy, as the canonical splice sites remain intact, thus retaining the potential for restoring constitutive splicing. Mutational analysis of Portuguese galactosemic patients revealed the intronic variation c.820+13A>G as the second most prevalent mutation, strongly suggesting its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize this intronic variation, to elucidate its pathogenic molecular mechanism(s) and, ultimately, to correct it by antisense therapy. Minigene splicing assays in two distinct cell lines and patients' transcript analyses showed that the mutation activates a cryptic donor splice site, inducing an aberrant splicing of the GALT pre-mRNA, which in turn leads to a frameshift with inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.D274Gfs*17). Functional-structural studies of the recombinant wild-type and truncated GALT showed that the latter is devoid of enzymatic activity and prone to aggregation. Finally, two locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides, designed to specifically recognize the mutation, successfully restored the constitutive splicing, thus establishing a proof of concept for the application of antisense therapy as an alternative strategy for the clearly insufficient dietary treatment in classic galactosemia. PMID:25052314

  8. Electroporation increases antitumoral efficacy of the bcl-2 antisense G3139 and chemotherapy in a human melanoma xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi Alfonso; D'Angelo Carmen; Scarsella Marco; De Mori Roberta; Biroccio Annamaria; Spugnini Enrico P; Leonetti Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Nucleic acids designed to modulate the expression of target proteins remain a promising therapeutic strategy in several diseases, including cancer. However, clinical success is limited by the lack of efficient intracellular delivery. In this study we evaluated whether electroporation could increase the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against bcl-2 (G3139) as well as the efficacy of combination chemotherapy in human melanoma xenografts. Methods Melanoma-bearing ...

  9. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  10. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Baby Santosh; Pramod K. Yadava

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Ma...

  11. Therapeutic nucleic acids: current clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gogtay, Nithya Jaideep

    2016-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are simple linear polymers that have been the subject of considerable research in the last two decades and have now moved into the realm of being stand-alone therapeutic agents. Much of this has stemmed from the appreciation that they carry out myriad functions that go beyond mere storage of genetic information and protein synthesis. Therapy with nucleic acids either uses unmodified DNA or RNA or closely related compounds. From both a development and regulatory perspective, they fall somewhere between small molecules and biologics. Several of these compounds are in clinical development and many have received regulatory approval for human use. This review addresses therapeutic uses of DNA based on antisense oligonucleotides, DNA aptamers and gene therapy; and therapeutic uses of RNA including micro RNAs, short interfering RNAs, ribozymes, RNA decoys and circular RNAs. With their specificity, functional diversity and limited toxicity, therapeutic nucleic acids hold enormous promise. However, challenges that need to be addressed include targeted delivery, mass production at low cost, sustaining efficacy and minimizing off-target toxicity. Technological developments will hold the key to this and help accelerate drug approvals in the years to come. PMID:27111518

  12. C5a反义肽对脓毒症凝血异常及其急性肺损伤发病的影响%Effects of C5a anti-sense peptide on sepsis-induced abnormal coagulation and acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭振辉; 姜巧; 陈蕊; 孙杰; 俞宙; 肖飞; 熊日成; 吕凤林

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察C5a反义肽对脓毒症凝血异常及ALI发病的影响。方法 盲肠结扎穿孔复制小鼠脓毒症ALI模型,随机(随机数字法)分为健康组、假手术组、造模组和C5a反义肽干预组,分别在2,4,8,12 h时点观察肺组织损伤的病理改变和凝血指标;并采用ELISA检测血浆TF质量浓度的变化。结果 盲肠结扎穿孔后,2h后出现肺组织炎症细胞浸润、蛋白渗出和毛细血管内弥漫血栓形成,并进行性加重;而反义肽干预后的不同时间点上述病理改变均显著改善。造模组和C5a反义肽干预组,PT,TT,APTT进行性延长和DD进行性升高,而Fbg和PLT计数进行性降低,与健康组和假手术组比较P<0.05;而与造模组比较,反义肽干预后相应时间点的各指标明显改善(P<0.05)。TF质量浓度在健康组、假手术组分别为(42.75 ±1.25) pg/mL和(60.73±1.43) pg/mL;造模组2,4,6,12 h时点其浓度进行性升高,其中,12 h组最高为(139.81±6.17) pg/mL;而与造模组相比,反义肽组各相应时间点明显降低,12 h组为(121.41±7.21)pg/mL,各组比较有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 CSa反义肽能改善脓毒症的促凝亢进与ALI/ARDS的病理改变。%Objective To investigate the effects of C 5a anti-sense peptide on the pathogenesis of sepsis -induced abnormal coagulation and acute lung injury (ALI) in the early stage of sepsis. Methods The method of cecal ligature and puncture (CLP) was used to establish sepsis modeL Mice were randomly (random number) divided into control group, sham operation group, model group and C5a anti-sense peptide treatment group. In each group, pathological changes of the lung tissue and coagulation marker of mice were observed at intervals of 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 12 hours after CLP. Meanwhile, the blood levels of tissue factor (TF) were detected by using ELISA at various intervals. Results The microscopicexamination showed that inflammatory

  13. Nucleic acid-based approaches to STAT inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2012-10-01

    Silencing of abnormally activated genes can be accomplished in a highly specific manner using nucleic acid based approaches. The focus of this review includes the different nucleic acid based inhibition strategies such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), dominant-negative constructs, G-quartet oligonucleotides and decoy oligonucleotides, their mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these approaches to targeting the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins in cancer. Among the STAT proteins, especially STAT3, followed by STAT5, are the most frequently activated oncogenic STATs, which have emerged as plausible therapeutic cancer targets. Both STAT3 and STAT5 have been shown to regulate numerous oncogenic signaling pathways including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and migration/invasion. PMID:24058785

  14. Analysis and Diagnosis of Nucleic Acid Based and Protein Peptide in Aged Patients with Coronary Heart Disease%老龄冠心病患者的核酸基与蛋白多肽分析及诊疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈龙皓; 严金龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective:In aged patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) nucleic acid and protein polypeptide has different characteristics, prevention of coronary heart disease. To achieve the effective diagnosis and treatment of aged patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods:To a specialized hospital of 33 cases of senile patients with coronary heart disease for subjects and for patients with clinical follow-up observation and biochemical index test, in aged patients with coronary heart disease in vivo nucleic acid bases and protein peptide feature. Effect on coronary heart disease of TSH suppression. In the polymerization of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, contrast rate was 3 ml/s, the Valsalva test, the kinase glo lu-minescent kinase assay kit determination of protein lipid body phospholipid and protein content, using SPSS12.0 software was used for statistical analysis and treatment scheme. Results:the carbon carbon triple bond series transformation, when free radicals is added to the reaction system caused agent (AIBN, 10 mol%), formation of optical coherence tomography (OCT), combined with auxiliary examination found evidence of myocardial ischemia and coronary occlusion, coronary angi-ography was performed, statistical analysis and treatment for aged patients with coronary heart disease. By adjusting the dif-ferent time protein polypeptide and nucleic acid bases. Conclusion:Check up method in aged patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) including routine electrocardiogram (ECG) and electrocardiogram stress test, nuclide myocardial imaging, and screening of high-risk patients with coronary artery disease, using the method of stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary artery syndrome has significant curative effect and preventive.%目的:老龄冠心病患者体内的核酸基与蛋白多肽具有差异性特征,通过对该类核酸基与蛋白多肽差异性特征进行分析,了解并干预危险因素,进行冠心病预防,实现对老龄

  15. Modulation of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated immune stimulation by locked nucleic acid (LNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollmer, Jörg; Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Uhlmann, Eugen; Schetter, Christian; Jurk, Marion; Wader, Tanja; Wüllner, Meike; Krieg, Arthur M; Stenvang, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is an RNA derivative that when introduced into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), mediates high efficacy and stability. CpG ODNs are potent immune stimulators and are recognized by toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9). Some phosphorothioate antisense ODNs bearing CpG dinucleotides have...... been shown to possess immune modulatory capacities. We investigated the effects of LNA substitutions on immune stimulation mediated by antisense ODN G3139 or CpG ODN 2006. LNA ODNs were tested for their ability to stimulate cytokine secretion from human immune cells or TLR9-dependent signaling....... Phosphorothioate chimeric LNA/DNA antisense ODNs with phosphodiester-linked LNA nucleobases at both ends showed a marked decrease of immune modulation with an increasing number of 3' and 5' LNA bases. In addition, guanosine-LNA and cytosine-LNA or simply cytosine-LNA substitutions in the CpG dinucleotides of ODN...

  16. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  17. Antiviral Effects of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers in Murine Coronavirus Infection Models▿

    OpenAIRE

    Burrer, Renaud; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Ting, Joey P.C.; Stein, David A.; Moulton, Hong M.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Kuhn, Peter; Michael J Buchmeier

    2007-01-01

    The recent emergence of novel pathogenic human and animal coronaviruses has highlighted the need for antiviral therapies that are effective against a spectrum of these viruses. We have used several strains of murine hepatitis virus (MHV) in cell culture and in vivo in mouse models to investigate the antiviral characteristics of peptide-conjugated antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (P-PMOs). Ten P-PMOs directed against various target sites in the viral genome were tested in cell...

  18. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical...

  19. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5′ untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology. PMID:26756967

  20. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  1. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. 评估人类精子中原位非整倍体:引物原位杂交和缩氨酸核酸荧光原位杂交技术的使用%In situ aneuploidy assessment in human sperm: the use of primed in situ and peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Pellestor

    2006-01-01

    引物原位杂交(PRINS)和缩氨酸核酸荧光原位杂交(PNA-FISH)技术都可替代传统的荧光原位杂交(FISH)技术,用于染色体的研究.PRINS反应的基本物是DNA聚合酶和引物原位扩展反应中的标引核苷.缩氨酸核酸探针是合成的不带电聚酰胺主链的DNA类似物.这两种技术特异、快速、识别能力强的优点使它们细胞遗传学研究中很受欢迎.它们在人类精子研究中的应用使男性配子的染色体筛选过程得到新的快速发展,成为男性配子非整倍体原位评估中的FISH技术的有效补充.%Both the primed in situ (PRINS) and the peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)techniques constitute alternatives to the conventional (fluorescence in situ hybridization, FISH) procedure for chromosomal investigations. The PRINS reaction is based on the use of a DNA polymerase and labeled nucleotide in an in situ primer extension reaction. Peptide nucleic acid probes are synthetic DNA analogs with uncharged polyamide backbones. The two procedures present several advantages (specificity, rapidity and discriminating ability) that make them very attractive for cytogenetic purposes. Their adaptation to human spermatozoa has allowed the development of new and fast procedures for the chromosomal screening of male gametes and has provided efficient complements to FISH for in situ assessment of aneuploidy in male gametes.

  3. Electrochemistry of nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2012), s. 3427-3481. ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleic acids electrochemistry * DNA biosensors * DNA damage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 41.298, year: 2012

  4. Nucleic Acid Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Anew method of immunization was discovered in the early 1990s. Several research groups independently demonstrated that direct inoculation of DNA plasmids coding for a specific protein antigen could elicit immune responses against that antigen[1-4].Since in theory the mRNA molecules also have the potential to be translated into the protein antigen, this vaccination approach was officially named by WHO as the nucleic acid vaccination even though the term DNA vaccine has been used more commonly in the literature. This novel approach is considered the fourth generation of vaccines after live attenuated vaccines, killed or inactivated vaccines and recombinant protein based subunit vaccines.

  5. Inhibition, Escape, and Attenuated Growth of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Treated with Antisense Morpholino Oligomers†

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Benjamin W.; Stein, David A.; Kroeker, Andrew D.; Churchill, Michael J.; Kim, Alice M.; Kuhn, Peter; Dawson, Philip; Moulton, Hong M.; Bestwick, Richard K.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Michael J Buchmeier

    2005-01-01

    The recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a potent pathogen of humans and is capable of rapid global spread. Peptide-conjugated antisense morpholino oligomers (P-PMO) were designed to bind by base pairing to specific sequences in the SARS-CoV (Tor2 strain) genome. The P-PMO were tested for their capacity to inhibit production of infectious virus as well as to probe the function of conserved viral RNA motifs and secondary structures. Several virus-targete...

  6. Progress toward therapy with antisense-mediated splicing modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Liutao; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AO) or antisense RNA can complementarily bind to a target site in pre-mRNA and regulate gene splicing, either to restore gene function by reprogramming gene splicing or to inhibit gene expression by disrupting splicing. These two applications represent novel therapeutic strategies for several types of diseases such as genetic disorders, cancers and infectious diseases. In this review, the recent developments and applications of antisense-mediated splicing modulatio...

  7. Antisense treatment of caliciviridae: an emerging disease agent of animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alvin W; Matson, David O; Stein, David A; Skilling, Douglas E; Kroeker, Andrew D; Berke, Tamas; Iversen, Patrick L

    2002-04-01

    The Earth's oceans are the primary reservoir for an emerging family of RNA viruses, the Caliciviridae, which can cause a spectrum of diseases in marine animals, wildlife, farm animals, pets and humans. Certain members of this family have unusually broad host ranges, and some are zoonotic (transmissible from animals to humans). The RNA virus replicative processes lack effective genetic repair mechanisms, and, therefore, virtually every calicivirus replicate is a mutant. Hence, traditional therapeutics dependent on specific nucleic acid sequences or protein epitopes lack the required diversity of sequence or conformational specificity that would be required to reliably detect, prevent or treat infections from these mutant clusters (quasi-species) of RNA viruses, including the Caliciviridae. Antisense technology using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers shows promise in overcoming these current diagnostic and therapeutic problems inherent with newly emerging viral diseases. PMID:12044040

  8. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  9. Nucleic Acid Charge Transfer: Black, White and Gray

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Keinan, Shahar; Balaeff, Alexander; Beratan, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) indicate that structure and dynamics modulate the charge transfer rates, and that different members of a structural ensemble support different charge transport mechanisms. Here, we review the influences of nucleobase geometry, electronic structure, solvent environment, and thermal conformational fluctuations on the charge transfer mechanism. We describe an emerging framework for understanding...

  10. Lipophilic nucleic acids--a flexible construction kit for organization and functionalization of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Matthias; Berti, Debora; Huster, Daniel; Herrmann, Andreas; Arbuzova, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Lipophilic nucleic acids have become a versatile tool for structuring and functionalization of lipid bilayers and biological membranes as well as cargo vehicles to transport and deliver bioactive compounds, like interference RNA, into cells by taking advantage of reversible hybridization with complementary strands. This contribution reviews the different types of conjugates of lipophilic nucleic acids, and their physicochemical and self-assembly properties. Strategies for choosing a nucleic acid, lipophilic modification, and linker are discussed. Interaction with lipid membranes and its stability, dynamic structure and assembly of lipophilic nucleic acids upon embedding into biological membranes are specific points of the review. A large diversity of conjugates including lipophilic peptide nucleic acid and siRNA provides tailored solutions for specific applications in bio- and nanotechnology as well as in cell biology and medicine, as illustrated through some selected examples. PMID:24650567

  11. Nucleic Acid Drugs for Prevention of Cardiac Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Suzuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation has been broadly performed in humans. However, occurrence of acute and chronic rejection has not yet been resolved. Several inflammatory factors, such as cytokines and adhesion molecules, enhance the rejection. The graft arterial disease (GAD, which is a type of chronic rejection, is characterized by intimal thickening comprised of proliferative smooth muscle cells. Specific treatments that target the attenuation of acute rejection and GAD formation have not been well studied in cardiac transplantation. Recent progress in the nucleic acid drugs, such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs to regulate the transcription of disease-related genes, has important roles in therapeutic applications. Transfection of cis-element double-stranded DNA, named as “decoy,” has been also reported to be a useful nucleic acid drug. This decoy strategy has been not only a useful method for the experimental studies of gene regulation but also a novel clinical strategy. In this paper, we reviewed the experimental results of NF-κB, E2F, AP-1, and STAT-1 decoy and other ODNs using the experimental heart transplant models.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  13. The landscape of antisense gene expression in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, O Alejandro; Malik, Rohit; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Prensner, John R; Cao, Xuhong; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan; Wang, Rui; Chen, Guoan; Beer, David G; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing has revealed more pervasive transcription of the human genome than previously anticipated. However, the extent of natural antisense transcripts' (NATs) expression, their regulation of cognate sense genes, and the role of NATs in cancer remain poorly understood. Here, we use strand-specific paired-end RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) data from 376 cancer samples covering nine tissue types to comprehensively characterize the landscape of antisense expression. We found consistent antisense expression in at least 38% of annotated transcripts, which in general is positively correlated with sense gene expression. Investigation of sense/antisense pair expressions across tissue types revealed lineage-specific, ubiquitous and cancer-specific antisense loci transcription. Comparisons between tumor and normal samples identified both concordant (same direction) and discordant (opposite direction) sense/antisense expression patterns. Finally, we provide OncoNAT, a catalog of cancer-related genes with significant antisense transcription, which will enable future investigations of sense/antisense regulation in cancer. Using OncoNAT we identified several functional NATs, including NKX2-1-AS1 that regulates the NKX2-1 oncogene and cell proliferation in lung cancer cells. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive account of NATs and supports a role for NATs' regulation of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in cancer biology. PMID:26063736

  14. Origin of nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of nucleic acids is the first event after the birth of membranes which made it possible to assure the perenniality of information. The complexity of these molecules has led some scientists to propose that they were not prebiotic but rather derived a more simple and achiral primitive ancestor. This hypothesis suggests that ribose possesses properties that allowed the formation of certain polysaccharides which evolved to RNA. The first step of the hypothesis is the selection and concentration of ribofuranose. This sugar has chelating properties and its alpha-ribofuranose is favoured in the chelating position. The density of the sugar with a heavy cation is greater than water and thus the complex can escape the UV radiation at the surface of the ocean. The particularity of ribose is to be able to form a homochiral regular array of these basic chelating structures with pyrophosphite. These arrays evolve towards the formation of polysaccharides (poly ribose phosphate) which have a very organized structure. These polysaccharides in turn evolve to RNA by binding of adenine and deoxyguanine which are HCN derivatives that can react with the polysaccharides. The primitive RNA is methylated and oxidized to form prebiotic RNA with adenosine, cytidine, 7methyl-guanosine and ribothymidine as nucleic bases. The pathway of biosynthesis of DNA form RNA will be studied. I suggest that the appearance of DNA results form the interaction between prebiotic double stranded RNA and proteins. DNA could be a product of RNA degradation by proteins. The catabolism of RNA to DNA requires a source of free radicals, protons and hydrides. RNA cannot produce free radicals, which are provided by the phenol group of the amino acid tyrosien. Protons are provided by the medium and hydrides are provided by 7-methyl-guanosine which can fix hydrides coming from hydrogen gas and donate them for the transformation of a riboside to a deoxyriboside. This pathway suggests that DNA appeared at

  15. Vector insert-targeted integrative antisense expression system for plasmid stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jeremy M; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2011-01-01

    Some DNA vaccine and gene therapy vector-encoded transgenes are toxic to the E. coli plasmid production host resulting in poor production yields. For plasmid products undergoing clinical evaluation, sequence modification to eliminate toxicity is undesirable because an altered vector is a new chemical entity. We hypothesized that: (1) insert-encoded toxicity is mediated by unintended expression of a toxic insert-encoded protein from spurious bacterial promoters; and (2) that toxicity could be eliminated with antisense RNA-mediated translation inhibition. We developed the pINT PR PL vector, a chromosomally integrable RNA expression vector, and utilized it to express insert-complementary (anti-insert) RNA from a single defined site in the bacterial chromosome. Anti-insert RNA eliminated leaky fluorescent protein expression from a target plasmid. A toxic retroviral gag pol helper plasmid produced in a gag pol anti-insert strain had fourfold improved plasmid fermentation yields. Plasmid fermentation yields were also fourfold improved when a DNA vaccine plasmid containing a toxic Influenza serotype H1 hemagglutinin transgene was grown in an H1 sense strand anti-insert production strain, suggesting that in this case toxicity was mediated by an antisense alternative reading frame-encoded peptide. This anti-insert chromosomal RNA expression technology is a general approach to improve production yields with plasmid-based vectors that encode toxic transgenes, or toxic alternative frame peptides. PMID:20607625

  16. The Nucleic Acid Database (NDB)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berman, H. M.; Feng, Z.; Schneider, Bohdan; Westbrook, J.; Zardecki, C.

    Vol. F. Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic, 2001 - (Rossmann, M.; Arnold, E.), s. 657-682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : database * nucleic acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  17. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids by PNA hybridization directed co-localization of fluorescent beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a pair of biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting two sequences in 18S rRNA (from the parasite Trypanosoma brucei) at a distance of 191 nt (corresponding to maximum distance of ca. 60 nm) from each other. The PNA probes were individually bound to (strept)avidin-c......We have designed a pair of biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting two sequences in 18S rRNA (from the parasite Trypanosoma brucei) at a distance of 191 nt (corresponding to maximum distance of ca. 60 nm) from each other. The PNA probes were individually bound to (strept...

  18. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø;

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing...... strategies and of new principles for regulating the activity of the inhibitory action of aptamers of general interest to researchers working with nucleic acid aptamers...

  19. Interaction of nucleic acids with carbon nanotubes and dendrimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bidisha Nandy; Mogurampelly Santosh; Prabal K Maiti

    2012-07-01

    Nucleic acid interaction with nanoscale objects like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and dendrimers is of fundamental interest because of their potential application in CNT separation, gene therapy and antisense therapy. Combining nucleic acids with CNTs and dendrimers also opens the door towards controllable self-assembly to generate various supra-molecular and nano-structures with desired morphologies. The interaction between these nanoscale objects also serve as a model system for studying DNA compaction, which is a fundamental process in chromatin organization. By using fully atomistic simulations, here we report various aspects of the interactions and binding modes of DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with CNTs, graphene and dendrimers. Our results give a microscopic picture and mechanism of the adsorption of single- and double-strand DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) on CNT and graphene. The nucleic acid–CNT interaction is dominated by the dispersive van der Waals (vdW) interaction. In contrast, the complexation of DNA (both ssDNA and dsDNA) and siRNA with various generations of poly-amido-amine (PAMAM) dendrimers is governed by electrostatic interactions. Our results reveal that both the DNA and siRNA form stable complex with the PAMAM dendrimer at a physiological pH when the dendrimer is positively charged due to the protonation of the primary amines. The size and binding energy of the complex increase with increase in dendrimer generation. We also give a summary of the current status in these fields and discuss future prospects.

  20. Study on peptide-peptide interaction using high-performance affinity chromatography and quartz crystal microbalance biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; HUANG YanYan; XIONG ShaoXiang; LIU GuoQuan; ZHAO Rui

    2007-01-01

    The specific interaction between sense and antisense peptides was studied by high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. Fragment 1-14 of human interferon-β (hlFN-β) was chosen as sense peptide and its three antisense peptides (AS-IFN 1,AS-IFN 2, and AS-IFN 3) were designed according to the degeneracy of genetic codes. The affinity column was prepared with sense peptide as ligand and the affinity chromatographic behavior was evaluated. Glu-substituted antisense peptide (AS-IFN 3) showed the strongest binding to immobilized sense peptide at pH 7.5. A quartz crystal microbalance-flow injection analysis (QCM-FIA) system was introduced to investigate the recognition process in real-time. The equilibrium dissociation constants between sense peptide and AS-IFN 1, AS-IFN 2 and AS-IFN 3 measured 2.08×10-4, 1.31×10-4 and 2.22×10-5 mol/L, respectively. The mechanism study indicated that the specific recognition between sense peptide and AS-IFN 3 was due to sequence-dependent and multi-modal affinity interaction.

  1. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  2. Undetected antisense tRNAs in mitochondrial genomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seligmann Hervé

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothesis that both mitochondrial (mt complementary DNA strands of tRNA genes code for tRNAs (sense-antisense coding is explored. This could explain why mt tRNA mutations are 6.5 times more frequently pathogenic than in other mt sequences. Antisense tRNA expression is plausible because tRNA punctuation signals mt sense RNA maturation: both sense and antisense tRNAs form secondary structures potentially signalling processing. Sense RNA maturation processes by default 11 antisense tRNAs neighbouring sense genes. If antisense tRNAs are expressed, processed antisense tRNAs should have adapted more for translational activity than unprocessed ones. Four tRNA properties are examined: antisense tRNA 5' and 3' end processing by sense RNA maturation and its accuracy, cloverleaf stability and misacylation potential. Results Processed antisense tRNAs align better with standard tRNA sequences with the same cognate than unprocessed antisense tRNAs, suggesting less misacylations. Misacylation increases with cloverleaf fragility and processing inaccuracy. Cloverleaf fragility, misacylation and processing accuracy of antisense tRNAs decrease with genome-wide usage of their predicted cognate amino acid. Conclusions These properties correlate as if they adaptively coevolved for translational activity by some antisense tRNAs, and to avoid such activity by other antisense tRNAs. Analyses also suggest previously unsuspected particularities of aminoacylation specificity in mt tRNAs: combinations of competition between tRNAs on tRNA synthetases with competition between tRNA synthetases on tRNAs determine specificities of tRNA amino acylations. The latter analyses show that alignment methods used to detect tRNA cognates yield relatively robust results, even when they apparently fail to detect the tRNA's cognate amino acid and indicate high misacylation potential. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Juergen Brosius, Dr Anthony M Poole and

  3. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  4. Analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions by photochemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Hanno; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    . Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a sensitive and efficient analytical technique for determination of such cross-linking sites in proteins. The present review of the field describes a number of MS-based approaches for the characterization of cross-linked protein-nucleic acid complexes and for......Photochemical cross-linking is a commonly used method for studying the molecular details of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Photochemical cross-linking aids in defining nucleic acid binding sites of proteins via subsequent identification of cross-linked protein domains and amino acid residues...... sequencing of peptide-nucleic acid heteroconjugates. The combination of photochemical cross-linking and MS provides a fast screening method to gain insights into the overall structure and formation of protein-oligonucleotide complexes. Because the analytical methods are continuously refined and protein...

