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Sample records for antisense impair inhibitory

  1. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  2. STUDY ON THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ANTISENSE ETAR OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES ON THE PROLIFERATION OF VASCULAR SMOOTH CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚; 张柏根; 张纪蔚; 钱济先; 张皓; 黄晓钟

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effect of antisense endothelin receptor A (ETAR) on the proliferation of the vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods The sense, antisense and mismatched ODNs for ETAR were designed and synthetized. The study was carried out using MTT method and binding assays.Results ETAR-ODNs could move successfully across VSMC membranes. Photo-absorption in the MTT test was reduced significantly (P<0.05) in the antisense group at 5μmol/L; the reduction of CPM also occurred in the 125I-ET-1 specific binding assay; and the sense and mismatched ODNs groups did not show this reduction. Conclusion Our study suggested that the antisense oligomers inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs by hindering the translation of target mRNA and by reducing the production of related protein.

  3. Inhibitory effects of PIN1 antisense gene on the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inhibitory effects of PIN1 antisense gene on the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells. Methods: Different doses of antisense PIN1 gene (0,20,50,100,200,250μl) were transfected into osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. The cells and the culture supernatants before and after transfection were collected. The cell growth curve was made using MTT method. The cell growth cycle and apoptosis were detected by FCM. The expression of PIN1 was detected by Western blot. The expression of PIN1 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: MTT and FCM assays indicated that the transfection of antisense PIN1 gene could inhibit proliferation of MG-63 cells and lead to cell apoptosis. Western-blot assays revealed the MG-63 cells transfected with antisense PIN1 gene had weaker expression than those without transfection with antisense PIN1 gene, and the band intensity was negatively related with doses. The cells transfected with different doses of gene (0,20,50,100,200,250 μl) had different absorbance rate(0.854 ± 0.136,0. 866 ± 0. 138,0. 732 ± 0. 154, 0. 611 ± 0. 121,0. 547 ± 0. 109,0. 398 ± 0. 113,0. 320 ± 0. 151 ), with significant difference assessed by F and q test ( P < 0.05). The absorbance rate of PINI mRNA was 0. 983 ± 0.125,0.988 ± 0.127, 0.915 ± 0.157,0.786 ± 0.125,0.608 ± 0.124,0.433 ± 0.130,0.410 ± 0. 158 respectively ( P < 0.05). Conclusion: The expression of PINlmRNA in MG-63 cells could be inhibited by antisense PIN1 gene, and then the expression of PIN1 was reduced and depressed, and so the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells MG-63 was inhibited.

  4. Impaired inhibitory control in recreational cocaine users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed.

  5. Inhibitory effect of human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of gastric cancer cell lines in variant tumor pathological subtype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ye; Yun-Lin Wu; Shu Zhang; Zi Chen; Li-Xia Guo; Ruo-Yu Zhou; Hong Xie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides on the growth of well (MKN-28), moderately (SGC-7901)and poorly (MKN-45) differentiated gastric cancer cell lines under specific conditions and its inhibition mechanism,and to observe the correlation between the growth inhibition ratio and the tumor pathologic subtype of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: Telomerase activity in three gastric cancer cell lines of variant tumor pathologic subtype was determined by modified TRAP assay before and after the specialized human telomerase antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides were dealt with under specific conditions. Effect of antisense oligomer under specific conditions of the growth and viability of gastric cancer cell lines was explored by using trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and cell apoptosis was detected by cell morphology observation, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Telomerase activity was detected in well,moderately and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell lines (the quantification expression of telomerase activity was 43.7TPG, 56.5TPG, 76.7TPG, respectively).Telomerase activity was controlled to 30.2TPG, 36.3TPG and 35.2TPG for MKN-28, SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cell lines respectively after treatment with human telomerase antisense oligomers at the concentration of 5 μmol/L, and was entirely inhibited at 10 μmol/L, against the template region of telomerase RNA component, whereas no inhibition effect was detected in missense oligomers (P<0.05). After treatment with antisense oligomers at different concentrations under specific conditions for 96 h, significant growth inhibition effects were found in MKN-45 and SGC-7901gastric cancer cell lines (the inhibition ratio was 40.89%and 71.28%), but not in MKN-28 cell lines (15.86%). The ratio of inactive SGC-7901 cells increased according to the prolongation of treatment from 48 to 96 h. Missense oligomers could not lead to the same effect (P<0

  6. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  7. Inhibitory effect of antisense vascular endothelial growth factor 165 eukaryotic expression vector on proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Gu; Chang-Jian Liu; Tong Qiao; Xue-Mei Sun; Lei-Lei Chen; Le Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct antisense VEGF165 eukaryotic expression vector PCDNA3-as-VEGF165 and to study its expression and effect on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells.METHODS: VEGF165 cDNA was inserted into polylinker sites of eukaryotic expression vector PCDNA3 to construct PCDNA3-as-VEGF165. Then the vector was transferred into human hepatocarcinoma cell strain SMMC-7721 with cation lipofectamine 2000 mediated methods to evaluate the expression of VEGF protein and the inhibitory effect on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells.RESULTS: The detection indicated the presence of VEGF cDNA in normally cultured SMMC-7721 cells by PCR. VEGF mRNA expression was notably decreased in SMMC-7721 cells by RT-PCR after PCDNA3-as-VEGF165 transfection. The expression of VEGF protein was dramatically inhibited (142.01±7.95 vs 1 625.52±64.46 pg·ml-1, P<0.01) 2 days after transfection,which correlated with the dose of PCDNA3-as-VEGF165 gene.VEGF protein was most expressed in PCDNA3 transferred SMMC-7721 cells but few in PCDNA3-as-VEGF165 transferred cells by immunohistochemical staining. The apoptotic rate of hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells was significantly promoted (17.98±0.86% vs4.86±0.27%, P<0.01) and the survival rate was notably decreased (80.99±3.20% vs 93.52±3.93%, P<0.05) due to antisense VEGF165 by flow cytometry (FCM). The transfection of antisense VEGF165 gene resulted in the inhibitory effect on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the death of all hepatocarcinoma cells on day 6 after transfection.CONCLUSION: It is confirmed that antisense VEGF165 can inhibit the expression of VEGF protein, interfere with the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells in our study. Antisense VEGF165 gene therapy may play an important role in the treatment of human hepatocarcinoma.

  8. Inhibitory effects of antisense RNA of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Peng Shang; Ai-Rong Qian; Li Wang; Yong Yang; Zhi-Nan Chen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effects of antisense RNA of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro.METHODS: Antisense RNA of HAb18G/CD147 vector PCIasHAb18G was constructed by reversely inserting HAb18G/CD147 cDNA to eukaryotic expression vector PCI-neo. The HCC cell line HHCC was transfected by PCI-asHAb18G via cation liposome. Expression of HAb18G/CD147 of transfected cells selected by G418 (geneticin) was observed by immunohistochemical SP staining and FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting). Gelatin zymography was used to determine the effect of PCI-asHAb18G on reducing secretions of MMP2 and MMP-9 of the transfected cells. Boyden chamber was employed to test the invasion of HCC cells in vitro.RESULTS: The construction of antisense RNA vector PCIasHAb18G was verified correct by partial nucleotide sequencing and restricted endonuclease digestion. The expression of HAb18G/CD147 in transfected HHCC was inhibited by PCI-asHAb18G. Secretions of MMP-2 and MMP9 of transfected HHCC were reduced and the invasion of transfected HHCC was inhibited compared to HHCC,respectively.CONCLUSION: Invasion of HCC cells can be inhibited by antisense RNA of HAb18G/CD147. HAb18G/CD147 may be used as a potential target of drugs for anti-invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  9. The Inhibitory Effects of an Antisense u-PAR Vector on Invasion of Highly Invasive Human Prostate Carcinoma PC-3M Cell Subclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖国宁; 李清芬; 冯友梅; 邓耀祖; 李卓娅; 龚非力; 马丁

    2003-01-01

    Summary: To observe the inhibitory effects of an antisense u-PAR vector on invasion of highly inva-sive PC-3M cell subclones, the effects of the antisense u-PAR on activity of MMP-9 in those highlyinvasive cell subclones were detected by a quantitative RT-PCR and zymography. The monolayer in-vasion assay and colony formation assay in soft agar were used. And tumorigenesis rate and invasionsby the cell subclones with or without the antisense u-PAR were observed in nude mice. It was foundthat in vitro growth of highly invasive PC-3M cell subclones transfected with the antisense u-PARwas declined, and the ability of anchorage-independent growth of those cell subclones was found de-creased sharply, with the inhibiting rate becoming 79 % and 60 %, respectively. Although the anti-sense u-PAR didn't change MMP-9 gene transcription, they could inhibit the activation of MMP-9 ofhighly invasive PC-3M cell subclones. Moreover, the tumorigenesis rate of the cell subclones with theantisense u-PAR decreased and the growth of a neoplasm also slowed down. Thet tests showed thedifference between experimental and control groups was statistically significant (P<0. 01). The anti-sense u-PAR vector could not only inhibit the invasion ability of highly invasive PC-3M cell subclonesin vitro but also restrain the growth of those cell subclones in vivo.

  10. Inhibitory effect of 2 '-o-methoxyethyl-modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A on SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yi-bing; WEN Ze-qing; ZHAO Xing-bo; YAN Lei; ZHANG Chun-hua; WANG Fei

    2011-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancers are often at an advanced stage at diagnosis because early detection is difficult. The poor prognosis of ovarian cancers highlights the crucial need to develop better therapeutic agents and strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of a new modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.Methods Antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A was designed, synthesized and transfected into SKOV3ovarian cancer cells. Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR were used to analyze the inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotides on VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression. Transwell matrix assay was used to detect cell migration inhibition.Results The antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A significantly decreased VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression and inhibited cell migration in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.Conclusions This new modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting VEGF-A can decrease VEGF-A expression and inhibit cell migration in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. This new oligonucleotides may be a promising therapeutic agent for ovarian cancers.

  11. Inhibitory effects of intrathecal p38β antisense oligonucleotide on bone cancer pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hang; Xiang, Hong-Bing; Ye, Da-Wei; Tian, Xue-Bi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of intrathecal administration p38β antisense oligonucleotide on the development of bone cancer pain rats. Forty female SD rats weighing 180~220 g were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10 each): Group A (control group): intra-tibial injection of 3 μl Hank's solution; group B (model group): intra-tibial injection of 3 μl MADB-106 mammary gland carcinoma cells of rats (4.8 × 10(3)/μl); group C (p38β-SODN 20 μg); group D (p38β-ASODN 20 μg). The model procedures in group C and D were same to those in the group B. From the 14th day after operation, p38β-SODN 20 μg and p38β-ASODN 20 μg were respectively intrathecally administrated in group C and D once daily for 6 days whereas normal saline was for group A and B. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and radiant heat threshold of rat hind paws were measured before operation and every other day until 22 d of post-operation. The lumbar 4-6 spinal cord was removed on the 22(nd) day. The expression of spinal p38β protein was determined by Western blot. No significant differences in mechanical withdrawal threshold and radiant heat threshold were found at all time points in control group. During the first 6 days after operation there were obvious differences in radiant heat stimulus between control group between the other groups (P 0.05). The expression of p38β protein in lumbar spinal cord was significantly higher between p38β-SODN group and Model group than that in control group (P 0.05). Hyperalgesia induced by bone cancer can be inhibited by intrathecal administration of p38β antisense oligonucleotide, which is achieved by reducing expression of p38β protein.

  12. Inhibitory effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to p44/p42 MAPK on angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic response in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-qinZHANG; BoDING; Zhao-guiGUO; Yun-xiaLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibitory effect of antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) to mitogen activated protein kinase(MAPK) on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ). METHODS: A 17-mer phosphorothioate-protected antisense ODN directed against the initiation of translation sites of the p42 and p44 MAPK isoforms byliposomal transfection was applied to inhibit the translation of p44/p42 MAPK mRNA. The sense and random ODNs to p44/p42MAPK were used as sequence controls. Neonatal cardiac myocytes were exposed to Ang Ⅱ (10nmol/L) for 5 min and then harvested in lysis buffer for the measurement of the activity and the phosphorylated protein content of p44/p42MAPK that were tested by P-81 phosphocellulose filter paper method and Western blotting, respectively. The rate of protein synthesis by [3H]leucine incorporation and the diameter of cell were measured after exposure to Ang Ⅱ for 24 h and 72 h, respectively. RESULTS: In cardiac myocyte Ang Ⅱ increased p44/p42MAPK activity and phosphorylated protein content by 140 % and 699 %, and also increased [3H]leucine incorporation and cell diameter by 40 % and 27 %. c-fos and c-myc mRNAs were induced significantly after exposure to Ang Ⅱ. Antisense ODN to p44/p42MAPK (0.2 μmol/L) reduced Ang Ⅱ-induced MAPK activity by 30 %,and phophorylated MAPK protein expression by 59 % in cardiac myocyte, and inhibited c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression induced by Ang Ⅱ by 44 % and 43 %, respectively. The diameter and the rate of protein synthesis of cardiac myocyte induced by Ang Ⅱ were decreased by 16 % and 22 % after pretreatment with antisense ODN to p44/p42MAPK. CONCLUSION: Antisense ODN to p44/p42 MAPK inhibited the increase of rate of protein synthesis,and the augmentation of cell diameter and expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNA induced by Ang Ⅱ in culturedcardiac myocytes, p44/p42 MAPK played a critical role in the hypertrophic response induced by Ang Ⅱ in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.

  13. Alcohol cues impair learning inhibitory signals in beer drinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laude, Jennifer R.; Fillmore, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Models of drug addiction emphasize the reciprocal influence of incentive-motivational properties of drug-related cues and poor impulse control resulting in drug use. Recent studies have shown that alcohol-related cues can impair response inhibition. What is unknown is whether these cues also disrupt learning of inhibitory associations. Methods Participants performed a Conditioned Inhibition (CI) task and were required to learn that a neutral image was a conditioned inhibitor when presented in the context of either an alcohol image intended to draw their attention away from the to-be-trained inhibitor, or a control condition in which the alcohol image was absent. After training, subjects in each condition rated the likelihood that the neutral image would signal the outcome. Eye tracking was used to verify that attention to the neutral image was in fact reduced when the alcohol image was present. Results Compared with controls those trained in the alcohol image condition reported a greater likelihood that the presence of the inhibitor would be followed by the outcome and thus were less able to acquire CI. Measures of eye-tracking verified that attention to the alcohol cue was associated with this maladaptive behavior. Conclusions When alcohol cues are present, there is a reduced ability to learn that such information is irrelevant to an outcome, and this impairs ones’ ability to inhibit perseveration of a response. This has implications for persistence of a drinking episode. PMID:25872597

  14. Inhibitory effects of antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides on pancreatic cancer cell Bxpc-3 telomerase activity and cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Feng Wang; Ke-Jian Guo; Bei-Ting Huang; Yong Liu; Xiao-Yun Tang; Jian-Jun Zhang; Qiang Xia

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of telomerase hTERT gene antisense oligonucleotide (hTERT-ASO) on proliferation and telomerase activity of pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc-3.METHODS: MTT assay was used to detect the effect of different doses of hTERT-ASO on proliferation of Bxpc-3 cell for different times. To study the anti-tumor activity,the cells were divided into there groups: Control group (pancreatic cancer cell Bxpc-3); antisense oligonucleotide (hTERT-ASO) group; and nosense oligonucleotide group decorated with phosphorothioate. Telomerase activity was detected using TRAP-PCR-ELISA. Cell DNA distribution was examined using flow cytometry assay.Cell apoptosis was observed by transmission electron microscope in each group.RESULTS: After treatment with 6 mmol/L hTERTASO, cell proliferation was inhibited in dose- and timedependent manner. The telomerase activity decreased after treatment with hTERT-ASO for 72 h. Flow cytometry showed the cell number of G0/G1 phase increased from 2.7% to 14.7%, the cell number of S phase decreased from 72.7% to 51.0%, and a sub-G1 stage cell apoptosis peak appeared in front of G1 stage.CONCLUSION: Telomerase antisense oligodeoxynucleotide can inhibit the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc-3 and decrease the telomerase activity and increase cell apoptosis rate in vitro.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Anti-sense PTTG on Malignant Phenotype of Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Line SK-OV-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈刚; 李静; 李辅军; 李箫; 周剑锋; 卢运萍; 马丁

    2004-01-01

    To construct eukaryotic expression vector expressing full length anti-sense pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) mRNA and observe its blocking effect on the potential invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3. PCR primers containing designed enzyme cut sites were used for cloning full-length PTTG gene fragment, and the resulting PCR product was inserted into the eukaryotic vector pcDNA3. 1 in the antisense direction. The recombinant vector was then transfected into SK-OV-3 by Lipofectamine. The positive cell clone was screened by G418, PTTG and bFGF at protein level expression were detected by Western blot. The biological behavior change of transfection positive cells was observed by colony formation in soft agar assay. Our results showed that SK-OV-3 clones stably expressing full-length recombinant pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas were obtained. The expressions of PTTG and bFGF protein in transfected cells were decreased by 61.5 % and 52.3%, respectively as compared with non-transfected ones. The number of colony formation was reduced significantly in transfected cells as compared with empty vector transfected and non-transfected cells. It is concluded that the recombinant vector pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas is a novel tool and provides an alternative anti-sense gene therapy targeted at PTTG in human carcinoma.

  16. Sex Differences in How Erotic and Painful Stimuli Impair Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Hung, Daisy L.; Tseng, Philip; Tzeng, Ovid J. L.; Muggleton, Neil G.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Witnessing emotional events such as arousal or pain may impair ongoing cognitive processes such as inhibitory control. We found that this may be true only half of the time. Erotic images and painful video clips were shown to men and women shortly before a stop signal task, which measures cognitive inhibitory control. These stimuli impaired…

  17. Sex Differences in How Erotic and Painful Stimuli Impair Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Hung, Daisy L.; Tseng, Philip; Tzeng, Ovid J. L.; Muggleton, Neil G.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Witnessing emotional events such as arousal or pain may impair ongoing cognitive processes such as inhibitory control. We found that this may be true only half of the time. Erotic images and painful video clips were shown to men and women shortly before a stop signal task, which measures cognitive inhibitory control. These stimuli impaired…

  18. Inhibitory effect of antisense vascular endothelial growth factor RNA on the profile of hepatocellular carcinoma cell line in vitro and in vivo

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    Ji-Hui Hao; Ming Yu; Hui-Kai Li; Yu-Rong Shi; Qiang Li; Xi-Shan Hao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) RNA (PCMV-FGEV)transfection on the profile of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) SMMC-7721 cells in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: SMMC-7721 cells were transfected with PCMV-FGEV antisense, PCMV-VEGF sense and empty vector plasmid encapsulated by lipofectamine as antisense group, sense group and control group respectively. The positive cell clones were selected with G418. The stable transfection and expression of VEGF in the cells were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell proliferation was observed by MTT assay. FACS analysis was used to determine the effect of PCMV-FGEV transfection on cell apoptosis. The growth of transfected cells in vivo was also observed in nude mice.RESULTS: VEGFexpression was reduced in SMMC-7721transfected with PCMV-FGEV, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. No effect of PCMVFGEV transfection was found on cell proliferation and cell apoptosis of SMMC-7721 in vitro. The growth of cells transfected with PCMV-FGEV was slow in nude mice and accompanied with obvious apoptosis. The latent time of tumors in the antisense group was 25.0± 1.8d, which was longer than that in sense and control groups (F=19.455, P<0.01). The average tumor weight in antisense group (0.96g±0.28 g) was the smallest among the three groups (F=21.501, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: The expression of VEGF can be inhibited by antisense PCMV-FGEV. Antisense PCMV-FGEV has no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis of SMMC-7721in vitro but can inhibit tumor growth and induce cell apoptosis in vivo.

  19. Conjugated agent insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN enhances the inhibitory effect on proliferation of rat aortic artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM:Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration from the arterial wall media into the intima are believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of restenosis. Several studies have demonstrated that phosphothioate (PS) oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against genes involved in SMC proliferation inhibits in vitro SMC proliferation and migration. However, the therapeutic effect of antisense ODN on the individual who receives the treatment of delivery of the agent depends on the efficacy of this agent in great degree. We investigated the inhibition effect of a novel agent, insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN on SMC proliferation in vitro. METHODS:The rat aortic artery SMCs were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagel's medium. The passage 8 to 13 were used as the experiment. Cell surface receptor binding assay was quantified through counting gamma particles emitted from 125    I labeled insulin. SMC rapid proliferation was brought by stimulation of high concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The novel agent of insulin conjugated to the antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN was obtained via incubation of both in condition of certain reagents, pH, temperature, and ion concentration. The characterization and purification of the agent was performed through HPLC. Inhibition of SMC proliferation was reflected by incorporation rate of trillium labeled thymidine deoxyribonucleotide.RESULTS:The binding efficacy of insulin to the receptor was remarkably increased in SMC cultured in supplement of 20% FBS. The inhibition effect of conjugator insulin-c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN was stronger than that of the simple c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN. The inhibition rate of conjugator and simple form on SMC proliferation were 48.34% and 29.54%, respectively. CONCLUSION:The binding efficacy and specificity of c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN to SMC may be enhanced by the insulin receptor mediation through the insulin-insulin receptor interaction. The insulin-receptor targeted method may be a

  20. An intranasal selective antisense oligonucleotide impairs lung cyclooxygenase-2 production and improves inflammation, but worsens airway function, in house dust mite sensitive mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujols Laura

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its reported pro-inflammatory activity, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 has been proposed to play a protective role in asthma. Accordingly, COX-2 might be down-regulated in the airway cells of asthmatics. This, together with results of experiments to assess the impact of COX-2 blockade in ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized mice in vivo, led us to propose a novel experimental approach using house dust mite (HDM-sensitized mice in which we mimicked altered regulation of COX-2. Methods Allergic inflammation was induced in BALBc mice by intranasal exposure to HDM for 10 consecutive days. This model reproduces spontaneous exposure to aeroallergens by asthmatic patients. In order to impair, but not fully block, COX-2 production in the airways, some of the animals received an intranasal antisense oligonucleotide. Lung COX-2 expression and activity were measured along with bronchovascular inflammation, airway reactivity, and prostaglandin production. Results We observed impaired COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in the lung tissue of selective oligonucleotide-treated sensitized mice. This was accompanied by diminished production of mPGE synthase and PGE2 in the airways. In sensitized mice, the oligonucleotide induced increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine, but a substantially reduced bronchovascular inflammation. Finally, mRNA levels of hPGD synthase remained unchanged. Conclusion Intranasal antisense therapy against COX-2 in vivo mimicked the reported impairment of COX-2 regulation in the airway cells of asthmatic patients. This strategy revealed an unexpected novel dual effect: inflammation was improved but AHR worsened. This approach will provide insights into the differential regulation of inflammation and lung function in asthma, and will help identify pharmacological targets within the COX-2/PG system.

  1. Alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control is linked to attenuated brain responses in right fronto-temporal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Gabriela; Guevara, Alvaro; Marxen, Michael; Neumann, Maike; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kobiella, Andrea; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Schwarz, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Smolka, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background A self-enhancing loop between impaired inhibitory control under alcohol and alcohol consumption has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying dysfunctional drinking in susceptible people. However, the neural underpinnings of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control are widely unknown. Methods We measured inhibitory control in fifty young adults with a stop-signal task (SST) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a single-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, all participants performed the SST once under alcohol with a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 0.6 g/kg, and once under placebo. In addition, alcohol consumption was assessed using a free-access alcohol self-administration (ASA) paradigm in the same participants. Results Inhibitory control was robustly decreased under alcohol compared to placebo indicated by longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRTs). On the neural level, impaired inhibitory control under alcohol was associated with attenuated brain responses in the right fronto-temporal portion of the inhibition network that supports the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals, and subsequent updating of action plans from response execution to inhibition. Furthermore, the extent of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control predicted free-access alcohol consumption. Conclusion We suggest that during inhibitory control alcohol affects cognitive processes preceding actual motor inhibition. Under alcohol, decreased brain responses in right fronto-temporal areas might slow down the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans which leads to impaired inhibitory control. In turn, pronounced alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control may enhance alcohol consumption in young adults which might promote future alcohol problems. PMID:24560581

  2. Alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control is linked to attenuated brain responses in right fronto-temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Gabriela; Guevara, Alvaro; Marxen, Michael; Neumann, Maike; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kobiella, Andrea; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Schwarz, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-11-01

    A self-enhancing loop between impaired inhibitory control under alcohol and alcohol consumption has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying dysfunctional drinking in susceptible people. However, the neural underpinnings of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control are widely unknown. We measured inhibitory control in 50 young adults with a stop-signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In a single-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, all participants performed the stop-signal task once under alcohol with a breath alcohol concentration of .6 g/kg and once under placebo. In addition, alcohol consumption was assessed with a free-access alcohol self-administration paradigm in the same participants. Inhibitory control was robustly decreased under alcohol compared with placebo, indicated by longer stop-signal reaction times. On the neural level, impaired inhibitory control under alcohol was associated with attenuated brain responses in the right fronto-temporal portion of the inhibition network that supports the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans from response execution to inhibition. Furthermore, the extent of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control predicted free-access alcohol consumption. We suggest that during inhibitory control alcohol affects cognitive processes preceding actual motor inhibition. Under alcohol, decreased brain responses in right fronto-temporal areas might slow down the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans, which leads to impaired inhibitory control. In turn, pronounced alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control might enhance alcohol consumption in young adults, which might promote future alcohol problems. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-09-02

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  4. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

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    Jena B. Hales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP. However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF. In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion.

  5. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Jena B.; Ocampo, Amber C.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF). In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion. PMID:26380123

  6. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Farr, Susan A; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya B; Allan Butterfield, D

    2013-12-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model for investigating the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Event-Related Potential and Behavioral Study of Impaired Inhibitory Control in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Pan, Chien-Yu; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Hsieh, Kai-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by a deficit of dorsal visual stream processing as well as the impairment of inhibitory control capability. However, the cognitive processing mechanisms of executive dysfunction have not been addressed. In the present study, the endogenous Posner paradigm task was administered to 15 children with…

  8. General trigeminospinal central sensitization and impaired descending pain inhibitory controls contribute to migraine progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Nelly; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain; Monconduit, Lénaïc

    2014-07-01

    Migraine is a chronic disease with episodic manifestations. In a subgroup, attack frequency increases over time, leading to chronic migraine. One of the most important risk factors for migraine progression is frequency of headache attacks at baseline. Unfortunately, the actual effects of repeated activation of dural nociceptors are poorly known. We investigated the behavioral, anatomical, and electrophysiological changes induced by repeated low- and high-intensity stimulation of meningeal nociceptor by injecting an inflammatory soup in rats. Single high-intensity, but not low-intensity, stimulation produces a reversible cephalic allodynia. Upon repetition, however, low-intensity stimulation, too, induces a reversible cephalic allodynia, and high-intensity, reversible cephalic and extracephalic allodynia. Moreover, cephalic allodynia becomes, in part, persistent upon repeated high-intensity stimulation. Fos expression reveals that a single high-intensity stimulation already leads to widespread, trigeminal, and spinal central sensitization, and that such general central sensitization potentiates upon repetition. Trigeminovascular nociceptive neurons become persistently sensitized and their diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) concomitantly impaired. Thus, compared with single stimulation, repeated dural nociceptor activation specifically leads to: 1) a gradual worsening of cutaneous hypersensitivity and general neuronal hyperexcitability and 2) spreading of cutaneous hypersensitivity superimposed on 3) persistent cephalic cutaneous hypersensitivity and trigeminal central sensitization. Such repetition-induced development of central sensitization and its consequence, cutaneous allodynia, may arise from both the general neuronal hyperexcitability that results from DNIC impairment and hyperexcitability that likely develops in trigeminal nociceptive neurons in response to their repetitive activation. These neuronal changes may in turn elevate the risk for

  9. A deleterious Nav1.1 mutation selectively impairs telencephalic inhibitory neurons derived from Dravet Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yishan; Paşca, Sergiu P; Portmann, Thomas; Goold, Carleton; Worringer, Kathleen A; Guan, Wendy; Chan, Karen C; Gai, Hui; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Ying-Jiun J; Mao, Rong; Chan, Karrie; Rubenstein, John Lr; Madison, Daniel V; Hallmayer, Joachim; Froehlich-Santino, Wendy M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-07-26

    Dravet Syndrome is an intractable form of childhood epilepsy associated with deleterious mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding neuronal sodium channel Nav1.1. Earlier studies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have produced mixed results regarding the importance of Nav1.1 in human inhibitory versus excitatory neurons. We studied a Nav1.1 mutation (p.S1328P) identified in a pair of twins with Dravet Syndrome and generated iPSC-derived neurons from these patients. Characterization of the mutant channel revealed a decrease in current amplitude and hypersensitivity to steady-state inactivation. We then differentiated Dravet-Syndrome and control iPSCs into telencephalic excitatory neurons or medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like inhibitory neurons. Dravet inhibitory neurons showed deficits in sodium currents and action potential firing, which were rescued by a Nav1.1 transgene, whereas Dravet excitatory neurons were normal. Our study identifies biophysical impairments underlying a deleterious Nav1.1 mutation and supports the hypothesis that Dravet Syndrome arises from defective inhibitory neurons.