  5. Detection, characterization and regulation of antisense transcripts in HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesnard Jean-Michel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have recently demonstrated that the human retrovirus HTLV-I was producing a spliced antisense transcript, which led to the synthesis of the HBZ protein. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1 and to provide a better characterization of the transcript and its regulation. Results Initial experiments conducted by standard RT-PCR analysis in latently infected J1.1 cell line and pNL4.3-transfected 293T cells confirmed the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1. A more adapted RT-PCR protocol with limited RT-PCR artefacts also led to a successful detection of antisense transcripts in several infected cell lines. RACE analyses demonstrated the existence of several transcription initiation sites mapping near the 5' border of the 3'LTR (in the antisense strand. Interestingly, a new polyA signal was identified on the antisense strand and harboured the polyA signal consensus sequence. Transfection experiments in 293T and Jurkat cells with an antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 proviral DNA showed luciferase reporter gene expression, which was further induced by various T-cell activators. In addition, the viral Tat protein was found to be a positive modulator of antisense transcription by transient and stable transfections of this proviral DNA construct. RT-PCR analyses in 293T cells stably transfected with a pNL4.3-derived construct further confirmed these results. Infection of 293T, Jurkat, SupT1, U937 and CEMT4 cells with pseudotyped virions produced from the antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 DNA clone led to the production of an AZT-sensitive luciferase signal, which was however less pronounced than the signal from NL4.3Luc-infected cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that antisense transcription exists in HIV-1 in the context of infection. Possible translation of the predicted antisense ORF in this transcript should

  6. Phosphorothioate Antisense Oligonucleotides Induce the Formation of Nuclear Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Peter; Baker, Brenda F.; Bennett, C. Frank; Spector, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools for the in vivo regulation of gene expression. We have characterized the intracellular distribution of fluorescently tagged phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PS-ONs) at high resolution under conditions in which PS-ONs have the potential to display antisense activity. Under these conditions PS-ONs predominantly localized to the cell nucleus where they accumulated in 20–30 bright spherical foci designated phosphorothioate bodies (PS bodies), w...

  7. The landscape of antisense gene expression in human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Balbin, O. Alejandro; Malik, Rohit; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Prensner, John R.; Cao, Xuhong; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan; Wang, Rui; Chen, Guoan; Beer, David G.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Arul M Chinnaiyan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing has revealed more pervasive transcription of the human genome than previously anticipated. However, the extent of natural antisense transcripts’ (NATs) expression, their regulation of cognate sense genes, and the role of NATs in cancer remain poorly understood. Here, we use strand-specific paired-end RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) data from 376 cancer samples covering nine tissue types to comprehensively characterize the landscape of antisense expression. We found c...

  8. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus in vitro by antisense oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides against hepatitis B virus (HBV) were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral effect in Hep-G2 cells transfected with HBV genome. The inhibitor effect of the tested antisense oligonucleotides was sequence-specific, dose- and time-dependent, and synergistic for certain combinations. In virus-inhibitory concentrations the oligonucleotides were harmless to 2.2.15 cells. The most effective antisense oligonucleotides were found directed against the HBV mRNA transcribed from the cap site of SP II promoter, the portion of polyadenylation signal and the initiation region of gene S, with an inhibition of the HBsAg and HBeAg production by 85 - 95 % and 50 - 60 %, respectively. To our surprise, antisense oligonucleotides directed against three key sites of HBV X gene blocked the expression of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBxAg. This fact might be related to the trans-activation of HBV X protein. Using radioisotope labelling, we demonstrated that Lipofectin promoted the cellular uptake and antiviral effect of antisense oligomers in 2.2.15 cells. These results suggest a therapeutic potential of antisense oligonucleotides in the treatment of patients chronically infected with HBV. (author)

  9. Antisense inhibition effect of 99Tcm-VIP-ASON on the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the antisense inhibition effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor-mediated radiolabeled C-myc mRNA antisense oligonuclide complexes (99Tcm-VIP-ASON) on the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29. Methods: A 15-base single-stranded antisense oligonuclide (ASON) complementary to C-myc mRNA was labeled with 99Tcm. 99Tcm-ASON was complexed with VIP under certain condition. The HT29 cells were incubated with the complex and the uptake rate of 99Tcm-VIP-ASON was assayed. The effect of 99Tcm-VIP-ASON on cell growth and C-myc cancer protein expression was studied by VIP receptor-mediated endocytosis. Results: The uptake rate of HT29 cell exposed to 99Tcm-VIP-ASON complex was highly increased by VIP receptor-mediated endocytosis, the highest uptake rate was 27.39% at 2 h and significantly higher than that exposed to 99Tcm-ASON (P99Tcm-VIP-ASON group was significantly lower than in other study groups (P99Tcm-VIP-ASON group and was very significantly lower than that in other groups (P99Tcm-ASON into HT29 cell and the 99Tcm-ASON entering into cells could effectively inhibit cell proliferation and C-myc cancer protein expression

  10. Antitumor effects of radioiodinated antisense oligonucleotide mediated by VIP receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: we had constructed a targeting delivery system based on intestinal peptide (VIP) for antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) transfer into VIP receptor-positive cells in previous study. The aims of present studies are to observe the antitumor effect of VIP-131I-ASON in HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts. Methods: A 15-met phosphorothioate ASON, which was complementary to the translation start region of the C-myc oncogene mRNA, was labeled with 131I and the labelled compound was linked to the VIP bound covalently 'to a polylysine chain so as to deliver oligonucleotide into tumor cells. Distribution experiments for evaluating the radiolabeled antisense complexe uptake in tumor tissue were performed in BALB/c nude mice bearing with HT29 tumor xenografts. Nude mice beating HT29 tumor xenografts were adminstered VIP-131I-ASON (3.7,7.4 MBq) or 131I-ASON (3.7 MBq), 131I labeled control sense and nosense DNA (3.7 MBq), or saline. Antitumor effects were assessed using endpoints of tumor growth delay. C-myc-encoded protein expression of tumor was measured by immunocytohistochemical staining. Results: Distribution experiment performed with athymic mice bearing human colon tumor xenografts revealed maximal accumulation of conjugated ASON in the tumor tissue 2 h after administration and significantly higher than that in nude mice injected unconjngated ASON [(5.89±1.03)%ID/g and(1.56±0.31)%ID/g, respectively; t=7.7954 P<0.001]. The radioratio of tumor to muscle was peaked 4h after administration. VIP-131I-ASON exhibited strong antitumor effects against HT29 xenografts, decreasing their growth rate 7-fold compare with that in saline-treated mice(tumor growth delay, 25.4±0.89 day). The antitumor effects of unconjugated 131I-ASON were much less profound than VIP-131I-ASON (tumor growth delay, 3.2±1.3 and 25.4±0.89 day, respectively; q=51.4126 P<0.01). Sense, nosense control ON with VIP carder caused no therapeutic effect. There was no progressive weight loss or

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  12. Optimizing antisense oligonucleotides using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popplewell, Linda J; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations that disrupt the reading frame of the human DMD gene. Selective removal of exons flanking an out-of-frame DMD mutation can result in an in-frame mRNA transcript that may be translated into an internally deleted Becker muscular dystrophy-like functionally active dystrophin protein with therapeutic activity. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) can be designed to bind to complementary sequences in the targeted mRNA and modify pre-mRNA splicing to correct the reading frame of a mutated transcript. AO-induced exon skipping resulting in functional truncated dystrophin has been demonstrated in animal models of DMD both in vitro and in vivo, in DMD patient cells in vitro in culture, and in DMD muscle explants. The recent advances made in this field suggest that it is likely that AO-induced exon skipping will be the first gene therapy for DMD to reach the clinic. However, it should be noted that personalized molecular medicine may be necessary, since the various reading frame-disrupting mutations are spread across the DMD gene. The different deletions that cause DMD would require skipping of different exons, which would require the optimization and clinical trial workup of many specific AOs. This chapter describes the methodologies available for the optimization of AOs, in particular phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers, for the targeted skipping of specific exons on the DMD gene. PMID:22454060

  13. Effects of 125I-Labeled Peptide Nuclear Acid Targeting Ki67 on the Growth of Implanted Human Renal Cell Carcinoma in Nude Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiacunChen; JunnianZheng; SongWu; HaibiaoLai; XiaoqingSun; JunjieLiu

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the potential of 125I-labeled anti-sense peptide nucleic acids (125I-AS-PNAs) to inhibit the expression of the Ki-67 gene and growth of implanted human renal carcinoma cells in nude mice.METHODS Anti-sense peptide nucleic acids (AS-PNAs) targeting the Ki67 gene were synthesized and labeled with 125I by the Chloraseptine-T method. Drugs including PNAs and 125I-AS-PNAs capsulated by cationic lipid were directly injected into tumors in nude mice. The Ki67 expression in tumors was detected by an immunohistochemical technique and Western blot. The apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by a TUNEL assay. Tumor volumes were measured every 3 days and tumor suppression rates were calculated at 12 days after treatment. Control groups were treated with AS-PNA, MMPNAs (mismatch PNAs) and 125I-Na.RESULTS The Ki67 expression rate of tumors treated by 125I-AS-PNAs [(15.3±1.8)%] was lower than that treated by AS-PNAs [(23.0±2.4)%] (P<0.01). The Ki67 protein production rate of tumors treated by 125I-AS-PNAs [(43.6±3.5)%] was lower than that treated by AS-PNAs [(59.7±2.3)%] (P<0.01 ). The apoptosis rate of tumors treated by 125I-AS-PNAs [(40.3±2.4)%] was higher than that treated by AS-PNAs [(31.1 ±2.0)%] (P<0.01). The volume of tumors treated by 125I-AS-PNAs [(330.4±57.8) mm3 ]was smallerthan that treated by AS- PNAs [(513.2±64.2 ) mm3] (P<0.01 ).CONCLUSION 125I-AS-PNAs targeted against the Ki67 gene have a greater inhibitory effect on the expression of the Ki67 gene and a larger apoptotic action on human renal carcinoma cells and can more efficiently inhibit tumor growth than AS-PNAs. 125I-AS-PNAs targeting the Ki67 gene may be a promising anti-sense/anti-gene radiotherapy method for treating renal cell carcinoma.

  14. Electroporation increases antitumoral efficacy of the bcl-2 antisense G3139 and chemotherapy in a human melanoma xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids designed to modulate the expression of target proteins remain a promising therapeutic strategy in several diseases, including cancer. However, clinical success is limited by the lack of efficient intracellular delivery. In this study we evaluated whether electroporation could increase the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against bcl-2 (G3139 as well as the efficacy of combination chemotherapy in human melanoma xenografts. Methods Melanoma-bearing nude mice were treated i.v. with G3139 and/or cisplatin (DDP followed by the application of trains of electric pulses to tumors. Western blot, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were performed to analyze protein and mRNA expression. The effect of electroporation on muscles was determined by histology, while tumor apoptosis and the proliferation index were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides tumor accumulation was measured by FACS and confocal microscopy. Results The G3139/Electroporation combined therapy produced a significant inhibition of tumor growth (TWI, more than 50% accompanied by a marked tumor re-growth delay (TRD, about 20 days. The efficacy of this treatment was due to the higher G3139 uptake in tumor cells which led to a marked down-regulation of bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the G3139/EP combination treatment resulted in an enhanced apoptotic index and a decreased proliferation rate of tumors. Finally, an increased tumor response was observed after treatment with the triple combination G3139/DDP/EP, showing a TWI of about 75% and TRD of 30 days. Conclusions These results demonstrate that electroporation is an effective strategy to improve the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides within tumor cells in vivo and it may be instrumental in optimizing the response of melanoma to chemotherapy. The high response rate observed in this study suggest to apply this strategy for the treatment of melanoma patients.

  15. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Beverley J. Glass; Rebecca G. Hu; Anthony R. J. Phillips; Becker, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protei...

  16. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychak, Joshua J; Klibanov, Alexander L

    2014-06-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, and viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. The major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, and pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  17. A model for protocellular coordination of nucleic acid and protein syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The proteinoid model for the coordination of protein synthesis with nucleic acid coding within the evolving protocell is discussed. Evidence for the self-ordering of amino acid chains, which would enhance the catalytic activity of a lysine-rich proteinoid, is presented, along with that for the preferential formation of microparticles, particularly proteinoid microparticles, in various solutions. Demonstrations of the catalytic activity of lysine-rich proteinoids in the synthesis of peptide and internucleotide bonds are pointed out. The view of evolution as a two stage sequence in which the geological synthesis of peptides evolved to the protocellular synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides is discussed, and contrasted with the alternative view, in accord with the central dogma, that nucleic acids arose first then governed the production of proteins and protocells.

  18. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  19. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Andreasen, P A

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing small molecule protease inhibitors of sufficient specificity has proved a daunting task. Aptamers seem to represent a promising alternative. In our review, we concentrate on biochemical mechanisms of...

  20. Electrochemical analysis of nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Fojta, Miroslav; Jelen, František; Vetterl, Vladimír

    Weinheim : WileyVCH, 2002 - (Bard, A.; Stratmann, M.; Wilson, G.), s. 365-429 ISBN 3-527-30401-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084; GA AV ČR IBS5004107; GA AV ČR IAA4004901; GA AV ČR IAA4004002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : nucleic acid s * electrochemical analysis * DNA biosensors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial

  2. Sequence-specific nucleic acid detection from binary pore conductance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Esfandiari, Leyla; Monbouquette, Harold G.; Jacob J. Schmidt

    2012-01-01

    We describe a platform for sequence-specific nucleic acid (NA) detection utilizing a micropipette tapered to a 2 μm diameter pore and 3 μm diameter polystyrene beads to which uncharged peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe molecules have been conjugated. As the target NAs hybridize to the complementary PNA-beads, the beads acquire negative charge and become electrophoretically mobile. An applied electric field guides these NA-PNA-beads toward the pipette tip, which they obstruct, leading to an ind...

  3. JAWS: Just Add Water System - A device for detection of nucleic acids in Martian ice caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, Eske; Mørk, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    The design of a device for nucleic acid detection in the Martian ice caps is presented; the Just Add Water System (JAWS). It is based on fiber-optic PNA (peptide nucleic acid) light up probe random microsphere universal array technology. JAWS is designed to be part of a larger system with a...... regulation of pH and salt concentrations e.g. the MOD systems and could be installed on a planetary probe melting its way down the Martian ice caps e.g. the NASA Cryobot. JAWS can be used for detection of remains of ancient life preserved in the Martian ice as well as for detection of contamination brought...

  4. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.;

    2003-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder which is caused by an expansion of a CAG repeat sequence in the HD gene. The repeat encodes an expanded polyglutamine tract in the protein huntingtin. The still unknown pathological mechanisms leading to death of...... specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... of the fusion protein and/or suppression of the aggregate formation in both cell types. In the NT2 cells the antisense effect was dependent on the way of administration of the oligo. Conclusions The PS-antisense oligo is effective in downregulation of mutant huntingtin, and the reduction of aggregate...

  5. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.; Huber, Harald; Brügger, Kim; Garrett, Roger Antony; Bachellerie, J. P.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    -box RNAs, where the latter only exhibit partial complementarity to RNA targets. The most prominent group of antisense RNAs is transcribed in the opposite orientation to the transposase genes, encoded by insertion elements (transposons). Thus, these antisense RNAs may regulate transposition of insertion...... first report of stably expressed antisense RNAs in an archaeal species and it raises the prospect that antisense-based mechanisms are also used widely in Archaea to regulate gene expression....

  6. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  7. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  8. Inhibition of retroviral replication by anti-sense RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    To, R Y; Booth, S C; Neiman, P E

    1986-01-01

    We tested the effect of anti-sense RNA on the replication of avian retroviruses in cultured cells. The replication of a recombinant retrovirus carrying a neomycin resistance gene (neor) in the anti-sense orientation was blocked when the cells expressed high steady-state levels of RNA molecules with neor in sequence in the sense was blocked when the cells expressed high steady-state levels of RNA molecules with neor sequences in the sense orientation, i.e., complementary to the viral sequence....

  9. Antisense molecules: A new class of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potaczek, Daniel P; Garn, Holger; Unger, Sebastian D; Renz, Harald

    2016-05-01

    An improved understanding of disease pathogenesis leads to identification of novel therapeutic targets. From a pharmacologic point of view, these can be addressed by small chemical compounds, so-called biologicals (eg, mAbs and recombinant proteins), or by a rather new class of molecule based on the antisense concept. Recently, a new wave of clinical studies exploring antisense strategies is evolving. In addition to cancer, they include predominantly trials on infectious and noninfectious diseases, such as chronic inflammatory and metabolic conditions. This article, based on a systematic PubMed literature search, highlights recent developments in this emerging field. PMID:27155029

  10. Design and Synthesis of Novel Peptide Nucleic Acid Monomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白金泉; 李英; 刘克良

    2001-01-01

    All of the four nucleobases in DNA have replaced the 4-hydroxy group of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trams-4-hydroxy]tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester with cis-stereochemistry. An efficient route for the synthesis of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trans-4-hydroxy]-tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester has been developed.Starting with this intermediate, the protected monmers were synthesized by the Mitsunobu reaction or via its tosylate.

  11. Multiplexed microfluidic approach for nucleic acid enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Langevin, Stanley Alan; Bent, Zachary; Renzi, Ronald F.; Ferko, Scott M.; Van De Vreugde, James L.; Lane, Todd; Patel, Kamlesh; Branda, Steven

    2016-04-26

    A system for enhancing a nucleic acid sample may include a one pump, a denaturing chamber; a microfluidic hydroxyapatite chromatography device configured for performing hydroxyapatite chromatography on the nucleic acid sample, a sample collector, and tubing connecting the pump with the denaturing chamber, the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and the sample collector such that the pump may be used to move the nucleic acid sample from the denaturing chamber to the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and then to the sample collector.

  12. Applications of radioactively labelled nucleic acid probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopically labelled nucleic acid probes are used extensively in many areas of molecular biology research. Several radioactive isotopes have been utilised for this purpose, with P-32 and S-35 proving the most popular. This contribution will highlight the factors dictating the choice of radioisotope and will describe techniques for in vitro labelling of nucleic acids. The experimental data presented will be focused on applications of labelled nucleic acids including DNA probe assays and DNA sequencing. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Highly expressed genes are associated with inverse antisense transcription in mouse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andras Györffy; Pawel Surowiak; Zsolt Tulassay; Balazs Györffy

    2007-08-01

    There is a growing evidence, that antisense transcription might have a key role in a range of human diseases. Although predefined sense–antisense pairs were extensively studied, the antisense expression of the known sense genes is rarely investigated. We retrieved and correlated the expression of sense and antisense sequences of 1182 mouse transcripts to assess the prevalence and to find the characteristic pattern of antisense transcription. We contrasted three Affymetrix MGU74A version 1 mouse genome chips to six MGU74A version 2 chips. For these 1182 transcripts, the version 1 chips contain the antisense sequences of the transcripts presented on the version 2 chips. The original data was taken from the GEO database (GDS431 and GDS432). As the Affymetrix data are semiquantitative, the relative expression levels of antisense partners were analysed. We detected antisense transcription, although the average antisense expression is shifted towards smaller expression values (MGU74A version 1, 516; version 2, 1688). An inverse direct correlation between sense and antisense expression values could be observed at high expression values. At a very high relative expression—above 40,000—the Pearson correlation coefficient is getting closer to −1. Transcripts with high inverse expression ratio may be correlated to the investigated gene (major histocompatibility complex class II trans activator). The ratio of sense to antisense transcripts varied among different chromosomes; on chromosomes 14 and 1 the level of antisense expression was higher than that of sense. We conclude that antisense transcription is a common phenomenon in the mouse genome. The hypothesis of regulatory role of antisense transcripts is supported by the inverse antisense gene expression of highly expressed genes.

  14. Influence of different chelators (HYNIC, MAG3 and DTPA) on tumor cell accumulation and mouse biodistribution of technetium-99m labeled to antisense DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown recently that cell accumulation in culture of antisense DNA is strongly influenced by the presence of a 99mTc-MAG3 group for radiolabeling. We have now compared the in vitro and mouse in vivo behavior of 99mTc when radiolabeled to one antisense phosphorothioate DNA by three different methods. The 18-mer antisense DNA against the RIα subunit of PKA was conjugated via a primary amine on the 5'-end with the NHS esters of HYNIC and MAG3 and by the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that the association rate constant for hybridization was unchanged for all three chelators as compared with that of the native DNA. Size exclusion HPLC showed rapid and quantitative protein binding for all three chelators upon incubation of labeled DNAs in 37 C serum and cell culture medium. However, in each case, radiolabeled and intact oligonucleotide was still detectable after 24 h. Cellular uptake was tested in an RIα mRNA-positive cancer cell line. The order of cellular accumulation of 99mTc was DTPA>HYNIC(tricine)>MAG3, with the differences increasing with time between 4 and 24 h. The rate of 99mTc egress from cells was found to be MAG3>HYNIC>DTPA, which may explain the order of cellular accumulation. The biodistribution in normal mice was heavily influenced by the labeling method and followed a pattern similar to that seen previously by us for peptides labeled with the same chelators. In conclusion, although these studies concerned only one antisense DNA in one cell line, the results suggest that the success of antisense imaging may depend, in part, on the method of radiolabeling. (orig.)

  15. Nucleic Acids in Human Glioma Treatment: Innovative Approaches and Recent Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Catuogno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors with a dismal prognosis. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have a modest survival benefit. A crucial challenge is to deliver drugs effectively to invasive glioma cells residing in a sanctuary within the central nervous system. New therapies are essential, and oligonucleotide-based approaches, including antisense, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, and nucleic acid aptamers, may provide a viable strategy. Thanks to their unique characteristics (low size, good affinity for the target, no immunogenicity, chemical structures that can be easily modified to improve their in vivo applications, these molecules may represent a valid alternative to antibodies particularly to overcome challenges presented by the blood-brain barrier. Here we will discuss recent results on the use of oligonucleotides that will hopefully provide new effective treatment for gliomas.

  16. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A;

    2015-01-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with ...

  17. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most...

  19. Chromosomally encoded small antisense RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemanová, Martina; Kadeřábková, Pavla; Pátek, Miroslav; Knoppová, Monika; Šilar, Radoslav; Nešvera, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 2 (2008), s. 195-201. ISSN 0378-1097 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC204/07/J012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : corynebacterium glutamicum * srna * antisense rna Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2008

  20. Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide-Mediated Gene Knockdown in Pollen Tubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezvoda, Radek; Pleskot, Roman; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    Vol. 1080. New York: Humana Press, 2014 - (Žárský, V.; Cvrčková, F.), s. 231-236. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-62703-643-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide * Pollen tube * AODN Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Stability measurements of antisense oligonucleotides by capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruin, G J; Börnsen, K O; Hüsken, D; Gassmann, E; Widmer, H M; Paulus, A

    1995-08-11

    The approach of using antisense oligonucleotides as potential drugs is based on hybridization of a short chemically-modified oligonucleotide with complementary cellular DNA or RNA sequences. A critical question is the stability of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides in cellular environments. In a model system, resistance against various nucleases was evaluated by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). For some of the samples, matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used as an additional analytical tool to perform stability measurements. Using CGE, the enzymatic degradation of single nucleotides from the oligomer can be followed after different incubation times. 10% T polyacrylamide gels give baseline resolution for oligonucleotides ranging between 5 and 30 bases in length. The kinetic influence of a specific nuclease concentration and the antisense oligonucleotide structure on the cleavage reaction are discussed. Also, a simple desalting method to improve the injection efficiency and sensitivity of the method are described. Examples of measurements of chemically modified antisense 19-mers are presented. PMID:7581844

  2. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  3. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  4. Pulmonary delivery of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, James

    2007-11-01

    The lung is an appropriate present and future target for gene therapy approaches designed to treat inherited monogenic diseases, eradicate bronchial tumours, transfer pharmacologically active products to the general circulation, express enzymes to catabolise toxins, manage pulmonary hypertension and lung injury and vaccinate against infection. Despite 35 years of gene therapy research and some significant milestones in molecular biology, the clinical potential of gene therapy has yet to be realised. In pulmonary gene therapy the nucleic acid cargo needs to be delivered to cells in the target region of the lung, and even in cases when these targets are well defined this is severely limited by the pulmonary architecture, clearance mechanisms, immune activation, the presence of respiratory mucus and the availability of a truly representative biological model. The challenge from a drug delivery perspective is to consider the suitability of conventional nebulisers and inhalers for delivering DNA to the lung and design and apply integrated formulation and device solutions specific to nucleic acid delivery. PMID:17970661

  5. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure.

  6. High affinity nucleic acid aptamers for streptavidin incorporated into bi-specific capture ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri-Alaoui, Abdessamad; Frigotto, Laura; Manville, Nick; Ibrahim, Jamal; Romby, Pascale; James, William

    2002-01-01

    We have isolated 2′-Fluoro-substituted RNA aptamers that bind to streptavidin (SA) with an affinity around 7 ± 1.8 nM, comparable with that of recently described peptide aptamers. Binding to SA was not prevented by prior saturation with biotin, enabling nucleic acid aptamers to form useful ternary complexes. Mutagenesis, secondary structure analysis, ribonuclease footprinting and deletion analysis provided evidence for the essential structural features of SA-binding aptamers. In order to prov...

  7. LNA-antisense rivals siRNA for gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Wengel, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing unprecedented binding affinity toward complementary DNA and RNA while obeying the Watson-Crick base-pairing rules. For efficient gene silencing in vitro and in vivo, fully modified or chimeric LNA oligonucleotides have been...... phosphorothioate-DNA segment flanked by LNA gaps, rivals siRNA as the technology of choice for target validation and therapeutic applications....

  8. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  9. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  10. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, Brianne E.; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro. Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Treating Neurodegeneration at the Level of RNA

    OpenAIRE

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Miller, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate therapies are lacking for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and other neurodegenerative diseases. The ability to use antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to target disease-associated genes by means of RNA may offer a potent approach for the treatment of these, and other, neurodegenerative disorders. In modifying the basic backbone chemistry, chemical groups, and target sequence, ASOs can act through numerous mechanisms to decr...

  12. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    OpenAIRE

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, th...

  13. Progress in therapeutic antisense applications for neuromuscular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are a frequent cause of chronic disability in man. They often result from mutations in single genes and are thus, in principle, well suited for gene therapy. However, the tissues involved (muscle and the central nervous system) are post-mitotic, which poses a challenge for most viral vectors. In some cases, alternative approaches may use small molecules, for example, antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). These do not deliver a new gene, but rather modulate existing gene p...

  14. Antitumor Activity of a Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide Against Akt1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Heejeong; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Gellert, Ginelle C.; Shay, Jerry W.; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Lee, Young Bok

    2009-01-01

    The AKT pathway is an important therapeutic target for cancer drug discovery as it functions as a main point for transducing extracellular and intracellular oncogenic signals. Moreover, alternations of the AKT pathway have been found in a wide range of cancers. In the present study, we found that an Akt1 antisense oligonucleotide (Akt1 AO) significantly downregulated the expression of AKT1 at both the mRNA and protein levels and inhibited cellular growth at nanomolar concentrations in various...

  15. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  16. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  17. Combination Antisense Treatment for Destructive Exon Skipping of Myostatin and Open Reading Frame Rescue of Dystrophin in Neonatal mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Jarmin, Susan A; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Dickson, George

    2015-08-01

    The fatal X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), characterized by progressive muscle wasting and muscle weakness, is caused by mutations within the DMD gene. The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) modulating pre-mRNA splicing to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame, subsequently generating a shortened but functional protein has emerged as a potential strategy in DMD treatment. AO therapy has recently been applied to induce out-of-frame exon skipping of myostatin pre-mRNA, knocking-down expression of myostatin protein, and such an approach is suggested to enhance muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia and to reduce muscle necrosis. Within this study, we investigated dual exon skipping of dystrophin and myostatin pre-mRNAs using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers conjugated with an arginine-rich peptide (B-PMOs). Intraperitoneal administration of B-PMOs was performed in neonatal mdx males on the day of birth, and at weeks 3 and 6. At week 9, we observed in treated mice (as compared to age-matched, saline-injected controls) normalization of muscle mass, a recovery in dystrophin expression, and a decrease in muscle necrosis, particularly in the diaphragm. Our data provide a proof of concept for antisense therapy combining dystrophin restoration and myostatin inhibition for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25959011

  18. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section... nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of... Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay for the Detection of Enterovirus...

  19. Trans-natural antisense transcripts including noncoding RNAs in 10 species: implications for expression regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiong-Tang; Zhang, Yong; Kong, Lei; Liu, Qing-Rong; Wei, Liping

    2008-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts are at least partially complementary to their sense transcripts. Cis-Sense/Antisense pairs (cis-SAs) have been extensively characterized and known to play diverse regulatory roles, whereas trans-Sense/Antisense pairs (trans-SAs) in animals are poorly studied. We identified long trans-SAs in human and nine other animals, using ESTs to increase coverage significantly over previous studies. The percentage of transcriptional units (TUs) involved in trans-SAs among al...

  20. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  1. Two perspectives to consider Nucleic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Sosic, A

    2013-01-01

    Since their discovery, nucleic acids have been the object of intense and thorough explorations, leading to the understanding of their structure and functions. Their role as genetic information carriers is well known but there are evidences that they are also involved in a series of other less known processes. No longer have nucleic acids to be considered passive structures, but they are dynamic and active macromolecules, able to assume a number of three-dimensional conformations. Precisely, t...

  2. Interaction of Nucleic Acids with the Glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Palte, Michael J.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian cells resist the uptake of nucleic acids. The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane presents one barrier. Here, we report on a second physicochemical barrier for uptake. To create a sensitive probe for nucleic acid–cell interactions, we synthesized fluorescent conjugates in which lipids are linked to DNA oligonucleotides. We found that these conjugates incorporate readily into the plasma membrane but are not retained there. Expulsion of lipid–oligonucleotide conjugates from the plasm...

  3. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed. PMID:27597250

  4. Nucleic acid visualization with UCSF Chimera

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Gregory S.; Hendrix, Donna K.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    With the increase in the number of large, 3D, high-resolution nucleic acid structures, particularly of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits and the intact bacterial ribosome, advancements in the visualization of nucleic acid structural features are essential. Large molecular structures are complicated and detailed, and one goal of visualization software is to allow the user to simplify the display of some features and accent others. We describe an extension to the UCSF Chimera molecular visuali...

  5. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  6. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  7. Site-specific control of silica mineralization on DNA using a designed peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Makoto; Nagai, Kazuma; Nishiyama, Hiroto; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Fujii, Satoshi; Endoh, Tamaki; Imai, Takahito; Tomizaki, Kin-Ya; Usui, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    We developed a site-specific method for precipitating inorganic compounds using organic compounds, DNA, and designed peptides with peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). Such a system for site-specific precipitation represents a powerful tool for use in nanobiochemistry and materials chemistry. PMID:26690695

  8. A Tat-grafted anti-nucleic acid antibody acquires nuclear-localization property and a preference for TAR RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We generate 'H3Tat-3D8' by grafting Tat48-60 peptide to VH CDR of 3D8 scFv antibody. → H3Tat-3D8 antibody retains nucleic acid binding and hydrolyzing activities. → H3Tat-3D8 acquires a preference for TAR RNA structure. → Properties of Tat48-60 is transferred to an antibody via Tat-grafting into a CDR. -- Abstract: The 3D8 single chain variable fragment (3D8 scFv) is an anti-nucleic acid antibody that can hydrolyze nucleic acids and enter the cytosol of cells without reaching the nucleus. The Tat peptide, derived from the basic region of the HIV-1 Tat protein, translocates to cell nuclei and has TAR RNA binding activity. In this study, we generated a Tat-grafted antibody (H3Tat-3D8) by replacing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) within the VH domain of the 3D8 scFv with a Tat48-60 peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ). H3Tat-3D8 retained the DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity of the scFv, and translocated to the nuclei of HeLa cells and preferentially recognized TAR RNA. Thus, the properties associated with the Tat peptide were transferred to the antibody via Tat-grafting without loss of the intrinsic DNA-binding and hydrolyzing activities of the 3D8 scFv antibody.

  9. PERSPECTIVES OF ANTISENSE GENE THERAPY IN ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Reznik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Global organ shortage is the crucial point of transplantation nowadays. Usage of expanded criteria donors represents reliable source of donor organs, making transplantation more accessible for patients with end stage organs failure. Ischemia-reperfusion injury followed by the activation of programmed cell death scenarios remains the main obstacle in utilization of marginal grafts. Programmed cell death often leads to life threatening complications in posttransplant period. Antisense gene therapy could provide a therapeutic tool, capable to improve quality of grafts and, consequently, transplantation outcomes. 

  10. Parallel Synthesis of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Conjugates of PMO Toward Exon Skipping Enhancement in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donovan, Liz; Okamoto, Itaru; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Williams, Donna L.; Deuss, Peter; Gait, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe two new methods of parallel chemical synthesis of libraries of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) cargoes on a scale suitable for cell screening prior to in vivo analysis for therapeutic development. The methods represent an extension of the SELection of PEPtide CONjugates (SELPEPCON) approach previously developed for parallel peptide-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) synthesis. However, these new methods allow for the utilization of commercial PMO ...

  11. Development of a Method for Profiling Protein Interactions with LNA-Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides Using Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2016-04-01

    Development of locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by nontarget-mediated hepatotoxicity. Increased binding of hepatocellular proteins to toxic LNA gapmers may be one of the mechanisms contributing to LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the protein binding propensity of nontoxic sequence-1 (NTS-1), toxic sequence-2 (TS-2), and severely highly toxic sequence-3 (HTS-3) LNA gapmers using human protein microarrays. We previously demonstrated by the transcription profiling analysis of liver RNA isolated from mice that TS-2 and HTS-3 gapmers modulate different transcriptional pathways in mice leading to hepatotoxicity. Our protein array profiling demonstrated that a greater number of proteins, including ones associated with hepatotoxicity, hepatic system disorder, and cell functions, were bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 compared with NTS-1. However, the profiles of proteins bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 were similar and did not distinguish proteins contributing to severe in vivo toxicity. These results, together with the previous transcription profiling analysis, indicate that the combination of sequence-dependent transcription modulation and increased protein binding of toxic LNA gapmers contributes to hepatotoxicity. PMID:26643897

  12. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Youn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis.

  13. Highly stable triple helix formation by homopyrimidine (l)-acyclic threoninol nucleic acids with single stranded DNA and RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Vipin; Kesavan, Venkitasamy; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2015-01-01

    Acyclic (l)-threoninol nucleic acid (aTNA) containing thymine, cytosine and adenine nucleobases were synthesized and shown to form surprisingly stable triplexes with complementary single stranded homopurine DNA or RNA targets. The triplex structures consist of two (l)-aTNA strands and one DNA or...... RNA, and these triplexes are significantly stronger than the corresponding DNA or RNA duplexes as shown in competition experiments. As a unique property the (l)-aTNAs exclusively form triplex structures with DNA and RNA and no duplex structures are observed by gel electrophoresis. The results were...... compared to the known enantiomer (d)-aTNA, which forms much weaker triplexes depending upon temperature and time. It was demonstrated that (l)-aTNA triplexes are able to stop primer extension on a DNA template, showing the potential of (l)-aTNA for antisense applications....

  14. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor (Madison, WI); Olive, David Michael (Madison, WI); Prudent, James Robert (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  15. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  16. HIV-1-encoded antisense RNA suppresses viral replication for a prolonged period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi-Ishihara Mie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence proposes a novel concept that mammalian natural antisense RNAs play important roles in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of several genes. Identification and characterization of retroviral antisense RNA would provide new insights into mechanisms of replication and pathogenesis. HIV-1 encoded-antisense RNAs have been reported, although their structures and functions remain to be studied. We have tried to identify and characterize antisense RNAs of HIV-1 and their function in viral infection. Results Characterization of transcripts of HEK293T cells that were transiently transfected with an expression plasmid with HIV-1NL4–3 DNA in the antisense orientation showed that various antisense transcripts can be expressed. By screening and characterizing antisense RNAs in HIV-1NL4–3-infected cells, we defined the primary structure of a major form of HIV-1 antisense RNAs, which corresponds to a variant of previously reported ASP mRNA. This 2.6 kb RNA was transcribed from the U3 region of the 3′ LTR and terminated at the env region in acutely or chronically infected cell lines and acutely infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Reporter assays clearly demonstrated that the HIV-1 LTR harbours promoter activity in the reverse orientation. Mutation analyses suggested the involvement of NF-κΒ binding sites in the regulation of antisense transcription. The antisense RNA was localized in the nuclei of the infected cells. The expression of this antisense RNA suppressed HIV-1 replication for more than one month. Furthermore, the specific knockdown of this antisense RNA enhanced HIV-1 gene expression and replication. Conclusions The results of the present study identified an accurate structure of the major form of antisense RNAs expressed from the HIV-1NL4–3 provirus and demonstrated its nuclear localization. Functional studies collectively demonstrated a new role of the antisense RNA in viral

  17. Toward Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Directed Peptide Translation Using Ester Based Aminoacyl Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Bagnacani, Valentina; Corradini, Roberto;

    2014-01-01

    of phenylalanine occurs either between two ends of a PNA stem loop structure, between two PNAs in a duplex, or between two PNAs assembled on a PNA template, we show that bona fide template instructed phenylalanine transfer can take place. Thus, we have identified conditions which allow template...

  18. Construction of antisense Bmi-1 expression plasmid and its inhibitory effect on K562 cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiu-xiang; LIU Wei-hong; LIU Dan-dan; ZHAO Xin-yu; SU Ben-li

    2005-01-01

    Background Bmi-1 gene determines the proliferative capacity of normal and leukemia stem cells. Expression of Bmi-1 has been found in all types of myeloid leukemia cells in both humans and mice. This study aimed at assessing the effect of antisense Bmi-1 expression on K562 cells proliferation and p16 protein (p16) expression.Results K562 cells transfected with antisense Bmi-1 plasmid grew significantly slower than that of controls (the parental K562 and cells transfected with empty plasmid). The colony forming ability of antisense Bmi-1 plasmid transfected cells decreased significantly (P<0.01) compared with controls. The p16 expression of cells transfected with antisense Bmi-1 was upgraded more apparently than that of controls.Conclusion The antisense Bmi-1 gene can inhibit the growth of K562 cell and upgrade expression of p16 in K562 cells.

  19. Novel Biochip Platform for Nucleic Acid Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Diaz-Mochon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the use of a novel biochip platform for the rapid analysis/identification of nucleic acids, including DNA and microRNAs, with very high specificity. This approach combines a unique dynamic chemistry approach for nucleic acid testing and analysis developed by DestiNA Genomics with the STMicroelectronics In-Check platform, which comprises two microfluidic optimized and independent PCR reaction chambers, and a sequential microarray area for nucleic acid capture and identification by fluorescence. With its compact bench-top “footprint” requiring only a single technician to operate, the biochip system promises to transform and expand routine clinical diagnostic testing and screening for genetic diseases, cancers, drug toxicology and heart disease, as well as employment in the emerging companion diagnostics market.

  20. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  1. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti......-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor...

  2. Locked and unlocked nucleosides in functional nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Holger; Vester, Birte

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acids are able to adopt a plethora of structures, many of which are of interest in therapeutics, bio- or nanotechnology. However, structural and biochemical stability is a major concern which has been addressed by incorporating a range of modifications and nucleoside derivatives. This rev...... review summarizes the use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) and un-locked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers in functional nucleic acids such as aptamers, ribozymes, and DNAzymes....

  3. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in cl...

  4. Chemical consequences of irradiating nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of literature data, a discussion is presented of the DNA damage which would be produced in a cellular environment and an attempt is made to place this damage in perspective as a potential hazard in food irradiation. The topics discussed are radiation damage mechanisms, OH reactions with DNA, base products, sugar products, and evaluation of damage from irradiated nucleic acids

  5. A locked nucleic Acid-based nanocrawler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Pasternak, Karol; Campbell, Meghan A;

    2013-01-01

    Herein we introduce a novel fluorescent LNA/DNA machine, a nanocrawler, which reversibly moves along a directionally polar complementary road controlled by affinity-enhancing locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers and additional regulatory strands. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dyes attached to 2'-a...

  6. Trends in protein and nucleic acid electroanalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil

    Seville, 2008. s. 1. [The 59th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Electrochemistry. 07.09.2008-12.09.2008, Seville] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : protein electroanalysis * nucleic acid electroanalysis Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine

  7. Simulations of nucleic acid vibrational spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrushchenko, Valery; Wieser, H.; Bouř, Petr

    Wroclaw : Wroclaw University of Technology, 2010. L24-L24. [Modeling & Design of Molecular Materials 2010. 04.07.2010-08.07.2010, Wroclaw] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0559; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleic acid * IR * VCD Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Advances in magnetofection-magnetically guided nucleic acid delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetofection is nucleic acid delivery to cells supported and site-specifically guided by the attractive forces of magnetic fields acting on nucleic acid shuttles (vectors) which are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. Recent progress with the method confirms its general applicability with small and large nucleic acids and viruses. The method's therapeutic application as well as mechanistic studies will be discussed

  9. Functional Analysis of Polyphenol Oxidases by Antisense/Sense Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutharat Attajarusit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO. These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F., cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner, whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants

  10. Inhibitory effect of IGF-Ⅱ antisense RNA on malignant phenotype of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hua Yang; Ming Qing Zhang; Han Rong Qin; Zi Rong Fan; Jiang Du; Chong Xu; Qiao Ming Liang; Ji Fang Mao

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION According to the therapeutic effect and strategy of antisense RNA for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we have specifically synthesized partial cDNA of human insulin-like growth factor Ⅱ (IGFⅡ ) and constructed IGF-Ⅱ cDNA antisense eukaryotic expression vector. The constructed vector was introduced into hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 to block the intrinsic IGF- Ⅱexpression. The biological behavior changes of hepatoma cells were observed. All these would provide scientific basis for IGF- Ⅱ antisense RNA in the treatment of HCC.

  11. An antisense RNA that governs the expression kinetics of a multifunctional virulence gene

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of several bacterial species have recently uncovered a hitherto unappreciated amount of antisense transcription. However, the physiological role, regulation and significance of such antisense transcripts are presently unclear. We now report the identification of a cis-encoded 1.2 kb long antisense RNA – termed AmgR – that is complementary to the mgtC portion of the mgtCBR polycistronic message from Salmonella enterica. The mgtCBR mRNA specifies the MgtC prot...

  12. Inhibition of Leukemic Cell Telomerase Activity by Antisense Phosphorothioate Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEDongmei; ZHANGYuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) gene antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) on telomerase activity in K562 cells.Methods Telomerase activity was detemined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA) in K562 cells treated with ASODN and hTERTmRNA expression was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The hTERTmRNA level was decreased,and telomerase activity was significantly inhibited when the K562 cells were treated with ASODN for 48 h. Conclusion It is suggested that hTETR ASODN might specifically inhibit telomrase activity of K562 cells at translation level,and it is further proved that hTERT gene has significant correlation with telopmerase activity.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver. PMID:12270110

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  15. Antisense angiopoietin-1 inhibits tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Kai-Chun Wu; De-Xin Zhang; Dai-Ming Fan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1)on biological behaviors in vitro and tumorigenesis and angiogenesis in vitro of human gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Human full-length Ang-1 gene was cloned from human placental tissues by RT-PCR method.Recombinant human Ang-1 antisense eukaryotic expression vector was constructed by directional cloning,and transfected by lipofectin method into human gastric cancer line SGC7901 with high Ang-1 expression level.Inhibition efficiency was confirmed by semi- quantitive PCR and Western blot method. Cell growth curve and cell cycle were observed with MTT assays and flow cytometry, respectively. Nude mice tumorigenicity test was employed to compare in vitro tumorigenesis of cells with Ang-1 suppression. Microvessel density (MVD) of implanted tumor tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry for factor Ⅷ staining.RESULTS: Full-length Ang-1 gene was successfully cloned and stable transfectants were established,namely 7Ang1- for antisense, and 7901P for empty vector transfected. 7Ang1- cells showed down-regulated Ang-1 expression, while its in vitro proliferation and cell cycle distribution were not significantly changed.In contrast, xenograft of 7Ang1- cells in nude mice had lower volume and weight than those of 7901P after 30 days' implantation (P<0.01, 293.00±95.54 mg vs. 624.00±77.78 mg) accompanied with less vessel formation with MVD 6.00±1.73 compared to 7901P group 8.44±1.33 (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Ang-1 may play an important role in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer, and targeting its expression may be beneficial for the therapy of gastric cancer.

  16. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  17. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  18. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  19. Peptides as catalysts in the RNA world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Dörr, Mark; Luisi, Pier Luigi;

    the RNA world concept. Contrary to RNA building blocks, amino acids form quite easily in simulated prebiotic reactions. Also, many prebiotic scenarios for condensation of amino acids into peptides have been proposed and successfully demonstrated experimentally (Rode 1999). We also have growing body of...... experimental evidence showing various catalytic activities associated with short chain peptides, some of them as small as dipeptides. One such peptide, composed of only two amino acid residues; serine and histidine, was reported to exhibit broad hydrolytic activities. The dipeptide SerHis can catalyze the...... hydrolysis of esters, proteins and nucleic acids (Li et al. 2000). The direction of the catalysis either toward hydrolysis or condensation is determined by thermodynamic constraints. In an aqueous medium (a general requirement for prebiotically compatible reactions), hydrolysis is thermodynamically favored...

  20. Cis-encoded noncoding antisense RNAs in streptococci and other low GC Gram (+ bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Hong eCho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent advances of bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technology, discovery of regulatory noncoding RNAs in bacteria has been increased to a great extent. Based on this bandwagon, many studies searching for trans-acting small noncoding RNAs in streptococci have been performed intensively, especially in the important human pathogen, group A and B streptococci. However, studies for cis-encoded noncoding antisense RNAs in streptococci have been scarce. A recent study shows antisense RNAs are involved in virulence gene regulation in group B streptococcus, S. agalactiae. This suggests antisense RNAs could have important roles in the pathogenesis of streptococcal pathogens. In this review, we describe recent discoveries of chromosomal cis-encoded antisense RNAs in streptococcal pathogens and other low GC Gram (+ bacteria to provide a guide for future studies.

  1. Construction and transfection of sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors for human cathepsin L gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maolin He; Anmin Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To obtain sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors for human cathepsin L gene, and study the biological effects on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection. Methods: Cathepsin L gene sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed with recombinant technology and transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63. The expression of cathepsin L gene mRNA was examined with RT-PCR and the expression of cathepsin L was examined with Western blot. Results: The sense/antisense recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors for cathepsin L were successfully constructed and transfected into MG-63 cell.Conclusion: Antisense cathepsin L gene can significantly inhibit the expression of cathepsin L mRNA and protein.

  2. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  3. Inhibition of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon in Escherichia coli by antisense DNA analogs.

    OpenAIRE

    White, D G; Maneewannakul, K; von Hofe, E; Zillman, M; Eisenberg, W; Field, A K; Levy, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marORAB) in Escherichia coli controls intrinsic susceptibility and resistance to multiple, structurally different antibiotics and other noxious agents. A plasmid construct with marA cloned in the antisense direction reduced LacZ expression from a constitutively expressed marA::lacZ translational fusion and inhibited the induced expression of LacZ in cells bearing the wild-type repressed fusion. The marA antisense construction also decreased the multi...

  4. Cathepsin B antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses invasive potential of MG-63 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the biological effects of cathepsin B phosporothioated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection.Methods A 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(ASODN)targeted against the cathepsin B mRNA was transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 by lipofectamine 2000.The sense and nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides to cathepsin B and blank vector were used as controls.The expression of cathepsin B mRNA was examined by RT-PCR an...

  5. Microinjection of antisense c-mos oligonucleotides prevents meiosis II in the maturing mouse egg.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Keefe, S J; Wolfes, H; Kiessling, A A; Cooper, G M

    1989-01-01

    Injection of antisense oligonucleotides was used to investigate the function of c-mos in murine oocytes. Oocytes injected with antisense c-mos oligonucleotides completed the first meiotic division but failed to initiate meiosis II. Instead, loss of c-mos function led to chromosome decondensation, reformation of a nucleus after meiosis I, and cleavage to two cells. Therefore, c-mos is required for meiosis II during murine oocyte maturation.

  6. Targeted Skipping of Human Dystrophin Exons in Transgenic Mouse Model Systemically for Antisense Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wu; Ehsan Benrashid; Peijuan Lu; Caryn Cloer; Allen Zillmer; Mona Shaban; Qi Long Lu

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD/...

  7. A Tandem Oligonucleotide Approach for SNP-Selective RNA Degradation Using Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been studied for many years as a tool for gene silencing. One of the most difficult cases of selective RNA silencing involves the alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, in which the allele sequence is differentiated by a single nucleotide. A new approach to improve the performance of allele selectivity for antisense oligonucleotides is proposed. It is based on the simultaneous application of two oligonucleotides. One is complementary to the mutated form of...

  8. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  9. Novel applications of locked nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) nucleoside triphosphates were prepared and their substrate properties for different polymerases during primer extension and PCR experiments investigated. Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase and 9( degrees )Nm(TM) DNA polymerase readily accept LNA nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates in primer extension assays. However, in PCR assays, However, in PCR assays, DNA 9oN(m) polymerase proved to be the best for amplification employing the LNA-A nucleotide. PMID:18029570

  10. Total Nucleic Acid Extraction from Soil

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Roey Angel ### Abstract The following protocol is intended for the simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from various soil samples along with suggestions on how to tweak the protocol for soil with higher humic content. The protocol has been used by many and results in very high yields of nucleic acids, typically much more than commercial kits. For buffers and solutions used in this protocol, please see accompanying document Buffers and Solutions for TNA Extractions.pdf. ...

  11. Genome-wide analysis of antisense transcription with Affymetrix exon array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Yong-chul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of natural antisense transcripts have been identified in human and mouse genomes. Study of their potential functions clearly requires cost-efficient method for expression analysis. Results Here we show that Affymetrix Exon arrays, which were designed to detect conventional transcripts in the sense orientation, can be used to monitor antisense expression across all exonic loci in mammalian genomes. Through modification of the cDNA synthesis protocol, we labeled single-strand cDNA in the reverse orientation as in the standard protocol, thus enabling the detection of antisense transcripts using the same array. Applying this technique to human Jurkat cells, we identified antisense transcription at 2,088 exonic loci of 1,516 UniGene clusters. Many of these antisense transcripts were not observed previously and some were validated by orientation-specific RT-PCR. Conclusion Our results suggest that with a modified protocol Affymetrix human, mouse and rat Exon arrays can be used as a routine method for genome-wide analysis of antisense transcription in these genomes.

  12. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients. PMID:20030230

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1IIIB infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent

  14. Sequence Selective Recognition of Double-Stranded RNA at Physiologically Relevant Conditions Using PNA-Peptide Conjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Zengeya, Thomas; Mwaura, Juddy; Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W.; Grewer, Christof T.; Rozners, Eriks

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) with tetralysine peptides strongly enhanced triple helical binding to RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The PNA hexamers and heptamers carrying cationic nucleobase and tetralysine modifications displayed high binding affinity for complementary double-stranded RNA without compromising sequence selectivity. The PNA-peptide conjugates had unique preference for binding double-stranded RNA, while having little, if any, affinity for double-...