  10. Antisense oligonucleotides in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanotto, Daniela; Stein, Cy A

    2014-11-01

    Over the past several dozen years, regardless of the substantial effort directed toward developing rational oligonucleotide strategies to silence gene expression, antisense oligonucleotide-based cancer therapy has not been successful. This review focuses on the most likely reasons for this lack of success, and on the barriers that still need to be overcome to make a clinical cancer treatment reality out of the promise of antisense therapy. Considerable progress has been made in the design and delivery of nucleic acid fragments. Chemical modifications have considerably improved oligonucleotide absorption, distribution and metabolism while at the same time reducing toxicity. Nevertheless, the delivery and the cellular uptake of these molecules are still not adequate to provide the desired therapeutic outcome. Recent therapeutic interventional phase III trials of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides for a cancer indication will be discussed, in addition to those studies that markedly improve the scientific understanding of the properties of these molecules. We still do not have a marketed antisense oligonucleotide for a cancer indication. This is because critical aspects of the cellular, tumor pharmacology and delivery properties of these agents are still not well understood.

  11. Antisense-mediated knockdown of Na(V1.8, but not Na(V1.9, generates inhibitory effects on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Qing Yu

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R sodium channels Na(V1.8 and Na(V1.9 in sensory neurons were known as key pain modulators. Comparing with the widely reported Na(V1.8, roles of Na(V1.9 on inflammatory pain are poorly studied by antisense-induced specific gene knockdown. Here, we used molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods to examine the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN targeting Na(V1.8 and Na(V1.9 on inflammatory pain. Following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA inflammation treatment, Na(V1.8 and Na(V1.9 in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions and increased sodium current densities. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated that Na(V1.8 mainly localized in medium and small-sized DRG neurons, whereas Na(V1.9 only expressed in small-sized DRG neurons. Intrathecal (i.t. delivery of AS ODN was used to down-regulate Na(V1.8 or Na(V1.9 expressions confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Unexpectedly, behavioral tests showed that only Na(V1.8 AS ODN, but not Na(V1.9 AS ODN could reverse CFA-induced heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that TTX-R sodium channels Na(V1.8 and Na(V1.9 in primary sensory neurons played distinct roles in CFA-induced inflammatory pain and suggested that antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated blocking of key pain modulator might point toward a potential treatment strategy against certain types of inflammatory pain.

  12. Inhibitory effect ofThymus vulgaris extract on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Rabiei; Shiva Mokhtari; Samira Asgharzade; Mostafa Gholami; Samira Rahnama; Mahmoud Rafieian-kopaei

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect ofThymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) on learning and memory functions in scopolamine-induced memory deficit in rats. Memory enhancing activity in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats was investigated by assessing the Morris water maze and passive avoidance paradigm. Methods:A total of 42 male Wistar rats were divided into 6 equal groups as follow: control group: received water, scopolamine treated group: received scopolamine 1 mg/kg for 15 days, two scopolamine+T. vulgaris treated groups: received scopolamine andT. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days, two intact groups: receivedT. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days. Results: Administration ofT. vulgaris extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test. Conclusions:T. vulgaris extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extract on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rat简

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra; Rabiei; Shiva; Mokhtari; Samira; Asgharzade; Mostafa; Gholami; Samira; Rahnama; Mahmoud; Rafieian-kopaei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Thymus vulgaris(T. vulgaris) on learning and memory functions in scopolamine-induced memory deficit in rats. Memory enhancing activity in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats was investigated by assessing the Morris water maze and passive avoidance paradigm.Methods: A total of 42 male Wistar rats were divided into 6 equal groups as follow:control group: received water, scopolamine treated group: received scopolamine 1 mg/kg for 15 days, two scopolamine + T. vulgaris treated groups: received scopolamine and T. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days, two intact groups:received T. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days.Results: Administration of T. vulgaris extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test.Conclusions: T. vulgaris extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Increased training prevents the impairing effect of intra-amygdala infusion of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX on inhibitory avoidance expression

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    Roesler R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-amygdala infusion of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX prior to testing impairs inhibitory avoidance retention test performance. Increased training attenuates the impairing effects of amygdala lesions and intra-amygdala infusions of CNQX. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of additional training on the impairing effects of intra-amygdala CNQX on expression of the inhibitory avoidance task. Adult female Wistar rats bilaterally implanted with cannulae into the border between the central and the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala were submitted to a single session or to three training sessions (0.2 mA, 24-h interval between sessions in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. A retention test session was held 48 h after the last training. Ten minutes prior to the retention test session, the animals received a 0.5-µl infusion of CNQX (0.5 µg or its vehicle (25% dimethylsulfoxide in saline. The CNQX infusion impaired, but did not block, retention test performance in animals submitted to a single training session. Additional training prevented the impairing effect of CNQX. The results suggest that amygdaloid non-NMDA receptors may not be critical for memory expression in animals given increased training.

  15. Making Sense of Antisense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Yacyshyn

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the DNA double-stranded helix, the gene as a target of therapy and, moreover, the use of DNA as a drug have been possibilities. ‘Antisense’ is used by some living organisms, specifically viruses, to control gene replication. Only recently, the use of antisense DNA as a mechanism to control human gene translation has been appreciated. A recent report on the use of systemically administered oligonucleotides in human Crohn’s disease is reviewed. DNA antisense oligonucleotides offer a technology capable of unique use at the laboratory bench as well as for highly specific therapeutic drugs. The conceptualization and possible future directions of these exciting compounds are reviewed.

  16. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) Inhibition during Mid-Gestation Impairs Trophoblast Invasion and Spiral Artery Remodelling during Pregnancy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion into the endometrium are fundamental events in the initiation of placentation. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been shown to promote trophoblast invasion in vitro, however its precise role in trophoblast invasion in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling in mice. Both LIF and its receptor (LIFRα) co-localized with cytokeratin-positive invasive endovascular extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via administration of our unique LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal trophoblast invasion and impaired spiral artery remodeling compared to PEG control. PEGLA-treated mouse decidual vessels were characterized by retention of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-positive vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), while PEG control decidual vessels were remodelled by cytokeratin-positive trophoblasts. LIF blockade did not alter F4/80-positive decidual macrophage numbers between treatment groups, but resulted in down-regulation of decidual transcript levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), which are important immune cell activation factors that promote spiral artery remodeling during pregnancy. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in trophoblast invasion in vivo and may facilitate trophoblast-decidual-immune cell cross talk to enable adequate spiral artery remodeling.

  17. Radiolabeled oligonucleotides for antisense imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotides radiolabeled with isotopes emitting γ-rays (for SPECT imaging) or positrons (for PET imaging) can be useful for targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) thereby serving as non-invasive imaging tools for detection of gene expression in vivo (antisense imaging). Radiolabeled oligonucleotides may also be used for monitoring their in vivo fate, thereby helping us better understand the barriers to its delivery for antisense targeting. These developments have led to a new area of molecular imaging and targeting, utilizing radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides. However, the success of antisense imaging relies heavily on overcoming the barriers for its targeted delivery in vivo. Furthermore, the low ability of the radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide to subsequently internalize into the cell and hybridize with its target mRNA poses additional challenges in realizing its potentials. This review covers the advances in the antisense imaging probe development for PET and SPECT, with an emphasis on radiolabeling strategies, stability, delivery and in vivo targeting. PMID:21822406

  18. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF Inhibition during Mid-Gestation Impairs Trophoblast Invasion and Spiral Artery Remodelling during Pregnancy in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Winship

    Full Text Available The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion into the endometrium are fundamental events in the initiation of placentation. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF has been shown to promote trophoblast invasion in vitro, however its precise role in trophoblast invasion in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling in mice. Both LIF and its receptor (LIFRα co-localized with cytokeratin-positive invasive endovascular extravillous trophoblasts (EVT in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via administration of our unique LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal trophoblast invasion and impaired spiral artery remodeling compared to PEG control. PEGLA-treated mouse decidual vessels were characterized by retention of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA-positive vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, while PEG control decidual vessels were remodelled by cytokeratin-positive trophoblasts. LIF blockade did not alter F4/80-positive decidual macrophage numbers between treatment groups, but resulted in down-regulation of decidual transcript levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10, which are important immune cell activation factors that promote spiral artery remodeling during pregnancy. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in trophoblast invasion in vivo and may facilitate trophoblast-decidual-immune cell cross talk to enable adequate spiral artery remodeling.

  19. Impaired clearance of early apoptotic cells mediated by inhibitory IgG antibodies in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome.

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    Menelaos N Manoussakis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Deficient efferocytosis (i.e. phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells has been frequently reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Todate, patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS have not been assessed for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (ApoCell-phagocytosis and of particulate targets (microbeads, MB-phagocytosis. DESIGN: ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis were comparatively assessed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood specimens and monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM preparations from healthy blood donors (HBD and consecutive SS, SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Cross-admixture ApoCell-phagocytosis experiments were also performed using phagocytes from HBD or patients, and apoptotic cells pretreated with whole sera or purified serum IgG derived from patients or HBD. RESULTS: Compared to HBD, approximately half of SS and SLE patients studied (but not RA manifested significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis (p<0.001 and MB-phagocytosis (p<0.003 by blood-borne phagocytes that correlated inversely with disease activity (p≤0.004. In cross-admixture assays, healthy monocytes showed significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis when fed with apoptotic cells that were pretreated with sera or purified serum IgG preparations from SS and SLE patients (p<0.0001, compared to those from HBD or RA. Such aberrant effect of the SS and SLE sera and IgG preparations correlated linearly with their content of IgG antibodies against apoptotic cells (p≤0.0001. Phagocytic dysfunction maybe also present in certain SS and SLE patients, as supported by deficient capacity of MDM for ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis under patients' serum-free conditions. CONCLUSION: Similarly to SLE, efferocytosis is frequently impaired in SS and is primarily due to the presence of inhibitory IgG anti-ApoCell antibodies and secondarily to phagocytes' dysfunction.

  20. Aberrant location of inhibitory synaptic marker proteins in the hippocampus of dystrophin-deficient mice: implications for cognitive impairment in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Elżbieta Krasowska

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a neuromuscular disease that arises from mutations in the dystrophin-encoding gene. Apart from muscle pathology, cognitive impairment, primarily of developmental origin, is also a significant component of the disorder. Convergent lines of evidence point to an important role for dystrophin in regulating the molecular machinery of central synapses. The clustering of neurotransmitter receptors at inhibitory synapses, thus impacting on synaptic transmission, is of particular significance. However, less is known about the role of dystrophin in influencing the precise expression patterns of proteins located within the pre- and postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses. To this end, we exploited molecular markers of inhibitory synapses, interneurons and dystrophin-deficient mouse models to explore the role of dystrophin in determining the stereotypical patterning of inhibitory connectivity within the cellular networks of the hippocampus CA1 region. In tissue from wild-type (WT mice, immunoreactivity of neuroligin2 (NL2, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively in postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses, and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT, a marker of GABAergic presynaptic elements, were predictably enriched in strata pyramidale and lacunosum moleculare. In acute contrast, NL2 and VGAT immunoreactivity was relatively evenly distributed across all CA1 layers in dystrophin-deficient mice. Similar changes were evident with the cannabinoid receptor 1, vesicular glutamate transporter 3, parvalbumin, somatostatin and the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit. The data show that in the absence of dystrophin, there is a rearrangement of the molecular machinery, which underlies the precise spatio-temporal pattern of GABAergic synaptic transmission within the CA1 sub-field of the hippocampus.

  1. Infusions of AP5 into the basolateral amygdala impair the formation, but not the expression, of step-down inhibitory avoidance

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    Roesler R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of infusions of the NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5 into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA on the formation and expression of memory for inhibitory avoidance. Adult male Wistar rats (215-300 g were implanted under thionembutal anesthesia (30 mg/kg, ip with 9.0-mm guide cannulae aimed 1.0 mm above the BLA. Bilateral infusions of AP5 (5.0 µg were given 10 min prior to training, immediately after training, or 10 min prior to testing in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (0.3 mA footshock, 24-h interval between training and the retention test session. Both pre- and post-training infusions of AP5 blocked retention test performance. When given prior to the test, AP5 did not affect retention. AP5 did not affect training performance, and a control experiment showed that the impairing effects were not due to alterations in footshock sensitivity. The results suggest that NMDA receptor activation in the BLA is involved in the formation, but not the expression, of memory for inhibitory avoidance in rats. However, the results do not necessarily imply that the role of NMDA receptors in the BLA is to mediate long-term storage of fear-motivated memory within the amygdala.

  2. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  3. Antithrombotic effect of antisense factor XI oligonucleotide treatment in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeffrey R; Marzec, Ulla; Revenko, Alexey S; Zhao, Chenguang; Gao, Dacao; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David; MacLeod, A Robert; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, Andras; Hanson, Stephen R; Monia, Brett P

    2013-07-01

    During coagulation, factor IX (FIX) is activated by 2 distinct mechanisms mediated by the active proteases of either FVIIa or FXIa. Both coagulation factors may contribute to thrombosis; FXI, however, plays only a limited role in the arrest of bleeding. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of FXI may produce an antithrombotic effect with relatively low hemostatic risk. We have reported that reducing FXI levels with FXI antisense oligonucleotides produces antithrombotic activity in mice, and that administration of FXI antisense oligonucleotides to primates decreases circulating FXI levels and activity in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Here, we evaluated the relationship between FXI plasma levels and thrombogenicity in an established baboon model of thrombosis and hemostasis. In previous studies with this model, antibody-induced inhibition of FXI produced potent antithrombotic effects. In the present article, antisense oligonucleotides-mediated reduction of FXI plasma levels by ≥ 50% resulted in a demonstrable and sustained antithrombotic effect without an increased risk of bleeding. These results indicate that reducing FXI levels using antisense oligonucleotides is a promising alternative to direct FXI inhibition, and that targeting FXI may be potentially safer than conventional antithrombotic therapies that can markedly impair primary hemostasis.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-04-01

    In 1987, when I became interested in the notion of antisense technology, I returned to my roots in RNA biochemistry and began work to understand how oligonucleotides behave in biological systems. Since 1989, my research has focused primarily on this topic, although I have been involved in most areas of research in antisense technology. I believe that the art of excellent science is to frame large important questions that are perhaps not immediately answerable with existing knowledge and methods, and then conceive a long-term (multiyear) research strategy that begins by answering the most pressing answerable questions on the path to the long-term goals. Then, a step-by-step research pathway that will address the strategic questions posed must be implemented, adjusting the plan as new things are learned. This is the approach we have taken at Ionis. Obviously, to create antisense technology, we have had to address a wide array of strategic questions, for example, the medicinal chemistry of oligonucleotides, manufacturing and analytical methods, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, as well as questions about the molecular pharmacology of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Each of these endeavors has consumed nearly three decades of scientific effort, is still very much a work-in-progress, and has resulted in hundreds of publications. As a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award 2016 granted by the Oligonucleotide Therapeutic Society, in this note, my goal is to summarize the contributions of my group to the efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms of ASOs.

  5. Early-life Social Isolation Impairs the Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone Neuronal Activity and Serotonergic System in Male Rats

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    Tomoko eSoga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation in early life deregulates the serotonergic system of the brain, compromising reproductive function. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus are critical to the inhibitory regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal activity in the brain and release of luteinising hormone by the pituitary gland. Although GnIH responds to stress, the role of GnIH in social isolation-induced deregulation of the serotonin system and reproductive function remains unclear. We investigated the effect of social isolation in early life on the serotonergic–GnIH neuronal system using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged GnIH-transgenic rats. Socially isolated rats were observed for anxious and depressive behaviours. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined c-Fos protein expression in EGFP–GnIH neurons in 9-week-old adult male rats after 6 weeks post-weaning isolation or group -housing. We also inspected serotonergic fibre juxtapositions in EGFP–GnIH neurons in control and socially isolated male rats. Socially isolated rats exhibited anxious and depressive behaviours. The total number of EGFP–GnIH neurons was the same in control and socially isolated rats, but c-Fos expression in GnIH neurons was significantly reduced in socially isolated rats. Serotonin fibre juxtapositions on EGFP–GnIH neurons was also lower in socially isolated rats. In addition, levels of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus were significantly attenuated in these rats. These results suggest that social isolation in early life results in lower serotonin levels, which reduce GnIH neuronal activity and may lead to reproductive failure.

  6. Impaired desensitization of a human polymorphic α2B-adrenergic receptor variant enhances its sympatho-inhibitory activity in chromaffin cells

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    Lymperopoulos Anastasios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α2-adrenergic receptors (ARs mediate many cellular actions of epinephrine and norepinephrine and inhibit their secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells. Like many other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, they undergo agonist-dependent phopshorylation and desensitization by GPCR Kinases (GRKs, a phenomenon recently shown to play a major role in the sympathetic overdrive that accompanies and aggravates chronic heart failure. A deletion polymorphism in the human α2B-AR gene (Glu301-303 causes impaired agonist-promoted receptor phosphorylation and desensitization in heterologous cell lines. Given the importance of α2-ARs in regulation of catecholamine secretion from chromaffin cells, we sought to investigate, in the present study, the desensitization properties and the sympatho-inhibitory activity of this variant in a chromaffin cell line. For this purpose, we expressed this variant and its wild type counterpart in the well-established chromaffin cell line PC12, and performed receptor phosphorylation and desensitization studies, as well as in vitro catecholamine secretion assays. Results Both the agonist-induced phosphorylation and agonist-dependent desensitization of the human Glu301-303 deletion polymorphic α2B-AR are significantly impaired in PC12 cells, resulting in enhanced signaling to inhibition of cholinergic-induced catecholamine secretion in vitro. Conclusion This α2B-AR gene polymorphism (Glu301-303 deletion might confer better protection against conditions characterized and aggravated by sympathetic/catecholaminergic overstimulation in vivo.

  7. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  8. Inhibitory effect of sesquiterpene lactones and the sesquiterpene alcohol aromadendrane-4β,10α-diol on memory impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoah, Solomon K S; Dalla Vecchia, Maria Tereza; Pedrini, Beatriz; Carnhelutti, Gabriela Lazzarotto; Gonçalves, Ana Elisa; Dos Santos, Diogo Adolfo; Biavatti, Maique W; de Souza, Márcia Maria

    2015-12-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the aged brain with no known cause or cures, has become a major medical and social problem for industrialized countries. Cerebral deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a critical feature of AD. The use of medicinal plants as an alternative form of prevention, or even as a possible treatment of AD, is therefore interesting areas of research. Sesquiterpene lactones and a sesquiterpene alcohol are compounds found in H. brasiliense that have several anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated whether these compounds have neuroprotective effects in an amyloid-β peptide-induced Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Mice were injected with Aβ1-42 peptide intracerebroventricularly and were subsequently injected (i.c.v.) with 1µg/site of IGM-A (15-acetoxy-isogermafurenolide), IGM-H (15-hydroxy-isogermafurenolide), PDA (Podoandin), EHP (1,2-epoxy-10α-hydroxy-podoandin), HDS (13-hydroxy-8,9-dehydroshizukanolide), and ARD (aromadendrane-4β,10α-diol). Seven days after treatments the animals had their memory tested in the inhibitory avoidance. After the behavioral testing of animals the brains were removed and subjected to biochemical tests for oxidative stress. The results showed that ARD, HDS and PDA significantly ameliorated the Aβ1-42 peptide-induced memory impairment in the passive avoidance task (PAlzheimer's disease therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

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    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  10. Superior Silencing by 2′,4′-BNANC-Based Short Antisense Oligonucleotides Compared to 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-Based Apolipoprotein B Antisense Inhibitors

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    Tsuyoshi Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The duplex stability with target mRNA and the gene silencing potential of a novel bridged nucleic acid analogue are described. The analogue, 2′,4′-BNANC antisense oligonucleotides (AONs ranging from 10- to 20-nt-long, targeted apolipoprotein B. 2′,4′-BNANC was directly compared to its conventional bridged (or locked nucleic acid (2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterparts. Melting temperatures of duplexes formed between 2′,4′-BNANC-based antisense oligonucleotides and the target mRNA surpassed those of 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterparts at all lengths. An in vitro transfection study revealed that when compared to the identical length 2′,4′-BNA/LNA-based counterpart, the corresponding 2′,4′-BNANC-based antisense oligonucleotide showed significantly stronger inhibitory activity. This inhibitory activity was more pronounced in shorter (13-, 14-, and 16-mer oligonucleotides. On the other hand, the 2′,4′-BNANC-based 20-mer AON exhibited the highest affinity but the worst IC50 value, indicating that very high affinity may undermine antisense potency. These results suggest that the potency of AONs requires a balance between reward term and penalty term. Balance of these two parameters would depend on affinity, length, and the specific chemistry of the AON, and fine-tuning of this balance could lead to improved potency. We demonstrate that 2′,4′-BNANC may be a better alternative to conventional 2′,4′-BNA/LNA, even for “short” antisense oligonucleotides, which are attractive in terms of drug-likeness and cost-effective bulk production.

  11. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  12. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  13. Antisense technologies targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinshun; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthesis is a coordinated process involving multiple enzymes. Overexpression of some of these enzymes plays important roles in tumor growth and development. Therefore, these enzymes are attractive targets for cancer therapies. Antisense agents provide highly specific inhibition of the expression of target genes and thus have served as powerful tools for gene functional studies and potential therapeutic agents for cancers. This article reviews different types of antisense agents and their applications in the modulation of fatty acid synthesis. Patents of antisense agents targeting fatty acid synthetic enzymes are introduced. In addition, miR-122 has been shown to regulate the expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes, and thus antisense agent patents that inhibit miR-122 expression are also discussed.

  14. Antisense expression increases gene expression variability and locus interdependency

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wu; Gagneur, Julien; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Smolik, Miłosz; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription profiling has revealed extensive expression of non-coding RNAs antisense to genes, yet their functions, if any, remain to be understood. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of sense–antisense expression in response to genetic and environmental changes in yeast. We find that antisense expression is associated with genes of larger expression variability. This is characterized by more ‘switching off' at low levels of expression for genes with antisense compa...

  15. A novel HBV antisense RNA gene delivery system targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Ma; Xiao-Hong Liang; Wen-Sheng Sun; Pei-Kun Tian; Li-Fen Gao; Su-Xia Liu; Xiao-Yan Wang; Li-Ning Zhang; Ying-Lin Cao; Li-Hui Han

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system targeting hapatocellular carcinoma and study its inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: GE7,a 16-peptide specific to EGFR, and HA20,a homologue of N-terminus of haemagglutinin of influenza viral envelope protein, were synthesized and conjugated with polylysin. The above conjugates were organized into the pEBAF-as-preS2, a hepatocarcinoma specific HBV antisense expression vector, to construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system, named AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. Hepatocelluar carcinoma HepG2.2.15 cells was used to assay the in vitro inhibition of the complex on HBV. Expression of HBV antigen was assayed by ELISA. BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2.2.15 cells were injected with AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The expression of HBV antisense RNA was examined by RT-PCR and the size of tumor in nude mice were measured.RESULTS: The AFP-enhancing 4-element complex was constructed and DNA was completely trapped at the slot with no DNA migration when the ratio of polypeptide to plasmid was 1:1.The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg of HepG2.2.15 cells was greatly decreased after being transfected by AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The inhibitory rates were 33.4 % and 58.5 % respectively. RTPCR showed HBV antisense RNA expressed specifically in liver tumor cells of tumor-bearing nude mice. After 4injections of AFP-enhancing 4-element complex containing 0.2 μg DNA, the diameter of the tumor was 0.995 cm±0.35,which was significantly smaller than that of the control groups (2.215 cm±0.25, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: AFP-enhancing 4-element complex could deliver HBV antisense RNA targeting on hepatocarcinoma and inhibit both HBV and liver tumor cells in vitro and in vivo.

  16. A novel HBV antisense RNA gene delivery system targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Tian, Pei-Kun; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Su-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ning; Cao, Ying-Lin; Han, Li-Hui; Liang, Xiao-Hong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system targeting hapatocellular carcinoma and study its inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: GE7,a 16-peptide specific to EGFR, and HA20, a homologue of N-terminus of haemagglutinin of influenza viral envelope protein, were synthesized and conjugated with polylysin. The above conjugates were organized into the pEBAF-as-preS2, a hepatocarcinoma specific HBV antisense expression vector, to construct a novel HBV antisense RNA delivery system, named AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. Hepatocelluar carcinoma HepG2.2.15 cells was used to assay the in vitro inhibition of the complex on HBV. Expression of HBV antigen was assayed by ELISA. BALB/c nude mice bearing HepG2.2.15 cells were injected with AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The expression of HBV antisense RNA was examined by RT-PCR and the size of tumor in nude mice were measured. RESULTS: The AFP-enhancing 4-element complex was constructed and DNA was completely trapped at the slot with no DNA migration when the ratio of polypeptide to plasmid was 1:1.The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg of HepG2.2.15 cells was greatly decreased after being transfected by AFP-enhancing 4-element complex. The inhibitory rates were 33.4% and 58.5% respectively. RT-PCR showed HBV antisense RNA expressed specifically in liver tumor cells of tumor-bearing nude mice. After 4 injections of AFP-enhancing 4-element complex containing 0.2 μg DNA, the diameter of the tumor was 0.995 cm ± 0.35, which was significantly smaller than that of the control groups (2.215 cm ± 0.25, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: AFP-enhancing 4-element complex could deliver HBV antisense RNA targeting on hepatocarcinoma and inhibit both HBV and liver tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12632498

  17. Variable coordination of cotranscribed genes in Escherichia coli following antisense repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulyté Agne

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of bacterial genes belong to tight clusters and operons, which complicates gene functional studies using conventional knock-out methods. Antisense agents can down-regulate the expression of genes without disrupting the genome because they bind mRNA and block its expression. However, it is unclear how antisense inhibition affects expression from genes that are cotranscribed with the target. Results To examine the effects of antisense inhibition on cotranscribed genes, we constructed a plasmid expressing the two reporter genes gfp and DsRed as one transcriptional unit. Incubation with antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA targeted to the mRNA start codon region of either the upstream gfp or the downstream DsRed gene resulted in a complete expression discoordination from this artificial construct. The same approach was applied to the three cotranscribed genes in the endogenously expressed lac-operon (lacZ, Y and A and partial downstream expression coordination was seen when the lacZ start codon was targeted with antisense PNA. Targeting the lacY mRNA start codon region showed no effect on the upstream lacZ gene expression whereas expression from the downstream lacA gene was affected as strongly as the lacY gene. Determination of lacZ and lacY mRNA levels revealed a pattern of reduction that was similar to the Lac-proteins, indicating a relation between translation inhibition and mRNA degradation as a response to antisense PNA treatment. Conclusion The results show that antisense mediated repression of genes within operons affect cotranscribed genes to a variable degree. Target transcript stability appears to be closely related to inhibition of translation and presumably depends on translating ribosomes protecting the mRNA from intrinsic decay mechanisms. Therefore, for genes within operons and clusters it is likely that the nature of the target transcript will determine the inhibitory effects on cotranscribed genes

  18. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

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    Farooqi AA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ammad Ahmad Farooqi,1 Zia ur Rehman,2 Jordi Muntane3,4 1Laboratory for Translational Oncology and Personalized Medicine, Rashid Latif Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan; 2Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Kohat University of Science and Technology (KUST, Kohat, Pakistan; 3Department of General Surgery, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS, Hospital Universitary "Virgen del Rocío"/CSIC/University of Seville, Sevilla, Spain; 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD o Ciberehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Abstract: There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA, and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent

  19. Inhibitory noise

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    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  20. Adenovirus serotype 5 vaccine vectors trigger IL-27-dependent inhibitory CD4+ T cell responses that impair CD8+ T cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Rafael A.; Provine, Nicholas M.; Aid, Malika; Iampietro, M. Justin; Borducchi, Erica N.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David; Bricault, Christine A.; Blass, Eryn; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors elicit robust CD8+ T cell responses, but these responses typically exhibit a partially exhausted phenotype. However, the immunologic mechanism by which Ad5 vectors induce dysfunctional CD8+ T cells has not previously been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that, following immunization of B6 mice, Ad5 vectors elicit antigen-specific IL-10+CD4+ T cells with a distinct transcriptional profile in a dose-dependent fashion. In rhesus monkeys, we similarly observed upregulated expression of IL-10 and PD-1 by CD4+ T cells following Ad5 vaccination. These cells markedly suppressed vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in vivo and IL-10 blockade increased the frequency and functionality of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells as well as improved protective efficacy against challenge with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, induction of these inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells correlated with IL-27 expression and IL-27 blockade substantially improved CD4+ T cell functionality. These data highlight a role for IL-27 in the induction of inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells, which suppress CD8+ T cell magnitude and function following Ad5 vector immunization. A deeper understanding of the cytokine networks and transcriptional profiles induced by vaccine vectors should lead to strategies to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of viral vector-based vaccines.

  1. Effect of TGF-β1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on renal function in chronic renal failure rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Law Chung HIONG; Kiew Lik VOON; Nor Azizan ABDULLAH; Munavvar A SATTAR; Nazarina AbduRAHMAN; Abdul Hye KHAN; Edward James JOHNS

    2008-01-01

    Aim:The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of trans-forming growth factor (TGF)-β1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) in ame-liorating deteriorated kidney function in rats with puromycin-induced chronic renal failure (CRF). Methods:Saline, puromycin, puromycin+TGF-β1 antisense ODN or puromycin+scrambled ODN were administered to unilaterally nephrecto-mized rats. Renal hemodynamic and excretory measurements were taken in the anaesthetized rats that had undergone surgical procedure. Results:It was ob-served that in the CRF rats, there was a marked reduction in the renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), severe proteinuria, and almost 6-fold in-creased fractional excretion of sodium (FE Na+) as compared to that in the control rats (all P<0.05). It was further observed that in the CRF rats, the treatment with TGF-β1 antisense, but not scrambled ODN, markedly attenuated the reduction of RBF, GFR, and proteinuria and markedly prevented the increase of the FE Na+ (all P<0.05). In addition, the renal hypertrophy in the CRF group (P<0.05 vs non-renal failure control) was markedly attenuated after treatment with TGF-1 antisense ODN (P<0.05). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was evident only in the un-treated and scrambled ODN-treated CRF groups. An interesting observation of this study was that in the CRF rats, although there was marked attenuating and preventive effects of the TGF-β1 antisense ODN on the deteriorated renal functions, the antisense treatment did not cause any marked change in the renal expression of TGF-β1 at the protein level. Conclusion:Collectively, the data obtained sug-gests that TGF-β1 antisense ODN possesses beneficial effects in puromycin-induced chronic renal failure and that the deterioration in morphology and im-paired renal function in this pathological state is in part dependent upon the action of TGF-β1 within the kidney.