  15. Nanoparticle Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides and Their Application in the Exon Skipping Strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA,...

  16. Conformational analysis of Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV derived cell penetrating peptide (CPP analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay G. Joshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to develop peptide analogs of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD virus VP5 protein segment having cell penetrating ability to improve their interaction with cargo molecule (Nucleic acid without affecting the backbone conformation. Materials and Methods: IBDV VP5 protein segment designated as RATH peptide were synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis and their solution conformation was elucidated using CD spectroscopy in polar (water and apolar (TFE solvents. Cell penetrating ability of RATH-CONH2 was observed using FITC labeled peptide internalization in to HeLa cells under fluorescent microscopy. The efficacy of RATH analog interactions with nucleic acids was evaluated using FITC labeled oligonucleotides by fluorescence spectroscopy and plasmid constructs in gel retardation assay. Results: CD spectra of RATH analogs in water and apolar trifluroethanol (TFE helped to compare their secondary structures which were almost similar with dominant beta conformations suggesting successful induction of positive charge in the analogs without affecting back bone conformation of CPP designed. Cell penetrating ability of RATH CONH2 in HeLa cell was more than 90%. The fluorescence spectroscopy and plasmid constructs in gel retardation assay demonstrated successful interaction of amide analogs with nucleic acid. Conclusion: Intentional changes made in IBDV derived peptide RATH COOH to RATH CONH2 did not showed major changes in backbone conformation and such modifications may help to improve the cationic charge in most CPPs to interact with nucleic acid. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 307-312

  17. Silencing MIG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effects of antisense MIG1 expression and MIG1 gene disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Lisbeth; Larsen, M.E.; Rønnow, B.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    repression, However, silencing of MIG1 expression was not achieved by expressing antisense MIG1, even though antisense MIG1 RNA was sufficiently stable to be detected. In the wild-type and Delta mig1 strains, the specific growth rate was 0.32 to 0.33 h(-1), whereas it was lower in the antisense strains, 0......Silencing of MIG1, a transcription factor imposing carbon catabolite repression on invertase was attempted, either by disrupting the gene or by expressing antisense copies of the gene. The performance of the recombinant strains in bioreactor batch cultivations on sucrose, in the presence of glucose...

  18. A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay based on strand displacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Vary, C P

    1987-01-01

    A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay which is conducted in solution and requires no separation steps is described. The assay is based on the concept of strand displacement. In the strand displacement assay, an RNA "signal strand" is hybridized within a larger DNA strand termed the "probe strand", which is, in turn, complementary to the target nucleic acid of interest. Hybridization of the target nucleic acid with the probe strand ultimately results in displacement of the RNA signal ...

  19. Directional gene expression and antisense transcripts in sexual and asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Barragán María J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that nearly a quarter of the initial predicted gene models in the Plasmodium falciparum genome contain errors. Although there have been efforts to obtain complete cDNA sequences to correct the errors, the coverage of cDNA sequences on the predicted genes is still incomplete, and many gene models for those expressed in sexual or mosquito stages have not been validated. Antisense transcripts have widely been reported in P. falciparum; however, the extent and pattern of antisense transcripts in different developmental stages remain largely unknown. Results We have sequenced seven bidirectional libraries from ring, early and late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, gametocyte V, and ookinete, and four strand-specific libraries from late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, and gametocyte V of the 3D7 parasites. Alignment of the cDNA sequences to the 3D7 reference genome revealed stage-specific antisense transcripts and novel intron-exon splicing junctions. Sequencing of strand-specific cDNA libraries suggested that more genes are expressed in one direction in gametocyte than in schizont. Alternatively spliced genes, antisense transcripts, and stage-specific expressed genes were also characterized. Conclusions It is necessary to continue to sequence cDNA from different developmental stages, particularly those of non-erythrocytic stages. The presence of antisense transcripts in some gametocyte and ookinete genes suggests that these antisense RNA may play an important role in gene expression regulation and parasite development. Future gene expression studies should make use of directional cDNA libraries. Antisense transcripts may partly explain the observed discrepancy between levels of mRNA and protein expression.

  20. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail epidermis subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. (orig.)

  1. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C J; Giménez, I B; Cabrini, R L

    1976-03-01

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. PMID:1258094

  2. Flexibility of nucleic acids: from DNA to RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Lei; Jin, Lei; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids.

  3. Extrachromosomal nucleic acids in bovine babesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Hotzel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of small extrachromosomal nucleic acid elements were found in the bovine babesias, Babesia bovis and B. bigemina. One element with an apparent size of 5.5 kilobase pairs (kbp is a double stranded RNA related to virus like particles. Another molecule is a double stranded DNA with a molecular size of about 6.2 kbp. Southern blot comparison of restriction DNA fragments of the latter molecule, which is present in both B. bovis and B. bigemina is described.

  4. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. PMID:26896846

  5. Expression of an Antisense BcMF3 Affects Microsporogenesis and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Le-cheng; CAO Jia-shu; YU Xiao-lin; XIANG Xun; FEI Yong-jun

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to provide some information relevant to the molecular mechanism of genic male sterility in plants, BcMF3 gene that encodes a pectin methylesterase was isolated from the fertile B line of Chinese cabbage-pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp.chinensis, syn. B. campestris ssp. chinensis). In the present paper, a 455-bp antisense cDNA fragment of BcMF3 was introduced to binary vector pBI121, and then was mobilized into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. The A.tumefaciens harboring the BcMF3 antisense fragment was transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip. Scanning electronic microscopy examination demonstrated that 47.8% of BcMF3 antisense pollen grains exhibited abnormal shape,which might lead to decreased germination of pollens, suggesting that the product of BcMF3 gene plays an important role during microsporogenesis. The evidence on burst of 45.7% of BcMF3 antisense pollen tubes in vitro and a majority of BcMF3 antisense pollens restricted within the stigmatic tissue revealed that BcMF3 is involved in aiding the growth of pollen tubes. The results suggest that BcMF3 acts at both stages of microsporogensis and pollen tube growth.

  6. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  7. MEANS AND METHODS FOR CLONING NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma, Eric Robin; Poolman, Berend

    2008-01-01

    The invention provides means and methods for efficiently cloning nucleic acid sequences of interest in micro-organisms that are less amenable to conventional nucleic acid manipulations, as compared to, for instance, E.coli. The present invention enables high-throughput cloning (and, preferably, expr

  8. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  9. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-01

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand. PMID:27294440

  10. Functional comparison of antisense proteins of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in viral pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eBarbeau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of antisense transcripts from the 3’ long terminal repeat (LTR in human T-lymphotropic retroviruses has now been clearly demonstrated. After the identification of the antisense strand-encoded HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ factor, we reported that HBZ could interact with CREB transcription factors and consequently turn off the important activating potential of the viral Tax protein on HTLV-1 5’ LTR promoter activity. We have recently accumulated new results demonstrating that antisense transcripts also exist in HTLV-2, -3 and -4. Furthermore, our data have confirmed the existence of encoded proteins from these antisense transcripts (termed antisense proteins of HTLVs or APHs. APHs are also involved in the down-regulation of Tax-dependent viral transcription. In this review, we will focus on the different molecular mechanisms used by HBZ and APH-2 to control viral expression. While HBZ interacts with CREB through its basic zipper domain, APH-2 binds to this cellular factor through a five amino acid motif localized in its carboxyl terminus. Moreover, unlike APH-2, HBZ possesses an N-terminal activation domain that also contributes to the inhibition of the viral transcription by interacting with the KIX domain of p300/CBP. On the other hand, HBZ was found to induce T-cell proliferation while APH-2 was unable to promote such proliferation. Interestingly, HTLV-2 has not been causally linked to human T-cell leukemia, while HTLV-1 is responsible for the development of the Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL. We will further discuss the possible role played by antisense proteins in the establishment of pathologies induced by viral infection.

  11. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Sebastien A; Hart, Christopher E; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Crooke, Stanley T; Henry, Scott P

    2016-03-18

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  12. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural antisense transcripts (NATs are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded or a different locus (trans-encoded. They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation. NATs give rise to sense-antisense transcript pairs and the number of these identified has escalated greatly with the availability of DNA sequencing resources and public databases. Traditionally, NATs were identified by the alignment of full-length cDNAs or expressed sequence tags to genome sequences, but an alternative method for large-scale detection of sense-antisense transcript pairs involves the use of microarrays. In this study we developed a novel protocol to assay sense- and antisense-strand transcription on the 55 K Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array, which is a 3' in vitro transcription (3'IVT expression array. We selected five different tissue types for assay to enable maximum discovery, and used the 'Chinese Spring' wheat genotype because most of the wheat GeneChip probe sequences were based on its genomic sequence. This study is the first report of using a 3'IVT expression array to discover the expression of natural sense-antisense transcript pairs, and may be considered as proof-of-concept. Results By using alternative target preparation schemes, both the sense- and antisense-strand derived transcripts were labeled and hybridized to the Wheat GeneChip. Quality assurance verified that successful hybridization did occur in the antisense-strand assay. A stringent threshold for positive hybridization was applied, which resulted in the identification of 110 sense-antisense transcript pairs, as well as 80 potentially antisense-specific transcripts. Strand-specific RT-PCR validated the microarray observations, and showed that antisense transcription is likely to be tissue specific. For the annotated sense-antisense

  13. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills. PMID:23849929

  14. Combination Adenovirus-Mediated HSV-tk/GCV and Antisense IGF-1 Gene Therapy for Rat Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of combination adenovirus-mediated HSV-tk/GCV system and antisense IGF-1 gene therapy for rat glioma and analyze the mechanism.Methods Using the recombinant adenovirus vector,GCV killing effeciency after combined gene transfer of HSV-tk and antisense IGF-1 was observed in vitro.Rat glioma was treated with HSV-tk/GCV and antisense IGF-1 and the survival rate of rats was observed.Results C6 cells transfected with tk and antisense IGF-1 gene were more sensitive to GCV than that transfected with tk gene alone.The survival of the combination gene therapy group was prolonged significantly and large amounts of CD+4,CD+8 lymphocytes were detected in the tumor tissues.Conclusion Antisense IGF-1 gene may enhance the tumor-killing effects of HSV-tk/GCV.

  15. Inhibiting effect of antisense hTRT on telomerase activity of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟娇; 李晓冬; 杨庆; 贾凤岐; 卫立辛; 郭亚军; 吴孟超

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To induce changes in biological character of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 by blocking the expression of telomerase genes hTRT and to explore its value in cancer gene therapy. Methods: The vehicle for eukaryotic expression of antisense hTRT was constructed and then transfected into SMMC-7721 cells. The effects of antisense hTRT gene on telomerase activity, cancer cell growth and malignant phenotypes were analyzed. Results: The obtained transfectants that could express antisense hTRT gene stably showed marked decrease in telomerase activity; the shortening of telomere was obvious; cells presented contact growth inhibition; in nude mice transplantation, the rate of tumor induction dramatically decreased. Conclusion: Antisense hTRT gene expression can significantly inhibit telomerase activity of cancer cells and decrease malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, as a telomerase inhibitor, antisense hTRT gene may be a new pathway for cancer therapy.

  16. Role of natural antisense transcripts pertaining to tumor suppressor genes in human carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overlapping transcripts in opposite orientations can potentially form perfect sense-antisense duplex RNA. Recently, several studies have revealed the extent of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and their role in important biological phenomena also in higher organisms. In order to test the hypothesis that the function of NATs in man might represent an essential element in the regulation of gene expression, especially at transcriptional level, in this study we planned to look for, systematically examine, and characterize NATs belonging in the human genome to the tumour suppressor class of genes, so to identify physiological (and potentially pathological) modulators in this gene class

  17. Construction of neuron specific vector of human antisense noggin gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengnian Zhou; Chengshan Li; Xiansen Wei; Liqing Liu; Zhengda Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The noggin gene is present in the central nervous system in embryonic and postnatal mammals,and plays an important role in maintaining nervous system development and physiological function.A 0.76-kb sequence of human noggin gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction with the digestion site of Hind Ⅲ and Xba l on the 5' end.The cloned fragment was reversely inserted into pCS2+[Tα1]-GFP plasmid,an neural cell-specific antisense eukaryotic expression vector.The plasmid expresses antisense for human noggin specifically in neurons,which may facilitate understanding of the physiological function of noggin.

  18. Intragenic pausing and anti-sense transcription within the murine c-myc locus.

    OpenAIRE

    Nepveu, A; Marcu, K B

    1986-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of strand-specific transcription in different regions of the murine c-myc locus. In normal and transformed cell lines, RNA polymerase II directed transcription occurs in the sense and anti-sense direction. Three noncontiguous regions show a high level of transcription in the anti-sense orientation: upstream of the first exon, within the first intron and in the 3' part of the gene (intron 2 and exon 3). In a cell line carrying a c-myc amplification (54c12), anti-...

  19. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 multiplication by antisense and sense RNA expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, S; Van Brunschot, A; Asad, S.; van der Elst, I; Read, S. E.; Bernstein, A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primarily infects CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages and causes AIDS in humans. Retroviral vectors allowing neomycin phosphotransferase (npt) gene expression were engineered to express 5' sequences of HIV-1 RNA in the antisense or sense orientation and used to transform the human CD4+ lymphocyte-derived MT4 cell line. Cells expressing antisense or sense RNA to the HIV-1 tat mRNA leader sequence, as part of the 3' untranslated region of the npt mRNA, r...

  20. Survivin antisense compound inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis in liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Jian Dai; Cai-De Lu; Ri-Yong Lai; Jun-Ming Guo; Hua Meng; Wei-Sheng Chen; Jun Gu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of survivin on cell proliferation and apoptosis in liver cancer.METHODS: MTT assay was used to generate and optimize phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs)LipofectamineTM2000 (LiP) compound by varying ODNs (μg):LiP (μL) ratios from 1:0.5 to 1:5. Then, liver cancer cells (HepG2) were transfected with the compound. By using RT-PCR and Western blot, the expression levels of survivin mRNA and proteins were detected in HepG2 cells treated with antisense compounds (ODNs:LiP = 1:4), and compared with those treated with sense compounds (1:4) as control.MTT assay was applied to the determination of cell proliferation in HepG2 cells. Active caspase-3 was evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. The morphological changes were assessed by electron microscopy. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was performed to detect the subcellular localization of survivin proteins in treated and untreated cells.RESULTS: Antisense compounds (1:4) down-regulated survivin expression (mRNA and protein) in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 250 nmol/L. Its maximum effect was achieved at a concentration of 500 nmol/L, at whichmRNA and protein levels were down-regulated by 80%.The similar results were found in MTT assay. Antisense compound (1:4)-treated cells revealed increased caspase3-like protease activity compared with untreated cells.Untreated cells as control were primarily negative for the presence of active-caspase-3. As shown by transmission electron microscopy, treated cells with antisense compounds (1:4) resulted in morphological changes such as blebbing and loss of microvilli, vacuolization in the cytoplasm,condensation of the cytoplasm and nuclei, and fragmented chromatin. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of survivin protein pool inside the cytoplasm in untreated cells. Labeled-FITC immunofluorescence staining of survivin clearly showed that survivin was distributed mainly in a spotted form inside the cytoplasm. Whereas

  1. Use of electrophoretic mobility to determine the secondary structure of a small antisense RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, J P; Susskind, M M

    1991-01-01

    Natural antisense RNAs have stem-loop (hairpin) secondary structures that are important for their function. The sar antisense RNA of phage P22 is unusual: the 3' half of the molecule forms an extensive stem-loop, but potential structures for the 5' half are not predicted to be thermodynamically stable. We devised a novel method to determine the secondary structure of sar RNA by examining the electrophoretic mobility on non-denaturing gels of numerous sar mutants. The results show that the wil...

  2. Scaffolding along Nucleic Acid Duplexes Using 2'-Amino-Locked Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    '-amino-LNA nucleotides. By application of different chemical reactions, modification of 2'-amino-LNA scaffolds can be efficiently performed in high yields and with various tags, postsynthetically or during the automated oligonucleotide synthesis. The choice of a synthetic method for scaffolding along 2......Conspectus Incorporation of chemically modified nucleotide scaffolds into nucleic acids to form assemblies rich in function is an innovative area with great promise for nanotechnology and biomedical and material science applications. The intrinsic biorecognition potential of nucleic acids combined......'-amino-LNA mainly depends on the chemical nature of the modification, its price, its availability, and applications of the product. One of the most useful applications of the product LNA/DNA scaffolds containing 2'-amino-LNA is to detect complementary DNA and RNA targets. Examples of these applications...

  3. Cell penetrating peptide delivery of splice directing oligonucleotides as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Corinne A; Wood, Matthew J A

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe, X-linked muscle wasting disorder caused by the absence of an integral structural protein called dystrophin. This is caused by mutations or deletions in the dystrophin gene which disrupt the reading frame, thereby halting the production of a functional protein. A number of potential therapies have been investigated for the treatment of this disease including utrophin upregulation, 'stop-codon read through' aminoglycosides and adeno-associated virus gene replacement as well as stem cell therapy. However, the most promising treatment to date is the use of antisense oligonucleotides which cause exon skipping by binding to a specific mRNA sequence, skipping the desired exon, thereby restoring the reading frame and producing a truncated yet functional protein. The results from recent 2'OMePS and morpholino clinical trials have renewed hope for Duchenne patients; however in vivo studies in a mouse model, mdx, have revealed low systemic distribution and poor delivery of oligonucleotides to affected tissues such as the brain and heart. However a variety of cell penetrating peptides directly conjugated to antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to enhance delivery in Duchenne model systems with improved systemic distribution and greater efficacy compared to 'naked' antisense oligonucleotides. These cell penetrating peptides, combined with an optimised dose and dosing regimen, as well as thorough toxicity profile have the potential to be developed into a promising treatment which may be progressed to clinical trial. PMID:23140454

  4. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  5. Structural studies of nucleic acids and proteins involved in nucleic acid recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Russo Krauss, Irene

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the structural analysis of the protein-nucleic acid recognition. In particular the research work has been focalized on two different kinds of proteins and their nucleotide ligands. The first part concerns the structural characterization of complexes between human α-thrombin, a protein of physiological and pathological relevance, and two oligonucleotide aptamers (the so called thrombin binding aptamer and a modified version of it), which adopt a G-quadruplex fold. Th...

  6. Intumescent features of nucleic acids and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The combustion resistance of DNA and caseins to different heat fluxes was studied. • Upon heating, DNA and caseins exhibited an intumescent behaviour. • The char derived from DNA was more stable and coherent than that from caseins. - Abstract: Are nucleic acids and proteins intumescent molecules? In order to get an answer, in the present manuscript, powders of deoxyribose nucleic acids (DNA) and caseins have been exposed to different heat fluxes under a cone calorimeter source and to the direct application of a propane flame. Under these conditions, DNA and caseins exhibited a typical intumescent behaviour, generating a coherent expanded cellular carbonaceous residue (char), extremely resistant to heat exposure. The resulting volumetric expansion as well as the resistance of the formed char turned out to be dependent on (i) the chemical structure of the chosen biomacromolecule, (ii) the evolution of ammonia and (iii) the adopted heat flux in cone calorimetry tests (namely, 25, 35, 50 and 75 kW/m2). The presence of ribose units within the DNA backbone determined the formation of highly expanded and coherent residues as compared to those obtained from caseins. Indeed, under a heat flux of 35 kW/m2, when a carbon source (i.e. common cane sugar) was added to caseins, the resulting char was similar to that formed by DNA. Furthermore, the char expansion was ascribed to the evolution of ammonia released by these biomacromolecules upon heating, as detected by thermogravimetry coupled to infrared spectroscopy, and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy experiments performed on the bubbles present in the residues of flammability tests

  7. Intumescent features of nucleic acids and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.alongi@polito.it; Cuttica, Fabio; Blasio, Alessandro Di; Carosio, Federico; Malucelli, Giulio

    2014-09-10

    Highlights: • The combustion resistance of DNA and caseins to different heat fluxes was studied. • Upon heating, DNA and caseins exhibited an intumescent behaviour. • The char derived from DNA was more stable and coherent than that from caseins. - Abstract: Are nucleic acids and proteins intumescent molecules? In order to get an answer, in the present manuscript, powders of deoxyribose nucleic acids (DNA) and caseins have been exposed to different heat fluxes under a cone calorimeter source and to the direct application of a propane flame. Under these conditions, DNA and caseins exhibited a typical intumescent behaviour, generating a coherent expanded cellular carbonaceous residue (char), extremely resistant to heat exposure. The resulting volumetric expansion as well as the resistance of the formed char turned out to be dependent on (i) the chemical structure of the chosen biomacromolecule, (ii) the evolution of ammonia and (iii) the adopted heat flux in cone calorimetry tests (namely, 25, 35, 50 and 75 kW/m{sup 2}). The presence of ribose units within the DNA backbone determined the formation of highly expanded and coherent residues as compared to those obtained from caseins. Indeed, under a heat flux of 35 kW/m{sup 2}, when a carbon source (i.e. common cane sugar) was added to caseins, the resulting char was similar to that formed by DNA. Furthermore, the char expansion was ascribed to the evolution of ammonia released by these biomacromolecules upon heating, as detected by thermogravimetry coupled to infrared spectroscopy, and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy experiments performed on the bubbles present in the residues of flammability tests.

  8. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  9. THE EFFECT OF ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDE ON THE INTERLEUKIN-5 IN THE SUPERNATANTS OF SPLEEN CELL CULTURES OF ASTHMATIC MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美琴; 白春学; 钮善福; 方晓惠; 陈常庆; 陈波

    2001-01-01

    To explore the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on the production of IL-5 by mouse spleen T lymphocytes.Methods Based on the IL-5 cDNA sequence of mouse, a segment of antisense oligonucleotide was designed and synthesized. 5’-labeling of antisense oligonucleotide was signed by T4 PNK in order that the efficiency of stearylamine liposome in transfecting antisense oligonucleotide can be evaluated. Asthma model was duplicated with ovalbumin(OVA) absorbed to aluminum hydroxide. T lymphocytes of mice were separated by nylon fiber method, then T lymphocytes transfected with different concentration of antisense oligonucleotide with cation stearylamine liposme were incubated respectively in order to observe the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on Il-5 production by T lymphocytes. IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were determined by ELISA.Results Stearylamine liposome could markedly increase the efficiency of antisense oligonucleotide transfection. The transfection efficiency of antisense oligouncleotide increased approximately 12 times at a ratio of 1: 15m/m (antisense oligonucleotide to SA liposome). In healthy and asthma Balb/c mice, IL-5 was not detectable in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures without stimulated with OVA; however, IL-5 was increased markedly in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures stimulated with OVA. After transfection with different concentrations of antisense oligonucleotide, IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were significantly lower than those in control cultured without antisense oligonucleotide transfection. IL-5 levels decreased from 44.60±6.23 pg/ml to 30.70±7.362 pg/ml, 17.20±6.181 pg/ml and 8.16±2.34 pg/ml respectively. And IL-5 synthesis was inhibited by 31.17%, 61.43% and 81.7% respectively.Conclusion IL-5 synthesis could be obviously inhibited by antisense oligonucleotide and showed a markedly correlation between dose and effectiveness. It suggests the production

  10. Tailoring Conformation-Induced Chromism of Polythiophene Copolymers for Nucleic Acid Assay at Resource Limited Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwar, Deepa; Ammanath, Gopal; Cheema, Jamal Ahmed; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Here we report on the design and synthesis of cationic water-soluble thiophene copolymers as reporters for colorimetric detection of microRNA (miRNA) in human plasma. Poly(3-alkoxythiophene) (PT) polyelectrolytes with controlled ratios of pendant groups such as triethylamine/1-methyl imidazole were synthesized for optimizing interaction with target miRNA sequence (Tseq). Incorporation of specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences with the cationic polythiophenes yielded distinguishable responses upon formation of fluorescent PT-PNA-Tseq triplex and weakly fluorescent PT-Tseq duplex, thereby enabling selective detection of target miRNA. Unlike homopolymers of PT (hPT), experimental results indicate the possibility of utilizing copolymers of PT (cPT) with appropriate ratios of pendant groups for miRNA assay in complex matrices such as plasma. As an illustration, colorimetric responses were obtained for lung cancer associated miRNA sequence (mir21) in human plasma, with a detection limit of 10 nM, illustrating the feasibility of proposed methodology for clinical applications without involving sophisticated instrumentation. The described methodology therefore possesses high potential for low-cost nucleic acid assays in resource-limited settings. PMID:26956217

  11. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  12. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  13. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized synthetic oligonucleotides are finding growing applications in research, clinical studies, and therapy. However, it is not easy to prepare them in a biocompatible and highly efficient manner. We report a new strategy to synthesize oligonucleotides with promising nucleic acid...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  14. Effect of C-myc Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Hypoxia-induced Proliferation of Pulmonary Vascular Pericytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the effect of c-myc antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on proliferation of pulmonary vascular pericytes (PC) induced by hypoxia, cell culture, dot hybridization using probe of digoxigenin-11-dUTP-labeled cDNA,3H-thymidine incorporation, immunocytochemical technique and image analysis methods were used to observe the effect of c-myc antisense ODNs on expression of c-myc gene and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC induced by hypoxia. The results showed that hypoxia could significantly enhance the expression of c-myc and PCNA (P<0.01), and elevate 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC (P<0.01), but antisense ODNs could significantly inhibit the expression of c-myc and PCNA (P<0.05), and 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC (P<0.01). It was suggested that hypoxia could promote the proliferation of PC by up-regulating the expression of c-myc gene, but c-myc antisense ODNs could inhibit hypoxia-induced proliferation of PC by downregulating the expression of c-myc gene.

  15. Expression of antisense small RNAs in response to stress in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise;

    2014-01-01

    Background: RNA sequencing technologies reveal that bacteria express RNA molecules other than mRNA, rRNA or tRNA. During the last years genome-wide bacterial transcriptomes have been shown to comprise intergenic RNA, antisense RNA, and untranslated regions, all capable of performing diverse regul...