  2. Splenic CD4+ T Cells in Progressive Visceral Leishmaniasis Show a Mixed Effector-Regulatory Phenotype and Impair Macrophage Effector Function through Inhibitory Receptor Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Elvia Y.; Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Travi, Bruno L.; Kong, Fanping; Spratt, Heidi; Soong, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by infection with the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is a chronic progressive disease with a relentlessly increasing parasite burden in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. The disease is characterized by fever, splenomegaly, cachexia, and pancytopenia, and progresses to death if not treated. Control of Leishmania infection is mediated by Th1 (IFNγ-producing) CD4+ T cells, which activate macrophages to produce nitric oxide and kill intracellular parasites. However, despite expansion of CD4+ T cells and increased IFNγ expression in the spleen, humans with active VL do not control the infection. We used an experimental model of chronic progressive VL in hamsters, which mimics clinical and pathological features seen in humans, to better understand the mechanisms that lead to progressive disease. Transcriptional profiling of the spleen during chronic infection revealed expression of markers of both T cell activation and inhibition. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleen during chronic progressive VL showed mixed expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and chemokines, and were marginally effective in controlling infection in an ex vivo T cell-macrophage co-culture system. Splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages from hamsters with VL showed increased expression of inhibitory receptors and their ligands, respectively. Blockade of the inhibitory receptor PD-L2 led to a significant decrease in parasite burden, revealing a pathogenic role for the PD-1 pathway in chronic VL. PD-L2 blockade was associated with a dramatic reduction in expression of host arginase 1, but no change in IFNγ and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the expression of counter-regulatory molecules on splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages promotes a more permissive macrophage phenotype and attenuates intracellular parasite control in chronic progressive VL. Host-directed adjunctive therapy targeting the PD-1 regulatory pathway may be efficacious for VL. PMID

  3. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  7. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and cell uptake of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Norris, Daniel; Yu, Rosie; Bennett, C Frank

    2015-06-29

    Pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides are largely driven by chemistry of the backbone and thus are sequence independent within a chemical class. Tissue bioavailability (% of administered dose) is assisted by plasma protein binding that limits glomerular filtration and ultimate urinary excretion of oligonucleotides. The substitution of one non-bridging oxygen with the more hydrophobic sulfur atom (phosphorothioate) increases both plasma stability and plasma protein binding and thus, ultimately, tissue bioavailability. Additional modifications of the sugar at the 2' position, increase RNA binding affinity and significantly increase potency, tissue half-life and prolong RNA inhibitory activity. Oligonucleotides modified in this manner consistently exhibit the highest tissue bioavailability (>90%). Systemic biodistribution is broad, and organs typically with highest concentrations are liver and kidney followed by bone marrow, adipocytes, and lymph nodes. Cell uptake is predominantly mediated by endocytosis. Both size and charge for most oligonucleotides prevents distribution across the blood brain barrier. However, modified single-strand oligonucleotides administered by intrathecal injection into the CSF distribute broadly in the CNS. The majority of intracellular oligonucleotide distribution following systemic or local administration occurs rapidly in just a few hours following administration and is facilitated by rapid endocytotic uptake mechanisms. Further understanding of the intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides may provide further enhancements in design and ultimate potency of antisense oligonucleotides in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Diversification of antisense research and development: review of the Ringberg meeting, April 1994. Mechanisms of antisense-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J W; Nellen, W

    1994-01-01

    Antisense technology has established itself as a new and vibrant entrant into the discipline of molecular biology. As such, it has contributed to basic research by providing tools for the molecular dissection of diverse experimental systems. In applied research, antisense approaches have contributed to development of agricultural products (D. Grierson) now coming to market and to the design of a number of oligonucleotide drugs, now in clinical trials. However, few activities to date have focused on the study of antisense per se. Further, few conceptual perspectives have regarded antisense as an integral part of cellular function and genetic regulation. The Ringberg conference showcased a number of systems that would seem unrelated if we regard antisense as a superficial tool to be imposed on nature. On the other hand, if we want to begin to regard antisense as a field of its own with deeper biological and genetic rationales, the Ringberg meeting provided much tantalizing evidence to do so.

  9. IFNA2 p.Ala120Thr impairs the inhibitory activity of Interferon-α2 against the hepatitis B virus through altering its binding to the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuming; Zhu, Xiang; Xu, Wenxiong; Yang, Fangji; Zhang, Genglin; Wu, Lina; Zheng, Yongyuan; Gao, Zhiliang; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang

    2017-09-25

    Our previous study found that a rare genetic mutation IFNA2p.Ala120Thr affects the structure of IFN-α2 and contributes to increased host susceptibility to CHB. However, the way in which the single amino acid residue mutation affects IFN-α2 activity is unclear. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of IFNA2p.Ala120Thr on IFN-α2 activity. Plasmid transfection of BL-21 was used to construct both wild type IFNA2 (wt) and p.Ala120Thr IFNA2 (mut) proteins. The HepG2-NTCP model was established using a lentiviral vector (LV003). Anti-HBV activity of wt and mut were tested on HepG2-NTCP infected cells with HBV, through the detection of HBsAg and HBcAg using immunohistochemistry and by detecting HBV DNA with RT PCR. IF and Co-IP were performed in order to investigate the binding of the IFNA2 protein and its receptor. The changes in IFNAR density and signal molecule phosphorylation were measured with western blotting. We used qPCR to further explore anti-HBV protein expression including APOBEC3, MxA, OAS1, and PKR. Cell model experiments confirmed that IFNA2p.Ala120Thr impairs anti-HBV activity of IFN-α2. Co-IP tests indicated that the binding of mut-IFNα to IFNR was weaker in the mut-treated group. IFNR density on the cells surface increased after treatment with wt-IFN-α2. Obvious differences in the STAT phosphorylation profiles were seen between the mut-treated and wt-treated groups. The expression of four main kinds of anti-HBV proteins induced by mut was higher in the HepG2-NTCP cells. Thus, IFNA2p.Ala120Thr affects anti-HBV activity of IFN-α2. IFNA2p.Ala120Thr impairs the anti-HBV ability of IFN-a2, mainly by reducing its binding to the IFN receptor. Mut IFN-a2 has a very weak binding, barely inducing STAT phosphorylation, and induces the expression of only a low level of related anti-HBV ISG. This is quite different from the effects of wt IFN-a2, implying that modifying the key structural position of IFNa may lead to the

  10. Antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maartje E; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S G; Kastelein, John J P

    2012-06-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are short synthetic analogues of natural nucleic acids designed to specifically bind to a target messenger RNA (mRNA) by Watson-Crick hybridization, inducing selective degradation of the mRNA or prohibiting translation of the selected mRNA into protein. Antisense technology has the ability to inhibit unique targets with high specificity and can be used to inhibit synthesis of a wide range of proteins that could influence lipoprotein levels and other targets. A number of different classes of antisense agents are under development. To date, mipomersen, a 2'-O-methoxyethyl phosphorothioate 20-mer ASO, is the most advanced ASO in clinical development. It is a second-generation ASO developed to inhibit the synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-100 in the liver. In Phase 3 clinical trials, mipomersen has been shown to significantly reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) as well as other atherogenic apoB containing lipoproteins such as lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and small-dense LDL particles. Although concerns have been raised because of an increase in intrahepatic triglyceride content, preliminary data from long-term studies suggest that with continued treatment, liver fat levels tend to stabilize or decline. Further studies are needed to evaluate potential clinical relevance of these changes. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) is another promising novel target for lowering LDL-c by ASOs. Both second-generation ASOs and ASOs using locked nucleic acid technology have been developed to inhibit PCSK9 and are under clinical development. Other targets currently being addressed include apoC-III and apo(a) or Lp(a). By directly inhibiting the synthesis of specific proteins, ASO technology offers a promising new approach to influence the metabolism of lipids and to control lipoprotein levels. Its application to a wide variety of potential targets can be expected if these agents prove to be clinically safe and

  11. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  13. Identification of sequence motifs significantly associated with antisense activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peek Andrew S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the suppression activity of antisense oligonucleotide sequences is the main goal of the rational design of nucleic acids. To create an effective predictive model, it is important to know what properties of an oligonucleotide sequence associate significantly with antisense activity. Also, for the model to be efficient we must know what properties do not associate significantly and can be omitted from the model. This paper will discuss the results of a randomization procedure to find motifs that associate significantly with either high or low antisense suppression activity, analysis of their properties, as well as the results of support vector machine modelling using these significant motifs as features. Results We discovered 155 motifs that associate significantly with high antisense suppression activity and 202 motifs that associate significantly with low suppression activity. The motifs range in length from 2 to 5 bases, contain several motifs that have been previously discovered as associating highly with antisense activity, and have thermodynamic properties consistent with previous work associating thermodynamic properties of sequences with their antisense activity. Statistical analysis revealed no correlation between a motif's position within an antisense sequence and that sequences antisense activity. Also, many significant motifs existed as subwords of other significant motifs. Support vector regression experiments indicated that the feature set of significant motifs increased correlation compared to all possible motifs as well as several subsets of the significant motifs. Conclusion The thermodynamic properties of the significantly associated motifs support existing data correlating the thermodynamic properties of the antisense oligonucleotide with antisense efficiency, reinforcing our hypothesis that antisense suppression is strongly associated with probe/target thermodynamics, as there are no enzymatic

  14. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide that depletes RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase induces growth inhibition in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozaki, H; Budillon, A; Tortora, G; Meissner, S; Beaucage, S L; Miki, K; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1993-02-15

    Enhanced expression of the RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type I has been correlated with cancer cell growth. We provide evidence that RI alpha is a growth-inducing protein that may be essential for neoplastic cell growth. Human colon, breast, and gastric carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines exposed to a 21-mer human RI alpha antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (S-oligodeoxynucleotide) exhibited growth inhibition with no sign of cytotoxicity. Mismatched sequence (random) S-oligodeoxynucleotides of the same length exhibited no effect. The growth inhibitory effect of RI alpha antisense oligomer correlated with a decrease in the RI alpha mRNA and protein levels and with an increase in RII beta (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) expression. The growth inhibition was abolished, however, when cells were exposed simultaneously to both RI alpha and RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotides. The RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotide alone, exhibiting suppression of RII beta along with enhancement of RI alpha expression, led to slight stimulation of cell growth. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of cyclic AMP receptor proteins, RI alpha and RII beta, are reciprocally related in the growth control of cancer cells and that the RI alpha antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, which efficiently depletes the growth stimulatory RI alpha, is a powerful biological tool toward suppression of malignancy.

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnik, Peter; Boyer, David S.; Grillone, Lisa R.; Clement, John G.; Henry, Scott P.; Green, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and other parts of the world. Historically, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy surgery have been used for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetic macular edema. Both procedures have proven to be useful under certain conditions but have their limitations. New pathways and processes that promote diabetic retinopathy have been identified, and several new therapeutic approaches are under investigation. These new therapies may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and include antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, corticosteroids, and therapies that may potentially target a number of additional diabetic retinopathy-related factors and processes, including antisense oligonucleotides. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides, such as iCo-007, may offer a significant advantage in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by downregulating the signal pathways of multiple growth factors that seem to play a critical role in the process of ocular angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Benefits of such molecules are expected to include the specificity of the kinase target and an extended half-life, resulting in less frequent intravitreal drug administration, resistance to molecule degradation, and a good safety profile. PMID:20144342

  16. Synthesis and antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinghua; Pandey, Sanjay K; Khatri, Hetal; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2014-09-01

    To ascertain whether increasing hydrophobicity can enhance the activity of second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in muscle, we investigated the antisense properties of 2'-O-(2S-methoxypropyl)-RNA (2S-MOP)-modified ASOs. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl uridine phosphoramidite was accomplished on a multi-gram scale by Lewis-acid-catalyzed ring opening of 5'-O-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl ether-protected 2,2'-anhydro-5-methyl uridine with 2S-methoxy-1-propanol. Synthesis of the 2S-MOP 5-methyl cytidine nucleoside from the corresponding 5-methyl uridine nucleoside was accomplished by formation and displacement of a 4-triazolide intermediate with aqueous ammonia. 2S-MOP-modified oligonucleotides were prepared on an automated DNA synthesizer and showed similar enhancements in duplex thermal stability as 2'-O-methoxyethyl RNA (MOE)-modified oligonucleotides. 2S-MOP-containing antisense oligonucleotides were evaluated in Balb-c mice and showed good activity for decreasing the expression levels of scavenger receptor B1 (Srb1) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mRNA in liver and muscle tissue. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Cellular uptake and trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Wang, Shiyu; Vickers, Timothy A; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages and different 2' modifications can be used either as drugs (e.g., to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and spinal muscular atrophy) or as research tools to alter gene expression. PS-ASOs can enter cells without additional modification or formulation and can be designed to mediate sequence-specific cleavage of different types of RNA (including mRNA and non-coding RNA) targeted by endogenous RNase H1. Although PS-ASOs function in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, localization to different subcellular regions can affect their therapeutic potency. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of PS ASOs are mediated by protein interactions. The main proteins involved in these processes have been identified, and intracellular sites in which PS ASOs are active, or inactive, cataloged.

  18. Guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides as synthetic riboregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by short oligonucleotides (antisense oligonucleotides), which can modulate RNA structures and inhibit subsequent associations with the translation machinery, is a potential approach for gene therapy. This chapter describes an alternative antisense strategy using guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides (G-ASs) to introduce a DNA-RNA heteroquadruplex structure at a designated sequence on RNA targets. The feasibility of using G-ASs to modulate RNA conformation may allow control of RNA function by inducing biologically important quadruplex structures. This approach to manipulate quadruplex structures using G-ASs may expand the strategies for regulating RNA structures and the functions of short oligonucleotide riboregulators.

  19. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  20. On primordial sense-antisense coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Andrei S; Rodin, Sergei N; Carter, Charles W

    2009-11-01

    The genetic code is implemented by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). These 20 enzymes are divided into two classes that, despite performing same functions, have nothing common in structure. The mystery of this striking partition of aaRSs might have been concealed in their sterically complementary modes of tRNA recognition that, as we have found recently, protect the tRNAs with complementary anticodons from confusion in translation. This finding implies that, in the beginning, life increased its coding repertoire by the pairs of complementary codons (rather than one-by-one) and used both complementary strands of genes as templates for translation. The class I and class II aaRSs may represent one of the most important examples of such primordial sense-antisense (SAS) coding (Rodin and Ohno, Orig Life Evol Biosph 25:565-589, 1995). In this report, we address the issue of SAS coding in a wider scope. We suggest a variety of advantages that such coding would have had in exploring a wider sequence space before translation became highly specific. In particular, we confirm that in Achlya klebsiana a single gene might have originally coded for an HSP70 chaperonin (class II aaRS homolog) and an NAD-specific GDH-like enzyme (class I aaRS homolog) via its sense and antisense strands. Thus, in contrast to the conclusions in Williams et al. (Mol Biol Evol 26:445-450, 2009), this could indeed be a "Rosetta stone" gene (Carter and Duax, Mol Cell 10:705-708, 2002) (eroded somewhat, though) for the SAS origin of the two aaRS classes.

  1. Inhibitory effect of 4-O-methylhonokiol on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation, amyloidogenesis and memory impairment via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB in vitro and in vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Young-Jung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation is important in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD. Previously, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuroinflammation caused memory impairments. In the present study, we investigated the possible preventive effects of 4-O-methylhonokiol, a constituent of Magnolia officinalis, on memory deficiency caused by LPS, along with the underlying mechanisms. Methods We investigated whether 4-O-methylhonokiol (0.5 and 1 mg/kg in 0.05% ethanol prevents memory dysfunction and amyloidogenesis on AD model mice by intraperitoneal LPS (250 μg/kg daily 7 times injection. In addition, LPS-treated cultured astrocytes and microglial BV-2 cells were investigated for anti-neuroinflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic effect of 4-O-methylhonkiol (0.5, 1 and 2 μM. Results Oral administration of 4-O-methylhonokiol ameliorated LPS-induced memory impairment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, 4-O-methylhonokiol prevented the LPS-induced expression of inflammatory proteins; inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 as well as activation of astrocytes (expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP in the brain. In in vitro study, we also found that 4-O-methylhonokiol suppressed the expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as the production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β in the LPS-stimulated cultured astrocytes. 4-O-methylhonokiol also inhibited transcriptional and DNA binding activity of NF-κB via inhibition of IκB degradation as well as p50 and p65 translocation into nucleus of the brain and cultured astrocytes. Consistent with the inhibitory effect on neuroinflammation, 4-O-methylhonokiol inhibited LPS-induced Aβ1-42 generation, β- and γ-secretase activities, and expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP, BACE1 and C99 as well as activation of astrocytes and neuronal cell death in the

  2. Detection, characterization and regulation of antisense transcripts in HIV-1

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    Mesnard Jean-Michel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have recently demonstrated that the human retrovirus HTLV-I was producing a spliced antisense transcript, which led to the synthesis of the HBZ protein. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1 and to provide a better characterization of the transcript and its regulation. Results Initial experiments conducted by standard RT-PCR analysis in latently infected J1.1 cell line and pNL4.3-transfected 293T cells confirmed the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1. A more adapted RT-PCR protocol with limited RT-PCR artefacts also led to a successful detection of antisense transcripts in several infected cell lines. RACE analyses demonstrated the existence of several transcription initiation sites mapping near the 5' border of the 3'LTR (in the antisense strand. Interestingly, a new polyA signal was identified on the antisense strand and harboured the polyA signal consensus sequence. Transfection experiments in 293T and Jurkat cells with an antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 proviral DNA showed luciferase reporter gene expression, which was further induced by various T-cell activators. In addition, the viral Tat protein was found to be a positive modulator of antisense transcription by transient and stable transfections of this proviral DNA construct. RT-PCR analyses in 293T cells stably transfected with a pNL4.3-derived construct further confirmed these results. Infection of 293T, Jurkat, SupT1, U937 and CEMT4 cells with pseudotyped virions produced from the antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 DNA clone led to the production of an AZT-sensitive luciferase signal, which was however less pronounced than the signal from NL4.3Luc-infected cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that antisense transcription exists in HIV-1 in the context of infection. Possible translation of the predicted antisense ORF in this transcript should

  3. Antitumor Effect of Antisense Ornithine Decarboxylase Adenovirus on Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui TIAN; Lin LI; Xian-Xi LIU; Yan ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, was found to increase in cancer cells, especially lung cancer cells. Some chemotherapeutic agents aimed at decreasing ODC gene expression showed inhibitory effects on cancer cells. In this study, we examined the effects of adenoviral transduced antisense ODC on lung cancer cells. An adenovirus carrying antisense ODC (rAd-ODC/Ex3as) was used to infect lung cancer cell line A-549. The 3-(4,5-me thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to analyze the effect on cell growth. Expression of ODC and concentration of polyamines in cells were determined by Western blot analysis and high performance liquid chromatography. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling was used to analyze cell apoptosis. The expression of ODC in A-549 cells was reduced to 54%, and that of three polyamines was also decreased through the rAd-ODC/Ex3as treatment. Consequently, cell growth was substantially inhibited and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling showed that rAd-ODC/Ex3as could lead to cell apoptosis, with apoptosis index of 46%. This study suggests that rAd-ODC/Ex3as has an antitumor effect on the human lung cancer cells.

  4. RNA Interference-Guided Targeting of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Antisense Locked Nucleic Acid-Based Oligonucleotides Containing 8-oxo-dG Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutso, Margit; Nikonov, Andrei; Pihlak, Arno; Žusinaite, Eva; Viru, Liane; Selyutina, Anastasia; Reintamm, Tõnu; Kelve, Merike; Saarma, Mart; Karelson, Mati; Merits, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory potency of an antisense oligonucleotide depends critically on its design and the accessibility of its target site. Here, we used an RNA interference-guided approach to select antisense oligonucleotide target sites in the coding region of the highly structured hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. We modified the conventional design of an antisense oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues at its termini (LNA/DNA gapmer) by inserting 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) residues into the central DNA region. Obtained compounds, designed with the aim to analyze the effects of 8-oxo-dG modifications on the antisense oligonucleotides, displayed a unique set of properties. Compared to conventional LNA/DNA gapmers, the melting temperatures of the duplexes formed by modified LNA/DNA gapmers and DNA or RNA targets were reduced by approximately 1.6-3.3°C per modification. Comparative transfection studies showed that small interfering RNA was the most potent HCV RNA replication inhibitor (effective concentration 50 (EC50): 0.13 nM), whereas isosequential standard and modified LNA/DNA gapmers were approximately 50-fold less efficient (EC50: 5.5 and 7.1 nM, respectively). However, the presence of 8-oxo-dG residues led to a more complete suppression of HCV replication in transfected cells. These modifications did not affect the efficiency of RNase H cleavage of antisense oligonucleotide:RNA duplexes but did alter specificity, triggering the appearance of multiple cleavage products. Moreover, the incorporation of 8-oxo-dG residues increased the stability of antisense oligonucleotides of different configurations in human serum.

  5. RNA Interference-Guided Targeting of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Antisense Locked Nucleic Acid-Based Oligonucleotides Containing 8-oxo-dG Modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Mutso

    Full Text Available The inhibitory potency of an antisense oligonucleotide depends critically on its design and the accessibility of its target site. Here, we used an RNA interference-guided approach to select antisense oligonucleotide target sites in the coding region of the highly structured hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA genome. We modified the conventional design of an antisense oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acid (LNA residues at its termini (LNA/DNA gapmer by inserting 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG residues into the central DNA region. Obtained compounds, designed with the aim to analyze the effects of 8-oxo-dG modifications on the antisense oligonucleotides, displayed a unique set of properties. Compared to conventional LNA/DNA gapmers, the melting temperatures of the duplexes formed by modified LNA/DNA gapmers and DNA or RNA targets were reduced by approximately 1.6-3.3°C per modification. Comparative transfection studies showed that small interfering RNA was the most potent HCV RNA replication inhibitor (effective concentration 50 (EC50: 0.13 nM, whereas isosequential standard and modified LNA/DNA gapmers were approximately 50-fold less efficient (EC50: 5.5 and 7.1 nM, respectively. However, the presence of 8-oxo-dG residues led to a more complete suppression of HCV replication in transfected cells. These modifications did not affect the efficiency of RNase H cleavage of antisense oligonucleotide:RNA duplexes but did alter specificity, triggering the appearance of multiple cleavage products. Moreover, the incorporation of 8-oxo-dG residues increased the stability of antisense oligonucleotides of different configurations in human serum.

  6. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Valentina; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Falzarano, Maria Sofia

    2017-04-05

    Neuromuscular disorders such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy are neurodegenerative genetic diseases characterized primarily by muscle weakness and wasting. Until recently there were no effective therapies for these conditions, but antisense oligonucleotides, a new class of synthetic single stranded molecules of nucleic acids, have demonstrated promising experimental results and are at different stages of regulatory approval. The antisense oligonucleotides can modulate the protein expression via targeting hnRNAs or mRNAs and inducing interference with splicing, mRNA degradation, or arrest of translation, finally, resulting in rescue or reduction of the target protein expression. Different classes of antisense oligonucleotides are being tested in several clinical trials, and limitations of their clinical efficacy and toxicity have been reported for some of these compounds, while more encouraging results have supported the development of others. New generation antisense oligonucleotides are also being tested in preclinical models together with specific delivery systems that could allow some of the limitations of current antisense oligonucleotides to be overcome, to improve the cell penetration, to achieve more robust target engagement, and hopefully also be associated with acceptable toxicity. This review article describes the chemical properties and molecular mechanisms of action of the antisense oligonucleotides and the therapeutic implications these compounds have in neuromuscular diseases. Current strategies and carrier systems available for the oligonucleotides delivery will be also described to provide an overview on the past, present and future of these appealing molecules.

  7. Upregulation of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF during the early stage of optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ogai

    Full Text Available Fish retinal ganglion cells (RGCs can regenerate their axons after optic nerve injury, whereas mammalian RGCs normally fail to do so. Interleukin 6 (IL-6-type cytokines are involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, and axon regrowth; thus, they may play a role in the regeneration of zebrafish RGCs after injury. In this study, we assessed the expression of IL-6-type cytokines and found that one of them, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, is upregulated in zebrafish RGCs at 3 days post-injury (dpi. We then demonstrated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a downstream target of LIF, at 3-5 dpi. To determine the function of LIF, we performed a LIF knockdown experiment using LIF-specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (LIF MOs. LIF MOs, which were introduced into zebrafish RGCs via a severed optic nerve, reduced the expression of LIF and abrogated the activation of STAT3 in RGCs after injury. These results suggest that upregulated LIF drives Janus kinase (Jak/STAT3 signaling in zebrafish RGCs after nerve injury. In addition, the LIF knockdown impaired axon sprouting in retinal explant culture in vitro; reduced the expression of a regeneration-associated molecule, growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43; and delayed functional recovery after optic nerve injury in vivo. In this study, we comprehensively demonstrate the beneficial role of LIF in optic nerve regeneration and functional recovery in adult zebrafish.

  8. Antisense mRNA for NPY-Y1 receptor in the medial preoptic area increases prolactin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Silveira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the participation of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptors within the medial preoptic area in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin release. Four bilateral microinjections of sense (control or antisense 18-base oligonucleotides of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA (250 ng corresponding to the NH2-terminus of the neuropeptide Y1 receptor were performed at 12-h intervals for two days into the medial preoptic area of ovariectomized Wistar rats (N = 16, weighing 180 to 200 g, treated with estrogen (50 µg and progesterone (25 mg two days before the experiments between 8.00 and 10:00 a.m. Blockade of Y1 receptor synthesis in the medial preoptic area by the antisense mRNA did not change plasma luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone but did increase prolactin from 19.6 ± 5.9 ng/ml in the sense group to 52.9 ± 9.6 ng/ml in the antisense group. The plasma hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay and the values are reported as mean ± SEM. These data suggest that endogenous neuropeptide Y in the medial preoptic area has an inhibitory action on prolactin secretion through Y1 receptors.

  9. Downregulation of yidC in Escherichia coli by antisense RNA expression results in sensitization to antibacterial essential oils eugenol and carvacrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Deepak Patil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria and inefficiency of current antibiotics to meet clinical requirements has augmented the need to establish new and innovative approaches for antibacterial drug discovery involving identification of novel antibacterial targets and inhibitors. Being obligatory for bacterial growth, essential gene products are considered vital as drug targets. The bacterial protein YidC is highly conserved among pathogens and is essential for membrane protein insertion due to which it holds immense potential as a promising target for antibacterial therapy. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and efficacy of expressed antisense-mediated gene silencing for specific downregulation of yidC in Escherichia coli. We induced RNA silencing of yidC which resulted in impaired growth of the host cells. This was followed by a search for antibacterial compounds sensitizing the YidC depleted cells as they may act as inhibitors of the essential protein or its products. The present findings affirm that reduction of YidC synthesis results in bacterial growth retardation, which warrants the use of this enzyme as a viable target in search of novel antibacterial agents. Moreover, yidC antisense expression in E. coli resulted in sensitization to antibacterial essential oils eugenol and carvacrol. Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Indices (FICIs point towards high level of synergy between yidC silencing and eugenol/carvacrol treatment. Finally, as there are no known YidC inhibitors, the RNA silencing approach applied in this study put forward rapid means to screen novel potential YidC inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present results suggest that YidC is a promising candidate target for screening antibacterial agents. High level of synergy reported here between yidC silencing and eugenol/carvacrol treatment is indicative of a potential antibacterial therapy. This is the

  10. Stimulation of ribosomal frameshifting by antisense LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H. M.; Olsthoorn, René C. L.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism commonly used by RNA viruses to express two or more proteins from a single mRNA at a fixed ratio. An essential element in this process is the presence of an RNA secondary structure, such as a pseudoknot or a hairpin, located downstream of the slippery sequence. Here, we have tested the efficiency of RNA oligonucleotides annealing downstream of the slippery sequence to induce frameshifting in vitro. Maximal frameshifting was observed with oligonucleotides of 12–18 nt. Antisense oligonucleotides bearing locked nucleid acid (LNA) modifications also proved to be efficient frameshift-stimulators in contrast to DNA oligonucleotides. The number, sequence and location of LNA bases in an otherwise DNA oligonucleotide have to be carefully manipulated to obtain optimal levels of frameshifting. Our data favor a model in which RNA stability at the entrance of the ribosomal tunnel is the major determinant of stimulating slippage rather than a specific three-dimensional structure of the stimulating RNA element. PMID:20693527

  11. Sense and Antisense DMPK RNA Foci Accumulate in DM1 Tissues during Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Michel

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is caused by an unstable expanded CTG repeat located within the DMPK gene 3'UTR. The nature, severity and age at onset of DM1 symptoms are very variable in patients. Different forms of the disease are described, among which the congenital form (CDM is the most severe. Molecular mechanisms of DM1 are well characterized for the adult form and involve accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA forming foci in the nucleus. These RNA foci sequester proteins from the MBNL family and deregulate CELF proteins. These proteins are involved in many cellular mechanisms such as alternative splicing, transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation miRNA regulation as well as mRNA polyadenylation and localization. All these mechanisms can be impaired in DM1 because of the deregulation of CELF and MBNL functions. The mechanisms involved in CDM are not clearly described. In order to get insight into the mechanisms underlying CDM, we investigated if expanded RNA nuclear foci, one of the molecular hallmarks of DM1, could be detected in human DM1 fetal tissues, as well as in embryonic and neonatal tissues from transgenic mice carrying the human DMPK gene with an expanded CTG repeat. We observed very abundant RNA foci formed by sense DMPK RNA and, to a lesser extent, antisense DMPK RNA foci. Sense DMPK RNA foci clearly co-localized with MBNL1 and MBNL2 proteins. In addition, we studied DMPK sense and antisense expression during development in the transgenic mice. We found that DMPK sense and antisense transcripts are expressed from embryonic and fetal stages in heart, muscle and brain and are regulated during development. These results suggest that mechanisms underlying DM1 and CDM involved common players including toxic expanded RNA forming numerous nuclear foci at early stages during development.