  16. Antisense silencing of the creA gene in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bautista, L. F.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Hentzer, Morten; Henriksen, Anne Laurence Santerre; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Antisense expression of a portion of the gene encoding the major carbon catabolite repressor CREA in Aspergillus nidulans resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of glucose-repressible enzymes, both endogenous and heterologous, in the presence of glucose. The derepression effect was...

  17. Regulation of Polyphosphate Kinase Production by Antisense RNA in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    OpenAIRE

    Silby, Mark W.; Julie S Nicoll; Levy, Stuart B.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas spp. adapt rapidly to environmental fluctuations. Loss or overproduction of polyphosphate reduces the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, indicating the importance of the fine-tuning of polyphosphate production. An antisense RNA was investigated and shown to regulate the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) by a posttranscriptional mechanism reducing ppk transcript abundance.

  18. Effects of recombinant epidermal growth factor receptor antisense adenovirus combined with irradiation on breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a recombinant antisense adenovirus for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) combined with irradiation on breast cancer cells. Methods: Human EGFR cDNA fragment was subcloned in the opposite orientation to the cytomegaloviral promoter and inserted into a E1/E3-deleted type 5 adenoviral vector to obtain AdE5 construct which expresses EGFR antisense RNA. Combined with γ-ray irradiation, its effects on clonogenicity and cell cycle phase distribution were studied in a human breast cancer line MDA-MB-23. Results: EGFR protein expression was dramatically inhibited in MDA-MB-231 cells after AdE5 infection. The post-irradiation clonogenicity was reduced by AdE5 in a viral and irradiation dose-dependent manner. Further cytometric analysis showed that AdE5 infection at a MOI of 300 pfu/cell induced a cell cycle progression from radio-resistant G0 + G1 phases to radiosensitive G2 + M phases, resulting in a synergistic effect after combination of these two treatments. Conclusions: The transduction of EGFR antisense RNA by adenoviral vector is effective for antisense strategy targeting EGFR, and increases the cell-killing effect of ionizing radiation on breast cancer cells.(authors)

  19. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Becker, David L

    2016-07-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx43 promote tissue repair in a variety of different wounds. Delivery of the antisense drug has most often been achieved by a thermoreversible hydrogel, Pluronic F-127, which is very effective in the short term but does not allow for sustained delivery over several days. For chronic wounds that take a long time to heal, repeated dosing with the drug may be desirable but is not always compatible with conventional treatments such as the weekly changing of compression bandages on venous leg ulcers. Here the coating of collagen scaffolds with antisense oligonucleotides is investigated and a way to provide protection of the oligodeoxynucleotide drug is found in conjunction with sustained release over a 7 d period. This approach significantly reduces the normal foreign body reaction to the scaffold, which induces an increase of Cx43 protein and an inhibition of healing. As a result of the antisense integration into the scaffold, inflammation is reduced with the rate of wound healing and contracture is significantly improved. This coated scaffold approach may be very useful for treating venous leg ulcers and also for providing a sustained release of any other types of oligonucleotide drugs that are being developed. PMID:27253638

  20. TSUNAMI: an antisense method to phenocopy splicing-associated diseases in animals

    OpenAIRE

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Hua, Yimin; Ling, Karen K Y; Hung, Gene; Rigo, Frank; Horev, Guy; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C. Frank; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an antisense oligonucleotide methodology to phenocopy a disease—in this case, the motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy in mice. Sahashi et al. show that it is possible to fine-tune disease severity through dose-dependent effects on RNA splicing, making this a novel animal model for monitoring disease onset and progression as well as testing candidate therapeutics.

  1. Inhibition of lipoxygenase in lentil protoplasts by expression of antisense RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Hilbers, M.P.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    1995-01-01

    A number of plasmids were constructed containing chimeric genes consisting of fragments of antisense-oriented lentil lipoxygenase cDNA. The different constructs were tested for their ability to lower lipoxygenase activity in lentil protoplasts. Plasmids containing a full length lentil lipoxygenase c

  2. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  3. Effect of TGF-β1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on renal function in chronic renal failure rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Law Chung HIONG; Kiew Lik VOON; Nor Azizan ABDULLAH; Munavvar A SATTAR; Nazarina AbduRAHMAN; Abdul Hye KHAN; Edward James JOHNS

    2008-01-01

    Aim:The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of trans-forming growth factor (TGF)-β1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) in ame-liorating deteriorated kidney function in rats with puromycin-induced chronic renal failure (CRF). Methods:Saline, puromycin, puromycin+TGF-β1 antisense ODN or puromycin+scrambled ODN were administered to unilaterally nephrecto-mized rats. Renal hemodynamic and excretory measurements were taken in the anaesthetized rats that had undergone surgical procedure. Results:It was ob-served that in the CRF rats, there was a marked reduction in the renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), severe proteinuria, and almost 6-fold in-creased fractional excretion of sodium (FE Na+) as compared to that in the control rats (all P<0.05). It was further observed that in the CRF rats, the treatment with TGF-β1 antisense, but not scrambled ODN, markedly attenuated the reduction of RBF, GFR, and proteinuria and markedly prevented the increase of the FE Na+ (all P<0.05). In addition, the renal hypertrophy in the CRF group (P<0.05 vs non-renal failure control) was markedly attenuated after treatment with TGF-1 antisense ODN (P<0.05). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was evident only in the un-treated and scrambled ODN-treated CRF groups. An interesting observation of this study was that in the CRF rats, although there was marked attenuating and preventive effects of the TGF-β1 antisense ODN on the deteriorated renal functions, the antisense treatment did not cause any marked change in the renal expression of TGF-β1 at the protein level. Conclusion:Collectively, the data obtained sug-gests that TGF-β1 antisense ODN possesses beneficial effects in puromycin-induced chronic renal failure and that the deterioration in morphology and im-paired renal function in this pathological state is in part dependent upon the action of TGF-β1 within the kidney.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide to insulin—like growth factor Ⅱ induces apotosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINDELING; LUPU; 等

    1998-01-01

    The effects of antisense oligonucleotide to insulin0like growth factor -Ⅱ(IGFⅡ)to induce apotosis in human ovarian cancer cells were evaluated.Antiproliferation effects of antisense to IGFⅡin ovarian cancer AO cells were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation.Apoptosis of the IGFⅡ antisense-treated cells was quantitated by both nuclear condensation and flow cytometry after cells were stained with propidium iodide,IGFⅡ antisense(4.5μM) treatment of 48h maximally inhibited proliferation of AO cells,More than 25% of IGFⅡantisense-treated cells(4.5μM for 24h) had undergone apoptosis,whereas less than 3% of the cells were apoptotic in either IGFⅡ sense-treated cells or untreated cells.Antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell.These data suggest that IGFII may be a potential target in treatment of ovarian cancer and antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ may serve as a therapeutic approach.

  5. Effect of CD44 Suppression by Antisense Oligonucleotide on Attachment of Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells to HA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中国; 张虹

    2004-01-01

    The effects of suppression of CD44 by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronic acid (HA) were observed and the possible relationship between CD44 and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) investigated. CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was delivered with cationic lipid to cultured human trabecular meshwork cells. The expression of CD44 suppressed by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The effect of CD44 suppression by specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of trabecular meshwork cells to HA was measured by MTT assay. Results showed that expression of CD44 was suppressed by CD4, specific antisense oligonucleotide. Antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the adhesion of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA in a concentration dependent manner. It was concluded that attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA was decreased when CD44 was suppressed by specific antisense oligonucleotide. CD44might play a role in pathogenesis of POAG by affecting the adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to HA.

  6. Suppression of intracranial glioma tumorigenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor antisense oligonucleotide in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李维方; 张光霁; 朱诚; 金由辛; 卢亦成

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the inhibition of intracranial glioma tumorigenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) in rats. Methods: Totally 20 μl Hank's liquid containing 1×106 C6 glioma cells was seeded into rat right caudate putamen in high-flow microinfusion with stereotactic technique. VEGF antisense ODN was simultaneously used with glioma cell. Each rat of the treated groupⅠ and the treated group Ⅱ was treated with 1 000 μmol/L VEGF antisense ODN. Each rat of the treated group Ⅲ and the treated group Ⅳ was treated with 2 000 μmol/L VEGF antisense ODN. The experimental periods of the treated group Ⅰ, the treated group Ⅲ and the control group Ⅰ were 2 weeks, those of the treated group Ⅱ, the treated group Ⅳ and the control group Ⅱ were 3 weeks. Before sacrifice, MRI was performed on each rat. Tumor magnitude and pathologic examination were detected after samples were dissected. Results: The survival state of all treated rats was better, and that of the control rats was in severe danger. The tumor volumes of the treated group Ⅰ and the treated group Ⅱ were remarkably lessened. Tumor tissue could not be found macroscopically in the brain samples of the treated group Ⅲ and the treated group Ⅳ, but tumor nest could be found with microscopy. Tumors of the treated groupⅠand the treated group Ⅱ had weak expressions of VEGF mRNA and VEGF, while normal brains and the samples of the treated group Ⅲ and the treated group Ⅳ had negative expressions, but tumors of the control groups had strong expressions. Conclusion: VEGF antisense ODN used early in situ can suppress angiogenesis and growth of rat intracranial glioma to retard tumorigenesis.

  7. Effects of a plasmid expressing antisense tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 on liver fibrosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Wei; WANG Ji-yao; YANG Chang-qing; LIU Wen-bin; WANG Yi-qing; HE Bo-ming

    2005-01-01

    Background No efficient therapy for liver fibrosis has been available. This study was aimed to provide evidence that the introduction of a plasmid expressing antisense tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) into a rat model of immunologically induced liver fibrosis can result in the increased activity of interstitial collagenase, thus enhancing the degradation of collagen.Methods Real-time nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-Nested-PCR) and gene recombination techniques were used to construct a rat antisense TIMP-1 recombinant plasmid that can be expressed in eukaryotic cells. Both the recombinant plasmid and an empty vector (pcDNA3) were encapsulated with glycosyl-poly-L-lysine and injected into rats suffering from pig serum-induced liver fibrosis. The expression of exogenous transfected plasmid was assessed by Northern blot, RT-PCR, and Western blot. Hepatic interstitial collagenase activity was detected using fluorescinisothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled type Ⅰ collagen. In addition to hepatic hydroxyproline content, hepatic collagen types Ⅰ and Ⅲ were detected by immunohistochemical staining, and the stages of liver fibrosis by Van Gieson staining.Results Exogenous antisense TIMP-1 was successfully expressed in vivo and could block the gene and protein expression of TIMP-1. Active and latent hepatic interstitial collagenase activities were elevated (P<0.01), hepatic hydroxyproline content and the accumulation of collagen types Ⅰ and Ⅲ were lowered, and liver fibrosis was alleviated in the antisense TIMP-1 group (P<0.01) as compared with the model group. Conclusion The results demonstrate that antisense TIMP-1 recombinant plasmids have some inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis.

  8. Antisense EGFR sequence enhances apoptosis in a human hepatoma cell line BEL—7404

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUTAO; HELIU; 等

    1996-01-01

    Effects of antisense epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) sequence on apoptotic cell death were examined in a human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 cells.In the cells of JX-1,a sub clone of BEL-7404 stably transfected with antisense EGFR vector (Cell Research,3:75,1993),an enhanced rate(9.5%) of spontaneous apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry,whereas the rates of spontaneous apoptosis in JX-0 cells,a sub-clone of BEL-7404 transfected by control vector,and the parent BEL-7404 transfected by control vector,and the parent BEL-7404 transfected by control vector,and the parent BEL-7404 cells were almost equal and about 1.7%.Serum-starvation for 72h increased the rate of apoptosis of JX-lcells up to 33.7%,while JX-0 and BEL-7404 cells,under the same condition,produced less than 5% of apoptotic cells.Observation with electron microscope demonstrated that condensation and fragmentation of chromatin and formation of apoptotic bodies often occurred in JX-1 cells,especially during serumstarvation.These results,combined with the data of DNA fragmentation Elisa test,suggested that antisense EGFR sequence enhances apoptosis in the human hepatoma cells.Comparison of intracellular Ca2+ level and the responsiveness of JX-1 cells to the induced action of EGF and tharpsigargin (TG) treatment with that of control JX-0 cells indicated that antisense egfr might interrupt the EGF/EGFR sigaling pathway resulting in the decreass of intracellular Ca2+ pool content as well as the responsiveness of these cells to the extracellular signals.These findings suggest that antisense EGFR either directly or indirectly regulates Ca2+ storage in endoplasmic reticulum,thereby enhances apoptosis in the human hepatoma cells.

  9. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  10. Boronic acid-based autoligation of nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbeyron, R.; Vasseur, J.-J.; Smietana, M.;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The development of synthetic systems displaying dynamic and adaptive characteristics is a formidable challenge with wide applications from biotechnology to therapeutics. Recently, we described a dynamic and programmable nucleic acid-based system relying on the formation of reversible...

  11. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Energy and Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems is presented. This unit discusses methods used to treat the energy and to sample representative configurations. Emphasis is placed on molecular mechanics and empirical force fields.

  12. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  14. Roles of Intrinsic Disorder in Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, H. Jane

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with t...

  15. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of locked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Karin E; Højland, Torben; Hansen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most promising new nucleic acid analogues that has been produced under the past two decades. In this chapter, we have tried to cover many of the different areas, where this molecule has been used to improve the function of synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs). ...... and the adaptation of enzymes for LNA incorporation are reviewed. Such enzymes may become important for the development of stabilized LNA-containing aptamers....

  16. Hydrophilic magnetic latex for nucleic acid extraction, purification and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core-shell magnetic latex particles bearing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) in the shell were prepared by encapsulation of magnetic core using a precipitation polymerization process. The cationic character of the particles' surface is favorable for nucleic acid adsorption-desorption by controlling the pH and salinity of the medium. The concentration process of nucleic acids was presented and proven using DNA as a model

  17. Electrical and Electrochemical Monitoring of Nucleic Acid Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Goda, Tatsuro; Tabata, Miyuki; Miyahara, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a gold standard technique for analyzing a tiny amount of nucleotides in molecular biology, clinical diagnostics, food safety, and environmental testing. Electrical and electrochemical monitoring of the amplification process draws attention over conventional optical methods because of the amenability toward point-of-care applications as there is a growing demand for nucleic acid sensing in situations outside the laboratory. A number of electrical and electrochemic...

  18. Thermodynamics of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides insights into the influence of modified nucleotide residues on stability of nucleic acids and is crucial for designing duplexes with given properties. In this article, we introduce detailed thermodynamic analysis of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotide residues. We investigate UNA single substitutions as well as model mismatch and dangling end effects. UNA residues placed in a central position makes RNA duplex structure less favourable by 4...

  19. Computational Approaches to Nucleic Acid Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Hosna; Aminpour, Maral; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-10-12

    Recent advances in experimental DNA origami have dramatically expanded the horizon of DNA nanotechnology. Complex 3D suprastructures have been designed and developed using DNA origami with applications in biomaterial science, nanomedicine, nanorobotics, and molecular computation. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) origami has recently been realized as a new approach. Similar to DNA, RNA molecules can be designed to form complex 3D structures through complementary base pairings. RNA origami structures are, however, more compact and more thermodynamically stable due to RNA's non-canonical base pairing and tertiary interactions. With all these advantages, the development of RNA origami lags behind DNA origami by a large gap. Furthermore, although computational methods have proven to be effective in designing DNA and RNA origami structures and in their evaluation, advances in computational nucleic acid origami is even more limited. In this paper, we review major milestones in experimental and computational DNA and RNA origami and present current challenges in these fields. We believe collaboration between experimental nanotechnologists and computer scientists are critical for advancing these new research paradigms. PMID:26348196

  20. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  1. Dynamic interactions of the HIV-1 Tat with nucleic acids are critical for Tat activity in reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudier, Christian; Humbert, Nicolas; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Godet, Julien; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Mély, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein is thought to stimulate reverse transcription (RTion). The Tat protein and, more specifically, its (44-61) domain were recently shown to promote the annealing of complementary DNA sequences representing the HIV-1 transactivation response element TAR, named dTAR and cTAR, that plays a key role in RTion. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism of the basic Tat(44-61) peptide in this annealing further revealed that this peptide constitutes a representative nucleic acid annealer. To further understand the structure-activity relationships of this highly conserved domain, we investigated by electrophoresis and fluorescence approaches the binding and annealing properties of various Tat(44-61) mutants. Our data showed that the Tyr47 and basic residues of the Tat(44-61) domain were instrumental for binding to cTAR through stacking and electrostatic interactions, respectively, and promoting its annealing with dTAR. Furthermore, the annealing efficiency of the mutants clearly correlates with their ability to rapidly associate and dissociate the complementary oligonucleotides and to promote RTion. Thus, transient and dynamic nucleic acid interactions likely constitute a key mechanistic component of annealers and the role of Tat in the late steps of RTion. Finally, our data suggest that Lys50 and Lys51 acetylation regulates Tat activity in RTion. PMID:24153111

  2. Interactions of Night Blue with Nucleic Acids and Determination of Nucleic Acids Using Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴会灵; 梁宏; 等

    2003-01-01

    The noncovalent interactions of night blue (NB) with several nucleic acids in buffer medium of Britton-Robinson at pH 4.1 have been studied by spectroscopic methods.It is shown that the binding of NB with nucleic acids involves the J-aggregation of NB molecules on the surface of nucleic acids.The aggregation was encouraged by polyanions nucleic acids,in which nucleic acids served for acting templates,In this connection,a new method of nucleic acids with sensitivity at nanogram level is proposed based on the measurement of enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS).The linear range of ctDNA,fsDNA and yRNA is 0.01-2.5,0.03-2.5 and 0.04-1.0 μg/mL,respectively,and the corresponding detection limits(3σ)are 9.4,7.3 and 5.7ng/mL at 2.5×1005mol/L of NB.Synthetic and real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results.

  3. Effect of c- erbB2 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Radiosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RENQing-Lan

    2003-01-01

    Object To explore tile effect of lipofectin - c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cell llne. Methods The expression of c - erbB2 was detected by means of RT - PCR, cellular response to irradiation was evaluated by tile colony forming assay. Results Lipofectin- c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(AS- ODN) could suppress the expression of c - erbB2 , and significantly decreased the colony forming rate of human ovarian cancer cells after ionizing irradiation (P 0.05 ). Condusion c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides sensitized the SKOV3 to ionizing irradiation through decreasing the expression of e - erbB2 , which might be the result of the fact that c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides inhibit the eelluar signal transductionpathway relating to the radiation- resistant phenotype.

  4. Lipolysis and apoptosis of adipocytes induced by neuropeptide Y—Y5 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in obese rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONGHai-Xia; GUOXi-Rong; FEILi; GUOMei; LIUQian-Qi; CHENRong-Hua

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the influence of central administration of neuropeptide Y-Y5 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(ODN) on the body weight and fat pads of high-energy diet-induced obese rats, and the effects on white adipocyte lipolysis and apoptosis. METHODS: Y5 receptor antisense, sense, mismatched oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) or vehicle were intracerebroventricularly injected, and average adipocyte area was calculated. DNA ladders were measured to evaluate adipocyte apoptosis, and RT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of bcl-2 and bax gene. RESULTS: (1) Central administration of Y5 receptor antisense ODN significantly decreased body weight, fat pads, and average adipocyte area. (2) DNA fragmentation was presented after electrophoresis at both epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. (3) The expression of bcl-2 gene was downregulated, while the expression of bax was upregulated. CONCLUSION:Lipolysis and adipocyte apoptosis may be important reasons for Y5 receptor antisense therapy.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides-induced local blockade of T-bet expression leads to airway inflammation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WANG; Chun-tao LIU; Zeng-li WANG; Li-li JIANG; Cuniang YAN; Feng-min LUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore whether local blockade of T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) expression in the 1ungs could lead to airway inflammation. Methods: Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: saline group, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized group, nonsense group, and the antisense group. The OVA-sensitized rats were sensitized and challenged with OVA, and the rats in the nonsense and antisense groups were subjected to an aerosol delivery of the nonsense and antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODN)of T-bet(0.1%, w/v). The levels of interferon-γ(IFN-γ), interleukin-4(IL-4), and IL-5 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were detected by ELISA, and the mRNA and the protein expression of T-bet and GATA-3 genes were examined by in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis, respectively. Results: The expression of T-bet mRNA and protein in the lungs of the rats in the antisense group were inhibited effectively. The lungs of the rats in the antisense and OVA-sensitized groups showed eosinophil and lymphocyte inflammatory infiltration, and eosinophilia located predominantly around the airways. The number of GATA-3 mRNA-positive cells and the level of GAllA-3 protein in the 1ungs of the rats in the antisense and the OVA-sensitized groups significantly increased. The level of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BALF in the antisense and OVA-sensitized groups were elevated, but the level of IFN-γ decreased markedly. Conclusion: Antisense ODN-induced local blockade of T-bet expression leads to airway inflammation with a selective alteration in patterns of cytokine expression and recruitment of eosinophil cells similar to that in the OVA-sensitized

  6. Analysis of the mechanism of protection in transgenic plants expressing the potato virus X coat protein or its antisense RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, Cynthia; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Kaniewski, Wojciech K.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    1988-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants engineered to express either the potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP+) or the antisense coat protein transcript (CP-antisense) were protected from infection by PVX, as indicated by reduced lesion numbers on inoculated leaves, delay or absence of systemic symptom development and reduction in virus accumulation in both inoculated and systemic leaves. The extent of protection observed in CP+ plants primarily depended upon the level of expression of the coat protein. P...

  7. Lignin reduction in transgenic poplars by expressing antisense CCoAOMT gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jing; ZHAO Huayan; WEI Jianhua; HE Yikun; SHI Chao; WANG Hongzhi; SONG Yanru

    2004-01-01

    The antisense Caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) cDNA was transformed into Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Many factors affecting the transformation efficiency were studied and a stable transformation system was established. PCR-Southern blot analysis indicated that antisense CCoAOMT cDNA had been integrated into the genome of the transgenic poplars. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses demonstrated that the endogenous CCoAOMT gene was suppressed at both transcriptional and translational levels. Klason lignin content assay exhibited the lignin reduction to different degrees in transgenic poplars. The stems of partial transgenic poplars with the remarkable lignin reduction turned red, and the color distribution was stripped or spotted. Taken together, these results suggested that CCoAOMT gene would be a potential useful gene in altering lignin biosynthesis by biotechnology for improving wood properties.

  8. Study of HIV-2 primer-template initiation complex using antisense oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulmé, F; Freund, F; Gryaznov, S;

    2000-01-01

    HIV-2 reverse transcription is initiated by the retroviral DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) from a cellular tRNALys3 partially annealed to the primer binding site in the 5'-region of viral RNA. The HIV-2 genome has two A-rich regions upstream of the primer binding site. In contrast to HIV-1...... approach, first validated in our in vitro HIV-1 reverse transcription system. Annealing of the antisense oligonucleotides to the pre-primer binding site (the upstream region contiguous to the HIV-2 primer binding site) was determined in the presence of native tRNALys3 or synthetic primers. Using natural...... and chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides we found that interactions between the anticodon of tRNALys3 and an A-rich loop of viral RNA led to an important destabilization of the pre-primer binding site; this region became accessible to anti-pre-primer binding site oligonucleotides in a...

  9. Improving the nutritional quality of the barley and wheat grain storage proteins by antisense technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikdar, Md. Shafiqul Islam; Lange, Mette; Aaslo, Per;

    2011-01-01

    genetic modification with antisense or the more drastic RNAi suppression technology and study the change in protein pattern under different environmental conditions. We have five antisense and 12 RNAi C-hordein lines of barley (RNAi lines are under characterisation) and wheat RNAi lines (gamma and alpha...... result, a considerable amount of research is focused on improving the quality and quantity of seed storage protein both by traditional plant breeding and by modern genetic engineering technology. In our research program we are trying to enrich the nutritional quality of barley and wheat grains using...... plan to construct wheat omega RNAi lines using RNAi technology. The cloning of the omega gliadin from wheat is in progress. Finally, the agronomic properties and nutritional values of the genetically modified barley and wheat will be evaluated. References Hansen, M., Lange, M., Friis, M., Dionisio. G...

  10. The Effects of Aerosolized STAT1 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Rat Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenjun; Liao, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Chen; Fan, Xianming

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) inhibited the expression of STAT1 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and decreased the concentrations of TGF-β, PDGF and TNF-α in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of STAT1 ASON ameliorated alveolitis in rat pulmonary fibrosis. However, further investigations are neede...

  11. Antisense MMP-9 RNA inhibits malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiyun Sun; Qian Wang; Hongxu Zhou; Shizhu Yu; Alain R.Simard; Chunsheng Kang; Yanyan Li

    2013-01-01

    The matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs),particularly MMP-9,play important roles in the pathogenesis and development of malignant gliomas.In the present study,the oncogenic role of MMP-9 in malignant glioma cells was investigated via antisense RNA blockade in vitro and in vivo.TJ905 malignant glioma cells were transfected with pcDNA3.0 vector expressing antisense MMP-9 RNA (pcDNA-ASMMP9),which significantly decreased MMP-9 expression,and cell proliferation was assessed.For in vivo studies,U251 cells,a human malignant glioma cell line,were implanted subcutaneously into 4-to 6-week-old BALB/c nude mice.The mice bearing well-established U251 gliomas were treated with intratumoral pcDNA-AS-MMP9-Lipofectamine complex (AS-MMP-9-treated group),subcutaneous injection of endostatin (endostatin-treated group),or both (combined therapy group).Mice treated with pcDNA (empty vector)-Lipofectamine served as the control group.Four or eight weeks later,the volume and weight of tumor,MMP-9 expression,microvessel density and proliferative activity were assayed.We demonstrate that pcDNA-AS-MMP9 significantly decreased MMP-9 expression and inhibited glioma cell proliferation.Volume and weight of tumor,MMP-9 expression,microvessel density and proliferative activity in the antisense-MMP-9-treated and therapeutic alliance groups were significantly lower than those in the control group.The results suggest that MMP-9 not only promotes malignant glioma cell invasiveness,but also affects tumor cell proliferation.Blocking the expression of MMP-9 with antisense RNA substantially suppresses the malignant phenotype of glioma cells,and thus can be used as an effective therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  12. Over 20% of human transcripts might form sense–antisense pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jianjun; Sun, Miao; Kent, W. James; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Xie, Hanqing; Wang, Wenquan; Zhou, Guolin; Shi, Run Zhang; Rowley, Janet D.