  12. Thiolated carboxymethyl dextran as a nanocarrier for colon delivery of hSET1 antisense: In vitro stability and efficiency study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, Melika, E-mail: Melika.kiani@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzazadeh Tekie, Farnaz Sadat, E-mail: mirzazadehf@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinarvand, Meshkat, E-mail: mdinarvand@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soleimani, Masoud, E-mail: soleim_m@modares.ac.ir [Stem Cell Technology Research Centre, P.O. Box 14155-3174, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Hematology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinarvand, Rassoul, E-mail: dinarvand@tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh, E-mail: atyabifa@tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy is an optimistic approach in cancer treatment. However, for efficient delivery of gene materials, designing an appropriate vector is necessary. Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) of chitosan and dextran could be considered a proper nanoparticulate carrier for sensitive biomaterials. In this study, PECs of chitosan and thiolated dextran were used as either an injectable or oral gene delivery system. hSET1 antisense was loaded into the PECs to suppress proliferation of colon cancer cell line. The prepared nanoparticles have ~ 115 nm diameter size and positive zeta potential with high mucoadhesion properties. They are able to protect antisense from degradation in serum and biorelevant fluids (FaSSIF and FaSSGF). Furthermore, prepared nanoparticles demonstrated superior cellular penetration and inhibitory effect on SW480 colon cancer cell proliferation. All nanoparticles significantly down regulated hSET1 in comparison with naked antisense. It can be concluded that thiolated PECs have potential use for injectable or oral delivery of nucleic acids such as antisense. - Highlights: • Formation of stable nanoparticle with dextran and chitosan derivatives for oral and intravenous gene delivery. • Satifactory cellular uptake of nanoparticles and approximately complete suppression of hSET1 expression in SW480 cell lines • Prolonged stability of nanoparticles against biorelevent media with desirable release rate.

  13. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.

    2003-01-01

    or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...... of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...

  14. Altered antisense-to-sense transcript ratios in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Reo; Shipitsin, Michail; Choudhury, Sibgat; Wu, Zhenhua; Protopopov, Alexei; Yao, Jun; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Bessarabova, Marina; Ishkin, Alex; Nikolsky, Yuri; Liu, X Shirley; Sukumar, Saraswati; Polyak, Kornelia

    2012-02-21

    Transcriptome profiling studies suggest that a large fraction of the genome is transcribed and many transcripts function independent of their protein coding potential. The relevance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in normal physiological processes and in tumorigenesis is increasingly recognized. Here, we describe consistent and significant differences in the distribution of sense and antisense transcripts between normal and neoplastic breast tissues. Many of the differentially expressed antisense transcripts likely represent long ncRNAs. A subset of genes that mainly generate antisense transcripts in normal but not cancer cells is involved in essential metabolic processes. These findings suggest fundamental differences in global RNA regulation between normal and cancer cells that might play a role in tumorigenesis.

  15. Antisense downregulation of mutant huntingtin in a cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, L.; Abell, K.; Norremolle, A.;

    2003-01-01

    of specific neurons in the brains of HD patients correlate with the expression of mutant huntingtin. Therefore, we have studied whether mutant huntingtin expression can be downregulated by antisense technique. Methods NT2 precursor cells and differentiated postmitotic NT2-N neurons, respectively, were...... transfected with plasmid constructs containing exon 1 of the HD gene with expanded CAG repeats in frame with the reporter protein EGFP. The transfected cell cultures were treated with a phosphorothioated antisense oligonucleotide (PS-ASHD/20+) or a control oligonucleotide either by cotransfection...... or by addition to the culture medium. Results Expression of the fusion protein containing the mutant huntingtin fragment resulted in diffuse green fluorescence in the cytoplasm and formation of aggregates in some of the NT2 cells and NT2-N neurons. We obtained antisense sequence-specific inhibition of expression...

  16. Inhibition of microRNA with antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of microRNA (miRNA) function has been an important tool for uncovering miRNA biology. Chemical modification of anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs) is necessary to improve affinity for target miRNA, stabilize the AMO to nuclease degradation, and to promote tissue uptake for in vivo delivery. Here I summarize the work done to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemically modified AMOs for use in cultured cells and rodent models, and outline important issues to consider when inhibiting miRNAs with antisense oligonucleotides.

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Han, Summer S.; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Leng, Lin; Mizue, Yuka; Anderson, George M.; Mulder, Erik J.; de Bildt, Annelies; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Chang, Joseph T.; Bucala, Richard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Autistic spectrum disorders are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communicative impairment and repetitive and stereotypical behavior. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an upstream regulator of innate immunity that promotes monocyte/macrophage

  18. Highly expressed genes are associated with inverse antisense transcription in mouse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andras Györffy; Pawel Surowiak; Zsolt Tulassay; Balazs Györffy

    2007-08-01

    There is a growing evidence, that antisense transcription might have a key role in a range of human diseases. Although predefined sense–antisense pairs were extensively studied, the antisense expression of the known sense genes is rarely investigated. We retrieved and correlated the expression of sense and antisense sequences of 1182 mouse transcripts to assess the prevalence and to find the characteristic pattern of antisense transcription. We contrasted three Affymetrix MGU74A version 1 mouse genome chips to six MGU74A version 2 chips. For these 1182 transcripts, the version 1 chips contain the antisense sequences of the transcripts presented on the version 2 chips. The original data was taken from the GEO database (GDS431 and GDS432). As the Affymetrix data are semiquantitative, the relative expression levels of antisense partners were analysed. We detected antisense transcription, although the average antisense expression is shifted towards smaller expression values (MGU74A version 1, 516; version 2, 1688). An inverse direct correlation between sense and antisense expression values could be observed at high expression values. At a very high relative expression—above 40,000—the Pearson correlation coefficient is getting closer to −1. Transcripts with high inverse expression ratio may be correlated to the investigated gene (major histocompatibility complex class II trans activator). The ratio of sense to antisense transcripts varied among different chromosomes; on chromosomes 14 and 1 the level of antisense expression was higher than that of sense. We conclude that antisense transcription is a common phenomenon in the mouse genome. The hypothesis of regulatory role of antisense transcripts is supported by the inverse antisense gene expression of highly expressed genes.

  19. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most pr...... oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)....

  1. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havens, Mallory A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA-RNA base-pairing or protein-RNA...

  2. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...

  3. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, R E; Kramer, M; Hiatt, W R

    1988-12-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive synthesis of PG antisense RNA in transgenic plants resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of PG mRNA and enzymatic activity in ripening fruit. The steady-state levels of PG antisense RNA in green fruit of transgenic plants were lower than the levels of PG mRNA normally attained during ripening. However, analysis of transcription in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the antisense RNA construct was transcribed at a higher rate than the tomato PG gene(s). Analysis of fruit from transgenic plants demonstrated a reduction in PG mRNA and enzymatic activity of 70-90%. The reduction in PG activity did not prevent the accumulation of the red pigment lycopene.

  4. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  5. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A

    2015-01-01

    ) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one......The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition......, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise...

  6. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin M Evers

    Full Text Available To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUGn triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG(7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well.

  7. Inhibition on the production of collagen type Ⅰ, Ⅲ of activated hepatic stellate cells by antisense TIMP-1 recombinant plasmid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bin Liu; Chang-Qing Yang; Wei Jiang; Yi-Qing Wang; Jing-Sheng Guo; Bo-Ming He; Ji-Yao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibition effects on the productionof collagen type I, Ⅲ secreted by activated rat hepatic stellatecells (rHSCs) by antisense tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase1 (TIMP-1) recombinant plasmid through elevating interstitialcollagenase activity.METHODS: rHSCs were extracted from normal rat liverby pronase and collagenase digestion and purified bycentrifugal elutriation, and were cultured on plastic dishesuntil they were activated to a myofibroblastic phenotypeafter 7-10 days. RT-Nest-PCR and gene recombinanttechniques were used to construct the rat antisense TIMP-1 recombinant plasmids which can express in eucaryoticcells. The recombinant plasmid and the pcDNA3 emptyplasmid were transfected in rHSCs by Effectene (QIAGEN)separately. Cells were selected after growing in DMEMcontaining 400 μg/ml G418 for 2-3 weeks. Expression ofexogenous gene was assessed by Northern blot, andexpression oflIMP-1 in rHSCs was determined by Northernblot and Western blot. We tested the interstitial collagenaseactivity with FITC-labled type I collagen as substrate.Ultimately, we quantified the type Ⅰ, Ⅲ collagen byWestern blot.RESULTS: The exogenous antisense TIMP-1 recombinantplasmid could be expressed in rHSCs well, which couldblock the expression of TIMP-1 greatly, the ratio of TIMP-1/GAPDH was 0.67, 2.41, and 2.97 separately at mRNAlevel (P<0.05); the ratio of TIMP-1/β-actin was 0.31, 0.98and 1.32 separately at protein level (P<0.05); It mightelevate active and latent interstitial collagenase activity,the collagenase activity was 0.3049, 0.1411 and 0.1196respectively. (P<0.05), which led to promotion thedegradation of type Ⅰ, Ⅲ collagen, the ratio of collagen I/β-actin was 0.63, 1.78 and 1.92 separately (P<0.05); andthe ratio of collagen Ⅲ/β-actin was 0.59, 1.81 and 1.98separately (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: These data shows that the antisense TIMP-1 recombinant plasmid has the inhibitory effects on theproduction of type Ⅰ, Ⅲ collagens

  8. In vivo correction of a Menkes disease model using antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Erik C; Morcos, Paul A; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2008-03-11

    Although the molecular basis of many inherited metabolic diseases has been defined, the availability of effective therapies in such disorders remains problematic. Menkes disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type Atpase. To develop therapeutic approaches in affected patients, we have identified a zebrafish model of Menkes disease termed calamity that results from splicing defects in the zebrafish orthologue of the ATP7A gene. Embryonic-recessive lethal mutants have impaired copper homeostasis that results in absent melanin pigmentation, impaired notochord formation, and hindbrain neurodegeneration. In this current study, we have attempted to rescue these striking phenotypic alterations by using a series of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against the splice-site junctions of two mutant calamity alleles. Our findings reveal a robust and complete correction of the copper-deficient defects of calamity in association with the generation of the WT Menkes protein in all rescued mutants. Interestingly, a quantitative analysis of atp7a-specific transcripts suggests that competitive translational regulation may account for the synthesis of WT protein in these embryos. This in vivo correction of Menkes disease through the rescue of aberrant splicing may provide therapeutic options in this fatal disease and illustrates the potential for zebrafish models of human genetic disease in the development of treatments based on the principles of interactions of synthetic oligonucleotide analogues with mRNA.

  9. Design and screening of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against PAI-1 mRNA in endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-sheng JIANG; Sheng-qi WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To design and screen antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODNs), which inhibit type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro. Methods: Twenty seven ASODNs against different sites of PAI-1 mRNA were designed and transfected to HUVEC by lipofectin in vitro. The effects of ASODNs on PAI-1 antigen, PAI-1 activity and PAI-1 mRNA expression were detected by ELISA, amidolytical assay and RT-PCR, respectively. Results: Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-treated HUVEC increased the expression of PAI-1 compared with the normal HUVEC. Five among twenty seven designed ASODNs were effective in inhibiting the increase in PAI-1 antigen and PAI-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner after 48-h transfection. In particular, ASODN 14 (AO14) exhibited the best inhibitory effect. The control sequences of AO14, including sense, scramble, and mismatch sequences, did not significantly inhibit PAI-1 activity. It was revealed that the inhibitory efficacy of AO14 was in a sequence-specific manner. RT-PCR showed that ASODN 1, 7, 8, 14, and 15 decreased PAI-1 mRNA expression induced by TGF-β1 and AO14 showed the best inhibitory effect. Conclusion: ASODN 1,7,8, 14, and 15, among twenty seven designed ASODNs against PAI-1 mRNA, significantly decreased PAI-1 antigen and PAI-1 activity induced by TGF-β1 in a dosedependent manner in HUVEC in vitro. AO14 showed the best inhibitory effect on PAI-1 expression in a sequence-specific manner. The results of RT-PCR indicated that inhibitory effects of ASODNs on PAI-1 biosynthesis occurred at the mRNA level. Four among five effective target sites of ASODNs located at the translation initiation site or within the translation area of PAI-1 mRNA, suggesting that these sites may be promising sites for the design of effective ASODNs.

  10. Sense and antisense transcription are associated with distinct chromatin architectures across genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Howe, Françoise S; Fischl, Harry; Chocian, Karolina; Nair, Anitha; Mellor, Jane

    2015-09-18

    Genes from yeast to mammals are frequently subject to non-coding transcription of their antisense strand; however the genome-wide role for antisense transcription remains elusive. As transcription influences chromatin structure, we took a genome-wide approach to assess which chromatin features are associated with nascent antisense transcription, and contrast these with features associated with nascent sense transcription. We describe a distinct chromatin architecture at the promoter and gene body specifically associated with antisense transcription, marked by reduced H2B ubiquitination, H3K36 and H3K79 trimethylation and increased levels of H3 acetylation, chromatin remodelling enzymes, histone chaperones and histone turnover. The difference in sense transcription between genes with high or low levels of antisense transcription is slight; thus the antisense transcription-associated chromatin state is not simply analogous to a repressed state. Using mutants in which the level of antisense transcription is reduced at GAL1, or altered genome-wide, we show that non-coding transcription is associated with high H3 acetylation and H3 levels across the gene, while reducing H3K36me3. Set1 is required for these antisense transcription-associated chromatin changes in the gene body. We propose that nascent antisense and sense transcription have fundamentally distinct relationships with chromatin, and that both should be considered canonical features of eukaryotic genes.

  11. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  12. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  13. ANTISENSE TECHNIQUE TO TREAT BREAST CANCER – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many genes which are responsible for developing breast cancer especially, BRCA2 (Breast Cancer 2 and HER2 are extensively involved in developing breast cancer and hence it is the centre of attractions for all the researchers. Nano-particles conjugated with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies are called as “Trastazumab” which directly target the HER2 gene. The major advantage of this technology is that the cells can be prevented before they evolve in to mature stages i.e. metastases production. The BRCA2 gene belongs to the family of tumor suppressor genes and its protein product is responsible for the error free repair mechanisms of DNA. This BRCA2 gene interacts with RAD51 gene to fix the DNA breaks. Mutation in BRCA2 gene such as insertion and deletion leads to breast cancer. More than 800 mutations are found in this gene that lead to increased risk of the breast cancer. Furthermore, BRCA2 gene is also associated with various cancers like prostate, ovarian, fallopian, male breast cancer. Researchers believe that altered products produced due to defects in this gene are unable to interact with the gene RAD51 and cannot repair the DNA. Antisense RNA is the tool which can used to block any RNA or DNA to synthesize its product. In this review we focus in using Antisense RNA against the sense RNA of an altered BRCA2 gene to block the altered affectivity of that gene on the DNA repair mechanism. However, Antisense RNA technique may not help in treating breast cancer, it can better manage the breast cancer to occur.

  14. A riboswitch-regulated antisense RNA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, J R; Tiensuu, Teresa; Bécavin, Christophe; Gouin, Edith; Johansson, Jörgen; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-08-06

    Riboswitches are ligand-binding elements located in 5' untranslated regions of messenger RNAs, which regulate expression of downstream genes. In Listeria monocytogenes, a vitamin B12-binding (B12) riboswitch was identified, not upstream of a gene but downstream, and antisense to the adjacent gene, pocR, suggesting it might regulate pocR in a nonclassical manner. In Salmonella enterica, PocR is a transcription factor that is activated by 1,2-propanediol, and subsequently activates expression of the pdu genes. The pdu genes mediate propanediol catabolism and are implicated in pathogenesis. As enzymes involved in propanediol catabolism require B12 as a cofactor, we hypothesized that the Listeria B12 riboswitch might be involved in pocR regulation. Here we demonstrate that the B12 riboswitch is transcribed as part of a noncoding antisense RNA, herein named AspocR. In the presence of B12, the riboswitch induces transcriptional termination, causing aspocR to be transcribed as a short transcript. In contrast, in the absence of B12, aspocR is transcribed as a long antisense RNA, which inhibits pocR expression. Regulation by AspocR ensures that pocR, and consequently the pdu genes, are maximally expressed only when both propanediol and B12 are present. Strikingly, AspocR can inhibit pocR expression in trans, suggesting it acts through a direct interaction with pocR mRNA. Together, this study demonstrates how pocR and the pdu genes can be regulated by B12 in bacteria and extends the classical definition of riboswitches from elements governing solely the expression of mRNAs to a wider role in controlling transcription of noncoding RNAs.

  15. Reduction of polygalacturonase activity in tomato fruit by antisense RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehy, Raymond E.; Kramer, Matthew; Hiatt, William R

    1988-01-01

    Polygalacturonase [PG; poly(1,4-α-D-galacturonide) glycanhydrolase; EC 3.2.1.15] is expressed in tomato only during the ripening stage of fruit development. PG becomes abundant during ripening and has a major role in cell wall degradation and fruit softening. Tomato plants were transformed to produce antisense RNA from a gene construct containing the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a full-length PG cDNA in reverse orientation. The construct was integrated into the tomato genome by A...

  16. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipu...

  17. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates forming Self-Assembled Nano-aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Julian; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier;

    2015-01-01

    A series of peptide nucleic acid-oligo(bicycloguanidinium) (PNA-BGn) conjugates have been synthesized and characterized in terms of cellular antisense activity using the pLuc750HeLa cell splice correction assay. PNA-BG4 conjugates exhibit low micromolar antisense activity and the cellular activit...

  18. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari;

    2016-01-01

    , increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate...

  19. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoy, Antoni E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  20. Respirable antisense oligonucleotides: a new drug class for respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Makoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respirable antisense oligonucleotides (RASONs, which attenuate specific disease-associated mRNAs, represent a new class of respiratory therapeutics with considerable potential. RASONs overcome previous obstacles that have impeded the development of antisense therapeutics targeting diseases in other organ systems. RASONs are delivered directly to the target tissue via inhalation; their uptake seems to be enhanced by cationic properties inherent in pulmonary surfactant, and, because of the markedly different target properties of mRNA and proteins, they can have very long durations of effect compared with traditional drugs targeting the protein of the same gene. RASONs contain chemical modifications that decrease their degradation by cellular nucleases. However, total insensitivity to nucleases is probably not an optimal design criterion for RASONs, because moderate nuclease sensitivity can prevent their systemic delivery, decreasing the potential for systemic toxicity. EPI-2010 is a 21-mer phosphorothioate RASON that attenuates bronchoconstriction, inflammation and surfactant depletion in preclinical models of human asthma, has a duration of effect of seven days, and seems to undergo minimal systemic delivery.

  1. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  2. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

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    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  3. An overview of sugar-modified oligonucleotides for antisense therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Thazha P

    2011-09-01

    Among the multitude of chemical modifications that have been described over the past two decades, oligonucleotide analogs that are modified at the 2'-position of the furanose sugar have been especially useful for improving the drug-like properties of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). These modifications bias the sugar pucker towards the 3'-endo-conformation and improve ASO affinity for its biological target (i.e., mRNA). In addition, antisense drugs incorporating 2'-modified nucleotides exhibit enhanced metabolic stability, and improved pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. Further conformational restriction of the 2'-substituent to the 4'-position of the furanose ring yielded the 2',4'-bridged nucleic acid (BNA) analogs. ASOs containing BNA modifications showed unprecedented increase in binding affinity for target RNA, while also improved nuclease resistance, in vitro and in vivo potency. Several ASO drug candidates containing 2'-modified nucleotides have entered clinical trials and continue to make progress in the clinic for a variety of therapeutic indications. 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  4. Mechanism of antisense oligonucleotide interaction with natural RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, R; Petyuk, V; Vorobijev, Y; Koval, V; Fedorova, O; Vlassov, V; Zenkova, M

    2011-08-01

    Oligonucleotides find several numbers of applications: as diagnostic probes, RT and PCR primers and antisense agents due to their ability of forming specific interactions with complementary nucleotide sequences within nucleic acids. These interactions are strongly affected by accessibility of the target sequence in the RNA structure. In the present work the mechanism of invasion of RNA structure by oligonucleotide was investigated using a model system: yeast tRNA(Phe) and oligonucleotides complementary to the 3'-part of this molecule. Kinetics of interaction of oligonucleotides with in vitro transcript of yeast tRNAPhe was studied using stopped-flow technique with fluorescence quenching detection, 5'-DABCYL labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized with 3'-fluorescein labeled tRNA(Phe). The results evidence for a four-step invasion process of the oligonucleotide-RNA complex formation. The process is initiated by formation of transition complexes with nucleotides in the T-loop and ACCA sequence. This complex formation is followed by RNA unfolding and formation of an extended heteroduplex with the oligonucleotide via strand displacement process. Computer modeling of oligonucleotide-tRNA(Phe) interaction revealed potential factors that could favor transition complexes formation and confirmed the proposed mechanism, showing the oligonucleotide to be a molecular "wedge". Our data evidence that oligonucleotide invasion into structured RNA is initiated by loop-single strand interactions, similar to the initial step of the antisense RNA-RNA interactions. The obtained results can be used for choosing efficient oligonucleotide probes.

  5. COOLAIR Antisense RNAs Form Evolutionarily Conserved Elaborate Secondary Structures

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    Emily J. Hawkes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable debate about the functionality of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs. Lack of sequence conservation has been used to argue against functional relevance. We investigated antisense lncRNAs, called COOLAIR, at the A. thaliana FLC locus and experimentally determined their secondary structure. The major COOLAIR variants are highly structured, organized by exon. The distally polyadenylated transcript has a complex multi-domain structure, altered by a single non-coding SNP defining a functionally distinct A. thaliana FLC haplotype. The A. thaliana COOLAIR secondary structure was used to predict COOLAIR exons in evolutionarily divergent Brassicaceae species. These predictions were validated through chemical probing and cloning. Despite the relatively low nucleotide sequence identity, the structures, including multi-helix junctions, show remarkable evolutionary conservation. In a number of places, the structure is conserved through covariation of a non-contiguous DNA sequence. This structural conservation supports a functional role for COOLAIR transcripts rather than, or in addition to, antisense transcription.

  6. Efficacy and Safety Profile of Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotides in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Relizani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases. However, despite advances in AON chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is limited due to poor tissue uptake and sufficient therapeutic efficacy is still difficult to achieve. A novel class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA is considered very promising for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a neuromuscular disease typically caused by frameshifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene-encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure in addition to cognitive impairment. Herein, we report the efficacy and toxicology profile of a 13-mer tcDNA in mdx mice. We show that systemic delivery of 13-mer tcDNA allows restoration of dystrophin in skeletal muscles and to a lower extent in the brain, leading to muscle function improvement and correction of behavioral features linked to the emotional/cognitive deficiency. More importantly, tcDNA treatment was generally limited to minimal glomerular changes and few cell necroses in proximal tubules, with only slight variation in serum and urinary kidney toxicity biomarker levels. These results demonstrate an encouraging safety profile for tcDNA, albeit typical of phosphorothiate AONs, and confirm its therapeutic potential for the systemic treatment of DMD patients.

  7. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual problem ...

  8. A unified framework for inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Yuko; Herd, Seth A; Chatham, Christopher H; Depue, Brendan E; Banich, Marie T; O'Reilly, Randall C

    2011-10-01

    Inhibiting unwanted thoughts, actions and emotions figures centrally in daily life, and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is widely viewed as a source of this inhibitory control. We argue that the function of the PFC is best understood in terms of representing and actively maintaining abstract information, such as goals, which produces two types of inhibitory effects on other brain regions. Inhibition of some subcortical regions takes a directed global form, with prefrontal regions providing contextual information relevant to when to inhibit all processing in a region. Inhibition within neocortical (and some subcortical) regions takes an indirect competitive form, with prefrontal regions providing excitation of goal-relevant options. These distinctions are crucial for understanding the mechanisms of inhibition and how they can be impaired or improved.

  9. Functional Analysis of Polyphenol Oxidases by Antisense/Sense Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutharat Attajarusit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO. These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F., cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner, whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants

  10. An antisense transcript in the human cytomegalovirus UL87 gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid advances in research on antisense transcripts are gradually changing our comprehension of genomic and gene expression aspects of the Herpesviridae. One such herpesvirus is the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. Although transcription of the HCMV UL87 gene has not been specifically investigated, cDNA clones of UL87 antisense transcripts were found in HCMV cDNA libraries previously. In this study, the transcription of the UL87 antisense strand was investigated in three clinically isolated HCMV strains. Results First, an 800 nucleotides transcript having an antisense orientation to the UL87 gene was found in a late HCMV cDNA library. Then, the UL87 antisense transcript was confirmed by Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and Northern blot in three HCMV clinical strains. Two ORFs were predicted in the antisense transcript. The putative protein of ORF 1 showed a high degree of conservation among HCMV and other CMV strains. Conclusion An 800nt antisense transcript in the UL87 gene region exists in HCMV clinical strains.

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Transcript Knockdown in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pauli

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are synthetic, single-strand RNA-DNA hybrids that induce catalytic degradation of complementary cellular RNAs via RNase H. ASOs are widely used as gene knockdown reagents in tissue culture and in Xenopus and mouse model systems. To test their effectiveness in zebrafish, we targeted 20 developmental genes and compared the morphological changes with mutant and morpholino (MO-induced phenotypes. ASO-mediated transcript knockdown reproduced the published loss-of-function phenotypes for oep, chordin, dnd, ctnnb2, bmp7a, alk8, smad2 and smad5 in a dosage-sensitive manner. ASOs knocked down both maternal and zygotic transcripts, as well as the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA MALAT1. ASOs were only effective within a narrow concentration range and were toxic at higher concentrations. Despite this drawback, quantitation of knockdown efficiency and the ability to degrade lncRNAs make ASOs a useful knockdown reagent in zebrafish.

  12. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine suppresses in vivo angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Xiang Wang; Xing Yao; Yong-Liang Lu; Jin-Liang Ping; Jian-Fang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of antisense oligonucleotide targeting midkine (MK-AS) on angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) andin situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: An in situ human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model and CAM assay were used in this experiment. The effect of MK-AS on angiogenesis was evaluated by cell proliferation assay and hematoxylineosin (HE) staining.RESULTS: MK-AS significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in situ human HCC growth. At the same time, MK-AS suppressed the angiogenesis both in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HEPG2)-induced CAM and in situ human HCC tissues.CONCLUSION: MK-AS is an effective antiangiogenesis agent in vivo.

  14. Inhibition of Leukemic Cell Telomerase Activity by Antisense Phosphorothioate Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEDongmei; ZHANGYuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT) gene antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) on telomerase activity in K562 cells.Methods Telomerase activity was detemined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA) in K562 cells treated with ASODN and hTERTmRNA expression was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The hTERTmRNA level was decreased,and telomerase activity was significantly inhibited when the K562 cells were treated with ASODN for 48 h. Conclusion It is suggested that hTETR ASODN might specifically inhibit telomrase activity of K562 cells at translation level,and it is further proved that hTERT gene has significant correlation with telopmerase activity.

  15. LNA-antisense rivals siRNA for gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Wengel, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing unprecedented binding affinity toward complementary DNA and RNA while obeying the Watson-Crick base-pairing rules. For efficient gene silencing in vitro and in vivo, fully modified or chimeric LNA oligonucleotides have been a...... or phosphorothioate-DNA segment flanked by LNA gaps, rivals siRNA as the technology of choice for target validation and therapeutic applications....... applied. LNA oligonucleotides are commercially available, can be transfected using standard techniques, are non-toxic, lead to increased target accessibility, can be designed to activate RNase H, and function in steric block approaches. LNA-Antisense, including gapmer LNA containing a central DNA...

  16. Liposome-coated lipoplex-based carrier for antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrozumska, Paulina; Meissner, Justyna; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Szarawarska, Marta; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Ugorski, Maciej; Walasek, Marta A; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-01-01

    The chemical nature of genetic drugs (e.g. antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA, vectors) requires a suitable carrier system to protect them from enzymatic degradation without changing their properties and enable efficient delivery into target cells. Lipid vectors for nucleic acid delivery that have been widely investigated for years can be very effective. As the majority of attempts made in the field of cancer gene therapy have focused on solid tumors, while blood cancer cells have attracted less attention, the latter became the subject of our investigation. The lipid carrier proposed here is based on liposomes constructed by others but the lipid composition is original. A liposome-coated lipoplex (L-cL) consists of a core arising from complexation of positively charged lipid and negatively charged oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) or plasmid DNA coated by a neutral or anionic lipid bilayer. Moreover, our lipid vector demonstrates size stability and is able to retain a high content of enclosed plasmid DNA or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asODNs). Observed transfection efficacies of the tested preparation using a plasmid coding for fluorescent protein were up to 60-85% of examined leukemia cells (Jurkat T and HL-60 lines) in the absence or the presence of serum. When BCL‑2 asODN was encapsulated in the L-cL, specific silencing of this gene product at both the mRNA and protein level and also a markedly decreased cell survival rate were observed in vitro. Moreover, biodistribution analysis in mice indicates prolonged circulation characteristic for PEG-modified liposomal carriers. Experiments on tumor-engrafted animals indicate substantial inhibition of tumor growth.