    2004-01-01

    The major challenge to identifying natural sense– antisense (SA) transcripts from public databases is how to determine the correct orientation for an expressed sequence, especially an expressed sequence tag sequence. In this study, we established a set of very stringent criteria to identify the correct orientation of each human transcript. We used these orientation-reliable transcripts to create 26 741 transcription clusters in the human genome. Our analysis shows that 22% (5880) of the human...

  13. Cotton transgenics with Antisense AC1 gene for resistance against cotton leaf curl virus

    OpenAIRE

    J.Amudha, G.Balasubramani, V.G.Malathi, D.Monga, K.C.Bansal and K.R.Kranthi

    2010-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus is a devastating pest in the North India and in small pockets of Southern states. Cotton leaf curldisease (CLCuD) is caused by a Geminivirus, transmitted by whitefly Bemisia tabaci vector. This is a serious problem inthe northern region and leads to yield losses up to 58% and 69% (ICAC recorder, 1999). Genetic engineering for cottontransgenics resistant to leaf curl disease (CLCuD) through antisense RNA approach is potential to tackle the disease incotton. Cotton transg...

  14. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Exon Skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Progress and Challenges.

    OpenAIRE

    Arechavala-Gomeza, V.; Anthony, K.; Morgan, J; Muntoni, F.

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common childhood neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that disrupt the open reading frame (ORF) preventing the production of functional dystrophin protein. The loss of dystrophin ultimately leads to the degeneration of muscle fibres, progressive weakness and premature death. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeted to splicing elements within DMD pre-mRNA can induce the skipping of targeted exons, restoring the ORF an...

  15. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel; Desviat, Lourdes R.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with suc...

  16. Conserved alternative and antisense transcripts at the programmed cell death 2 locus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihola, Ondřej; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2007), s. 20. ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/01/0997; GA ČR GA301/05/0738; GA AV ČR IAA5052406; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Pdcd2 * antisense * alternative transcript * imprinting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2007

  17. Directional gene expression and antisense transcripts in sexual and asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    López-Barragán María J; Lemieux Jacob; Quiñones Mariam; Williamson Kim C; Molina-Cruz Alvaro; Cui Kairong; Barillas-Mury Carolina; Zhao Keji; Su Xin-zhuan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It has been shown that nearly a quarter of the initial predicted gene models in the Plasmodium falciparum genome contain errors. Although there have been efforts to obtain complete cDNA sequences to correct the errors, the coverage of cDNA sequences on the predicted genes is still incomplete, and many gene models for those expressed in sexual or mosquito stages have not been validated. Antisense transcripts have widely been reported in P. falciparum; however, the extent an...

  18. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples. PMID

  19. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression

    OpenAIRE

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement...

  20. Progeny from the crosses of two antisense potato plants exhibit ectopic xylem differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Obembe, O.; Vincken, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Progeny from the crosses of two transgenic potato lines csr2-1 and csr4-8, containing two different antisense constructs, csr2 and csr4 had been previously characterized to exhibit altered tuber production. Histochemical staining and microscopic examinations of the tubers were made to investigate cellular phenotype in the tubers. We observed ectopic proliferation of xylem, which is most pronounced in the csr2 tubers. Light microscopy of csr2 tubers revealed that the proliferation of xylem was...

  1. Nucleic acids in circulation: Are they harmful to the host?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indraneel Mittra; Naveen Kumar Nair; Pradyumna Kumar Mishra

    2012-06-01

    It has been estimated that 1011–1012 cells, primarily of haematogenous origin, die in the adult human body daily, and a similar number is regenerated to maintain homeostasis. Despite the presence of an efficient scavenging system for dead cells, considerable amounts of fragmented genetic material enter the circulation in healthy individuals. Elevated blood levels of extracellular nucleic acids have been reported in various disease conditions; such as ageing and age-related degenerative disorders, cancer; acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, severe trauma and autoimmune disorders. In addition to genomic DNA and nucleosomes, mitochondrial DNA is also found in circulation, as are RNA and microRNA. There is extensive literature that suggests that extraneously added nucleic acids have biological actions. They can enter into cells in vitro and in vivo and induce genetic transformation and cellular and chromosomal damage; and experimentally added nucleic acids are capable of activating both innate and adaptive immune systems and inducing a sterile inflammatory response. The possibility as to whether circulating nucleic acids may, likewise, have biological activities has not been explored. In this review we raise the question as to whether circulating nucleic acids may have damaging effects on the host and be implicated in ageing and diverse acute and chronic human pathologies.

  2. Structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gansler

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects.

  3. Murine neurofibroma reversion by antisense RNA for HTLV-I tax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌本; Mark; C.Horowitz; Nancy; H.Ruddle

    1999-01-01

    Neurofibroma cell lines derived from mice transgenic for HTLV-I LTR tax express high levels of HTLV-I tax mRNA and protein and exhibit a transformed phenotype. A retrovirus vector carrying HTLV-I tax cDNA in reversed transcriptional orientation was stably transfected into the neurofibroma cells. Antisense RNA inhibited expression of the tax gene with a decrease of more than 40 % in both tax mRNA and protein. Tax antisense RNA reversed the transformed phenotype as exhibited by dramatic changes in cell morphology and growth characteristics. Expression of several cellular genes which are activated by Tax protein including GM-CSF, IL-6, LT/TNF, c-myc and LIF was down-regulated, while M-CSF and c-src proto-oncogene expressions were up-regulated. Accumulation of β-actin mRNA was not affected. The changes that occurred in the tax antisense expressing neurofibroma cells could be the consequence of the decreased concentration of Tax protein. These results also indicate that HTLV-I Tax protein is crucial for main

  4. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs. However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon. PMID:24809691

  6. Specific inhibition of hepatitis B virus gene expression by an antisense oligonucleotide in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was previously shown that a number of antisense oligonucleotides against hepatitis B virus (HBV) mRNAa were highly effective in inhibition of HBV gene expression. Here, using radioisotope techniques, we report a specific inhibition of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) production in vitro by 2.2.15 cells (Hep-G2 cells transfected with HBV genome) by the antisense oligonucleotide 15-S-asON, a 15-mer phosphorothioate analogue complementary to the cap site of the SPII promoter of HBV mRNA, ar a concentration of 2 - 5 :m:mol/l. After 24 and 48 hours of incubation of cells with 15-S-asON, the intracellular concentration of the latter rose to 69.4 and 75.8 nmol/l, respectively, and the HBsAg level assayed by ELISA was reduced by 50.0% and 70.6%, respectively. The results were checked by use of the radio-immunoprecipitation method: 2.2.15 cells exposed to 15-S-asON and labelled with [35S]-methionine for 48 hours showed a decrease of the HBsAg level by 81.26% but almost none of the total proteins. No cytotoxicity of the 15-S-asON was observed with regard to the cell morphology and growth. These results indicate that the tested antisense oligonucleotide specifically inhibits the HBV gene expression. (author)

  7. Antisense RNA-based High-Throughput Screen System for Directed Evolution of Quorum Quenching Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Soo; Park, Won-Ji; Kim, Hak-Sung; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2015-11-20

    Quorum quenching (QQ) enzymes, which disrupt the quorum sensing signaling process, have attracted considerable attention as new antimicrobial agents. However, their low catalytic efficiency for quorum sensing molecules remains a challenge. Herein, we present an antisense RNA-based high-throughput screen system for directed evolution of a quorum quenching enzyme. The screening system was constructed by incorporating an antisense RNA (RyhB) into a synthetic module to quantitatively regulate the expression of a reporter gene fused with a sense RNA (sodB). To control the expression of a reporter gene in response to the catalytic activity of a quorum quenching enzyme, the region of interaction and mode between a pair of antisense (RyhB) and sense (sodB) RNAs was designed and optimized through the prediction of the secondary structure of the RNA pair. The screening system constructed was shown to lead to a significant reduction in the false-positive rate (average 42%) in the screening of N-acyl-homoserine lactonase (AiiA) with increased catalytic activity, resulting in a true-positive frequency of up to 76%. The utility and efficiency of the screening system were demonstrated by selecting an AiiA with 31-fold higher catalytic efficiency than the wild-type in three rounds of directed evolution. The present approach can be widely used for the screening of quorum quenching enzymes with the desired catalytic property, as well as for a synthetic network for a stringent regulation of the gene expression. PMID:26366664

  8. L1 Antisense Promoter Drives Tissue-Specific Transcription of Human Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription of transposable elements interspersed in the genome is controlled by complex interactions between their regulatory elements and host factors. However, the same regulatory elements may be occasionally used for the transcription of host genes. One such example is the human L1 retrotransposon, which contains an antisense promoter (ASP driving transcription into adjacent genes yielding chimeric transcripts. We have characterized 49 chimeric mRNAs corresponding to sense and antisense strands of human genes. Here we show that L1 ASP is capable of functioning as an alternative promoter, giving rise to a chimeric transcript whose coding region is identical to the ORF of mRNA of the following genes: KIAA1797, CLCN5, and SLCO1A2. Furthermore, in these cases the activity of L1 ASP is tissue-specific and may expand the expression pattern of the respective gene. The activity of L1 ASP is tissue-specific also in cases where L1 ASP produces antisense RNAs complementary to COL11A1 and BOLL mRNAs. Simultaneous assessment of the activity of L1 ASPs in multiple loci revealed the presence of L1 ASP-derived transcripts in all human tissues examined. We also demonstrate that L1 ASP can act as a promoter in vivo and predict that it has a heterogeneous transcription initiation site. Our data suggest that L1 ASP-driven transcription may increase the transcriptional flexibility of several human genes.

  9. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  10. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined.......To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  11. Comparative Characterization of Hepatic Distribution and mRNA Reduction of Antisense Oligonucleotides Conjugated with Triantennary N-Acetyl Galactosamine and Lipophilic Ligands Targeting Apolipoprotein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Kasuya, Takeshi; Onishi, Reina; Kitade, Naohisa; Mayumi, Kei; Ikehara, Tatsuya; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-05-01

    TriantennaryN-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc, GN3) and lipophilic ligands such as cholesterol andα-tocopherol conjugations dramatically improve the distribution and efficacy of second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the whole liver. To characterize ligands for delivery to liver cells based on pharmacokinetics and efficacy, we used a locked nucleic acid gapmer of ASO targeting apolipoprotein B as a model compound and evaluated the amount of ASO and apolipoprotein B mRNA in the whole liver, hepatocytes, and nonparenchymal (NP) cells as well as plasma total cholesterol after administration of ASO conjugated with these ligands to mice. Compared with unconjugated ASO, GN3 conjugation increased the amount (7-fold) and efficacy (more than 10-fold) of ASO in hepatocytes only and showed higher efficacy than the increased rate of the amount of ASO. On the other hand, lipophilic ligand conjugations led to increased delivery (3- to 5-fold) and efficacy (5-fold) of ASO to both hepatocytes and NP cells. GN3 and lipophilic ligand conjugations increased the area under the curve of ASOs and the pharmacodynamic duration but did not change the half-life in hepatocytes and NP cells compared with unconjugated ASO. In the liver, the phosphodiester bond between ASO and these ligands was promptly cleaved to liberate unconjugated ASO. These ligand conjugations reduced plasma total cholesterol compared with unconjugated ASO, although these ASOs were well tolerated with no elevation in plasma transaminases. These findings could facilitate ligand selection tailored to liver cells expressed in disease-related genes and could contribute to the discovery and development of RNA interference-based therapy. PMID:26907624

  12. Nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wing-Fu Lai

    2011-09-01

    Lifespan prolongation is a common desire of the human race. With advances in biotechnology, the mechanism of aging has been gradually unraveled, laying the theoretical basis of nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation. Regretfully, clinically applicable interventions do not exist without the efforts of converting theory into action, and it is the latter that has been far from adequately addressed at the moment. This was demonstrated by a database search on PubMed and Web of Science, from which only seven studies published between 2000 and 2010 were found to directly touch on the development of nucleic acid therapy for anti-aging and/or longevity enhancing purposes. In light of this, the objective of this article is to overview the current understanding of the intimate association between genes and longevity, and to bring the prospect of nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation to light.

  13. Prospects for using self-assembled nucleic acid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudchenko, M N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-04-01

    According to the central dogma in molecular biology, nucleic acids are assigned with key functions on storing and executing genetic information in any living cell. However, features of nucleic acids are not limited only with properties providing template-dependent biosynthetic processes. Studies of DNA and RNA unveiled unique features of these polymers able to make various self-assembled three-dimensional structures that, among other things, use the complementarity principle. Here, we review various self-assembled nucleic acid structures as well as application of DNA and RNA to develop nanomaterials, molecular automata, and nanodevices. It can be expected that in the near future results of these developments will allow designing novel next-generation diagnostic systems and medicinal drugs. PMID:25869355

  14. Amino-containing magnetic nanoemulsions: elaboration and nucleic acid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino-containing magnetic colloids were prepared from highly magnetic oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. The functionalization was performed by controlling the adsorption of polyethyleneimine onto negatively charged magnetic emulsions. The cationic magnetic nanodroplets were characterized in terms of chemical composition, particle size, size distribution, zeta potential and colloidal stability as a function of storage time. These amino-containing magnetic emulsions were assessed as a new tool for nucleic acid extraction and amplification. The adsorption of nucleic acids was mostly controlled by attractive electrostatic interactions. The adsorption efficiency of a model RNA was found to be encouraging and the captured nucleic acid molecules were directly enzymatically amplified in the presence of the magnetic particles without any elution step

  15. Cross-catalytic peptide nucleic acid (PNA) replication based on templated ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Nielsen, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first PNA self-replicating system based on template directed cross-catalytic ligation, a process analogous to biological replication. Using two template PNAs and four pentameric precursor PNAs, all four possible carbodiimide assisted amide ligation products were detected and...... identified by HPLC and MALDI-TOF analysis. We conclude that the two template complementary reaction products are generated via cross-catalysis, while the other two self-complementary (and in principle auto-catalytic) products are formed via intra-complex coupling between the two sets of complementary PNA...... precursors. Cross-catalytic product formation followed product inhibited kinetics, but approximately two replication rounds were observed. Analogous but less efficient replication was found for a similar tetrameric system. These results demonstrate that simpler nucleobase replication systems than natural...

  16. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rüdiger Pipkorn, Manfred Wiessler, Waldemar Waldeck, Ute Hennrich, Kiyoshi Nokihara, Marcel Beining, Klaus Braun

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but...

  17. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Hennrich, Ute; Nokihara, Kiyoshi; Beining, Marcel; Braun, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but...

  18. Synthetic approaches towards modified peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) for biomimetical nanostructured surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mohnani, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    “There is plenty of room at the bottom”. These were the famous words of Richard P. Feynman in 1959 that led to the birth of nanotechnology and nanoscience. Electronic devices based on inorganic semiconductors have been part of our daily lives for the last 60 years. Their miniaturisation has occurred gradually over the years, however, according to Moore’s law the contemporary microelectronic industry’s “top-down” manufacturing technique will soon reach its limits. Therefore, the recent develop...

  19. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Mads E.; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA–dsDNA triplexes—mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine substitution, in combination with (oligo)lysine or 9-aminoacridine conjugation, homopyrimidine PNA oligomers bind complementary dsDNA targets via triplex formation with (sub)nanomolar affinities (at pH 7....

  20. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads E; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA-dsDNA triplexes-mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine...... substitution, in combination with (oligo)lysine or 9-aminoacridine conjugation, homopyrimidine PNA oligomers bind complementary dsDNA targets via triplex formation with (sub)nanomolar affinities (at pH 7.2, 150 mM Na(+)). Binding affinity can be modulated more than 1000-fold by changes in pH, PNA oligomer...... length, PNA net charge and/or by substitution of pseudoisocytosine for cytosine, and conjugation of the DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine. Furthermore, 9-aminoacridine conjugation also strongly enhanced triplex invasion. Specificity for the fully matched target versus one containing single centrally...

  1. Tethered particle analysis of supercoiled circular DNA using peptide nucleic acid handles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Nielsen, Peter Eigil;

    2014-01-01

    -digoxigenin-coated glass cover slide, and one conjugated with biotin for attachment to a submicron-sized streptavidin-coated polystyrene bead. Plasmids are constructed, purified and incubated with the PNA handles. The dynamics of the construct is analyzed by tracking the tethered bead using video microscopy: less...

  2. DNA recognition by peptide nucleic acid-modified PCFs: from models to real samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleri, S.; Coscelli, E.; Poli, F.; Passaro, D.; Cucinotta, A.; Lantano, C.; Corradini, R.; Marchelli, R.

    2010-04-01

    The increased concern, emerged in the last few years, on food products safety has stimulated the research on new techniques for traceability of raw food materials. DNA analysis is one of the most powerful tools for the certification of food quality, and it is presently performed through the polymerase chain reaction technique. Photonic crystal fibers, due to the presence of an array of air holes running along their length, can be exploited for performing DNA recognition by derivatizing hole surfaces and checking hybridization of complementary nucledotide chains in the sample. In this paper the application of a suspended core photonic crystal fiber in the recognition of DNA sequences is discussed. The fiber is characterized in terms of electromagnetic properties by means of a full-vector modal solver based on the finite element method. Then, the performances of the fiber in the recognition of mall synthetic oligonucleotides are discussed, together with a test of the possibility to extend this recognition to samples of DNA of applicative interest, such as olive leaves.

  3. Enhanced peptide nucleic acid binding to supercoiled DNA: possible implications for DNA "breathing" dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, T; Nielsen, Peter E.

    1996-01-01

    efficient with supercoiled than with linear DNA. In the presence of 140 mM KCI, the PNA binding rate was reduced but, notably, highly dependent on template topology. Negative supercoiling (mean superhelix density, sigma approximately -0.051) increased the rate of binding by 2 orders of magnitude compared...... to that of relaxed DNA. The pseudo-first-order rate constant [k psi (sigma)] obeys an exponential function, k psi (sigma) = k psi (lin)e-sigma delta, where delta is a constant of 105 and k psi lin is the rate of PNA binding to linear DNA (sigma = 0). The activation energy [Ea(sigma)] was determined as approximately...... 93 and approximately 48 kJ mol-1 for PNA binding to linear and supercoiled DNA, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the possible future use of PNA as an antigene agent and in the framework of DNA "breathing" dynamics....

  4. Enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of G-quadruplexes comprising locked nucleic acids and intercalating nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Nielsen, Claus; Filichev, Vyacheslav V

    2011-01-01

    Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylet......Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4......-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylmethyl]glycerol (twisted intercalating nucleic acid, TINA). Incorporation of LNA or INA/TINA monomers provide as much as 8-fold improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. We demonstrate for the first time a detailed analysis of the effect the incorporation of INA/TINA monomers in quadruplex forming...... of the 50-phosphate inhibits dimerisation of this G-quadruplex as a result of negative charge–charge repulsion. Contrary to that, we found that attachment of the 50-O-DMT-group produced a more active 17-mer sequence that showed signs of aggregation—forming multimeric G-quadruplex species in solution...

  5. Identification and Characterization of Second-Generation Invader Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) for Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sau, Sujay P; Madsen, Andreas S; Podbevsek, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The development of synthetic agents that recognize double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is a long-standing goal that is inspired by the promise for tools that detect, regulate, and modify genes. Progress has been made with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, and polyamides, but...... substantial efforts are currently devoted to the development of alternative strategies that overcome the limitations observed with the classic approaches. In 2005, we introduced Invader locked nucleic acids (LNAs), i.e., double-stranded probes that are activated for mixed-sequence recognition of dsDNA through...... monomers. We compare the thermal denaturation characteristics of double-stranded probes featuring different interstrand zippers of pyrene-functionalized monomers based on 2'-amino-α-l-LNA, 2'-N-methyl-2'-amino-DNA, and RNA scaffolds. Insights from fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and NMR...

  6. Analysis of wheat SAGE tags reveals evidence for widespread antisense transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbings J George

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE is a powerful tool for genome-wide transcription studies. Unlike microarrays, it has the ability to detect novel forms of RNA such as alternatively spliced and antisense transcripts, without the need for prior knowledge of their existence. One limitation of using SAGE on an organism with a complex genome and lacking detailed sequence information, such as the hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum, is accurate annotation of the tags generated. Without accurate annotation it is impossible to fully understand the dynamic processes involved in such complex polyploid organisms. Hence we have developed and utilised novel procedures to characterise, in detail, SAGE tags generated from the whole grain transcriptome of hexaploid wheat. Results Examination of 71,930 Long SAGE tags generated from six libraries derived from two wheat genotypes grown under two different conditions suggested that SAGE is a reliable and reproducible technique for use in studying the hexaploid wheat transcriptome. However, our results also showed that in poorly annotated and/or poorly sequenced genomes, such as hexaploid wheat, considerably more information can be extracted from SAGE data by carrying out a systematic analysis of both perfect and "fuzzy" (partially matched tags. This detailed analysis of the SAGE data shows first that while there is evidence of alternative polyadenylation this appears to occur exclusively within the 3' untranslated regions. Secondly, we found no strong evidence for widespread alternative splicing in the developing wheat grain transcriptome. However, analysis of our SAGE data shows that antisense transcripts are probably widespread within the transcriptome and appear to be derived from numerous locations within the genome. Examination of antisense transcripts showing sequence similarity to the Puroindoline a and Puroindoline b genes suggests that such antisense transcripts might have a

  7. Identification of novel endogenous antisense transcripts by DNA microarray analysis targeting complementary strand of annotated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohama Chihiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent transcriptomic analyses in mammals have uncovered the widespread occurrence of endogenous antisense transcripts, termed natural antisense transcripts (NATs. NATs are transcribed from the opposite strand of the gene locus and are thought to control sense gene expression, but the mechanism of such regulation is as yet unknown. Although several thousand potential sense-antisense pairs have been identified in mammals, examples of functionally characterized NATs remain limited. To identify NAT candidates suitable for further functional analyses, we performed DNA microarray-based NAT screening using mouse adult normal tissues and mammary tumors to target not only the sense orientation but also the complementary strand of the annotated genes. Results First, we designed microarray probes to target the complementary strand of genes for which an antisense counterpart had been identified only in human public cDNA sources, but not in the mouse. We observed a prominent expression signal from 66.1% of 635 target genes, and 58 genes of these showed tissue-specific expression. Expression analyses of selected examples (Acaa1b and Aard confirmed their dynamic transcription in vivo. Although interspecies conservation of NAT expression was previously investigated by the presence of cDNA sources in both species, our results suggest that there are more examples of human-mouse conserved NATs that could not be identified by cDNA sources. We also designed probes to target the complementary strand of well-characterized genes, including oncogenes, and compared the expression of these genes between mammary cancerous tissues and non-pathological tissues. We found that antisense expression of 95 genes of 404 well-annotated genes was markedly altered in tumor tissue compared with that in normal tissue and that 19 of these genes also exhibited changes in sense gene expression. These results highlight the importance of NAT expression in the regulation

  8. Redox labeling and redox coding of nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balintová, Jana; Brázdová, Marie; Havran, Luděk; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    Praha: Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry AS CR, v. v. i, 2014 - (Hocek, M.), s. 229-230. (Collection Symposium Series. 14). ISBN 978-80-86241-50-0. [Symposium on Chemistry of Nucleic Acid Components /16./. Český Krumlov (CZ), 08.06.2014-13.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : nucleic acids * DNA * dNTPs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R)

  9. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  10. Peptider holder krabben rask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar......Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar...

  11. Hitting bacteria at the heart of the central dogma: sequence-specific inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Kim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An important objective in developing new drugs is the achievement of high specificity to maximize curing effect and minimize side-effects, and high specificity is an integral part of the antisense approach. The antisense techniques have been extensively developed from the application of simple long, regular antisense RNA (asRNA molecules to highly modified versions conferring resistance to nucleases, stability of hybrid formation and other beneficial characteristics, though still preserving the specificity of the original nucleic acids. These new and improved second- and third-generation antisense molecules have shown promising results. The first antisense drug has been approved and more are in clinical trials. However, these antisense drugs are mainly designed for the treatment of different human cancers and other human diseases. Applying antisense gene silencing and exploiting RNA interference (RNAi are highly developed approaches in many eukaryotic systems. But in bacteria RNAi is absent, and gene silencing by antisense compounds is not nearly as well developed, despite its great potential and the intriguing possibility of applying antisense molecules in the fight against multiresistant bacteria. Recent breakthrough and current status on the development of antisense gene silencing in bacteria including especially phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs will be presented in this review.