  17. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of ANGPTL3 Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Brandt, Teresa A; Tai, Li-Jung; Fu, Wuxia; Peralta, Raechel; Yu, Rosie; Hurh, Eunju; Paz, Erika; McEvoy, Bradley W; Baker, Brenda F; Pham, Nguyen C; Digenio, Andres; Hughes, Steven G; Geary, Richard S; Witztum, Joseph L; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-07-20

    Epidemiologic and genomewide association studies have linked loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL3, encoding angiopoietin-like 3, with low levels of plasma lipoproteins. We evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting Angptl3 messenger RNA (mRNA) for effects on plasma lipid levels, triglyceride clearance, liver triglyceride content, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis in mice. Subsequently, 44 human participants (with triglyceride levels of either 90 to 150 mg per deciliter [1.0 to 1.7 mmol per liter] or >150 mg per deciliter, depending on the dose group) were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of placebo or an antisense oligonucleotide targeting ANGPTL3 mRNA in a single dose (20, 40, or 80 mg) or multiple doses (10, 20, 40, or 60 mg per week for 6 weeks). The main end points were safety, side-effect profile, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures, and changes in levels of lipids and lipoproteins. The treated mice had dose-dependent reductions in levels of hepatic Angptl3 mRNA, Angptl3 protein, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as reductions in liver triglyceride content and atherosclerosis progression and increases in insulin sensitivity. After 6 weeks of treatment, persons in the multiple-dose groups had reductions in levels of ANGPTL3 protein (reductions of 46.6 to 84.5% from baseline, Pantisense oligonucleotide and three who received placebo reported dizziness or headache. There were no serious adverse events. Oligonucleotides targeting mouse Angptl3 retarded the progression of atherosclerosis and reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in mice. Use of the same strategy to target human ANGPTL3 reduced levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in humans. (Funded by Ionis Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02709850 .).

  18. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  19. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting at the initiator of hTERT arrests growth of hepatoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Xia; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Cao, Ying-Lin; Ma, Chun-Hong; Han, Li-Hui; Zhang, Li-Ning; Wang, Zhen-Guang; Zhu, Fa-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effect of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide (asON) complementary to the initiator of human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) on the growth of hepatoma cells. METHODS: The as-hTERT was synthesized by using a DNA synthesizer. HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with as-hTERT at the concentration of 10 μmol/L. After 72 h, these cells were obtained for detecting growth inhibition, telomerase activity using the methods of MTT, TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. BALB/c(nu/nu) mice were injected HepG2.2.15 cells and a human-nude mice model was obtained. There were three groups for anti-tumor activity study. Once tumors were established, these animals in the first group were administered as-hTERT and saline. Apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by FCM. In the 2nd group, the animals were injected HepG2.2.15 cells together with as-hTERT. In the third group, the animals were given as-hTERT 24 hours postinjection of HepG2.2.15 cells. The anti-HBV effects were assayed with ELISA in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Growth inhibition was observed in cells treated with as-hTERT in vitro. A significant different in the value of A570 - A630 was found between cells treated with as-hTERT and control (P < 0.01) by MTT method. The telomerase activity of tumor cells treated with as-hTERT was reduced, the value of A450 nm was 0.42 compared to control (1.49) with TRAP-PCR-ELISA. The peak of apoptosis in tumor cells given as-hTERT was 21.12%, but not seen in saline-treated control. A prolonged period of carcinogenesis was observed in the second and third group animals. There was inhibitory effect on the expression of HBsAg and HBeAg in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSION: As-hTERT has an anti-tumor activity, which may be useful for gene therapy of tumors. PMID:14760759

  20. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    of GIP and GLP-1 receptors, the incretin effect is essential for normal glucose tolerance. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus it turns out that the incretin effect is severely impaired or abolished. The explanation seems to be that both the secretion of GLP-1 and the effect of GIP are impaired...... (whereas both the secretion of GIP and the effect of GLP-1 are near normal). The impaired GLP-1 secretion is probably a consequence of diabetic metabolic disturbances. The known genetic variations in the GIP receptor sequence are not associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but a defective insulinotropic...... and its analogues are attractive as therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes mellitus, analogues of GIP are unlikely to be effective. On the other hand, GIP seems to play an important role in lipid metabolism, promoting the disposal of ingested lipids, and mice with a targeted deletion of the GIP receptor...

  1. Optimization of antisense drug design againstconservative local motif in simulant secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA and QSAR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; TANGZhong-Ming; SONGHai-Feng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mRNA secondary structure stability in antisense drug design and obtain better antisensecandidates against neu/HER-2/erbB-2 mRNA than previous report. METHODS: Program RNAstructure wasutilized to simulate the secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA. Then 21 antisense phosphorothioateoligodeoxynucleotides (S-ODN) targeting different parts of secondary structural motif were designed. HA4 wasset as positive control. Mean 50 % inhibitory effects (IC50) of S-ODN on proliferations of SK-BR-3 breast cancercells were evaluated. The expression of target mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The multiple regression andquantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was preformed by SPSS software. RESULTS: Oneoptimal and two suboptimal secondary structures of target mRNA were obtained. Nine out of 11 S-ODN againstcompletely conservative local motif (LM) (conservative among all simulant secondary structures) got lower orsimilar IC50 values compared with HA4. On the other hand, 2 out of 3 S-ODN against relatively conservative LM(conservative between any two simulant secondary structures) got lower or similar IC50 values compared withHA4. Only 2 out of 5 S-ODN targeting variable LM (variable among different predicted secondary structures) hadacceptable activities. Average IC50 of S-ODN against completely conservative LM was significantly lower than thatof S-ODN against diverse LM. QSAR analysis suggested that stability, base number of bulge loops, and target freeenergies △G°T were statistically significant. In the multiple regression, R was 0.967, P=0.005. CONCLUSION:Antisense drug design against conservative LM was helpful for improving the positive rate. Several S-ODN candidates better than positive control were screened.

  2. The effects of antisense PTEN gene transfection on the growth and invasion of glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-jie; ZHENG Zhao-cong; WANG Ru-mi; WANG Shou-sen; YANG Wei-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects of antisense PTEN gene on the growth and invasion of glioma cells. Methods:A pcDNA3. 1/Hygro (-) recombinant plasmid containing antisense PTEN gene fragment was constructed. Glioma cells of primary culture were transfected with antisense PTEN gene vector and stably transfected clones were selected. Then, the different growth and invasion abilities and the different MMP9 mRNA expressions of three kinds of cells were observed, including the transfected cells, untransfected cells and the cells transfected with empty vector. Results :The abilities of growth and invasion of the transfected cells and the expressions of MMP9 mRNA were obviously enhanced. Conclusion: Antisense PTEN gene could have a negative impact on the growth and invasion of primary culture glioma cells.

  3. Anti sense and sensibility : renal and skin effects of (antisense) oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the clinical investigation of a novel treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (t2dm) using an antisense oligonucleotide(aon)to inhibit the sglt2 receptor. Furthermore it describes skin effects of oligonucleotides

  4. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides using cholesterol-modified sense dendrimers and cationic lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaltin, Patrick; Margineanu, Anca; Marchand, Damien; Aerschot, Arthur Van; Rozenski, Jef; Schryver, Frans De; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Juliano, Rudolph; Fisher, Michael H.; Kang, Hyunmin; Feyter, Steven De; Herdewijn, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Cholesterol modified mono-, di-, and tetrameric oligonucleotides were synthesized and hybridized with antisense oligonucleotides to study their incorporation in cationic liposomes together with the influence of this dendrimeric delivery system on biological activity. Electrostatic interactions seem

  5. Effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin on growth of human gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantao Xu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Our study investigated the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin on human gastric cancer cells. Human gastric cancer cells were incubated with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin for pre-designed durations, and then the cell growth was observed under light and electronic microscopes. Electrophoresis of fractured DNA fragments was performed to detect the DNA distribution and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP was used for the detection of telomerase activity. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin could induce the apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells which were characterized by plasma membrane blistering, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and formation of apoptotic bodies. Electrophoresis showed characteristic DNA ladder. Flow cytometry revealed hypo-diploid apoptosis peak before G1 phase and the telomerase activity was significantly inhibited. These results demonstrated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin can induce the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells to inhibit their proliferation.

  6. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately.

  7. Reduction of tumorigenicity of SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells by vascular endothelial growth factor antisense gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Cheng Tang; Yu Li; Guan Xiang Qian

    2001-01-01

    AIM To test the hypothesis to block VEGFexpression of SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells mayinhibit tumor growth using the rat hepatomamodel.METHODS Amplifiy the 200 VEGF cDNAfragment and insert it into human U6 genecassette in the reverse orientation transcribingsmall antisense RNA which could specificallyinteract with VEGF165, and VEGF121 mRNA.Construct the retroviral vector containing thisantisense VEGF U6 cassette and package thereplication-deficient recombinant retrovirus.SMMC-7721 cells were transduced with thesevirus and positive clones were selected withG418. PCR and Southern blot analysis wereperformed to determine if U6 cassette integratedinto the genomic DNA of positive clone.Transfected tumor cells were evaluated for RNAexpression by ribonuclease protection assays.The VEGF protein in the supernatant of parentaltumor cells and genetically modified tumor cellswas determined with ELISA. In vitro and in vivogrowth properties of antisense VEGF cell clonein nude mice were analyzed.RESULTS Restriction enzyme digestion andPCR sequencing verified that the antisense VEGFRNA retroviral vector was successfullyconstructed. After G418 selection, resistantSMMC-7721 cell clone was picked up. PCR andSouthern blot analysis suggested that U6cassette was integrated into the cell genomicDNA. Stable SMMC-7721 cell clone transducedwith U6 antisense RNA cassette could express200bp small antisense VEGF RNA and secretereduced levels of VEGF in culture condition.Production of VEGF by antisense transgeneexpressing cells was 65 ± 10 ng / L per 106 cells,420 ± 45 ng/L per 106 cells in sense group and 485± 30 ng/L per 106 cells in the negative control group, (P<0.05). The antisense-VEGF cell clone appeared phenotypically indistinguishable from SMMC-7721 cells and SMMC-7721 cells transfected sense VEGF. The growth rate of the antisense-VEGF cell clone was the same as the control cells. When S. C. was implanted into nude mice, growth of antisense-VEGF cell lines was greatly inhibited

  8. EFFECT OF BcL-2 ANTISENSE DRUG WITH DIFFERENT STRUCTURE ON THE BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF K562 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷小勇; 张洹; 何冬梅

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the differences and similarities of the antisense drugs with different structures on the biological functions of K562 cells. Methods: Cytotoxic effects were measured by use of a cell viability assay. Flow cytometric analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA fragmentation were also performed. The expression level of protein was assayed by immunofluorescence using fluoresce isothiocyanate label. Results: PNA targeting the coding region of the Bcl-2 messenger RNA could effectively inhibit K562 cell viability, down-regulate the synthesis of the Bcl-2 protein and increase cell apoptosis. By 72 h after the Bcl-2 antisense PNA treatment, K562 cells showed more reduction in the level of Bcl-2 protein compared with cells treated with the antisense ODN. After treatment with 10μmol/L of Bcl-2 antisense PNA or antisense ODN for 72 h, apoptotic rates of K562 cells were 13.15±1.13 and 11.72±1.12, respectively. Furthermore, there was significant difference in the percentage of apoptotic cells between antisense PNA group and antisense ODN group. Conclusion: The results suggest that antisense PNA targeting the coding region of Bcl-2 mRNA has better antisense effects than the antisense oligonucleotides on inducing apoptosis of K562 cells.

  9. Cathepsin B antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses invasive potential of MG-63 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the biological effects of cathepsin B phosporothioated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection.Methods A 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(ASODN)targeted against the cathepsin B mRNA was transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 by lipofectamine 2000.The sense and nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides to cathepsin B and blank vector were used as controls.The expression of cathepsin B mRNA was examined by RT-PCR an...

  10. Studies of Liposomal bcl-2 Antisense Oligode-oxynucleofide Induction of Apoptosis in Raji Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongmeiHe; HuanZhong

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of liposomal G3139 and transfected antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides directed against the coding region of the bcl-2 messenger RNA and the translation site on apoptosis in Raji cells.METHODS Cytotoxic effects were measured by use of the MTT method; The expression levels of Bcl-2 protein were assayed by immunofiuorescence using a fluoresce isothiocyanate label. Apoptosis was determined by morphological observation and flow cytometric analysis.RESULTS The 2 antisense oligonucleotides and G3139 can reduce Bcl-2 protein levels and Raji cell viability (IC50=4.54, 4.72 and 4.26 μmol/L, respectively), and induce apoptosis. A scrambled sequence control oligonucleotide and empty liposomes did not alter cell viability, Bcl-2 protein expression or apoptosis rates. There was no difference in reducing Bcl-2 protein levels and apoptosis rates found among the 3 antisense oligonucleotides.CONCLUSION The 2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides of bcl-2 messenger RNA can effectively induce apoptosis of Raji cells. The 2 antisense sequences and G3139 have a similarity in their antisense effect.

  11. Determination of optimal sites of antisense oligonucleotide cleavage within TNFα mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. H.; Giles, R. V.; Spiller, D. G.; Grzybowski, J.; Tidd, D. M.; Sibson, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides provide a powerful tool in order to determine the consequences of the reduced expression of a selected target gene and may include target validation and therapeutic applications. Methods of predicting optimum antisense sites are not always effective. We have compared the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides, which were selected in vitro using random combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries of differing length and complexity, upon putative target sites within TNFα mRNA. The relationship of specific target site accessibility and oligonucleotide efficacy with respect to these parameters proved to be complex. Modification of the length of the recognition sequence of the oligonucleotide library illustrated that independent target sites demonstrated a preference for antisense oligonucleotides of a defined and independent optimal length. The efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide sequences selected in vitro paralleled that observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated U937 cells. The application of methylphosphonate:phosphodiester chimaeric oligonucleotides to U937 cells reduced mRNA levels to up to 19.8% that of the untreated cell population. This approach provides a predictive means to profile any mRNA of known sequence with respect to the identification and optimisation of sites accessible to antisense oligonucleotide activity. PMID:11522838

  12. Identification of sense and antisense transcripts regulated by drought in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke, Carolina Gimiliani; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Sato, Paloma Mieko; de Andrade, Rodrigo Fandiño; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important sugar and energy crop that can be used efficiently for biofuels production. The development of sugarcane cultivars tolerant to drought could allow for the expansion of plantations to sub-prime regions. Knowledge on the mechanisms underlying drought responses and its relationship with carbon partition would greatly help to define routes to increase yield. In this work we studied sugarcane responses to drought using a custom designed oligonucleotide array with 21,901 different probes. The oligoarrays were designed to contain probes that detect transcription in both sense and antisense orientation. We validated the results obtained using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A total of 987 genes were differentially expressed in at least one sample of sugarcane plants submitted to drought for 24, 72 and 120 h. Among them, 928 were sense transcripts and 59 were antisense transcripts. Genes related to Carbohydrate Metabolism, RNA Metabolism and Signal Transduction were selected for gene expression validation by qPCR that indicated a validation percentage of 90%. From the probes presented on the array, 75% of the sense probes and 11.9% of the antisense probes have signal above background and can be classified as expressed sequences. Our custom sugarcane oligonucleotide array provides sensitivity and good coverage of sugarcane transcripts for the identification of a representative proportion of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and sense-antisense transcript pairs (SATs). The antisense transcriptome showed, in most cases, co-expression with respective sense transcripts.

  13. Chromosomally encoded small antisense RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Martina; Kaderábková, Pavla; Pátek, Miroslav; Knoppová, Monika; Silar, Radoslav; Nesvera, Jan

    2008-02-01

    The first observation of chromosomally encoded small antisense RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum is reported. Transcription oriented in the reverse direction to the transcription of the genes cg1934 and cg1935 was demonstrated within the chromosomal cg1934-cg1935 intergenic region. The transcription was found to be increased after heat shock. The transcriptional start point of this RNA designated ArnA was localized 21 bp upstream of the cg1935 translational start point by primer extension analysis, when the total RNA was isolated from cells grown at 30 degrees C. After heat shock, the transcriptional start point of an additional species of ArnA RNA was detected 19 bp upstream of the cg1935 translational start point. The stress-response sigma factor SigH was found to be involved in the synthesis of ArnA RNAs. The 3' end of the ArnA RNAs was identified using the 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. The length of the two ArnA RNA species was thus determined to be 129 and 131 nt, respectively. The ArnA RNAs were found to overlap the 5'-untranslated region of the transcript of the cg1935 gene coding for a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. These results suggest that the noncoding ArnA RNAs have a regulatory function.

  14. Efficient in vivo delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Wenying; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Nishina, Tomoko; Sakata, Mina; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2013-03-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) is present on the ventricular walls of the brain, produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contains many blood vessels, and is a major functional component of the blood-CSF barrier. The CP is an important site in the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and meningeal amyloidosis. We performed gene silencing in the CP in vivo by using an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). A short ASO of length 12 nucleotides was intravenously injected into rats. The ASO was not delivered to neurons or glia in the central nervous system, but was successfully delivered into the CP, and resulted in a significant reduction of endogenous target gene expression in epithelial cells within the CP. Although the mechanism of uptake of the ASO by the CP was not elucidated, the ASO bound to albumin in vivo, and the distribution of ASO delivery was similar to that of albumin delivery. These findings suggest that we inhibited target gene expression in the epithelial cells of the CP via albumin-ASO conjugates. This strategy should be useful for investigations of the function of CP, and for the development of new gene-silencing therapies for diseases with pathophysiology related to the CP.

  15. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences.

  16. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe “specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture,” a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein–RNA interactions taking place at “zero distance.” Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. PMID:28476952

  17. Anti-angiogenesis effect of generation 4 polyamidoamine/vascular endothelial growth factor antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on breast cancer in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-zhi GU; Xin-han ZHAO; Ling-xiao ZHANG; Li LI; Zhi-yu WANG; Min MENG; Gai-li AN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of the generation 4 polyamidoamine/vascular endothelial growth factor antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (G4PAMAMNEGFASODN) compound on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its mRNA of breast cancer cells and on the inhibition of vascular endothelial cells. Methods: We examined the morphology of G4PAMAM/VEGFASODN compound and its pH stability, in vitro transfection efficiency and toxicity, and the expressions of VEGF and its mRNA. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay was used to detect the inhibitory function of the compound on vascular endothelial cells. Results: The compound was about 10 nm in diameter and was homogeneously netlike. From pH 5 to 10, it showed quite a buffered ability. The 48-h transfection rate in the charge ratio of 1:40 was 98.76%, significantly higher than that of the liposome group (P<0.05). None of the transfection products showed obvious toxicity on the cells. The expressions of both VEGF protein and its mRNA after G4PAMAM/VEGFASODN transfection decreased markedly. Conclusion: With a low toxicity, high safety, and high transfection rate, G4PAMAMNEGFASODN could be a promising gene vector. Specifically, it inhibits VEGF gene expression efficiently, laying a basis for further in vivo animal studies.

  18. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugates as carriers for cellular delivery of antisense oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the merits of a novel delivery strategy for the antisense oligomers based on cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a carrier PNA with sequence complementary to part of the antisense oligomer. The effect of these carrier CPP-PNAs was evaluated by using antisense PNA targeting...... splicing correction of the mutated luciferase gene in the HeLa pLuc705 cell line, reporting cellular (nuclear) uptake of the antisense PNA via luciferase activity measurement. Carrier CPP-PNA constructs were studied in terms of construct modification (with octaarginine and/or decanoic acid) and carrier PNA...

  19. Differential modification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid biosynthesis with an antisense chalcone synthase construct in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliver, S P; Morris, P; Robbins, M P

    1997-11-01

    Three clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus L. (bird's foot trefoil) were transformed with an antisense chalcone synthase (CHS) gene construct made using a stress induced CHS17 cDNA from Phaseolus vulgaris under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and Nos terminator via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, ten antisense and five control co-transformation events from each recipient clonal genotype were analysed. After elicitation with glutathione, the level of tannin accumulation was found to be increased in a number of antisense root cultures derived from the low (S33) and moderate (S50) tannin recipient genotypes. Six antisense and four control transformed lines from genotype S50 were selected for more detailed study. The antisense CHS construct was found to be integrated into the genome, with a copy number ranging from 1 to 5 and antisense orientation was confirmed by PCR. In transformed root cultures, increased CHS transcript levels were noted in a number of antisense lines. Biochemical analyses of glutathione-elicited-root cultures indicated a significant increase in tannin accumulation in antisense CHS lines and mean vestitol levels were reduced. These results show that the introduction of a heterologous antisense chalcone synthase construct into L. corniculatus resulted in an unpredicted molecular and biochemical phenotype. Such findings are discussed in relation to manipulation of this complex multigene family.

  20. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES(ASODN) ON HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINE PaTu8988s

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of different concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) on human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s. Method: Human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s in exponential growth stage was used to study the effect of different drug concentrations on the cell line in the presence of different concentrations (0 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, 25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 10 μg/m, 200 μg/ml) of ASODN and sense oligodeoxynucleotides (SODN). Cell counts and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolzyl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were carried out. Results: The inhibitory rate on the cell line PaTu8988s was 98.73%,95.76%,69.49%,33.05% and 0 for ASODM concentrations of 200 μg/ml,100 μg/ml,50 μg/ml,25 μg/ml and 5 μg/ml at 48 hours. Conclusions: K-ras complementary ASODN can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer cell line PaTu8988s by 30.05% to 98.73%. This is likely to contribute to the specificity of the K-ras mRNA complementary capped ASODN sequential codon. Non-specific effect and side effect of ASOND were observed for instance, the greater the concentration is, the earlier the peak of inhibitory rate is reached. In concentration of 25 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml ASODN showed a dose-effect correlation

  1. Acute alcohol effects on inhibitory control and implicit cognition: implications for loss of control over drinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Field; R.W. Wiers; P. Christiansen; M.T. Fillmore; J.C. Verster

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol impairs inhibitory control, and it alters implicit alcohol cognitions including attentional bias and implicit associations. These effects are seen after doses of alcohol which do not lead to global impairments in cognitive performance. We review studies which demonstrate that the effects of

  2. Obstructive Effects of Ultrasonic Microbubble Intensifier on CHG-5 Cell with Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hong-ying; CAO You-de; WANG Zhi-gang; LI Pan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects on human glioma cell line CHG-5 by ultrasonic microbubble intensifier with survivin antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN)transfection. Methods: Antisense oligonucleotides targeting survivin mRNA was designed and synthesized.Four regimen groups were designed,group A:survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with ultrasonic microbubble intensifier combined with ultrasound irradiation,group B: survivin antisense oligonucleotides transfected with lipofectamine combined with ultrasound irradiation,group C:survivin antisense oligonucelotides with lipofectamine transfection.group D:blank control.The expression changes of surviving protein were measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting,and MTr assay was used to measure the changes of proliferation.Results:Survivin protein expression in group A was decreased significantly in human glioma cell line CHG-5 than other groups(P<0.05),and the proliferating rate of CHG-5 in group A was also significantly inhibited(P<0.05).Conclusion:Ultrasonic microbubble intensifier transfection combined with ultrasound irradiation is a promising method in gene transfection effectively and noninvasively.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE GENE THERAPY OF MALIGNANT GLIOMA WITH ANTISENSE VEGF RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    浦佩玉; 王建桢; 黄强; 张敬; 张云亭

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antisense VEGF RNA on rat C6 gliomas in vivo and find out the feasibility of antiangiogenesis therapy with antisense VEGF RNA for malignant gliomas. Methods: Parental rat C6 glioma cells and C6 cells transfected with antisense VEGF cDNA were implanted intracerebrally and subcutaneously into SD rats as control and transfected group. Rats bearing cerebral and subcutaneous C6 gliomas were treated with antisense VEGF cDNA as treated group and sense VEGF cDNA and empty vector as control of treated group. The general manifestation, survival time, MRI and histopathological changes of all rats were observed. The volume of subcutaneously implanted tumors was determined regularly. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining were used for detection of VEGF gene expression of gliomas while PCNA immunostaining and TUNEL method for examination of proliferation activity and apoptosis of gliomas, respectively. Results: The survival of the rats in transfected and treated group was prolonged. There were two rats surviving over 90 d in the treated group and their tumors disappeared. The VEGF gene expression, the number of microvessels and the proliferation activity were decreased and a large amount of apoptotic cells could be found in cerebral and subcutaneous gliomas in treated and transfected groups. Conclusion: VEGF is one of the candidate genes for gene therapy of malignant gliomas. Antisense VEGF RNA combined with other therapies should be studied further for enhancing the therapeutic effect of malignant gliomas.

  4. Antihepatoma effect of alpha-fetoprotein antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotides in vitro and in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Wang Wang; Jin Hui Yuan; Ru Gang Zhang; Li Xia Guo; Yong Xie; Hong Xie

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate antihepatoma effect ofantisense phosphorothioate oligodeo-xyribonucleotides (S-ODNs) targeted to alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) genes in vitro and in nudemice.METHODS AFP gene expression was examinedby immunocytochemical method or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Effect of S-ODNson SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cell growth invitro was determined using microculturetetrazolium assay. In vivo antitumor activitiesof S-ODNs were monitored by measuring tumorweight differences in treated and control micebearing SMMC-7721 xenografts. Induction of cellapoptosis was evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis.RESULTS Antisense S-ODN treatment led toreduced AFP gene expression. Specificantisense S-ODNs, but not control S-ODNs,inhibited the growth of heaptoma cells in vitro.In vivo. only antisense S-ODNs exhibitedobvious antitumor activities. FACS analysisrevealed that the growth inhibition by antisenseS. ODNs was associated with their cell apoptosisinduction.CONCLUSION Antisense S-ODNs targeted toAFP genes inhibit the growth of human hepatomacells and solid hepatoma, which is related totheir cell apoptosis induction.

  5. Expression of XIST sense and antisense in bovine fetal organs and cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazmand, Ali; Basrur, Parvathi K; Stranzinger, Gerald; Graphodatskaya, Daria; Reyes, Ed R; King, W Allan

    2004-01-01

    Untranslated RNAs transcribed from sense and antisense strands of a gene referred to as X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) play crucial roles in the genetic inactivation and condensation of one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of female mammals. X inactivation is also thought to occur in mammalian male germ cells mainly based on the formation of a condensed structure referred to as a sex body or XY-body, during spermatogenesis. Molecular identity of the sex body, the roles of sense and antisense XIST RNAs in its formation, and the relevance of the sex body to spermatogenesis are not known. Here we report the results of our strand-specific RT-PCR approach to identify the amplicon detected in fetal bovine testes previously referred to as XIST and to test for sense/antisense expression in male and female organs and cell cultures of different sex chromosome constitution. Our results showed that the transcript detected consistently in male gonads and variably in somatic organs represents XIST antisense RNA and that XIST sense and antisense RNAs are co-expressed in female somatic tissues and cultured cells including cells of sex chromosome aneuploids (XXY and XXX). Our results, which differ from those of other investigators in this area, are discussed in the light of the recently reported differences in the expression pattern of murine Xist/Tsix loci and their structural and functional differences in different mammalian species.

  6. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in Hep-2 by antisense survivin RNA in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in Hep-2 by antisense survivin RNA. Methods: Antisense survivin RNA expression vector was constructed and then was transfected to human laryngeal carcinoma cell line Hep-2 by lipofectamine. HpEGFP/survivin cells (transfected with the combinant of antisense survivin RNA) were obstained by using G418. The levels of survivin protein before and after transfection were determined by Western-blot. Proliferation activity was measured by MTT assay. The experiment of colony formation in soft agar was carried out for assessing ability of proliferation of Hep-2 cell. Apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and acrdine orange(AO).Results:After antisense survivin RNA plasmids were transfected, the level of survivin protein was inhibited in Hep-2. ComPared with control, proliferation of HpEGFP/survivin cells were suppressed significantly. The experiment of colony formation in soft agar showed the ability of colony formation decreased in HpEGFP/survivin cells compared to control (P<0.05). Apoptosis rate increased about 1.81 folds compared with control. Conclusion: The antisense survivin RNA can partly inhibit the level of survivin protein expression in Hep-2 and can induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of Hep-2 by down-regulating the expression of endogenous survivin in vitro.

  7. BTEB2 antisense RNA inhibits intimal hyperplasia in a rat carotid balloon injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De; HE Guo-xiang; TANG Bing; TANG Bo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of basic transcriptional element binding protein-2(BTEB2) antisense RNA on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation and the neointimal formation after carotid balloon injury in rats. Methods: The cultured VSMCs were transfected with an adenoviral vector containing BTEB2 antisense gene, Ad ASBTEB2. Effects of BTEB2 antisense RNA on the expression of BTEB2 were investigated by Western blot analysis. The cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry. Ad ASBTEB2, control adenoviral vector Ad. LacZ or PBS was transduced into the rat carotid artery after balloon injury. The expression of BTEB2 at 7, 14, and 21 d after gene transfer was detected by immunohistochemistry and neointima-to-media (I/M) area ratio at these time points was calculated. Results: The cell cycle was arrested in G0/G1 phase and the expression of BETB2 was downregulated after transfection with Ad ASBTEB2. Ad ASBTEB2 treatment reduced I/M area ratios on day 7, 14, and 21 after injury by 45%, 50% and 53% respectively, whereas the Ad LacZ treatment did not significantly alter these ratios compared with control group. Conclusion: BTEB2 antisense RNA mediated by adenoviral vector inhibits proliferation of VSMCs and significantly reduces neointimal hyperplasia in the rat carotid balloon injury model. BTEB2 antisense RNA is a potential therapeutic approach to preventing neointimal formation after balloon injury.

  8. Expression of an Antisense BcMF3 Affects Microsporogenesis and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Le-cheng; CAO Jia-shu; YU Xiao-lin; XIANG Xun; FEI Yong-jun

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to provide some information relevant to the molecular mechanism of genic male sterility in plants, BcMF3 gene that encodes a pectin methylesterase was isolated from the fertile B line of Chinese cabbage-pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp.chinensis, syn. B. campestris ssp. chinensis). In the present paper, a 455-bp antisense cDNA fragment of BcMF3 was introduced to binary vector pBI121, and then was mobilized into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. The A.tumefaciens harboring the BcMF3 antisense fragment was transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip. Scanning electronic microscopy examination demonstrated that 47.8% of BcMF3 antisense pollen grains exhibited abnormal shape,which might lead to decreased germination of pollens, suggesting that the product of BcMF3 gene plays an important role during microsporogenesis. The evidence on burst of 45.7% of BcMF3 antisense pollen tubes in vitro and a majority of BcMF3 antisense pollens restricted within the stigmatic tissue revealed that BcMF3 is involved in aiding the growth of pollen tubes. The results suggest that BcMF3 acts at both stages of microsporogensis and pollen tube growth.

  9. Profiled support vector machines for antisense oligonucleotide efficacy prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Guerrero José D

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs for prediction and analysis of antisense oligonucleotide (AO efficacy. The collected database comprises 315 AO molecules including 68 features each, inducing a problem well-suited to SVMs. The task of feature selection is crucial given the presence of noisy or redundant features, and the well-known problem of the curse of dimensionality. We propose a two-stage strategy to develop an optimal model: (1 feature selection using correlation analysis, mutual information, and SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE, and (2 AO prediction using standard and profiled SVM formulations. A profiled SVM gives different weights to different parts of the training data to focus the training on the most important regions. Results In the first stage, the SVM-RFE technique was most efficient and robust in the presence of low number of samples and high input space dimension. This method yielded an optimal subset of 14 representative features, which were all related to energy and sequence motifs. The second stage evaluated the performance of the predictors (overall correlation coefficient between observed and predicted efficacy, r; mean error, ME; and root-mean-square-error, RMSE using 8-fold and minus-one-RNA cross-validation methods. The profiled SVM produced the best results (r = 0.44, ME = 0.022, and RMSE= 0.278 and predicted high (>75% inhibition of gene expression and low efficacy (http://aosvm.cgb.ki.se/. Conclusions The SVM approach is well suited to the AO prediction problem, and yields a prediction accuracy superior to previous methods. The profiled SVM was found to perform better than the standard SVM, suggesting that it could lead to improvements in other prediction problems as well.

  10. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  11. Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Giovanni; Neurath, Markus F; Ardizzone, Sandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Fantini, Massimo C; Castiglione, Fabiana; Scribano, Maria L; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Caprioli, Flavio; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Rogai, Francesca; Vecchi, Maurizio; Atreya, Raja; Bossa, Fabrizio; Onali, Sara; Fichera, Maria; Corazza, Gino R; Biancone, Livia; Savarino, Vincenzo; Pica, Roberta; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Crohn's disease-related inflammation is characterized by reduced activity of the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) due to high levels of SMAD7, an inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Preclinical studies and a phase 1 study have shown that an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, mongersen, targets ileal and colonic SMAD7. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we evaluated the efficacy of mongersen for the treatment of persons with active Crohn's disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10, 40, or 160 mg of mongersen or placebo per day for 2 weeks. The primary outcomes were clinical remission at day 15, defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of less than 150, with maintenance of remission for at least 2 weeks, and the safety of mongersen treatment. A secondary outcome was clinical response (defined as a reduction of 100 points or more in the CDAI score) at day 28. The proportions of patients who reached the primary end point were 55% and 65% for the 40-mg and 160-mg mongersen groups, respectively, as compared with 10% for the placebo group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants reaching clinical remission between the 10-mg group (12%) and the placebo group. The rate of clinical response was significantly greater among patients receiving 10 mg (37%), 40 mg (58%), or 160 mg (72%) of mongersen than among those receiving placebo (17%) (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). Most adverse events were related to complications and symptoms of Crohn's disease. We found that study participants with Crohn's disease who received mongersen had significantly higher rates of remission and clinical response than those who received placebo. (Funded by Giuliani; EudraCT number, 2011-002640-27.).

  12. Conjugation with receptor-targeted histidine-rich peptides enhances the pharmacological effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Juliano, Rudy

    2014-01-15

    Ineffective delivery to intracellular sites of action is one of the key limitations to the use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Here, we describe molecular scale antisense oligonucleotide conjugates that bind selectively to a cell surface receptor, are internalized, and then partially escape from nonproductive endosomal locations to reach their sites of action in the nucleus. Peptides that include bombesin sequences for receptor targeting and a run of histidine residues for endosomal disruption were covalently linked to a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide. The conjugates were tested for their ability to correct splicing and up-regulate expression of a luciferase reporter in prostate cancer cells that express the bombesin receptor. We found that trivalent conjugates that included both the targeting sequence and several histidine residues were substantially more effective than conjugates containing only the bombesin or histidine moieties. This demonstrates the potential of creating molecular scale oligonucleotide conjugates with both targeting and endosome escape capabilities.

  13. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  14. Effects of CIITA antisense RNA on the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the effect of the major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ (MHCⅡ) transactivator (CIITA) antisense RNA on the expression of the human leukemia (HLA) class Ⅱ molecules, 5′ end cDNA sequence of CIITA gene was cloned, and antisense RNA expression vector pcDNA-Ⅱ was constructed. HeLa cells transfected with pcDNA-Ⅱ and pcDNA3 were induced by IFN-g for 3 d. The expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules on HeLa/pcDNA-Ⅱ cells was significantly decreased, while it has no effect on the expression of HLA class Ⅰ molecules. This result suggests that the CIITA antisense RNA can inhibit the expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules in HeLa cells. It also implies a promising approach to generate immune tolerance in graft transplantation.

  15. A Simple Three-Step Method for Design and Affinity Testing of New Antisense Peptides: An Example of Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Štambuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide–receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense–antisense (epitope–paratope peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines.

  16. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); I.P. Rupp; P. Reynolds (Paul); L. Prakash; S. Prakash

    1989-01-01

    textabstractWe report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is

  17. Functional comparison of antisense proteins of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in viral pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eBarbeau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of antisense transcripts from the 3’ long terminal repeat (LTR in human T-lymphotropic retroviruses has now been clearly demonstrated. After the identification of the antisense strand-encoded HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ factor, we reported that HBZ could interact with CREB transcription factors and consequently turn off the important activating potential of the viral Tax protein on HTLV-1 5’ LTR promoter activity. We have recently accumulated new results demonstrating that antisense transcripts also exist in HTLV-2, -3 and -4. Furthermore, our data have confirmed the existence of encoded proteins from these antisense transcripts (termed antisense proteins of HTLVs or APHs. APHs are also involved in the down-regulation of Tax-dependent viral transcription. In this review, we will focus on the different molecular mechanisms used by HBZ and APH-2 to control viral expression. While HBZ interacts with CREB through its basic zipper domain, APH-2 binds to this cellular factor through a five amino acid motif localized in its carboxyl terminus. Moreover, unlike APH-2, HBZ possesses an N-terminal activation domain that also contributes to the inhibition of the viral transcription by interacting with the KIX domain of p300/CBP. On the other hand, HBZ was found to induce T-cell proliferation while APH-2 was unable to promote such proliferation. Interestingly, HTLV-2 has not been causally linked to human T-cell leukemia, while HTLV-1 is responsible for the development of the Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL. We will further discuss the possible role played by antisense proteins in the establishment of pathologies induced by viral infection.

  18. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural antisense transcripts (NATs are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded or a different locus (trans-encoded. They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation. NATs give rise to sense-antisense transcript pairs and the number of these identified has escalated greatly with the availability of DNA sequencing resources and public databases. Traditionally, NATs were identified by the alignment of full-length cDNAs or expressed sequence tags to genome sequences, but an alternative method for large-scale detection of sense-antisense transcript pairs involves the use of microarrays. In this study we developed a novel protocol to assay sense- and antisense-strand transcription on the 55 K Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array, which is a 3' in vitro transcription (3'IVT expression array. We selected five different tissue types for assay to enable maximum discovery, and used the 'Chinese Spring' wheat genotype because most of the wheat GeneChip probe sequences were based on its genomic sequence. This study is the first report of using a 3'IVT expression array to discover the expression of natural sense-antisense transcript pairs, and may be considered as proof-of-concept. Results By using alternative target preparation schemes, both the sense- and antisense-strand derived transcripts were labeled and hybridized to the Wheat GeneChip. Quality assurance verified that successful hybridization did occur in the antisense-strand assay. A stringent threshold for positive hybridization was applied, which resulted in the identification of 110 sense-antisense transcript pairs, as well as 80 potentially antisense-specific transcripts. Strand-specific RT-PCR validated the microarray observations, and showed that antisense transcription is likely to be tissue specific. For the annotated sense-antisense

  19. Effect of antisense oligonucleotides targeting telomerase catalytic subunit on tumor cell proliferationin vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To screen specific antitumor drugs targeting telomerase catalytic subunit (hEST2), 12 different hEST2 antisense oligonucleotides were designed based on hEST2 mRNA second structure and transfected into tumor cell lines by the lipofectin-mediated method. Cell growth activity was evaluated by MTT assay. hEST212 was picked out and its specificity, antitumor tree and continuous effect were analyzed. The results showed that hEST212 had promising antitumor activity in vitro, hEST2 can be used as a pratical target and an antisense drug candidate for cancer.

  20. Antisense silencing of the creA gene in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bautista, L. F.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Hentzer, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Antisense expression of a portion of the gene encoding the major carbon catabolite repressor CREA in Aspergillus nidulans resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of glucose-repressible enzymes, both endogenous and heterologous, in the presence of glucose. The derepression effect was appr......Antisense expression of a portion of the gene encoding the major carbon catabolite repressor CREA in Aspergillus nidulans resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of glucose-repressible enzymes, both endogenous and heterologous, in the presence of glucose. The derepression effect...

  1. The role of natural antisense transcripts in the pathogenesis of nervous system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei XIANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense transcripts (NATs. These antisense transcripts are now recognized as an important component of molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene expression. NATs are particularly prevalent in the mammalian nervous system. The importance of NATs in the normal functioning of nervous system is becoming increasingly evident. They are not only involved in neuronal differentiation, myelination and ion channel regulation, but also in advanced cognitive processes, such as synapse plasticity and memory formation. This paper focuses on the potential involvement of NATs in various neurodegenerative disorders. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.014

  2. Functional consequences of splicing of the antisense transcript COOLAIR on FLC transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Sebastian; Raitskin, Oleg; Wu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    perturbs a cotranscriptional feedback mechanism linking COOLAIR processing to FLC gene body histone demethylation and reduced FLC transcription. The importance of COOLAIR splicing in this repression mechanism was confirmed by disrupting COOLAIR production and mutating the COOLAIR proximal splice acceptor...... site. Our findings suggest that altered splicing of a long noncoding transcript can quantitatively modulate gene expression through cotranscriptional coupling mechanisms.......Antisense transcription is widespread in many genomes; however, how much is functional is hotly debated. We are investigating functionality of a set of long noncoding antisense transcripts, collectively called COOLAIR, produced at Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). COOLAIR initiates just...

  3. Method of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Mediated Antisense Inhibition of Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligonucleotide mimic that recognizes and binds to nucleic acids. The strong binding affinity of PNA to mRNA coupled with its high sequence specificity enable antisense PNA to selectively inhibit (i.e., knockdown) the protein synthesis of a target gene. This novel technology provides a powerful tool for Campylobacter studies because molecular techniques have been relatively less well-developed for this bacterium as compared to other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. This chapter describes a protocol for PNA-mediated antisense inhibition of gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

  4. Combination Adenovirus-Mediated HSV-tk/GCV and Antisense IGF-1 Gene Therapy for Rat Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of combination adenovirus-mediated HSV-tk/GCV system and antisense IGF-1 gene therapy for rat glioma and analyze the mechanism.Methods Using the recombinant adenovirus vector,GCV killing effeciency after combined gene transfer of HSV-tk and antisense IGF-1 was observed in vitro.Rat glioma was treated with HSV-tk/GCV and antisense IGF-1 and the survival rate of rats was observed.Results C6 cells transfected with tk and antisense IGF-1 gene were more sensitive to GCV than that transfected with tk gene alone.The survival of the combination gene therapy group was prolonged significantly and large amounts of CD+4,CD+8 lymphocytes were detected in the tumor tissues.Conclusion Antisense IGF-1 gene may enhance the tumor-killing effects of HSV-tk/GCV.

  5. Inhibiting effect of antisense hTRT on telomerase activity of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟娇; 李晓冬; 杨庆; 贾凤岐; 卫立辛; 郭亚军; 吴孟超

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To induce changes in biological character of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 by blocking the expression of telomerase genes hTRT and to explore its value in cancer gene therapy. Methods: The vehicle for eukaryotic expression of antisense hTRT was constructed and then transfected into SMMC-7721 cells. The effects of antisense hTRT gene on telomerase activity, cancer cell growth and malignant phenotypes were analyzed. Results: The obtained transfectants that could express antisense hTRT gene stably showed marked decrease in telomerase activity; the shortening of telomere was obvious; cells presented contact growth inhibition; in nude mice transplantation, the rate of tumor induction dramatically decreased. Conclusion: Antisense hTRT gene expression can significantly inhibit telomerase activity of cancer cells and decrease malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, as a telomerase inhibitor, antisense hTRT gene may be a new pathway for cancer therapy.

  6. Inhibitory control in bulimic-type eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudan Wu

    Full Text Available The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarise data from neuropsychological studies on inhibitory control to general and disease-salient (i.e., food/eating, body/shape stimuli in bulimic-type eating disorders (EDs. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify eligible experimental studies. The outcome measures studied included the performance on established inhibitory control tasks in bulimic-type EDs. Effect sizes (Hedges' g were pooled using random-effects models. For inhibitory control to general stimuli, 24 studies were included with a total of 563 bulimic-type ED patients: 439 had bulimia nervosa (BN, 42 had anorexia nervosa of the binge/purge subtype (AN-b, and 82 had binge eating disorder (BED. With respect to inhibitory control to disease-salient stimuli, 12 studies were included, representing a total of 218 BN patients. A meta-analysis of these studies showed decreased inhibitory control to general stimuli in bulimic-type EDs (g = -0.32. Subgroup analysis revealed impairments with a large effect in the AN-b group (g = -0.91, impairments with a small effect in the BN group (g = -0.26, and a non-significant effect in the BED group (g = -0.16. Greater impairments in inhibitory control were observed in BN patients when confronted with disease-salient stimuli (food/eating: g = -0.67; body/shape: g = -0.61. In conclusion, bulimic-type EDs showed impairments in inhibitory control to general stimuli with a small effect size. There was a significantly larger impairment in inhibitory control to disease salient stimuli observed in BN patients, constituting a medium effect size.

  7. Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büller, Harry R; Bethune, Claudette; Bhanot, Sanjay; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; Raskob, Gary E; Segers, Annelise; Verhamme, Peter; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-15

    Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively. This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).

  8. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial

  9. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide to the cornea by iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo, M; Valamanesh, F; Andrieu, C; Klein, C; Benezra, D; Courtois, Y; Behar-Cohen, F

    2003-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the potential of iontophoresis to promote the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) directed at the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 receptor (KDR/Flk) to the cornea of the rat eye. Fluorescence (CY5)-labeled ODNs in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (20 microM) were locally administered to rat eyes, and their fate within the anterior segment was studied. Thirty-four male, 5-week-old Wistar rats were used for all experiments. The rats were divided in four groups. In group I (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered by iontophoresis (300 microA for 5 minutes) using a specially designed corneal applicator. In group II (12 rats, 12 eyes), the ODNs (20 microM) were delivered using the same applicator, but no electrical current was applied. In group III (6 rats, 6 eyes), a corneal neovascular reaction was induced prior to the application of ODNs (20 microM), and iontophoresis electrical current was delivered as for group I rats. Group IV (4 rats, 4 eyes) received ODN (60 microM) iontophoresis application (300 microA for 5 minutes) and were used for ODN integrity studies. The animals were killed 5 minutes, 90 minutes, and 24 hours after a single ODN application and studied. Topically applied ODNs using the same iontophoresis applicator but without current do not penetrate the cornea and remain confined to the superficial epithelial layer. ODNs delivered with transcorneoscleral iontophoresis penetrate into all corneal layers and are also detected in the iris. In corneas with neovascularization, ODNs were particularly localized within the vascular endothelial cells of the stroma. ODNs extracted from eye tissues 24 hours after iontophoresis remained unaltered. The iontophoresis current did not cause any detectable ocular damage under these conditions. Iontophoresis promotes the delivery of ODNs to the anterior segment of the eye, including all corneal layers. Iontophoresis of ODNs directed at VEGF-R2 may be used for the

  10. The seeds of Lotus japonicus lines transformed with sense, antisense, and sense/antisense galactomannan galactosyltransferase constructs have structurally altered galactomannans in their endosperm cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary E; Choo, Tze-Siang; Dickson, Cathryn A; Scott, Catherine; Gidley, Michael J; Reid, J S Grant

    2004-03-01

    Galactomannan biosynthesis in legume seed endosperms involves two Golgi membrane-bound glycosyltransferases, mannan synthase and galactomannan galactosyltransferase (GMGT). GMGT specificity is an important factor regulating the distribution and amount of (1-->6)-alpha-galactose (Gal) substitution of the (1-->4)-beta-linked mannan backbone. The model legume Lotus japonicus is shown now to have endospermic seeds with endosperm cell walls that contain a high-Gal galactomannan (mannose [Man]/Gal = 1.2-1.3). Galactomannan biosynthesis in developing L. japonicus endosperms has been mapped, and a cDNA encoding a functional GMGT has been obtained from L. japonicus endosperms during galactomannan deposition. L. japonicus has been transformed with sense, antisense, and sense/antisense ("hairpin loop") constructs of the GMGT cDNA. Some of the sense, antisense, and sense/antisense transgenic lines exhibited galactomannans with altered (higher) Man/Gal values in their (T(1) generation) seeds, at frequencies that were consistent with posttranscriptional silencing of GMGT. For T(1) generation individuals, transgene inheritance was correlated with galactomannan composition and amount in the endosperm. All the azygous individuals had unchanged galactomannans, whereas those that had inherited a GMGT transgene exhibited a range of Man/Gal values, up to about 6 in some lines. For Man/Gal values up to 4, the results were consistent with lowered Gal substitution of a constant amount of mannan backbone. Further lowering of Gal substitution was accompanied by a slight decrease in the amount of mannan backbone. Microsomal membranes prepared from the developing T(2) generation endosperms of transgenic lines showed reduced GMGT activity relative to mannan synthase. The results demonstrate structural modification of a plant cell wall polysaccharide by designed regulation of a Golgi-bound glycosyltransferase.

  11. In vitro and in vivo rescue of aberrant splicing in CEP290-associated LCA by antisense oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanto, Alejandro; Chung, Daniel C; Duijkers, Lonneke; Corral-Serrano, Julio C; Messchaert, Muriël; Xiao, Ru; Bennett, Jean; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-06-15

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe disorder resulting in visual impairment usually starting in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA is an intronic mutation in CEP290 (c.2991 + 1655A > G) that creates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of a pseudoexon (exon X) into CEP290 mRNA. Previously, we showed that naked antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) effectively restored normal CEP290 splicing in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. We here explore the therapeutic potential of naked and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-packaged AONs in vitro and in vivo In both cases, AON delivery fully restored CEP290 pre-mRNA splicing, significantly increased CEP290 protein levels and rescued a ciliary phenotype present in patient-derived fibroblast cells. Moreover, administration of naked and AAV-packaged AONs to the retina of a humanized mutant Cep290 mouse model, carrying the intronic mutation, showed a statistically significant reduction of exon X-containing Cep290 transcripts, without compromising the retinal structure. Together, our data highlight the tremendous therapeutic prospective of AONs for the treatment of not only CEP290-associated LCA but potentially many other subtypes of retinal dystrophy caused by splicing mutations.

  12. Targeting TGF-β Signaling by Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Knockdown of TGF-β Type I Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi U Kemaladewi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by lack of functional dystrophin and results in progressive myofiber damage and degeneration. In addition, impaired muscle regeneration and fibrosis contribute to the progressive pathology of DMD. Importantly, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is implicated in DMD pathology and is known to stimulate fibrosis and inhibit muscle regeneration. In this study, we present a new strategy to target TGF-β signaling cascades by specifically inhibiting the expression of TGF-β type I receptor TGFBR1 (ALK5. Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs were designed to specifically induce exon skipping of mouse ALK5 transcripts. AON-induced exon skipping of ALK5 resulted in specific downregulation of full-length receptor transcripts in vitro in different cell types, repression of TGF-β activity, and enhanced C2C12 myoblast differentiation. To determine the effect of these AONs in dystrophic muscles, we performed intramuscular injections of ALK5 AONs in mdx mice, which resulted in a decrease in expression of fibrosis-related genes and upregulation of Myog expression compared to control AON-injected muscles. In summary, our study presents a novel method to target TGF-β signaling cascades with potential beneficial effects for DMD.

  13. Decorrelation of Neural-Network Activity by Inhibitory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Correlations in spike-train ensembles can seriously impair the encoding of information by their spatio-temporal structure. An inevitable source of correlation in finite neural networks is common presynaptic input to pairs of neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that spike correlations in recurrent neural networks are considerably smaller than expected based on the amount of shared presynaptic input. Here, we explain this observation by means of a linear network model and simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that inhibitory feedback efficiently suppresses pairwise correlations and, hence, population-rate fluctuations, thereby assigning inhibitory neurons the new role of active decorrelation. We quantify this decorrelation by comparing the responses of the intact recurrent network (feedback system) and systems where the statistics of the feedback channel is perturbed (feedforward system). Manipulations of the feedback statistics can lead to a significant increase in the power and coherence of the population response. In particular, neglecting correlations within the ensemble of feedback channels or between the external stimulus and the feedback amplifies population-rate fluctuations by orders of magnitude. The fluctuation suppression in homogeneous inhibitory networks is explained by a negative feedback loop in the one-dimensional dynamics of the compound activity. Similarly, a change of coordinates exposes an effective negative feedback loop in the compound dynamics of stable excitatory-inhibitory networks. The suppression of input correlations in finite networks is explained by the population averaged correlations in the linear network model: In purely inhibitory networks, shared-input correlations are canceled by negative spike-train correlations. In excitatory-inhibitory networks, spike-train correlations are typically positive. Here, the suppression of input correlations is not a result of the mere existence of correlations between

  14. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Causes Visual Impairment? People rarely lose their eyesight during their teen years. When they do, it's ... inflammation in the eye. It's often found in poor rural countries that have overcrowded living conditions and ...

  15. THE EFFECT OF ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDE ON THE INTERLEUKIN-5 IN THE SUPERNATANTS OF SPLEEN CELL CULTURES OF ASTHMATIC MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美琴; 白春学; 钮善福; 方晓惠; 陈常庆; 陈波

    2001-01-01

    To explore the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on the production of IL-5 by mouse spleen T lymphocytes.Methods Based on the IL-5 cDNA sequence of mouse, a segment of antisense oligonucleotide was designed and synthesized. 5’-labeling of antisense oligonucleotide was signed by T4 PNK in order that the efficiency of stearylamine liposome in transfecting antisense oligonucleotide can be evaluated. Asthma model was duplicated with ovalbumin(OVA) absorbed to aluminum hydroxide. T lymphocytes of mice were separated by nylon fiber method, then T lymphocytes transfected with different concentration of antisense oligonucleotide with cation stearylamine liposme were incubated respectively in order to observe the effect of antisense oligonucleotide on Il-5 production by T lymphocytes. IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were determined by ELISA.Results Stearylamine liposome could markedly increase the efficiency of antisense oligonucleotide transfection. The transfection efficiency of antisense oligouncleotide increased approximately 12 times at a ratio of 1: 15m/m (antisense oligonucleotide to SA liposome). In healthy and asthma Balb/c mice, IL-5 was not detectable in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures without stimulated with OVA; however, IL-5 was increased markedly in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures stimulated with OVA. After transfection with different concentrations of antisense oligonucleotide, IL-5 levels in the supernatants of T lymphocyte cultures were significantly lower than those in control cultured without antisense oligonucleotide transfection. IL-5 levels decreased from 44.60±6.23 pg/ml to 30.70±7.362 pg/ml, 17.20±6.181 pg/ml and 8.16±2.34 pg/ml respectively. And IL-5 synthesis was inhibited by 31.17%, 61.43% and 81.7% respectively.Conclusion IL-5 synthesis could be obviously inhibited by antisense oligonucleotide and showed a markedly correlation between dose and effectiveness. It suggests the production

  16. Antisense to the glucocorticoid receptor in hippocampal dentate gyrus reduces immobility in forced swim test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Buwalda, B; Bouman, S.D.; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    Immobility time of rats in the forced swim test was reduced after bilateral infusion of an 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide targeted to the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Vehicle-, sense- and scrambled sequence-treated animals spent

  17. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.;

    2005-01-01

    to target the 3'-untranslated regions of certain mRNAs. Furthermore, one of the ncRNAs that does not show antisense elements is transcribed from a repeat unit of a cluster of small regularly spaced repeats in S. solfataricus which is potentially involved in replicon partitioning. In conclusion...

  18. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  19. An in vivo transcriptome data set of natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Subudhi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Antisense transcription is pervasive among biological systems and one of the products of antisense transcription is natural antisense transcripts (NATs. Emerging evidences suggest that they are key regulators of gene expression. With the discovery of NATs in Plasmodium falciparum, it has been suggested that these might also be playing regulatory roles in this parasite. However, all the reports describing the diversity of NATs have come from parasites in culture condition except for a recent study published by us. In order to explore the in vivo diversity of NATs in P. falciparum clinical isolates, we performed a whole genome expression profiling using a strand-specific 244 K microarray that contains probes for both sense and antisense transcripts. In this report, we describe the experimental procedure and analysis thereof of the microarray data published recently in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under accession number GSE44921. This published data provide a wealth of information about the prevalence of NATs in P. falciparum clinical isolates from patients with diverse malaria related disease conditions. Supplementary information about the description and interpretation of the data can be found in a recent publication by Subudhi et al. in Experimental Parasitology (2014.

  20. Refinement of antisense oligonucleotide mediated exon skipping as therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, modulation of mRNA has emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. For instance, in the field of neuromuscular disorders therapeutic strategies are being developed for several diseases, including antisense oligonucleotide (AON) mediated exon skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DM

  1. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50...

  2. Tumor delivery of antisense oligomer using trastuzumab within a streptavidin nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Yale University, Yale PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Liu, Xinrong; Chen, Ling; Cheng, Dengfeng; Rusckowski, Mary [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Hnatowich, Donald J. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Umass Medical School, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin trademark) is often internalized following binding to Her2+ tumor cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether trastuzumab can be used as a specific carrier to deliver antisense oligomers into Her2+ tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. A biotinylated MORF oligomer antisense to RhoC mRNA and its biotinylated sense control were labeled with either lissamine for fluorescence detection or {sup 99m}Tc for radioactivity detection and were linked to biotinylated trastuzumab via streptavidin. The nanoparticles were studied in SUM190 (RhoC+, Her2+) study and SUM149 (RhoC+, Her2-) control cells in culture and as xenografts in mice. As evidence of unimpaired Her2+ binding of trastuzumab within the nanoparticle, accumulations were clearly higher in SUM190 compared to SUM149 cells and, by whole-body imaging, targeting of SUM190 tumor was similar to that expected for a radiolabeled trastuzumab. As evidence of internalization, fluorescence microscopy images of cells grown in culture and obtained from xenografts showed uniform cytoplasm distribution of the lissamine-MORF. An invasion assay showed decreased RhoC expression in SUM190 cells when incubated with the antisense MORF nanoparticles at only 100 nM. Both in cell culture and in animals, the nanoparticle with trastuzumab as specific carrier greatly improved tumor delivery of the antisense oligomer against RhoC mRNA into tumor cells overexpressing Her2 and may be of general utility. (orig.)

  3. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides as innovative therapeutic strategy in the treatment of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Gerardo; Caffo, Mariella; Raudino, Giuseppe; Alafaci, Concetta; Salpietro, Francesco M; Tomasello, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Despite the intensive recent research in cancer therapy, the prognosis in patients affected by high-grade gliomas is still very unfavorable. The efficacy of classical anti-cancer strategies is seriously limited by lack of specific therapies against malignant cells. The extracellular matrix plays a pivotal role in processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and migration in both the normal and the pathologic nervous system. Glial tumors seem to be able to create a favorable environment for the invasion of glioma cells in cerebral parenchyma when they combine with the extracellular matrix via cell surface receptors. Glioma cells synthesize matrix proteins, such as tenascin, laminin, fibronectin that facilitate the tumor cell's motility. New treatments have shown to hit the acting molecules in the tumor growth and to increase the efficacy and minimize the toxicity. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic stretches of DNA which hybridize with specific mRNA strands. The specificity of hybridization makes antisense method an interesting strategy to selectively modulate the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. In this review we will focus on the mechanisms of action of antisense oligonucleotides and report clinical and experimental studies on the treatment of high-grade gliomas. We will also report the patents of preclinical and/or clinical studies that adopt the antisense oligonucleotide therapy list in cerebral gliomas.