  12. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Saito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  13. Water-absorbent polymer as a carrier for a discrete deposit of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, M; Ichikawa, M; Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Takahashi, M

    1998-09-01

    One of the problems of introducing antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into the central nervous system (CNS) is their rapid disappearance from the target site due to their dispersion and diffusion, which results in poor uptake and/or retention in cells (M. Morris, A.B. Lucion, Antisense oligonucleotides in the study of neuroendocrine systems, J. Neuroendocrinol. 7 (1995) 493-500; S. Ogawa, H.E. Brown, H.J. Okano, D.W. Pfaff, Cellular uptake of intracerebrally administrated oligodeoxynucleotides in mouse brain, Regul. Pept. 59 (1995) 143-149) [2,5]. Recently, we adapted a new method using water-absorbent polymer (WAP; internally cross-linked starch-grafted-polyacrylates) as a carrier for antisense ODN. The polymer forms a hydro-gel after absorbing water which is chemically and biologically inert. In these studies, the polymer (powder-form) is fully swollen by physiological saline containing antisense ODN (0.2 micromol/ml) to make 80-fold volume gel. Hydro-gel (1 microliter) is injected into the target site, and water solutes are assumed to be diffused stoichiometrically into CNS from the surface of the gel. Histological studies indicate that 24 h after the injection, antisense ODN (5'biotinylated-S-oligos of 15 mer) are distributed to within 800 micrometer from the edge of the area where the gel is located and then gradually disappear from this area within days, but still remain within 300-micrometer distance 7 days later. Antisense ODN are effectively incorporated by all the cell types examined, i.e., neurons, astrocytes and microglias, and suppress the synthesis of the target protein. This method can be adapted to slow delivery of antisense ODN and other water soluble substances into the CNS. PMID:9767125

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  15. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  16. Nucleic acid analysis using liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of fast, reliable and sensitive methods for the analysis of biomolecules, especially nucleic acids, proteins, and peptides, is at the same time a deciding motor and has to keep pace with the steady progress of biochemical, molecular biological, and medical science. Miniaturized chromatographic separation methods are frequently the method of choice for the separation and characterization of complex biopolymer mixtures, when the amount of sample is limited. The concept of monolithic chromatographic separation media is especially favorable for the fabrication of capillary columns. Chemical immobilization of the monolith at the capillary wall eliminates the tedious preparation of retaining frits; the continuous porous polymer exhibits favorable mass transfer properties, enabling excellent separation efficiency. We prepared monolithic columns within the confines of fused silica capillaries of 200 μm i.d. by copolymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the presence of a suitable porogen mixture of 1-decanol and tetrahydrofuran. Different chemical and physical parameters that influence the morphology, porosity and separation efficiency of the obtained monolithic chromatographic columns were investigated, specifically the influence of the amount of cross-linking monomer, of different porogens and porogen mixtures, of polymerization temperature, and finally of the amount of radical initiator. The prepared monolithic columns were characterized by measurement of permeability with different solvents, determination of the pore size distribution by inverse size exclusion chromatography, examination of the morphology by scanning electron micrographs, and finally by chromatographic testing and determination of the separation parameters. Finally, the developed separation systems were applied to the separation of DNA ladder markers, of PCR amplified DNA fragments containing sequence-tagged sites used in the genotyping of individuals and of amplified short

  17. Recent progress of nucleic acid probes based on small molecules%基于小分子的核酸结构探针最新研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田沺; 肖珩; 翁小成; 王少儒; 周翔

    2012-01-01

    本文主要综述了基于小分子的核酸结构探针的最新研究进展.所探索的核酸结构主要有四链核酸(包括G-四链体以及i-motif)结构、三链核酸结构、左手螺旋DNA结构以及不规则核酸结构(包括突起结构以及环状结构)等;所探索的小分子包括过渡金属配合物、大环共轭化合物、环肽以及寡糖抗生素等.%This paper reviews the latest research progress of the nucleic acid probes based on small molecules. The related nucleic acid structures include quadruplex nucleic acids (including G-quadruplex and I-motif), triple-stranded nucleic acid structures, left-handed DNA helix structures, as well as irregular nucleic acid structures (bulge structures and loop structures). The related small molecules include transition metal complexes, the macrocyclic conjugated compounds, cyclic peptides, and oligosaccharide antibiotics.

  18. "Clickable" LNA/DNA probes for fluorescence sensing of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna S; Gupta, Pankaj; Wengel, Jesper; Astakhova, I Kira

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies.......Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies....

  19. A real-time assay for monitoring nucleic acid cleavage by quadruplex formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kankia, Besik I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct and straightforward methods to follow nucleic acid cleavage are needed. A spectrophotometric quadruplex formation assay (QFA) was developed, which allows real-time monitoring of site-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. QFA was applied to study both protein and nucleic acid restriction enzymes, and was demonstrated to accurately determine Michaelis–Menten parameters for the cleavage reaction catalyzed by EcoRI. QFA can be used to study the mechanisms of protein–nucleic acid recognition....

  20. Delivery Systems for In Vivo use of Nucleic Acid Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende R.R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The notorious biotechnological advance of the last few decades has allowed the development of experimental methods for understanding molecular mechanisms of genes and new therapeutic approaches. Gene therapy is maturing into a viable, practical method with the potential to cure a variety of human illnesses. Some nucleic-acid-based drugs are now available for controlling the progression of genetic diseases by inhibiting gene expression or the activity of their gene products. New therapeutic strategies employ a wide range of molecular tools such as bacterial plasmids containing transgenic inserts, RNA interference aptamers. A nucleic-acid based constitution confers a lower immunogenic potential and as result of the high stringency selection of large molecular variety, these drugs have high affi nity and selectivity for their targets. However, nucleic acids have poor biostability thus requiring chemical modifications and delivery systems to maintain their activity and ease their cellular internalization. This review discusses some of the mechanisms of action and the application of therapies based on nucleic acids such as aptamers and RNA interference as well as platforms for cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides and their trade-offs.

  1. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  2. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the oxidation of nucleic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Animals;chemistry;deficiency;DNA Damage;DNA Glycosylases;DNA Repair;DNA Repair Enzymes;Enzymes;genetics;Genomics;Guanine;Hydrolases;Intestinal Neoplasms;Japan;Liver Neoplasms;metabolism;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Mice;Mutagenesis;Mutation;Neoplasms;Nucleic Acids;Oxidation-Reduction;Oxidative Stress;Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases;Skin Neoplasms;Ultraviolet Rays.

  3. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Torelli, Emanuela

    2014-03-20

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  5. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Circulating nucleic acids as a new diagnostic tool

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Markéta; Plzák, J.; Strnad, Hynek; Betka, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2010), s. 242-259. ISSN 1425-8153 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : circulating nucleic acids * diagnostics * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2010

  7. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    -, č. 773 (2013), s. 9-23. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Nucleic acid * Biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 4.517, year: 2013

  8. Antisense RNA: a genetic approach to cell resistance against Parvovirus; RNA antisentido: una aproximacion de resistencia genetica a Parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Martinez, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    The Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp), an autonomous Parvovirus that replicates cytolytically in the A9 mouse fibroblast cell line, was interfered by constitutive expression of an antisense RNA targeted against the major non-structural NS-1 protein. Permanently transfected A9 clones expressing NS-1 antisense, showed increased proliferative capacity upon virus infection, and likewise cultures infected at low multiplicity by MVMp reached confluence overcoming virus growth. Correspondingly, an inhibition in virus multiplication was demonstrated by a significant lower virus production and plaque forming ability in clones expressing antisense RNa. At the molecular level, several fold reduction in viral DNA, RNA and proteins was quantitated by respective analysis of Southern, RNase protection and bidimensional gels. Remarkably, the accumulation of all three viral messengers(R1,R2,R3) was decreased both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, suggesting that antisense-mediated inhibition is primarily exerted at the level of viral transcription or nuclear post-transcriptional events. Thus, this system illustrates the possibility to create an antisense-mediated protective stage to highly cytotoxic viruses in permissive cells, by down-modulation the expression of a transactivator of virus genes. (author)180 refs., 25 figs.

  9. Antisense RNA: a genetic approach to cell resistance against Parvovirus. RNA antisentido: una aproximacion de resistencia genetica a Parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Martinez, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp), an autonomous Parvovirus that replicates cytolytically in the A9 mouse fibroblast cell line, was interfered by constitutive expression of an antisense RNA targeted against the major non-structural NS-1 protein. Permanently transfected A9 clones expressing NS-1 antisense, showed increased proliferative capacity upon virus infection, and likewise cultures infected at low multiplicity by MVMp reached confluence overcoming virus growth. Correspondingly, an inhibition in virus multiplication was demonstrated by a significant lower virus production and plaque forming ability in clones expressing antisense RNa. At the molecular level, several fold reduction in viral DNA, RNA and proteins was quantitated by respective analysis of Southern, RNase protection and bidimensional gels. Remarkably, the accumulation of all three viral messengers(R1,R2,R3) was decreased both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, suggesting that antisense-mediated inhibition is primarily exerted at the level of viral transcription or nuclear post-transcriptional events. Thus, this system illustrates the possibility to create an antisense-mediated protective stage to highly cytotoxic viruses in permissive cells, by down-modulation the expression of a transactivator of virus genes. (author)180 refs., 25 figs.

  10. Identification and characterization of a cis-encoded antisense RNA associated with the replication process of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Dadzie

    Full Text Available Antisense RNAs that originate from the complementary strand of protein coding genes are involved in the regulation of gene expression in all domains of life. In bacteria, some of these antisense RNAs are transcriptional noise while others play a vital role to adapt the cell to changing environmental conditions. By deep sequencing analysis of transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a partial RNA sequence encoded in-cis to the dnaA gene was revealed. Northern blot and RACE analysis confirmed the transcription of this antisense RNA which was expressed mostly in the stationary phase of the bacterial growth and also under iron limitation and osmotic stress. Pulse expression analysis showed that overexpression of the antisense RNA resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA levels of dnaA, which will ultimately enhance their translation. Our findings have revealed that antisense RNA of dnaA is indeed transcribed not merely as a by-product of the cell's transcription machinery but plays a vital role as far as stability of dnaA mRNA is concerned.

  11. DMPD: Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17082566 Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Deane JA, Bolland ...S. J Immunol. 2006 Nov 15;177(10):6573-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity.... PubmedID 17082566 Title Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Aut

  12. Anti-peptide aptamers recognize amino acid sequence and bind a protein epitope.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, W; Ellington, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro selection of nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) is superficially similar to the immune response. Both processes produce biopolymers that can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. While antibodies are known to recognize the sequence and conformation of protein surface features (epitopes), very little is known about the precise interactions between aptamers and their epitopes. Therefore, aptamers that could recognize a particular epitope, a peptide fragment of huma...

  13. Cell-penetrating peptides; chemical modification, mechanism of uptake and formulation development

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzat, Kariem

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy holds the promise of revolutionizing the way we treat diseases. By using recombinant DNA and oligonucleotides (ONs), gene functions can be restored, altered or silenced according to the therapeutic need. However, gene therapy approaches require the delivery of large and charged nucleic acid-based molecules to their intracellular targets across the plasma membrane, which is inherently impermeable to such molecules. In this thesis, two chemically modified cell-penetrating peptides ...

  14. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herington Adrian C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS, which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL. Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2. Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis, as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading

  15. Proliferative response of human prostate cancer cell to hormone inhibited by androgen receptor antisense RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江军; 王洛夫; 方玉华; 靳风烁; 靳文生

    2004-01-01

    Background The failure of endocrine treatment for advanced prostate cancer might be related to aberrant activation of androgen receptor (AR). Prostate cancer cell line LNCaP contains AR that can be activated by androgen, estrogen and progesterone. This study was set to investigate the effects of antisense AR RNA on growth of LNCaP cultured in medium containing varied concentrations of R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Methods LNCaP cells transfected with antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN were designated as LNCaPas-AR. LNCaP cells containing empty vector pLXSN served as LNCaPNeo. LNCaP and LNCaPNeo were taken as controls. In vitro cell growth assay, proliferative cells of LNCaP and tranfected LNCaPs were counted by typan staining when they cultured with synthetic androgen R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Results Growth of LNCaPas-AR was inhibited significantly (P<0.05) compared with that of LNCaP and LNCaPNeo at 1 nmol/L R1881, 10 nmol/L 17β-estradiol, and 1 nmol/L progesterone, respectively. No difference was seen between LNCaP and LNCaPNeo(P>0.05). Microscopic observation showed that LNCaP and LNCaPNeo cells grew well, but only few LNCaPas-AR cells were alive. Conclusions Our observations indicate that antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN could change androgen-independent characteristics of LNCaP cells, which might shed some novel insights into the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  16. Release profile and stability evaluation of optimized chitosan/alginate nanoparticles as EGFR antisense vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebrahim Azizi1,4, Alireza Namazi1, Ismaeil Haririan2,5, Shamileh Fouladdel1, Mohammad R Khoshayand3, Parisa Y Shotorbani6, Alireza Nomani1,7, Taraneh Gazori1,21Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, 3Department of Food and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Biomaterials Research Center (BRC Tehran, Iran; 6Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Azad University, Tehran, Iran; 7Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, IranAbstract: Chitosan/alginate nanoparticles which had been optimized in our previous study using two different N/P ratios were chosen and their ability to release epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antisense was investigated. In addition, the stability of these nanoparticles in aqueous medium and after freeze-drying was investigated. In the case of both N/P ratios (5, 25, nanoparticles started releasing EGFR antisense as soon as they were exposed to the medium and the release lasted for approximately 50 hours. Nanoparticle size, shape, zeta potential, and release profile did not show any significant change after the freeze-drying process (followed by reswelling. The nanoparticles were reswellable again after freeze-drying in phosphate buffer with a pH of 7.4 over a period of six hours. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the nanoparticles with the two different N/P ratios showed that these nanoparticles could protect EGFR antisense molecules for six hours.Keywords: chitosan/alginate nanoparticles, release profile, freeze-drying, agarose gel electrophoresis

  17. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  18. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  19. Easily denaturing nucleic acids derived from intercalating nucleic acids: thermal stability studies, dual duplex invasion and inhibition of transcription start

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Vester, Birte; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Pedersen, Erik B

    2005-01-01

    The bulged insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (monomer P) in two complementary 8mer DNA strands (intercalating nucleic acids) opposite to each other resulted in the formation of an easily denaturing duplex, which had lower thermal stability (21.0 degrees C) than the wild-type double...

  20. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  1. Effects of HSP70 Antisense Oligonucleotide on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雪; 贺海斌; 杨威; 宋涛; 郭成; 郑鑫; 刘青光

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of heat shock protein 70(HSP70) antisense oligonucleotide(ASODN) on the proliferation and apoptosis of a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line(SMMC-7721 cells) in vitro.HSP70 oligonucleotide was transfected into SMMC-7721 cells by the mediation of SofastTM transfection reagent.Inhibition rate of SMMC-7721 cells was determined by using MTT method.Apoptosis rate and cell cycle distribution were measured by flow cytometry.Immunocytochemistry staining was used to observe th...

  2. Inhibition of Gene Expression in Escherichia coli by Antisense Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Geller, B L; Deere, J. D.; Stein, D A; Kroeker, A. D.; Moulton, H. M.; Iversen, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    Antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) were tested for the ability to inhibit gene expression in Escherichia coli. PMOs targeted to either a myc-luciferase reporter gene product or 16S rRNA did not inhibit luciferase expression or growth. However, in a strain with defective lipopolysaccharide (lpxA mutant), which has a leaky outer membrane, PMOs targeted to the myc-luciferase or acyl carrier protein (acpP) mRNA significantly inhibited their targets in a dose-dependent respon...

  3. Identification of an antisense transcript to ZIM2 in the primate lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jennifer M.; Yu, Sungryul; Kim, Joomyeong

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we identified an antisense transcript to ZIM2 (zinc finger imprinted gene 2) in the human, called ZIM2as. Sequence analysis of the 110 kb region spanned by this transcript revealed a cluster of tandemly repeated sequence in the human, orangutan, and chimpanzee as well as a loss of approximately 70 kb from the corresponding region in the rhesus. The homologous region in most mammals contains a cluster of olfactory receptor (OLFR) genes, but this gene cluster has been lost from t...

  4. Development of Cotton leaf curl virus resistant transgenic cotton using antisense ßC1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ilah, Abdul; Husen, Azamal; Bhattacharya, P S; Rana, D

    2016-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a serious pathogen causing leaf curl disease and affecting the cotton production in major growing areas. The transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 310) plants were developed by using βC1 gene in antisense orientation gene driven by Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter and nos (nopaline synthase) terminator and mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and somatic embryogenesis system. Molecular confirmation of the transformants was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. The developed transgenic and inoculated plants remained symptomless till their growth period. In conclusion, the plants were observed as resistant to CLCuV. PMID:27081361

  5. Inhibition of HSP70 Gene Expression by Modified Antisense and Its Effects on Embryonic Sensitivity to Heat Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wen-ru; DU Li-yin; HE Jian-bin; LI Shou-jun

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of inhibition of HSP70 gene expression by antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the mRNA of HSP70 and to test the effects of inhibition of HSP70 gene expression on subsequent embryonic sensitivity to heat shock. The results showed that transfection of pre-implantation embryos at 4-cell stage with 5 μM antisense oligo had no effect on in vitro blastocyst development. However, transfection with 10 to 40 μM antisense oligo had reduced in vitro blastocyst development to 15, 10% and 0; For the embryos which exposed to 40 μM As arrested at the 16-cell stage, there was no blastocyst formation within the heat shock groups. In contrast, transfection had no effect on embryonic sensitivity to heat shock, above 25% of embryos developed to blastocyst stage in control groups.

  6. 靶向哺乳动物细胞线粒体的核酸转运%Targeting delivery nucleic acid into mammalian mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付爱玲

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)genome mutations and defects are the essential mechanism of a various of mitochondrial dysfunction associated with diseases. The studies of targeting de-livery nucleic acid into mammalian mitochondria can thoroughly correct mtDNA mutation, rescue mtDNA impairment and then reverse the progress of diseases. There’s obvious differences be-tween nucleic acid import pathway of mammalian mitochondria and gene transfection of nuclei. In this paper, the effective strat-egies of delivering DNA and RNA(tRNA,rRNA,mRNA and an-tisense RNA)into mitochondria have been reviewed, as well as the challenges and development.%线粒体 DNA(mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA)的遗传性突变和缺陷是多种线粒体功能失调相关疾病的根本原因。靶向线粒体递送核酸,可从根本上纠正 mtDNA 突变、挽救 mtD-NA 损伤、阻断疾病进程。哺乳细胞内线粒体的核酸转运途径与细胞核的基因转染大不相同。该文综述了向哺乳动物细胞线粒体递送 DNA 和 RNA(tRNA、rRNA、mRNA 和反义RNA)的有效策略,并对其存在问题和发展趋势做一阐述。

  7. Effect of NHE1 antisense gene transfection on the biological behavior of SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Xiao-Chun Teng; Jing-Chen Zheng; Gang Chen; Xing-Wei Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of type 1 Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) antisense human gene transfection on the biological behavior of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901.METHODS: Antisense NHE1 eukaryotic expression on vector pcDNA3.1 was constructed by recombinant DNA technique and transfected into gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 with DOTAP liposome transfection method.Morphological changes of cells were observed with optic and electron microscopes. Changes in cell proliferative capacity, apoptosis, intracellular pH (pH1), cell cycle,clone formation in two-layer soft agar, and tumorigenicity in nude mice were examined.RESULTS: Antisense eukaryotic expressing vectors were successfully constructed and transfected into 5GC-7901.The transfectant obtained named 7901-antisense (7901-,45) stablely produced antisense NHE1. There was a significant difference between the pH1 of 7901-AS cells (6.77 ± 0.05) and that of 7901-zeo cells and SGC-7901 cells (7.24 ± 0.03 and 7.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01). Compared with SGC-7901 and 7901-zeo cells, 7901-AS cells mostly showed cell proliferation inhibition, G1/Go phase arrest, increased cell apoptotic rate, recovery of contact inhibition, and density contact. The tumorigenicity in nude mice and cloning efficiency in the two-layer soft agar were dearly inhibited.CONCLUSION: NHE1 antisense gene significantly restrains the malignant behavior of human gastric carcinoma cells, suppresses cell growth and induces cell apoptosis, and partially reverses the malignant phenotypes of SGC-7901. These results suggest a potential role for human tumor gene therapy.

  8. Heat shock protein 70 antisense oligonucleotide inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Zhao; Wen-Lu Shen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Heat shock protein (HSP)70 is over-expressed in human gastric cancer and plays an important role in the progression of this cancer. We investigated the effects of antisense HSP70 oligomer on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, and its potential role in gene therapy for this cancer.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was treated in vitro with various concentrations of antisense HSP70 oligonucleotides at different intervals. Growth inhibition was determined as percentage by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Extracted DNA was electrophoresed on agarose gel, and distribution of cell cycle and kinetics of apoptosis induction were analyzed by propidium iodide DNA incorporation using flow cytometry, which was also used to detect the effects of antisense oligomer pretreatment on the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock in SGC-7901 cells. Proteins were extracted for simultaneous measurement of HSP70 expression level by SDS-PAGE Western blotting.RESULTS: The number of viable cells decreased in a doseand time-dependent manner, and ladder-like patterns of DNA fragments were observed in SGC-7901 cells treated with antisense HSP70 oligomers at a concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h, which were consistent with inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Flow cytometric analysis showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptotic rate by HSP70 antisense oligomers. This response was accompanied with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, suggesting inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, flow cytometry also showed that pretreatment of SGC-7901 cells with HSP70 antisense oligomers enhanced the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that HSP70 antisense oligomers inhibited HSP70 expression, which preceded apoptosis, and HSP70 was undetectable at the concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h.CONCLUSION: Antisense HSP70 oligomers

  9. Inhibitory effect of human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of gastric cancer cell lines in variant tumor pathological subtype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ye; Yun-Lin Wu; Shu Zhang; Zi Chen; Li-Xia Guo; Ruo-Yu Zhou; Hong Xie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of well (MKN-28), moderately (SGC-7901)and poorly (MKN-45) differentiated gastric cancer cell lines under specific conditions and its inhibition mechanism,and to observe the correlation between the growth inhibition ratio and the tumor pathologic subtype of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Telomerase activity in three gastric cancer cell lines of variant tumor pathologic subtype was determined by modified TRAP assay before and after the specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides were dealt with under specific conditions. Effect of antisense oligomer under specific conditions of the growth and viability of gastric cancer cell lines was explored by using trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and cell apoptosis was detected by cell morphology observation, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Telomerase activity was detected in well,moderately and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell lines (the quantification expression of telomerase activity was 43.7TPG, 56.5TPG, 76.7TPG, respectively).Telomerase activity was controlled to 30.2TPG, 36.3TPG and 35.2TPG for MKN-28, SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cell lines respectively after treatment with human telomerase antisense oligomers at the concentration of 5 μmol/L, and was entirely inhibited at 10 μmol/L, against the template region of telomerase RNA component, whereas no inhibition effect was detected in missense oligomers (P<0.05). After treatment with antisense oligomers at different concentrations under specific conditions for 96 h, significant growth inhibition effects were found in MKN-45 and SGC-7901gastric cancer cell lines (the inhibition ratio was 40.89%and 71.28%), but not in MKN-28 cell lines (15.86%). The ratio of inactive SGC-7901 cells increased according to the prolongation of treatment from 48 to 96 h. Missense oligomers could not lead to the same effect (P<0

  10. Plant signalling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wiśniewska, Justyna; Trejgell, Alina; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies have identified peptides that play crucial roles in plant growth and development, including defence mechanisms in response to wounding by pests, the control of cell division and expansion, and pollen self-incompatibility. The first two signalling peptides to be described in plants were tomato systemin and phytosulfokine (PSK). There is also biochemical evidence that natriuretic peptide-like molecules, immunologically-relatedt o those found ...

  11. Antisense suppression of LOX3 gene expression in rice endosperm enhances seed longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huibin; Wei, Yidong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Lian, Ling; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Chen, Qiushi; Lin, Zhongping; Wang, Zonghua; Xie, Huaan; Zhang, Jianfu

    2015-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a major role in seed longevity and viability. In rice grains, lipid peroxidation is catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3). Previous reports showed that grain from the rice variety DawDam in which the LOX3 gene was deleted had less stale flavour after grain storage than normal rice. The molecular mechanism by which LOX3 expression is regulated during endosperm development remains unclear. In this study, we expressed a LOX3 antisense construct in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants to down-regulate LOX3 expression in rice endosperm. The transgenic plants exhibited a marked decrease in LOX mRNA levels, normal phenotypes and a normal life cycle. We showed that LOX3 activity and its ability to produce 9-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) from linoleic acid were significantly lower in transgenic seeds than in wild-type seeds by measuring the ultraviolet absorption of 9-HPOD at 234 nm and by high-performance liquid chromatography. The suppression of LOX3 expression in rice endosperm increased grain storability. The germination rate of TS-91 (antisense LOX3 transgenic line) was much higher than the WT (29% higher after artificial ageing for 21 days, and 40% higher after natural ageing for 12 months). To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that decreased LOX3 expression can preserve rice grain quality during storage with no impact on grain yield, suggesting potential applications in agricultural production. PMID:25545811

  12. Cathepsin B antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses invasive potential of MG-63 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Maolin; Xiao Zengming; Li Shide; Chen Anmin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the biological effects of cathepsin B phosporotbioated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection. Methods A 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) targeted against the cathepsin B mRNA was transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 by lipofectamine 2000. The sense and nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides to cathepsin B and blank vector were used as controls. The expression of cathepsin B mRNA was examined by RT-PCR and the expression of cathepsin B was examined by Western blot. The invasive capability of MG-63 cells was evaluated by the boydern chamber assay. Results The expression of cathcpsin B was obviously inhibited in antlsense oligodeoxynucleotide treated cells compared with the control cells. The number of invading MG-63 cells was significantly lower in the ASODN-treated groups than that in the control groups. Conclusion The cathepsin B ASODN significantly inhibits the expression of cathepsin B and invasive ability of MG-63 cell in osteosarcoma.