  5. Effect of C-myc Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Hypoxia-induced Proliferation of Pulmonary Vascular Pericytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the effect of c-myc antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on proliferation of pulmonary vascular pericytes (PC) induced by hypoxia, cell culture, dot hybridization using probe of digoxigenin-11-dUTP-labeled cDNA,3H-thymidine incorporation, immunocytochemical technique and image analysis methods were used to observe the effect of c-myc antisense ODNs on expression of c-myc gene and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC induced by hypoxia. The results showed that hypoxia could significantly enhance the expression of c-myc and PCNA (P<0.01), and elevate 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC (P<0.01), but antisense ODNs could significantly inhibit the expression of c-myc and PCNA (P<0.05), and 3H-thymidine incorporation of PC (P<0.01). It was suggested that hypoxia could promote the proliferation of PC by up-regulating the expression of c-myc gene, but c-myc antisense ODNs could inhibit hypoxia-induced proliferation of PC by downregulating the expression of c-myc gene.

  6. Metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) plants transformed with an antisense chalcone synthase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Gall, G.; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Pedersen, Jan W.;

    2005-01-01

    A metabolite profiling study has been carried out on Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ecotype Wassilewskija and a series of transgenic lines of the ecotype transformed with a CHS (chalcone synthase) antisense construct. Compound identifications by LC/MS and H-1 NMR are discussed. The glucosinolate...

  7. Antisense to the glucocorticoid receptor in hippocampal dentate gyrus reduces immobility in forced swim test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Buwalda, B; Bouman, S.D.; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    Immobility time of rats in the forced swim test was reduced after bilateral infusion of an 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide targeted to the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Vehicle-, sense- and scrambled sequence-treated animals spent sign

  8. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  9. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Johans J.; Edwardson, Thomas G.; Conway, Justin W.; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into `gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing.Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable

  10. Antisense oligonucleotide to insulin—like growth factor Ⅱ induces apotosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINDELING; LUPU; 等

    1998-01-01

    The effects of antisense oligonucleotide to insulin0like growth factor -Ⅱ(IGFⅡ)to induce apotosis in human ovarian cancer cells were evaluated.Antiproliferation effects of antisense to IGFⅡin ovarian cancer AO cells were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation.Apoptosis of the IGFⅡ antisense-treated cells was quantitated by both nuclear condensation and flow cytometry after cells were stained with propidium iodide,IGFⅡ antisense(4.5μM) treatment of 48h maximally inhibited proliferation of AO cells,More than 25% of IGFⅡantisense-treated cells(4.5μM for 24h) had undergone apoptosis,whereas less than 3% of the cells were apoptotic in either IGFⅡ sense-treated cells or untreated cells.Antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human ovarian cancer AO cell.These data suggest that IGFII may be a potential target in treatment of ovarian cancer and antisense oligonucleotide to IGFⅡ may serve as a therapeutic approach.

  11. Effect of CD44 Suppression by Antisense Oligonucleotide on Attachment of Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells to HA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中国; 张虹

    2004-01-01

    The effects of suppression of CD44 by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronic acid (HA) were observed and the possible relationship between CD44 and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) investigated. CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was delivered with cationic lipid to cultured human trabecular meshwork cells. The expression of CD44 suppressed by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The effect of CD44 suppression by specific antisense oligonucleotide on attachment of trabecular meshwork cells to HA was measured by MTT assay. Results showed that expression of CD44 was suppressed by CD4, specific antisense oligonucleotide. Antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the adhesion of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA in a concentration dependent manner. It was concluded that attachment of human trabecular meshwork cells to HA was decreased when CD44 was suppressed by specific antisense oligonucleotide. CD44might play a role in pathogenesis of POAG by affecting the adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to HA.

  12. Antisense antibiotics: a brief review of novel target discovery and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hui; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-06-01

    The nightmare of multi-drug resistant bacteria will still haunt if no panacea is ever found. Efforts on seeking desirable natural products with bactericidal property and screening chemically modified derivatives of traditional antibiotics have lagged behind the emergence of new multi-drug resistant bacteria. The concept of using antisense antibiotics, now as revolutionary as is on threshold has experienced ups and downs in the past decade. In the past five years, however, significant technology advances in the fields of microbial genomics, structural modification of oligonucleotides and efficient delivery system have led to fundamental progress in the research and in vivo application of this paradigm. The wealthy information provided in the microbial genomics era has allowed the identification and/or validation of a number of essential genes that may serve as possible targets for antisense inhibition; antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the 3rd generation of modified structures, e.g., peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) have shown great potency in gene expression inhibition in a sequence-specific and dosedependent manner at low micromolar concentrations; and cell penetrating peptide mediated delivery system has enabled the effective display of intracellular antisense inhibition of targeted genes both in vitro and in vivo. The new methods show promise in the discovery of novel gene-specific antisense antibiotics that will be useful in the future battle against drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review describes this promising paradigm, the targets that have been identified and the recent technologies on which it is delivered.

  13. Adenovirus-mediated expression of both antisense ODC and AdoMetDC inhibited colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing ZHANG; Xian-xi LIU; Yan ZHANG; Chun-ying JIANG; Qing-shan TENG; Hai-yan HU; Wei WANG; Lei GONG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To construct a recombinant adenovirus that can simultaneously express both antisense ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) and detect its inhibitory effect on the intracellular polyamine pool and colorectal cancer cell growth. Methods: A 205-bp cDNA of AdoMetDC was reverse-inserted into recombinant pAdTrack-ODCas vectors and recombined with pAdEasy-1 vectors in AdEasy-1 cells. Positive clones were selected and transfected into the packaging cell HEK293 after they were linearized by Pad. Green fluorescent protein expression was used to monitor the process of adenovirus packaging. The ODC and AdoMetDC protein levels were identified by western blotting, and intracellular polyamine content was detected by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. A viable cell count was used to determine the growth of HT-29 cells with or without exogenous polyamine. Results: Sequencing confirmed that AdoMetDC cDNA was successfully ligated into the pAdTrack-ODCas vector. GFP expression in 293 cells during virus packing and amplification was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Western blotting demonstrated that both ODC and AdoMetDC were downregulated by Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas, and consequently 3 kinds of polyamine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) were reduced to very low levels. HT-29 cell growth was significantly inhibited as compared with control conditions, and growth arrest was not reversed by exogenous putrescine. Conclusion: The successfully constructed recombinant adenovirus, Ad-ODC-AdoMetDCas, blocked polyamine synthesis and has therapeutic potential for treating colorectal cancer in vitro.

  14. Anterograde effects of a single electroconvulsive shock on inhibitory avoidance and on cued fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A single electroconvulsive shock (ECS or a sham ECS was administered to male 3-4-month-old Wistar rats 1, 2, and 4 h before training in an inhibitory avoidance test and in cued classical fear conditioning (measured by means of freezing time in a new environment. ECS impaired inhibitory avoidance at all times and, at 1 or 2 h before training, reduced freezing time before and after re-presentation of the ECS. These results are interpreted as a transient conditioned stimulus (CS-induced anxiolytic or analgesic effect lasting about 2 h after a single treatment, in addition to the known amnesic effect of the stimulus. This suggests that the effect of anterograde learning impairment is demonstrated unequivocally only when the analgesic/anxiolytic effect is over (about 4 h after ECS administration and that this impairment of learning is selective, affecting inhibitory avoidance but not classical fear conditioning to a discrete stimulus.

  15. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  16. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  17. Inhibition of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation by expression of acyl-CoA-binding protein antisense RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Sorensen, R V; Helledie, T

    1998-01-01

    adipocyte differentiation. In this report we describe the effects of expression of high levels of ACBP antisense RNA on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Pools of 3T3-L1 cells transfected with vectors expressing ACBP antisense RNA showed significantly less lipid accumulation as compared with cells...... of the adipogenic transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha as well as several adipocyte-specific genes was significantly delayed and reduced. The adipogenic potential of antisense-expressing cells was partially restored by transfection...

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 LTR DNA contains an intrinsic gene producing antisense RNA and protein products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Chiu-Bin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While viruses have long been shown to capitalize on their limited genomic size by utilizing both strands of DNA or complementary DNA/RNA intermediates to code for viral proteins, it has been assumed that human retroviruses have all their major proteins translated only from the plus or sense strand of RNA, despite their requirement for a dsDNA proviral intermediate. Several studies, however, have suggested the presence of antisense transcription for both HIV-1 and HTLV-1. More recently an antisense transcript responsible for the HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ protein has been described. In this study we investigated the possibility of an antisense gene contained within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Results Inspection of published sequences revealed a potential transcription initiator element (INR situated downstream of, and in reverse orientation to, the usual HIV-1 promoter and transcription start site. This antisense initiator (HIVaINR suggested the possibility of an antisense gene responsible for RNA and protein production. We show that antisense transcripts are generated, in vitro and in vivo, originating from the TAR DNA of the HIV-1 LTR. To test the possibility that protein(s could be translated from this novel HIV-1 antisense RNA, recombinant HIV antisense gene-FLAG vectors were designed. Recombinant protein(s were produced and isolated utilizing carboxy-terminal FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK sequences. In addition, affinity-purified antisera to an internal peptide derived from the HIV antisense protein (HAP sequences identified HAPs from HIV+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion HIV-1 contains an antisense gene in the U3-R regions of the LTR responsible for both an antisense RNA transcript and proteins. This antisense transcript has tremendous potential for intrinsic RNA regulation because of its overlap with the beginning of all HIV-1 sense RNA transcripts by 25 nucleotides. The

  19. Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  20. All Vision Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is defined as the ... Ethnicity 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Vision Impairment by Age and Race/Ethnicity Table for ...

  1. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  2. Effect of antisense human telomerase RNA on malignant behaviors of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-liang; FANG Dian-chun; YANG Shi-ming; LUO Yuan-hui; LUO Kun-lun; LU Rong; LIU Wei-wen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of antisense human telomerase RNA (ahTR) transfection on the malignant behaviors of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 and its potential role in gene therapy for tumor. Methods: An antisense hTR eukaryotic expression vector containing the sequence of template region of telomere repeats was transfected into gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 with liposome DOTAP. The expressions of hTR RNA and antisense hTR RNA were observed with RT-PCR, telomerase activity with PCR-ELISA. Telomere length was measured with Southern blot. Cell morphology and cellular proliferation capacity were studied with MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptotic state were observed with flow cytometry. Efficiency of clone formation in soft agar and tumorigencity in nude mice were examined and evaluated in ahTR-transfected 7901 cells, and plasmid pCL-neo transfected 7901 cells and parental 7901 cells served as control. Results: An antisense hTR eukaryotic expression vector was transfected into 7901 cells successfully. The telomerase activity in ahTR-transfected 7901 cells was decreased from 100% to about 25%, and telomere length in the cells shortened from 4.08 kb to 3.35 kb at 60 population doublings (PDs). Compared with parental 7901 and pCL-neo transfected 7901 cells, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells displayed some morphological changes, including decreased cell atypia and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio under light microscope. Furthermore, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells displayed growth inhibition, decreased invasive capacity in Borden's chamber invasive model, increased G0/G1 phase rate and apoptotic rate, and restored contact inhibition and density inhibition. Surprisingly, ahTR-transfected 7901 cells lost their capacity of clone formation in soft agar and carcinogensis in nude mice. Conclusion: Antisense hTR transfection can induce 7901 cell differentiation and reverse its malignant phenotype. This study provides an exciting approach for cancer therapy through the

  3. INTEGRATIVE COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF ANTISENSE TRANSCRIPTS AND miRNA TARGETS IN PLANT GENOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Y.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNA, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important components of gene expression in eukaryotes, forming a regulatory network. miRNAs are expressed through nucleolytic maturation of hairpin precursors transcribed by RNA Polymerase II or III. Such transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants, fungi and animals. miRNAs bind to target RNA transcripts and guide their cleavage (mostly for plants or act to prevent translation. siRNAs act via a similar mechanism of cleavage of their target genes, but they also can direct genomic DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. It is estimated that large fraction, up to 30% of all human genes also may be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNAs. For plant genomes numbers could be higher depending on quality of sequencing and genome annotation. Due to availability of genome and mRNA sequences genome-wide searches for sense-antisense transcripts have been reported, but few plant sense-antisense transcript pairs have been studied. Integration of these data in specialized databases is challenging problem of computer genomics. We have developed set of computer programs to define antisense transcripts and miRNA genes based on available sequencing data. We have analyzed data from PlantNATsDB (Plant Natural Antisense Transcripts DataBase which is a platform for annotating and discovering Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT by integrating various data sources [1]. NATs can be grouped into two categories, cis-NATs and trans-NATs. Cis-NAT pairs are transcribed from opposing DNA strands at the same genomic locus and have a variety of orientations and differing lengths of overlap between the perfect sequence complementary regions, whereas trans-NAT pairs are transcribed from different loci and form partial complementarily. The database contains at the moment 69 plant species. The database provides an integrative, interactive and information-rich web graphical interface to

  4. Inhibition of Proliferation of Human Osteosarcoma Cells Transfected with PIN1 Antisense Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Wenhua; CHEN Anmin; GUO Fengjin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inhibition of proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells transfected with Pin1 anti-sense gene. Methods: Different doses of antisense Pin1 gene (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 250μL) were transfected into osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. The cells and culture supernatant before and after transfection were collected. The curve of cell growth was made by MTT method. The cell growth cycle and apoptosis were detected by FCM. The expression of Pin1 was detected by Western-blot and that of Pin1 mRNA by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) respectively. Results: MTT and FCM assays indicated that the transfection by antisense Pin1 gene could inhibit MG-63 proliferation and induce apoptosis. Western-blot assays revealed that the antisense Pin1 gene-transfected MG-63 cells had weaker staining than those without transfected with antisense Pin1 gene, and staining intensity was negatively related with doses. The cells transfected by different doses of gene (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 250μL) had different absorbance rate: 0.854±0.136, 0.866±0.138, 0.732±0.154, 0.611±0.121, 0.547±0.109, 0.398±0.113,0.320±0.151 respectively, with the difference being significant by F and q test (P<0.05). The expression of Pin1 mRNA had the similar results and its absorbance rate was 0.983±0.125, 0.988±0.127, 0.915±0.157,0.786±0.125, 0.608±0.124, 0.433±0.130, 0.410±0.158 respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion: The expression of Pin1 mRNA in MG-63 cells could be inhibited by antisense Pin1 gene, so to reduce the expression of Pin1 and depress the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells MG-63.

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Inhibition of Apolipoprotein C-III Reduces Plasma Triglycerides in Rodents, Nonhuman Primates, and Humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Bell, III, Thomas A; Fu, Wuxia; Mullick, Adam E; Alexander, Veronica J; Singleton, Walter; Viney, Nick; Geary, Richard; Su, John; Baker, Brenda F; Burkey, Jennifer; Crooke, Stanley T; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2013-01-01

    .... METHODS AND RESULTS:Rodent- and human-specific second-generation antisense oligonucleotides were identified and evaluated in preclinical models, including rats, mice, human apoC-III transgenic mice, and nonhuman...

  6. SENSITIZATION OF ACNU KILLING EFFECTS ON HeLa S3 CELLS BY MGMT ANTISENSE RNA TRANSFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季守平; 由英; 吴英; 陈建敏; 杨军; 章扬培

    1998-01-01

    O’-methylguanlne-DNA-msthybransferase(MGMT)plays a very important role in the ceUular resistsnce to uitrosoureas drugs. Inhibition of MGMT might be a useful approach in tumor chemotherapy. In this study, the depletlon vii MGMT activity hy retroviral-mediated antisense RNA transfectkm were reported. Three retroviral vectors expressing MGMT antisense RNA were constructed and transfected into HeLa S3 cells. The difference of MGMT mRNA, MGMT activity as well as cellular resistance to ACNU before and after transtecfion were ohserved. It was found that antisense RNA targeting 5''region and whole length of MGMT mRNA could partially deplete MGMT activity and enhance killing effects of ACNU.However, 3'' region antisense RNA had no effect on MGMT modulation.

  7. Effect of c- erbB2 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Radiosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RENQing-Lan

    2003-01-01

    Object To explore tile effect of lipofectin - c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cell llne. Methods The expression of c - erbB2 was detected by means of RT - PCR, cellular response to irradiation was evaluated by tile colony forming assay. Results Lipofectin- c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(AS- ODN) could suppress the expression of c - erbB2 , and significantly decreased the colony forming rate of human ovarian cancer cells after ionizing irradiation (P 0.05 ). Condusion c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides sensitized the SKOV3 to ionizing irradiation through decreasing the expression of e - erbB2 , which might be the result of the fact that c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides inhibit the eelluar signal transductionpathway relating to the radiation- resistant phenotype.

  8. Lipolysis and apoptosis of adipocytes induced by neuropeptide Y—Y5 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in obese rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONGHai-Xia; GUOXi-Rong; FEILi; GUOMei; LIUQian-Qi; CHENRong-Hua

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the influence of central administration of neuropeptide Y-Y5 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(ODN) on the body weight and fat pads of high-energy diet-induced obese rats, and the effects on white adipocyte lipolysis and apoptosis. METHODS: Y5 receptor antisense, sense, mismatched oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) or vehicle were intracerebroventricularly injected, and average adipocyte area was calculated. DNA ladders were measured to evaluate adipocyte apoptosis, and RT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of bcl-2 and bax gene. RESULTS: (1) Central administration of Y5 receptor antisense ODN significantly decreased body weight, fat pads, and average adipocyte area. (2) DNA fragmentation was presented after electrophoresis at both epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. (3) The expression of bcl-2 gene was downregulated, while the expression of bax was upregulated. CONCLUSION:Lipolysis and adipocyte apoptosis may be important reasons for Y5 receptor antisense therapy.

  9. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches.

  10. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)....

  11. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in Human Osteosarcoma Cells Transfected with Adeno-associated Virus-antisense VEGF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐卫国; 陈安民; 张衣北; 易成腊

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The expression of protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in osteosarcoma cells transfected with adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-antisense VEGF was studied to provide the foundation of osteosarcoma treatment through antivascularization. The rAAV-antisense VEGF at different doses (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 240 μl) was transfected into osteosarcoma MG-63 cell. The cells and culture supernatants were collected before and after tansfection. The expression of VEGF protein was detected by using immunohistochemical staining (SP) and Western blot. SP and Western-blot tests revealed that the MG-63 Cells transfected with rAAV-antisense VEGF had less staining than those without transfection with rAAV-antisense VEGF, and the staining intensity was negatively correlated with the doses of genes. The corresponding A values of transfected genes with different doses of rAAV-antisense VEGF (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 240 μA) were 86 614±13 776, 73 245±15 414, 61 078±12 124, 54 657±10 953, 39 802±11 308, 32 014±15 057 respectively,w ith the difference being significant (P<0.05). It was concluded that the expression of VEGF protein in MG-63 cells could be inhibited by rAAV-antisense VEGF.

  12. Cross-protective effect of antisense oligonucleotide developed against the common 3' NCR of influenza A virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Rajput, Roopali; Saxena, Latika; Banerjea, Akhil C; Khanna, Madhu

    2013-11-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) has eight segmented single-stranded RNA genome containing a common and evolutionarily conserved non-coding region (NCRs) at 5' and 3' ends that are important for the virus replication. In this study, we designed an antisense oligonucleotide against the 3' NCR of vital segments of the IAV genome to inhibit its replication. The results demonstrated that the co-transfection of Madine Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells with the antisense oligonucleotide and the plasmids encoding the viral genes led to the down-regulation of the viral gene expression. The designed antisense molecules reduced the cytopathic effect caused by A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), A/Udorn/307/72 (H3N2), and A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) strains of IAV for almost 48 h. Furthermore, the intra-venous delivery of this oligonucleotide significantly reduced the viral titers in the lungs of infected mice and protected the mice from lethal effects of all the strains of influenza virus. The study demonstrated that the antisense oligonucleotide designed against the NCR region inhibits the expression of the viral genome. The decrease of the cytopathic effect in the MDCK cells and increase in survival of mice confirmed the reduction of virus multiplication and pathogenesis in the presence of antisense oligonucleotide. Thus, we demonstrate that a single antisense oligonucleotide is capable of providing protection against more than one strains of the IAV.

  13. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...... have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA...

  14. Regulation of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNAs: focus on natural antisense transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistri, Marco; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2012-08-01

    In the decade following the publication of the Human Genome, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have reshaped our understanding of the broad landscape of genome regulation. During this period, natural antisense transcripts (NATs), which are transcribed from the opposite strand of either protein or non-protein coding genes, have vaulted to prominence. Recent findings have shown that NATs can exert their regulatory functions by acting as epigenetic regulators of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Here, we review recent work on the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications by NATs and their emerging role as master regulators of chromatin states. Unlike other long ncRNAs, antisense RNAs usually regulate their counterpart sense mRNA in cis by bridging epigenetic effectors and regulatory complexes at specific genomic loci. Understanding the broad range of effects of NATs will shed light on the complex mechanisms that regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression in development and disease.

  15. Oligonucleotides conjugated with short chemically defined polyethylene glycol chains are efficient antisense agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrzadeh, Nasrin; Winkler, Anna-Maria; Dirin, Mehrdad; Winkler, Johannes

    2014-12-15

    Ligand conjugation is an attractive approach to rationally modify the poor pharmacokinetic behavior and cellular uptake properties of antisense oligonucleotides. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) attachment is a method to increase solubility of oligonucleotides and prevent the rapid elimination, thus increasing tissue distribution. On the other hand, the attachment of long PEG chains negatively influences the pharmacodynamic effect by reducing the hybridization efficiency. We examined the use of short PEG ligands on the in vitro effect of antisense agents. Circular dichroism showed that the tethering of PEG12-chains to phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides had no influence on their secondary structure and did not reduce the affinity to the counter strand. In an in vitro tumor model, a luciferase reporter assay indicated unchanged gene silencing activity compared to unmodified compounds, and even slightly superior target down regulation was found after treatment with a phosphorothioate modified conjugate. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of antisense oligonucleotide therapy in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: risks, benefits, and management recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Anandita; Jones, Peter; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions. It functions at the cellular level by interfering with RNA function, often leading to degradation of specifically targeted abnormal gene products implicated in the disease process. Mipomersen is a novel antisense oligonucleotide directed at apolipoprotein (apoB)-100, the primary apolipoprotein associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), which has recently been approved for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy in lowering LDL-C and apoB levels in patients with elevated LDL-C despite maximal medical therapy using conventional lipid-lowering agents. This review outlines the risks and benefits of therapy and provides recommendations on the use of mipomersen.

  17. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Purification of noncoding RNA and bound proteins using FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense-oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    To understand the function of certain RNAs, including noncoding RNAs, it is important to identify the proteins that interact with the RNAs. Here we describe the method for purification of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes composed of specific cellular RNAs by pull-down with FLAG peptide-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Using this method, we identified a novel protein component of U7 snRNP complex.

  19. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Patients with Advanced Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. Improvements in therapy have increased the survival of patients with CRC from 10 months to two years, but for patients who stop responding to treatments, such as irinotecan, options for additional therapy are limited. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) may offer advantages over traditional therapies if an appropriate target can be identified.

  20. In vivo reduction of hepatitis B virus antigenemia and viremia by antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billioud, Gaetan; Kruse, Robert L; Carrillo, Melissa; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Gao, Dacao; Kim, Aneeza; Chen, Leon; McCaleb, Michael L; Crosby, Jeffrey R; Hamatake, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Swayze, Eric; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Wieland, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Current treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) includes interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues, which generally do not reduce HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) production, a constellation that is associated with poor prognosis of CHB. Here we evaluated the efficacy of an antisense approach using antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) technology already in clinical use for liver targeted therapy to specifically inhibit HBsAg production and viremia in a preclinical setting. A lead ASO was identified and characterized in vitro and subsequently tested for efficacy in vivo and in vitro using HBV transgenic and hydrodynamic transfection mouse and a cell culture HBV infection model, respectively. ASO treatment decreased serum HBsAg levels ⩾2 logs in a dose and time-dependent manner; HBsAg decreased 2 logs in a week and returned to baseline 4 weeks after a single ASO injection. ASO treatment effectively reduced HBsAg in combination with entecavir, while the nucleoside analogue alone did not. ASO treatment has pan-genotypic antiviral activity in the hydrodynamic transfection system. Finally, cccDNA-driven HBV gene expression is ASO sensitive in HBV infected cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate in a preclinical setting the efficacy of an antisense approach against HBV by efficiently reducing serum HBsAg (as well as viremia) across different genotypes alone or in combination with standard nucleoside therapy. Since the applied antisense technology is already in clinical use, a lead compound can be rapidly validated in a clinical setting and thus, constitutes a novel therapeutic approach targeting chronic HBV infection. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Tandem Oligonucleotide Approach for SNP-Selective RNA Degradation Using Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Dorota; Biala, Ewa; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been studied for many years as a tool for gene silencing. One of the most difficult cases of selective RNA silencing involves the alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, in which the allele sequence is differentiated by a single nucleotide. A new approach to improve the performance of allele selectivity for antisense oligonucleotides is proposed. It is based on the simultaneous application of two oligonucleotides. One is complementary to the mutated form of the targeted RNA and is able to activate RNase H to cleave the RNA. The other oligonucleotide, which is complementary to the wild type allele of the targeted RNA, is able to inhibit RNase H cleavage. Five types of SNPs, C/G, G/C, G/A, A/G, and C/U, were analyzed within the sequence context of genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and Machado-Joseph disease. For most analyzed cases, the application of the tandem approach increased allele-selective RNA degradation 1.5-15 fold relative to the use of a single antisense oligonucleotide. The presented study proves that differentiation between single substitution is highly dependent on the nature of the SNP and surrounding nucleotides. These variables are crucial for determining the proper length of the inhibitor antisense oligonucleotide. In the tandem approach, the comparison of thermodynamic stability of the favorable duplexes WT RNA-inhibitor and Mut RNA-gapmer with the other possible duplexes allows for the evaluation of chances for the allele-selective degradation of RNA. A larger difference in thermodynamic stability between favorable duplexes and those that could possibly form, usually results in the better allele selectivity of RNA degradation.

  2. Antisense RNA decreases AP33 gene expression and cytoadherence by T. vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundodi, V; Kucknoor, AS; Alderete, JF

    2007-01-01

    Background Host parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) is mediated by surface proteins. We showed before that antisense down-regulation of expression of adhesin AP65 decreased amounts of protein, which lowered levels of T. vaginalis adherence to VECs. We now perform antisense down-regulation of expression of the ap33 gene to evaluate and confirm a role for AP33 in adherence by T. vaginalis. We also used an established transfection system for heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus as an additional confirmatory approach. Results We successfully select stable trichomonads with sense (S) and antisense (AS) plasmids. RT-PCR confirmed decreased amounts of ap33 mRNA in AS-transfected parasites, and decreased amounts of AP33 had no effect on growth and viability when compared to wild-type (wt) trichomonads. Immunoblots of proteins from AS-transfectants gave significant decreased amounts of functional AP33 capable of binding to host cells compared to wt- and S-transfected trichomonads. As expected, AS-transfectants had lower levels of adherence to VECs, which was related to reduction in surface expression of AP33. Stable expression of T. vaginalis AP33::HA fusion in T. foetus was confirmed by immunoblots and fluorescence. The episomally-expressed surface AP33::HA fusion increased adherence of trichomonads to human VECs, which was abrogated with anti-AP33 serum. Conclusion These results using both antisense inhibition of gene expression and AP33 synthesis and the heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus confirms a role for this protein as an adhesin in T. vaginalis. PMID:17608941

  3. Antisense RNA decreases AP33 gene expression and cytoadherence by T. vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alderete JF

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs is mediated by surface proteins. We showed before that antisense down-regulation of expression of adhesin AP65 decreased amounts of protein, which lowered levels of T. vaginalis adherence to VECs. We now perform antisense down-regulation of expression of the ap33 gene to evaluate and confirm a role for AP33 in adherence by T. vaginalis. We also used an established transfection system for heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus as an additional confirmatory approach. Results We successfully select stable trichomonads with sense (S and antisense (AS plasmids. RT-PCR confirmed decreased amounts of ap33 mRNA in AS-transfected parasites, and decreased amounts of AP33 had no effect on growth and viability when compared to wild-type (wt trichomonads. Immunoblots of proteins from AS-transfectants gave significant decreased amounts of functional AP33 capable of binding to host cells compared to wt- and S-transfected trichomonads. As expected, AS-transfectants had lower levels of adherence to VECs, which was related to reduction in surface expression of AP33. Stable expression of T. vaginalis AP33::HA fusion in T. foetus was confirmed by immunoblots and fluorescence. The episomally-expressed surface AP33::HA fusion increased adherence of trichomonads to human VECs, which was abrogated with anti-AP33 serum. Conclusion These results using both antisense inhibition of gene expression and AP33 synthesis and the heterologous expression of AP33 in T. foetus confirms a role for this protein as an adhesin in T. vaginalis.