  13. Efficient inhibition of human telomerase activity by antisense oligonucleotides sensitizes cancer cells to radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-mei JI; Cong-hua XIE; Ming-hao FANG; Fu-xiang ZHOU; Wen-jie ZHANG; Ming-sheng ZHANG; Yun-feng ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of the antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) specific for human telomerase RNA (hTR) on radio sensitization and proliferation inhibition in human neurogliocytoma cells (U251). Methods: U251 cells were transfected with hTR ASODN or nonspecific oligonucleotides (NSODN). Before and after irradiation of 60Co-γray, telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP-PCR-ELISA), and DNA damage and repair were examined by the comet assay. The classical colony assay was used to plot the cell-survival curve, to detect the D0 value. Results: hTR antisense oligonucleotides could downregulate the telomerase activity, increase radiation induced DNA damage and reduce the subsequent repair. Furthermore, it could inhibit the proliferation and decrease the D0 value which demonstrates rising radiosensitivity. However, telomere length was unchanged over a short period of time. Conclusion: These findings suggest that an ASODN-based strategy may be used to develop telomerase inhibitors, which can efficiently sensitize radiotherapy.

  14. On Measuring miRNAs after Transient Transfection of Mimics or Antisense Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Daniel W.; Bracken, Cameron P.; Szubert, Jan M.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA) abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs) for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level. PMID:23358900

  15. Antisense mediated splicing modulation for inherited metabolic diseases: challenges for delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2014-02-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns-multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)-and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  16. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs. PMID:25111672

  17. On measuring miRNAs after transient transfection of mimics or antisense inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Thomson

    Full Text Available The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level.

  18. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  19. Irradiation of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Increases Uptake of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether irradiation before antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) administration enhances tissue uptake, and whether periodic dosing enhances cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled ODN relative to constant dosing. Methods and Materials: PC-3-Bcl-2 cells (prostate cancer cell line engineered to overexpress Bcl-2) were subjected to increasing doses of irradiation (0-10 Gy) with or without increasing concentrations of fluorescently labeled antisense Bcl-2 ODN (G4243). The fluorescent signal intensity was quantified as the total grain area with commercial software. In addition, PC-3-Bcl-2 subcutaneous xenograft tumors were treated with or without irradiation in combination with various dosing schemas of G4243. The uptake of fluorescent G4243 in tumors was quantitated. Results: The uptake of G4243 was increased in prostate cancer cells exposed to low doses of irradiation both in vitro and in vivo. Irradiation before G4243 treatment resulted in increased fluorescent signal intensity in xenograft tumors compared with those irradiated after G4243 treatment. A single weekly dose of G4243 produced higher G4243 uptake in xenograft tumors than daily dosing, even when the total dose administered per week was held constant. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ionizing radiation increases the uptake of therapeutic ODN in target tissues and, thus, has potential to increase the efficacy of ODN in clinical applications

  20. Antitumor Effect of Antisense Ornithine Decarboxylase Adenovirus on Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui TIAN; Lin LI; Xian-Xi LIU; Yan ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, was found to increase in cancer cells, especially lung cancer cells. Some chemotherapeutic agents aimed at decreasing ODC gene expression showed inhibitory effects on cancer cells. In this study, we examined the effects of adenoviral transduced antisense ODC on lung cancer cells. An adenovirus carrying antisense ODC (rAd-ODC/Ex3as) was used to infect lung cancer cell line A-549. The 3-(4,5-me thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to analyze the effect on cell growth. Expression of ODC and concentration of polyamines in cells were determined by Western blot analysis and high performance liquid chromatography. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling was used to analyze cell apoptosis. The expression of ODC in A-549 cells was reduced to 54%, and that of three polyamines was also decreased through the rAd-ODC/Ex3as treatment. Consequently, cell growth was substantially inhibited and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling showed that rAd-ODC/Ex3as could lead to cell apoptosis, with apoptosis index of 46%. This study suggests that rAd-ODC/Ex3as has an antitumor effect on the human lung cancer cells.

  1. Gene silencing of HIV chemokine receptors using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Amer; Zheng, Richard; Parlett, Terry; Shi, Xiaoju; Balaraman, Priyadhashini; Cheloufi, Sihem; Murphy, Brendan; Guntermann, Christine; Eagles, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are required for HIV-1 to enter cells, and the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS involves a switch in the co-receptor usage of the virus from CCR5 to CXCR4. These receptors therefore make attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention, and we have investigated the silencing of their genes by using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNAs. In the present study, we demonstrate using ribozymes that a depletion of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNAs can be achieved simultaneously in human PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells), cells commonly used by the virus for infection and replication. Ribozyme activity leads to an inhibition of the cell-surface expression of both CCR5 and CXCR4, resulting in a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication when PBMCs are challenged with the virus. In addition, we show that small single-stranded antisense RNAs can also be used to silence CCR5 and CXCR4 genes when delivered to PBMCs. This silencing is caused by selective degradation of receptor mRNAs. PMID:16293105

  2. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  3. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  4. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  5. Fluorescent Probes for Nucleic Acid Visualization in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre S. Boutorine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review analyses the literature concerning non-fluorescent and fluorescent probes for nucleic acid imaging in fixed and living cells from the point of view of their suitability for imaging intracellular native RNA and DNA. Attention is mainly paid to fluorescent probes for fluorescence microscopy imaging. Requirements for the target-binding part and the fluorophore making up the probe are formulated. In the case of native double-stranded DNA, structure-specific and sequence-specific probes are discussed. Among the latest, three classes of dsDNA-targeting molecules are described: (i sequence-specific peptides and proteins; (ii triplex-forming oligonucleotides and (iii polyamide oligo(N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole minor groove binders. Polyamides seem to be the most promising targeting agents for fluorescent probe design, however, some technical problems remain to be solved, such as the relatively low sequence specificity and the high background fluorescence inside the cells. Several examples of fluorescent probe applications for DNA imaging in fixed and living cells are cited. In the case of intracellular RNA, only modified oligonucleotides can provide such sequence-specific imaging. Several approaches for designing fluorescent probes are considered: linear fluorescent probes based on modified oligonucleotide analogs, molecular beacons, binary fluorescent probes and template-directed reactions with fluorescence probe formation, FRET donor-acceptor pairs, pyrene excimers, aptamers and others. The suitability of all these methods for living cell applications is discussed.

  6. Technetium-99m labeled antisense probes uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the arterial wall, smooth muscle cells (SMC) normally exist in a quiescent, differentiated state, representing the contractile phenotype. During the development of atherosclerosis SMC change towards the synthetic phenotype going along with proliferation, chemotactic response and increased monocyte binding. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic plaques contained 3-4 fold more c-myc mRNA than those in the normal aortic arteries, while increased Bax and Bak coupled with lack/paucity of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL are associated with SMC apoptosis in advanced lesions. Methods: 1 Oligonucleotide Conjugation: A solution of single stranded amine-derivatized DNA (100-1000μg) was prepared at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in 0.25M sodium bicarbonate, 1 M sodium chloride, 1mM EDTA, pH8.5. Cell uptake studies: 99mTc- MAG3-DNA radioactivity incorporation into porcine coronary smooth muscle cells in the log and plateau phases, respectively, was determined after different times of incubation at 37. The influence of extracellular 99mTc- MAG3-DNA concentration on SMC uptake was also analyzed. [Results] Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The MAG3-DNA was labeled with 99mTc at room temperature and neutral pH, with a mean labeling efficiency of 80.11%(s.d=2.96%,n=4). The labeled antisense DNA still remained the ability to hybridize with its complementary DNA. After labeling, the stability of the DNA in saline or serum was retained as determined by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis, except a shift at 30 min in serum incubation that suggesting a short time serum protein binding. 99mTc-MAG3-c-myc uptake plateaued at 60 min and was directly proportional to the ex

  7. Nucleic acid detection in the diagnosis and prevention of schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Song, Lan-Gui; Xie, Hui; Liang, Jin-Yi; Yuan, Dong-Ya; Wu, Zhong-Dao; Lv, Zhi-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important zoonotic parasitic disease that causes serious harms to humans and animals. Surveillance and diagnosis play key roles in schistosomiasis control, however, current techniques for surveillance and diagnosis of the disease have limitations. As genome data for parasites are increasing, novel techniques for detection incorporating nucleotide sequences are receiving widespread attention. These sensitive, specific, and rapid detection methods are particularly important in the diagnosis of low-grade and early infections, and may prove to have clinical significance. This paper reviews the progress of nucleic acid detection in the diagnosis and prevention of schistosomiasis, including such aspects as the selection of target genes, and development and application of nucleic acid detection methods. PMID:27025210

  8. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, I. A.; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-11-02

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  9. Clinical applications of nucleic acid aptamers in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    PEI, XIAOYU; Jun ZHANG; Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are small single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotide segments, which bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity via unique three-dimensional structures. Aptamers are generated by an iterative in vitro selection process, termed as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Owing to their specificity, non-immunogenicity, non-toxicity, easily modified chemical structure and wide range of targets, aptamers appear to be ideal candidates for vario...

  10. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Target Validation and Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pendergrast, P. Shannon; Marsh, H Nicholas; Grate, Dilara; Healy, Judith M.; Stanton, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In the simplest view, aptamers can be thought of as nucleic acid analogs to antibodies. They are able to bind specifically to proteins, and, in many cases, that binding leads to a modulation of protein activity. New aptamers are rapidly generated through the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment) process and have a very high target affinity and specificity (picomoles to nanomoles). Furthermore, aptamers composed of modified nucleotides have a long in vivo half-life ...

  11. Nucleic acid aptamers: clinical applications and promising new horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Xiaohua; Castanares, Mark; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Shawn E Lupold

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are a special class of nucleic acid molecules that are beginning to be investigated for clinical use. These small RNA/DNA molecules can form secondary and tertiary structures capable of specifically binding proteins or other cellular targets; they are essentially a chemical equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small in size, and non-immunogenic. Since the discovery of aptamers in the early 1990s, great efforts have been made to ma...

  12. Solid-state NMR studies of nucleic acid components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 16 (2015), s. 12300-12310. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * nucleic acids * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/ra/c4ra14404j

  13. Mass spectral characterization of a protein-nucleic acid photocrosslink.

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, M. C.; Resing, K. A.; Collins, B. D.; Willis, M. C.; Koch, T H

    1999-01-01

    A photocrosslink between basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF155) and a high affinity ssDNA oligonucleotide was characterized by positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). The DNA was a 61-mer oligonucleotide photoaptamer bearing seven bromodeoxyuridines, identified by in vitro selection. Specific photocrosslinking of the protein to the oligonucleotide was achieved by 308 nm XeCl excimer laser excitation. The cross-linked protein nucleic acid complex was proteolyzed with ...

  14. Delivery Systems for In Vivo use of Nucleic Acid Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Resende R.R; Torres H.A.M; Yuahasi K.K; Majumder P; Ulrich H.

    2007-01-01

    The notorious biotechnological advance of the last few decades has allowed the development of experimental methods for understanding molecular mechanisms of genes and new therapeutic approaches. Gene therapy is maturing into a viable, practical method with the potential to cure a variety of human illnesses. Some nucleic-acid-based drugs are now available for controlling the progression of genetic diseases by inhibiting gene expression or the activity of their gene products. New therapeutic st...

  15. Non-natural Nucleic Acids for Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Appella, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is an important facet of synthetic biology but can be complicated by undesired nuclease degradation. Incorporating non-natural nucleic acids into a gene could convey resistance to nucleases and promote expression. The compatibility of non-natural nucleosides with polymerases is reviewed with a focus on results from the past two years. Details are provided about how the different systems could be useful in synthetic biology.

  16. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Mauk, Michael G.; Changchun Liu; Jinzhao Song; Bau, Haim H

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (poly...

  17. New Approaches Towards Recognition of Nucleic Acid Triple Helices

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, Dev P.

    2010-01-01

    We show that groove recognition of nucleic acid triple helices can be achieved with aminosugars. Among these aminosugars, neomycin is the most effective aminoglycoside (groove binder) for stabilizing a DNA triple helix. It stabilizes both the T·A·T triplex and mixed-base DNA triplexes better than known DNA minor groove binders (which usually destabilize the triplex) and polyamines. Neomycin selectively stabilizes the triplex (T·A·T and mixed base) without any effect on the DNA duplex. The sel...

  18. Intracellular Fate of Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Conjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaochen A.; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates are a class of bionanomaterials that are extremely potent in many biomedical applications. Their unique ability to enter multiple mammalian cell types as single-entity agents arises from their novel three-dimensional architecture, which consists of a dense shell of highly oriented oligonucleotides chemically attached typically to a gold nanoparticle core. This architecture allows SNAs to engage certain cell surface receptors to facilitate e...

  19. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored i...

  20. Developing nucleic acid-based electrical detection systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabig-Ciminska Magdalena

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of nucleic acid-based detection systems is the main focus of many research groups and high technology companies. The enormous work done in this field is particularly due to the broad versatility and variety of these sensing devices. From optical to electrical systems, from label-dependent to label-free approaches, from single to multi-analyte and array formats, this wide range of possibilities makes the research field very diversified and competitive. New challenges and requirements for an ideal detector suitable for nucleic acid analysis include high sensitivity and high specificity protocol that can be completed in a relatively short time offering at the same time low detection limit. Moreover, systems that can be miniaturized and automated present a significant advantage over conventional technology, especially if detection is needed in the field. Electrical system technology for nucleic acid-based detection is an enabling mode for making miniaturized to micro- and nanometer scale bio-monitoring devices via the fusion of modern micro- and nanofabrication technology and molecular biotechnology. The electrical biosensors that rely on the conversion of the Watson-Crick base-pair recognition event into a useful electrical signal are advancing rapidly, and recently are receiving much attention as a valuable tool for microbial pathogen detection. Pathogens may pose a serious threat to humans, animal and plants, thus their detection and analysis is a significant element of public health. Although different conventional methods for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins exist and are currently being applied, improvements of molecular-based detection methodologies have changed these traditional detection techniques and introduced a new era of rapid, miniaturized and automated electrical chip detection technologies into pathogen identification sector. In this review some developments and current directions in

  1. The Protein and Nucleic Acid (PAN) Facility at Stanford University

    OpenAIRE

    Eckart, M.; Kosovilka, N.; Sanchez, A; Tran, Y; Walker, P; Winant, R.; Zuo, E.; Patel, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Protein and Nucleic Acid (PAN) Facility (http://pan.stanford.edu) at Stanford University's Beckman Center is a multifaceted biotechnology fee-for-service laboratory providing services to the Stanford scientific community, other non-profit and biopharmaceutical organizations. The Facility's mission is to be adaptable and responsive to the changing needs of biomedical research by providing basic science investigators continued access to key tools and applications in an efficient and cost ef...

  2. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  3. Nucleic Acid-Based Approaches for Detection of Viral Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    BEHZADI, Payam; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determining suitable nucleic acid diagnostics for individual viral hepatitis agent, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized, and summarized in different sections. Results: Various types of molecular biology tools can be used to detect and quantify viral genomic elements and analyze the sequences. These molecular assays are proper technologies for rapidly detecting viral agents with high accuracy, high sensit...

  4. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  5. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.; Jørgensen, M.; Larsson, C.; Buchardt, O.; Stanly, C.J.; Norden, B.; Nielsen, P.E.; Ørum, H.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  6. ANTISENSE SUPPRESSION OF A BETA-GALACTOSIDASE GENE (TBG6) IN TRANSGENIC TOMATO FRUIT INCREASES FRUIT CRACKING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antisense suppression of a tomato beta-galactosidase gene (TBG6) was used to study its role in fruit development, cell wall modification, and fruit firmness. TBG6 mRNA is highly abundant during the early stages of fruit development, but the levels decline sharply after the breaker stage and the star...

  7. Effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Song; LIN Haiyan; QI Jianguo; WANG Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation. Full-length cenpb cDNA was subcloned into pBI-EGFP eukaryotic expression vector in both sense and antisense orientation. HeLa-Tet-Off cells were transfected with sense or antisense cenpb vectors. Sense transfection of HeLa-Tet-Off cells resulted in the formation of a large centromere/kinetochore complex, and apoptosis of cells following several times of cell division. A stable antisense cenpb transfected cell line, named HACPB, was obtained. The centromere/kinetochore complex of HACPB cells became smaller than control HeLa-Tet-Off cells and scattered, and the expression of CENP-B was down-regulated. In addition, delayed cell cycle progression, inhibited malignant phenotype, restrained ability of tumor formation in nude mice, and delayed entry from G2/M phase into next G1 phase were observed in HACPB cells. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors (CKIs) were modulated during different phases of the cell cycle. CENP-B is an essential protein for the maintenance of the structure and function of centromere/kinetochore complex, and plays important roles in cell cycle regulation.

  8. Evaluation of Morpholino Antisense Oligos’ Role on BCR-ABL Gene Silencing in the K562 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Delalat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML develops when a hematopoietic stem cellacquires the BCR/ABL fusion gene. This causes these transformed hematopoietic cellsto have a greater than normal proliferation rate. Scientists attempt to improve the CMLtreatment process by silencing the BCR/ABL oncogene. In this work, we used morpholinoantisense oligos to silence the BCR/ABL oncogene.Materials and Methods: In this study, the K562 was used as a BCR/ABL fusion-genepositive cell line and the Jurkat cell line as a control. We explored the inhibiting capacityof morpholino antisense oligos in the the expression of the BCR/ABL oncogene andstudied their p210 BCR/ABL suppression, inhibition of cell proliferation and stimulation ofapoptosis in the K562 cells after 24 and 48 hours. Endo-Porter was used for delivery ofmorpholino antisense oligos into cell cytosols. Meanwhile, flow cytometric analysis wasperformed in order to determine the appropriate concentration of morpholino antisenseoligos.Results: Prolonged exposure of the K562 cell line to the morpholino antisense oligostargeted against the BCR-ABL gene showed proliferation inhibition as its main feature.After western blotting, we found that complete silencing of BCR/ABL was achieved, butflow cytometric analysis showed no broad apoptosis.Conclusion: The results indicate that the Morpholino antisense oligo is able to inhibitp210 BCR/ABL; however, it cannot induce broad apoptosis due to co-silencing of BCR.

  9. Growth inhibiting effects of antisense eukaryotic expression vector of proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene on human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童强松; 曾甫清; 林晨; 赵军; 鲁功成

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the growth inhibiting effects on human bladder cancer by antisense RNA targeting the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector for antisense PCNA cDNA was constructed and transferred into a bladder cancer EJ cell line. The PCNA expression in the cancer cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting assays. The in vitro proliferation activities of the transferred cells were observed by growth curve, tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry, tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR)incorporation, flow cytometry and clone formation testing, while its in vivo anti-tumor effects were detected on nude mice allograft models.Results After the antisense vector, pLAPSN, was transferred, cellular PCNA expression was inhibited at both protein and mRNA levels. The growth rates of EJ cells were reduced from 27.91% to 62.07% (P<0.01), with an inhibition of DNA synthesis rate by 52.31% (P<0.01). Transferred cells were blocked at G0/G1 phases in cell-cycle assay, with the clone formation ability decreased by 50.81% (P<0.01). The in vivo carcinogenic abilities of the transferred cancer cells were decreased by 54.23% (P<0.05). Conclusions Antisense PCNA gene transfer could inhibit the growth of bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which provided an ideal strategy for gene therapy of human cancers.

  10. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  11. BC047440 antisense eukaryotic expression vectors inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation and suppressed xenograft tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological functions of the BC047440 gene highly expressed by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are unknown. The objective of this study was to reconstruct antisense eukaryotic expression vectors of the gene for inhibiting HepG2 cell proliferation and suppressing their xenograft tumorigenicity. The full-length BC047440 cDNA was cloned from human primary HCC by RT-PCR. BC047440 gene fragments were ligated with pMD18-T simple vectors and subsequent pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids to construct the recombinant antisense eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1(+)BC047440AS. The endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance in target gene-transfected, vector-transfected and naive HepG2 cells was semiquantitatively analyzed by RT-PCR and cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were profiled by flow cytometry. The in vivo xenograft experiment was performed on nude mice to examine the effects of antisense vector on tumorigenicity. BC047440 cDNA fragments were reversely inserted into pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids. The antisense vector significantly reduced the endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance by 41% in HepG2 cells and inhibited their proliferation in vitro (P < 0.01). More cells were arrested by the antisense vector at the G1 phase in an apoptosis-independent manner (P = 0.014). Additionally, transfection with pcDNA3.1(+) BC047440AS significantly reduced the xenograft tumorigenicity in nude mice. As a novel cell cycle regulator associated with HCC, the BC047440 gene was involved in cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumorigenicity in vivo through apoptosis-independent mechanisms

  12. Effects of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide to Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor on the Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Cells Derived from Human Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; MA Ding; ZHU Changhong

    2007-01-01

    The human ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (hOMC) cells were co-cultured with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (antisense ODN), nonsense ODN, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) at different concentrations for the purpose of observing the effects of antisense ODN to FSH receptor (FSHR) on the proliferation and apoptosis of cultured hOMC cells in vitro. The inhibitory rates of growth were measured by using MTT method on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th days after the interference of antisense ODN, nonsense ODN, and FSH, respectively. The apoptotic rates and the cell cycles were determined by means of flow cytometry, the apoptosis indexes were detected by using TUNEL, and the expression of caspase-3 was measured by using SP immunohistochemistry. Compared with that in the control group, the proliferative activity of hOMC cells was increased obviously in FSH groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01), decreased distinctly in antisense ODN groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and unchanged in nonsense ODN groups, respectively. Meanwhile, antisense ODN could significantly antagonize the FSH-promoted cell proliferative activity (P<0.01). Compared with those in the control group, the apoptotic rates and the expression of caspase-3 were dramatically increased in the mid- and high-dose antisense ODN groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01), while the number of cells in G1/G0 phase was significantly decreased and that in S phase distinctly increased (P<0.01). There was no change in nonsense ODN groups (P>0.05). It was suggested that FSH may improve the development of hOMC cells. However, antisense ODN could inhibit proliferative activity and the FSH-promoted proliferative activity in hOMC cells, at the same time, antisense ODN could inhibit hOMC cell growth by inducing apoptosis.

  13. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts

  14. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  15. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcia, Marco, E-mail: marco.marcia@yale.edu; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pyle, Anna Marie, E-mail: marco.marcia@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  16. Effect of cisplatin and c-myb antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides combination on a human colon carcinoma cell line in vitro and in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Del Bufalo, D; Cucco, C.; C. Leonetti; Citro, G.; D'Agnano, I; M. Benassi; Geiser, T; Zon, G; Calabretta, B; Zupi, G.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of c-myb antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides [(S)ODNs] and cisplatin (CDDP) combination on the human colon carcinoma cell line LoVo Dx both in vitro and in nude mice bearing LoVo Dx solid tumour. We show that antisense (S)ODN treatment decreases c-myb mRNA and protein expression, induces growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and inhibits cell proliferation. In vivo treatment with c-myb antisense (S)ODNs results in a reduction in tumour growth...

  17. Os DNA sintéticos anti-sentido Antisense Synthtetic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Cravador

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available One old dream of the chemist in the field of the drug research is to create molecules capable of reaching their target with the precision of a missile. To accomplish it these molecules must have the propriety of distinguishing qualitative differences between healthy and diseased cells. A therapy based on this principle, able of eradicating specifically defective cells, or cells affected by a pathogen has an enormous advantage with the regard to the classical approach in which the cytotoxic drugs merely exploit quantitative biochemical and kinetic differences between abnormal and normal cells. We present in this article a review on the chemical synthesis of analogues of desoxyribonucleotides and on results obtained on the specific and irreversible inhibition of undesired genetic expression using the antisense principle.

  18. Inhibition of Telomerase Activity of Lymphoblastic Leukemic Cells by hTERT Antisense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYuan; LIWenyu

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of antisense, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA oligodeoxynucleotide on telomerase activity of lymphoblastic leukemic cells. Methods: Telomerase activity was measured by the telomerase PCR ELISA assay kit (TRAP), hTERT protein by immunochemistry and flowcytometry, hTERT mRNA expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and gel-image system. Results: Incubation of lymphoblastic leukemic cells (Jurkat, Raji and CEM cell lines) with 10 μmol/L AS PS-ODN could significantly decline the mRNA and hTERT after 72 h, and the telomerase activity was significantly down-regulated or inhibited. Conclusion: The hTERT AS PS-ODN was an excellent inhibitor for telomerase activity of lymphoblastic leukemic cells.

  19. A cytoplasmic pathway for gapmer antisense oligonucleotide-mediated gene silencing in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Lin, Min; Kowolik, Claudia; Wang, LiAnn; Ren, Xiao-Qin; Soifer, Harris S.; Koch, Troels; Hansen, Bo Rode; Oerum, Henrik; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Zhigang; Bauer, Paul; Rossi, John; Stein, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are known to trigger mRNA degradation in the nucleus via an RNase H-dependent mechanism. We have now identified a putative cytoplasmic mechanism through which ASO gapmers silence their targets when transfected or delivered gymnotically (i.e. in the absence of any transfection reagent). We have shown that the ASO gapmers can interact with the Ago-2 PAZ domain and can localize into GW-182 mRNA-degradation bodies (GW-bodies). The degradation products of the targeted mRNA, however, are not generated by Ago-2-directed cleavage. The apparent identification of a cytoplasmic pathway complements the previously known nuclear activity of ASOs and concurrently suggests that nuclear localization is not an absolute requirement for gene silencing. PMID:26433227

  20. Characteristics of photosynthesis in rice plants transformed with an antisense Rubisco activase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金松恒; 蒋德安; 李雪芹; 孙骏威

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic rice plants with an antisense gene inserted via Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used to explore the impact of the reduction of Rubisco activase (RCA) on Rubisco and photosynthesis. In this study, transformants containing 15% to 35% wild type Rubisco activase were selected, which could survive in ambient CO2 concentration but grew slowly compared with wild type controls. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the rate of photosynthesis decreased sig-nificantly, while stomatal conductance and transpiration rate did not change; and that the intercellular CO2 concentration even increased. Rubisco determination showed that these plants had approximately twice as much Rubisco as the wild types,although they showed 70% lower rate of photosynthesis, whichRubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.was likely an acclimation response to the reduction in Rubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.