  4. Antisense MMP-9 RNA inhibits malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiyun Sun; Qian Wang; Hongxu Zhou; Shizhu Yu; Alain R.Simard; Chunsheng Kang; Yanyan Li

    2013-01-01

    The matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs),particularly MMP-9,play important roles in the pathogenesis and development of malignant gliomas.In the present study,the oncogenic role of MMP-9 in malignant glioma cells was investigated via antisense RNA blockade in vitro and in vivo.TJ905 malignant glioma cells were transfected with pcDNA3.0 vector expressing antisense MMP-9 RNA (pcDNA-ASMMP9),which significantly decreased MMP-9 expression,and cell proliferation was assessed.For in vivo studies,U251 cells,a human malignant glioma cell line,were implanted subcutaneously into 4-to 6-week-old BALB/c nude mice.The mice bearing well-established U251 gliomas were treated with intratumoral pcDNA-AS-MMP9-Lipofectamine complex (AS-MMP-9-treated group),subcutaneous injection of endostatin (endostatin-treated group),or both (combined therapy group).Mice treated with pcDNA (empty vector)-Lipofectamine served as the control group.Four or eight weeks later,the volume and weight of tumor,MMP-9 expression,microvessel density and proliferative activity were assayed.We demonstrate that pcDNA-AS-MMP9 significantly decreased MMP-9 expression and inhibited glioma cell proliferation.Volume and weight of tumor,MMP-9 expression,microvessel density and proliferative activity in the antisense-MMP-9-treated and therapeutic alliance groups were significantly lower than those in the control group.The results suggest that MMP-9 not only promotes malignant glioma cell invasiveness,but also affects tumor cell proliferation.Blocking the expression of MMP-9 with antisense RNA substantially suppresses the malignant phenotype of glioma cells,and thus can be used as an effective therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  5. Effects of multidrug resistance, antisense RNA on the chemosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Jian-Ping Gong; Tian Ye; Lei Zhao; De-Hua Li; Xing-Hua Gou; Lan-Ying Zhao; Lei Han; Lin Chen; Lu-Nan Yan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. We examined whether the antisense RNA of multidrug resistance gene 1 (mdr1) could reverse multidrug resistance in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC7721/ADM. METHODS: The recombinant adenoviruses pAdEasy-GFP-ASmdr1 product was produced by the adenoviral vector AdEasy system, which can express antisense RNA against the mdr1 gene. Following that, the recombinant adenovirus was transfected into the P-glycoprotein-producing multidrug resistance cell line, SMMC7721/ADM human HCC cells resistant to adriamycin (ADM) and daunorubicin (DNR). In order to investigate the reversal of multidrug resistance phenotype, we measured the expression of mdr1 mRNA by RT-PCR and the production of P-glycoprotein by lfow cytometry. The sensitivities for ADM and DNR SMMC7721/ADM cells were examined by [3-(4, 5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl-terazolium bromide] (MTT) analysis. RESULTS: The low-level expression of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein production were observed in parental sensitive cells SMMC/7721 in addition to the overexpression of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein in SMMC7721/ADM cells. The transfection of antisense-RNA into SMMC7721/ADM cells resulted in decreases of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein, but increase of drug sensitivities. The sensitivities of transfected SMMC7721/ADM cells to ADM and DNR in IC50 reduced by 31.25% and 62.96%respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Mdr1 antisense RNA can increase the sensitivities of SMMC7721/ADM cells to anticancer drug by decreasing the expression of the mdr1 gene and inhibiting P-glycoprotein expression. This strategy may be applicable to cancer patients with P-glycoportein mediated multidrug resistance.

  6. Chemical Modifications of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers Enhance Their Efficacy against Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    specific PMOs in infected cells and mice during lethal Ebola virus challenge. Members of the Filoviridae family of viruses , Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg ...American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Chemical Modifications of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers Enhance Their Efficacy against Ebola Virus ...sequence is complementary to a region spanning the start codon of VP24 mRNA were protected against lethal Ebola virus challenge. In the present study, we

  7. Propionic and Methylmalonic Acidemia: Antisense Therapeutics for Intronic Variations Causing Aberrantly Spliced Messenger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón, A. ; Aguado, C. ; Desviat, L. R. ; Sánchez-Alcudia, R. ; Ugarte, M. ; Pérez, B. 

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs) to restore normal splicing caused by intronic molecular defects identified in methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and propionic acidemia (PA). The three new point mutations described in deep intronic regions increase the splicing scores of pseudoexons or generate consensus binding motifs for splicing factors, such as SRp40, which favor the intronic inclusions in MUT (r.1957ins76), PCCA (r.1284ins84), or PCCB (r.654ins72) messenger R...

  8. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  9. Cortical Neurodynamics of Inhibitory Control

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kai; Ghuman, Avniel S.; Dara S Manoach; Stephanie R. Jones; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (18–38 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-b...

  10. Impulsivity: A deficiency of inhibitory control?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansbergen, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Impulsivity has been defined as acting without thinking. Impulsivity can be quantified by impulsivity questionnaires, but also by behavioral paradigms which tax inhibitory control. Previous research has repeatedly demonstrated deficient inhibitory control in psychopathological samples characterized

  11. Evaluation of multiple-turnover capability of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides in cell-free RNase H-mediated antisense reaction and in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Naoko; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Shigesada, Naoya; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The multiple-turnover ability of a series of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in the RNase H-mediated scission reaction was estimated using a newly developed cell-free reaction system. We determined the initial reaction rates of AONs under multiple-turnover conditions and found that among 24 AONs tested, AONs with melting temperatures (Tm) of 40°C-60°C efficiently elicit multiple rounds of RNA scission. On the other hand, by measuring Tm with two 10-mer RNAs partially complementary to AONs as models of cleaved 5' and 3' fragments of mRNA, we found that AONs require adequate binding affinity for efficient turnover activities. We further demonstrated that the efficacy of a set of 13-mer AONs in mice correlated with their turnover efficiency, indicating that the intracellular situation where AONs function is similar to multiple-turnover conditions. Our methodology and findings may provide an opportunity to shed light on a previously unknown antisense mechanism, leading to further improvement of the activity and safety profiles of AONs.

  12. Cortical neurodynamics of inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kai; Ghuman, Avniel S; Manoach, Dara S; Jones, Stephanie R; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-07-16

    The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (18-38 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-band power (10-18 Hz) in the frontal eye field (FEF) increased. Trial-by-trial prestimulus FEF alpha-band power predicted successful saccadic inhibition. Further, inhibitory control enhanced cross-frequency amplitude coupling between PFC beta-band (18-38 Hz) activity and FEF alpha-band activity, and the coupling appeared to be initiated by the PFC. Our results suggest a generalized mechanism for top-down inhibitory control: prefrontal beta-band activity initiates alpha-band activity for functional inhibition of the effector and/or sensory system.

  13. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Yu, Xiyan, E-mail: yuxiyan@sdau.edu.cn [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Wang, Xiufeng, E-mail: xfwang@sdau.edu.cn [College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China)

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  14. A vector library for silencing central carbon metabolism genes with antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Ohno, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the construction of a series of 71 vectors to silence central carbon metabolism genes in Escherichia coli. The vectors inducibly express antisense RNAs called paired-terminus antisense RNAs, which have a higher silencing efficacy than ordinary antisense RNAs. By measuring mRNA amounts, measuring activities of target proteins, or observing specific phenotypes, it was confirmed that all the vectors were able to silence the expression of target genes efficiently. Using this vector set, each of the central carbon metabolism genes was silenced individually, and the accumulation of metabolites was investigated. We were able to obtain accurate information on ways to increase the production of pyruvate, an industrially valuable compound, from the silencing results. Furthermore, the experimental results of pyruvate accumulation were compared to in silico predictions, and both sets of results were consistent. Compared to the gene disruption approach, the silencing approach has an advantage in that any E. coli strain can be used and multiple gene silencing is easily possible in any combination.

  15. Pseudomonas exotoxin antisense RNA selectively kills hepatitis B virus infected cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Hafkemeyer; Ulrich Brinkmann; Elizabeth Brinkmann; Ira Pastan; Hubert E Blum; Thomas F Baumert

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To present an approach for selectively killing retrovirus-infected cells that combines the toxicity of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) and the presence of reverse transcriptase (RT) in infected cells. METHODS: PE antisense toxin RNA has palindromic stem loops at its 5' and 3' ends enabling self-primed generation of cDNA in the presence of RT. The RT activity expressed in retrovirus-infected cells converts "antisense-toxin-RNA" into a lethal toxin gene exclusively in these cells. RESULTS: Using cotransfection studies with Peexpressing RNAs and β-gal expressing reporter plasmids, we show that, in HepG2 and HepG2. 2. 15 hepatomacells as well as in duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infected cells, HBV or DHBV-polymerase reverse transcribe a lethal cDNA copy of an antisense toxin RNA, which is composed of sequences complementary to a PE gene and eukaryotic transcription and translation signals. CONCLUSION: This finding may have important implications as a novel therapeutic strategy aimed at the elimination of HBV infection.

  16. HTLV-I antisense transcripts initiating in the 3'LTR are alternatively spliced and polyadenylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense transcription in retroviruses has been suggested for both HIV-1 and HTLV-I, although the existence and coding potential of these transcripts remain controversial. Thorough characterization is required to demonstrate the existence of these transcripts and gain insight into their role in retrovirus biology. Results This report provides the first complete characterization of an antisense retroviral transcript that encodes the previously described HTLV-I HBZ protein. In this study, we show that HBZ-encoding transcripts initiate in the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR at several positions and consist of two alternatively spliced variants (SP1 and SP2. Expression of the most abundant HBZ spliced variant (SP1 could be detected in different HTLV-I-infected cell lines and importantly in cellular clones isolated from HTLV-I-infected patients. Polyadenylation of HBZ RNA occurred at a distance of 1450 nucleotides downstream of the HBZ stop codon in close proximity of a typical polyA signal. We have also determined that translation mostly initiates from the first exon located in the 3' LTR and that the HBZ isoform produced from the SP1 spliced variant demonstrated inhibition of Tax and c-Jun-dependent transcriptional activation. Conclusion These results conclusively demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in retroviruses, which likely plays a role in HTLV-I-associated pathogenesis through HBZ protein synthesis.

  17. Intrathecal PLC(β3) oligodeoxynucleotides antisense potentiates acute morphine efficacy and attenuates chronic morphine tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanhong, Zhou; Ying, Xue; Moxi, Chen; Tao, Xu; Jing, Wang; Xin, Zhang; Li, Wang; Derong, Cui; Xiaoli, Zhang; Wei, Jiang

    2012-09-07

    Morphine is a mainstay for chronic pain treatment, but its efficacy has been hampered by physical tolerance. The underlying mechanism for chronic morphine induced tolerance is complicated and not well understood. PLC(β3) is regarded as an important factor in the morphine tolerance signal pathway. In this study, we determined intrathecal (i.t.) administration of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) of PLC(β3) could quicken the on-set antinociceptive efficacy of acute morphine treatment and prolong the maximum effect up to 4h. The antisense could also attenuate the development of morphine-induced tolerance and left shift the ED50 after 7 day of coadministration with morphine. These results probably were contributed by the PLC(β3) antisense ODN as they successfully knocked down protein expression levels and reduced activity of PLC(β3) in spinal cord in rats. The mismatch group had no such effects. The results confirmed the important involvement of PLC(β3) in both acute morphine efficacy and chronic morphine tolerance at spinal level in rats. This study may provide an idea for producing a novel adjuvant for morphine treatment.

  18. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  19. PCSK9 LNA antisense oligonucleotides induce sustained reduction of LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Marie W; Elmén, Joacim; Fisker, Niels; Hansen, Henrik F; Persson, Robert; Møller, Marianne R; Rosenbohm, Christoph; Ørum, Henrik; Straarup, Ellen M; Koch, Troels

    2012-02-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). PCSK9 increases the degradation of the LDL receptor, resulting in high LDL-C in individuals with high PCSK9 activity. Here, we show that two locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 produce sustained reduction of LDL-C in nonhuman primates after a loading dose (20 mg/kg) and four weekly maintenance doses (5 mg/kg). PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and serum PCSK9 protein were reduced by 85% which resulted in a 50% reduction in circulating LDL-C. Serum total cholesterol (TC) levels were reduced to the same extent as LDL-C with no reduction in high-density lipoprotein levels, demonstrating a specific pharmacological effect on LDL-C. The reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA correlated with liver LNA oligonucleotide content. This verified that anti-PCSK9 LNA oligonucleotides regulated LDL-C through an antisense mechanism. The compounds were well tolerated with no observed effects on toxicological parameters (liver and kidney histology, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, and creatinine). The pharmacologic evidence and initial safety profile of the compounds used in this study indicate that LNA antisense oligonucleotides targeting PCSK9 provide a viable therapeutic strategy and are potential complements to statins in managing high LDL-C.

  20. Polymerase-Endonuclease Amplification Reaction (PEAR) for Large-Scale Enzymatic Production of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gou, Deming; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR), for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI) cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. PMID:20062528

  1. Reversing Antisense Oligonucleotide Activity with a Sense Oligonucleotide Antidote: Proof of Concept Targeting Prothrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Zhang, Hong; MacLeod, A Robert; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2015-12-01

    The tissue half-life of second-generation antisense oligonucleotide drugs (ASOs) is generally longer than traditional small molecule therapeutics. Thus, a strategy to reverse the activity of antisense drugs is warranted in certain settings. In this study, we describe a strategy employing the administration of a complementary sense oligonucleotide antidote (SOA). As a model system we have chosen to target the coagulation factor and antithrombotic drug target, prothrombin, to assess the feasibility of this approach. ASO targeting mouse prothrombin specifically suppressed >90% hepatic prothrombin mRNA levels and circulating prothrombin protein in mice. These effects were dose- and time-dependent, and as expected produced predictable increases in anticoagulation activity [prothrombin time/activated partial thromboplastin time (PT/aPTT)]. Treatment with prothrombin SOAs resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of ASO activity, as measured by a return in prothrombin mRNA levels and thrombin activity, and normalization of aPTT and PT. The antithrombotic activity of prothrombin ASOs was demonstrated in a FeCl3-induced thrombosis mouse model, and as predicted for this target, the doses required for antithrombotic activity were also associated with increased bleeding. Treatment with SOA was able to prevent prothrombin ASO-induced bleeding in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of SOAs to selectively and specifically reverse the intracellular effects of an antisense therapy.

  2. Antisense regulation of expression and transactivation functions of the tumorigenic HBx and c-myc genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Le; Kumar, Vijay

    2006-05-26

    Earlier we have shown that the X-myc transgenic mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to co-expression of c-Myc and HBx protein of hepatitis B virus [R. Lakhtakia, V. Kumar, H. Reddi, M. Mathur, S. Dattagupta, S.K. Panda, Hepatocellular carcinoma in a hepatitis B 'x' transgenic mouse model: a sequential pathological evaluation. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 18 (2003) 80-91]. With the aim to develop therapeutic strategies for HCC, we constructed several mono- and bicistronic antisense recombinants against HBx and c-myc genes to regulate their expression as well as transactivation function in a human hepatoma cell line. A dose-dependent inhibition in the expression levels of HBx and c-Myc was observed with monocistronic constructs. Likewise, the bicistronic recombinants also blocked the expression as well as transactivation functions of cognate genes with equal efficacy. Further, expression of the constituent genes from the X-myc transgene could also be inhibited by these antisense constructs in cell culture. Thus, our study points towards clinical implications of antisense regulation of tumor-promoting genes in the management of HCC.

  3. PNA-based artificial nucleases as antisense and anti-miRNA oligonucleotide agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglione, M; Milano, G; Chambery, A; Moggio, L; Romanelli, A; Messere, A

    2011-08-01

    Because of its interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) has attracted major attention in molecular biology, for diagnostics purposes and development of biosensors. PNAs have become candidates for gene therapeutic drugs in ANTISENSE (AO) strategy with favorable in vivo biochemical properties. Recently, antisense PNA oligonucleotides have been described in anti-miRNA approach (AMO). We propose PNA-based nucleases as AO and AMO agents. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of two kinds of artificial nucleases composed of a PEG-PNA-PEG domain conjugated to HGG·Cu (A) and DETA (B) as well known cleavage sites. Qualitative (MALDI-TOF) and quantitative (HTS) assays were planned to study nuclease activity of constructs A and B on RNA-3'-FAM target sequence. The results have highlighted the best performance of nuclease B and the relevance of the PEG spacer, in particular for conjugate A, in terms of efficiency of the cleavage, suggesting that conjugates A and B also act as potential antisense and anti-miRNA agents.

  4. Murine neurofibroma reversion by antisense RNA for HTLV-I tax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌本; Mark; C.Horowitz; Nancy; H.Ruddle

    1999-01-01

    Neurofibroma cell lines derived from mice transgenic for HTLV-I LTR tax express high levels of HTLV-I tax mRNA and protein and exhibit a transformed phenotype. A retrovirus vector carrying HTLV-I tax cDNA in reversed transcriptional orientation was stably transfected into the neurofibroma cells. Antisense RNA inhibited expression of the tax gene with a decrease of more than 40 % in both tax mRNA and protein. Tax antisense RNA reversed the transformed phenotype as exhibited by dramatic changes in cell morphology and growth characteristics. Expression of several cellular genes which are activated by Tax protein including GM-CSF, IL-6, LT/TNF, c-myc and LIF was down-regulated, while M-CSF and c-src proto-oncogene expressions were up-regulated. Accumulation of β-actin mRNA was not affected. The changes that occurred in the tax antisense expressing neurofibroma cells could be the consequence of the decreased concentration of Tax protein. These results also indicate that HTLV-I Tax protein is crucial for main

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon.

  6. Antisense-Mediated Depletion of Tomato Chloroplast Omega-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Enhances Thermal Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Yan Liu; Jing-Hua Yang; Bin Li; Xiu-Mei Yang; Qing-Wei Meng

    2006-01-01

    A chloroplast-localized tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene (LeFAD7) was isolated and characterized with regard to its sequence, response to various temperatures, and function in antisense transgenic tomato plants. The deduced amino acid sequence had four histidine-rich regions, of which three regions were highly conserved throughout the whole ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family.Southern blotting analysis showed that LeFAD7was encoded by a single copy gene and had two homologous genes in the tomato genome. Northern blot showed that LeFAD7was expressed in all organs and was especially abundant in leaf tissue. Meanwhile, expression of LeFAD7was induced by chilling stress (4 ℃),but was inhibited by high temperature (45 ℃), in leaves. Transgenic tomato plants were produced by integration of the antisense LeFAD7 DNA under the control of a CaMV35S promoter into the genome. Antisense transgenic plants with lower 18: 3 content could maintain a higher maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm)and O2 evolution rate than wild-type plants. These results suggested that silence of the LeFAD7 gene alleviated high-temperature stress. There was also a correlation between the low content of 18: 3 resulting from silence of the LeFAD7 gene and tolerance to high-temperature stress.

  7. A GmAOX2b antisense gene compromises vegetative growth and seed production in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Simmonds, Daina; Day, David A; Colmer, Timothy D; Finnegan, Patrick M

    2012-07-01

    The alternative oxidase mediates the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway in plant mitochondria. In non-thermogenic plants, the role of alternative oxidase in plant growth and development is not well understood. Soybean (Glycine max) lines carrying a GmAOX2b antisense gene had compromised vegetative growth and reproductive performance under typical glasshouse growth conditions. The reduction in vegetative growth was demonstrated by reduction in shoot height, the number of leaves per plant and the green leaf area. Antisense plants also had decreased pod formation and seed to pod ratios, which together led to a reduction in the number and total mass of seed produced. The negative effects of the antisense gene on pod set, seed set, ovule availability and total seed mass were primarily confined to the branches, rather than the main stem. The preferential effect of alternative oxidase suppression in the branches is discussed in relation to the reproductive potential of soybean under stress. Taken together, these results demonstrate that alternative oxidase provides the benefit of sustaining plant vegetative growth and reproductive capacity in soybean.

  8. Regulation of apoptosis by fau revealed by functional expression cloning and antisense expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Kirkham, Lucy; Farzaneh, Farzin; Williams, Gwyn T

    2004-12-16

    Functional expression cloning is a powerful strategy for identifying critical steps in biological pathways independently of prior assumptions. It is particularly suitable for the identification of molecules crucial to the control of apoptosis. Our screen for sequences suppressing T-cell apoptosis isolated a sequence antisense to fau (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene). The fox gene in FBR murine osteosarcoma virus is also antisense to fau and several reports have indicated that fau displays tumour suppressor and oncogenic properties in different contexts. Our observations indicate that the fau antisense sequence suppresses expression of endogenous fau mRNA and produces resistance to apoptosis induced both by the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone' by ultraviolet radiation, and by the anticancer drug cisplatin. In all cases, colony-forming ability is protected, indicating that fau affects the critical events prior to commitment to cell death. Overexpression of fau in the sense orientation induces cell death, which is inhibited both by Bcl-2 and by inhibition of caspases, in line with its proposed role in apoptosis.

  9. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  10. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  11. Enhanced therapeutic effects for human pancreatic cancer by application K-ras and IGF-IR antisense oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Mei Shen; Xiao-Chun Yang; Chen Yang; Jun-Kang Shen

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the combined effects of K-ras antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(K-ras ASODN)specific to GTT point mutation at codon 12 and type I insulin-like growth factor receptor(IGF-IR)antisense oligodeoxynucleotide(IGF-IR ASODN)on proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer Patu8988 cells in vitro and in vivo.METHODS:K-ras gene point mutation and its style at codon 12 of human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988 were detected by using polymerase chain reaction with special sequence primers(PCR-SSP)and sequence analysis.According to the mutation style,K-ras mutation ASODN specific to K-ras point mutation at codon 12 was designed and composed.After K-ras ASODN and IGF-IR ASODN treated on Patu8988 cells respectively or cooperatively,the proliferation and morphological change of Patu8988 cells were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,colony forming assay and transmission electron microscopy;the expression of K-ras and IGF-IR mRNA and protein in the treated cells was measured by reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and flow cytometry respectively;apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry.The combined antitumor activity of K-ras ASODN and IGFIR ASODN was evaluated in BALB/C nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer inoculated with Patu8988 cells.RESULTS:The results of PCR-SSP and sequence analysis showed that the human Dancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988 had point mutation at coclon 12,and the mutation style was GGT→GTT.2-32 μg/mL K-ras ASODN and 2-32 μg/mL IGF-IR ASODN could inhibit Patu8988 cells' growth,induce apoptosis and decrease the expression of K-ras and IGF-IR mRNA and protein alone.However,there was much more effective inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis by their combination than by each one alone.In tumor bearing mice,the combination of K-ras ASODN and IGF-IR ASODN showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of transplanted pancreatic cancer,resulting in

  12. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (PSK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  13. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudome, Yuya; Takahama, Mamiko; Hirose, Jun; Yoshida, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by providing sliding friction onto the surface of agar gel; we then investigated whether penetron formation was applicable to gene silencing techniques. Antisense DNA was artificially synthesized as 15 or 90mer DNA oligonucleotides based on the sequences around the translation start codon of target mRNAs. Mixtures of bacterial cells with antisense DNA adsorbed on α-sepiolite were stimulated by sliding friction on the surface of agar gel for 60 s. Upon formation of Escherichia coli penetrons, β-lactamase and β-galactosidase expression was evaluated by counting the numbers of colonies formed on LB agar containing ampicillin and by measuring β-galactosidase activity respectively. The numbers of ampicillin resistant colonies and the β-galactosidase activity derived from penetrons bearing antisense DNA (90mer) was repressed to 15% and 25%, respectively, of that of control penetrons which lacked antisense DNA. Biphenyl metabolite, ring cleavage yellow compound produced by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes penetron treated with antisense oligonucleotide DNA targeted to bphD increased higher than that lacking antisense DNA. This result indicated that expression of bphD in P. pseudoalcaligenes penetrons was repressed by antisense DNA that targeted bphD mRNA. Sporulation rates of Bacillus subtilis penetrons treated with antisense DNA (15mer) targeted to spo0A decreased to 24.4% relative to penetrons lacking antisense DNA. This novel method of gene silencing has substantial promise for

  14. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by providing sliding friction onto the surface of agar gel; we then investigated whether penetron formation was applicable to gene silencing techniques. Antisense DNA was artificially synthesized as 15 or 90mer DNA oligonucleotides based on the sequences around the translation start codon of target mRNAs. Mixtures of bacterial cells with antisense DNA adsorbed on α-sepiolite were stimulated by sliding friction on the surface of agar gel for 60 s. Upon formation of Escherichia coli penetrons, β-lactamase and β-galactosidase expression was evaluated by counting the numbers of colonies formed on LB agar containing ampicillin and by measuring β-galactosidase activity respectively. The numbers of ampicillin resistant colonies and the β-galactosidase activity derived from penetrons bearing antisense DNA (90mer) was repressed to 15% and 25%, respectively, of that of control penetrons which lacked antisense DNA. Biphenyl metabolite, ring cleavage yellow compound produced by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes penetron treated with antisense oligonucleotide DNA targeted to bphD increased higher than that lacking antisense DNA. This result indicated that expression of bphD in P. pseudoalcaligenes penetrons was repressed by antisense DNA that targeted bphD mRNA. Sporulation rates of Bacillus subtilis penetrons treated with antisense DNA (15mer) targeted to spo0A decreased to 24.4% relative to penetrons lacking antisense DNA. This novel method of gene silencing has substantial promise for

  15. Identification of novel endogenous antisense transcripts by DNA microarray analysis targeting complementary strand of annotated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohama Chihiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent transcriptomic analyses in mammals have uncovered the widespread occurrence of endogenous antisense transcripts, termed natural antisense transcripts (NATs. NATs are transcribed from the opposite strand of the gene locus and are thought to control sense gene expression, but the mechanism of such regulation is as yet unknown. Although several thousand potential sense-antisense pairs have been identified in mammals, examples of functionally characterized NATs remain limited. To identify NAT candidates suitable for further functional analyses, we performed DNA microarray-based NAT screening using mouse adult normal tissues and mammary tumors to target not only the sense orientation but also the complementary strand of the annotated genes. Results First, we designed microarray probes to target the complementary strand of genes for which an antisense counterpart had been identified only in human public cDNA sources, but not in the mouse. We observed a prominent expression signal from 66.1% of 635 target genes, and 58 genes of these showed tissue-specific expression. Expression analyses of selected examples (Acaa1b and Aard confirmed their dynamic transcription in vivo. Although interspecies conservation of NAT expression was previously investigated by the presence of cDNA sources in both species, our results suggest that there are more examples of human-mouse conserved NATs that could not be identified by cDNA sources. We also designed probes to target the complementary strand of well-characterized genes, including oncogenes, and compared the expression of these genes between mammary cancerous tissues and non-pathological tissues. We found that antisense expression of 95 genes of 404 well-annotated genes was markedly altered in tumor tissue compared with that in normal tissue and that 19 of these genes also exhibited changes in sense gene expression. These results highlight the importance of NAT expression in the regulation

  16. 冬凌草甲素和survivin反义核苷酸对前列腺癌细胞作用的研究%Effects of survivin antisense oligodeoxynecleotides and Oridonin on PC-3 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李进; 杨罗艳; 吴洪涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the synergistic effects of survivin antisense oligonucleotides combined with Oridonin on growth, apoptosis, and the expression of survivin of PC-3 cells. Methods Human prostate carcinoma cells PC-3 on logarithmic growth phase were used in this study. The cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The combination index (CI) was calculated using Pharmaconamics CalcuSynsoftware. The apoptotic rate was examined by flow cytometer (FCM). The expression of survivin was detected by Western Blot and Real-time Fluorescent Quantitation-PCR. Results After transfection with antisense Survivin RNAi, the proliferation of PC-3 cells was inhibited markedly. An obvious apoptosis was found in the transfected PC-3 cells. The inhibitory effect of combined administration of survivin antisense and Oridonin on cell proliferation was much stronger than that of the single way (P<0.01). It showed that there was a synergistic effect (Fa<0.80). Western Blot and RT-PCR assays demonstrated that survivin antisense and Oridonin all inhibited the expression of survivin(P <0.01). Conclusion Combined survivin antisense and Oridonin significantly inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and down-regulates survivin expression in PC-3 cells, indicating that survivin antisense and Oridonin have a synergistic effect on PC-3 cells.%目的:探讨冬凌草甲素联合survivin反义核苷酸(反义链)对前列腺癌PC-3细胞株增殖和凋亡以及survivin mRNA和蛋白的影响。方法常规培养PC-3细胞,用四甲基偶氮唑盐法(MTT法)检测survivin反义链联合冬凌草甲素对PC-3细胞增殖的影响;流式细胞仪(FCM)检测PC-3细胞凋亡率;以CalcuSyn药效学软件计算联合指数(CI)评价survivin反义链联合凌草甲素对PC-3细胞的联合效应,并通过荧光定量PCR和Western blot方法检测PC-3细胞survivin基因和蛋白表达变化。结果 survivin反义链转染PC-3细胞后,可以显著抑制PC-3

  17. Effects of Cyclin D1 Antisense Oligodeoxyneucleotides on the Growth and Expression of G1 Phase Regulators in Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅晓明; 韩高雄; 王国斌

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Cyclin D1 antisense oligodeoxyneucleotides (ASODN) on the growth, cell cycle progression and expression of G1 phase regulators in human gastric carcinoma cell lines SGC7901 and HS746T, phosphorothioate-modified Cyclin D1 ASODN were encapsulated by LipofectAMINE2000 and transfected into gastric carcinoma cells. Dose-dependent inhibitory effects were induced by Cyclin D1 ASODN in two gastric carcinoma cell lines. Treatment of gastric carcinoma cells with 0.2 μmol/L Cyclin D1 ASODN for 24 h could significantly inhibit their growth in vitro and in vivo, reduce expression of Cyclin DlmRNA to 26.3 % (SGC7901) and 17.3 %(HS746T) respectively. The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase was increased as revealed by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of p21 was increased and the expression of Cyclin D1 and pRb was decreased in the two cell lines; the expression of p27 was increased in HS746T, but unchanged in SGC7901. Cyclin D1 ASODN could inhibit the growth and the expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA in gastric carcinoma cells, influence the cell cycle and expression of its regulators.

  18. Genetic modification of condensed tannin biosynthesis in Lotus corniculatus. 1. Heterologous antisense dihydroflavonol reductase down-regulates tannin accumulation in "hairy root" cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, T R; Robbins, M P; Morris, P

    1994-03-01

    An antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) gene-construct made using the cDNA for DFR from Antirrhinum majus was introduced into the genome of a series of clonal genotypes of Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. After initial screening, 17 antisense and 11 control transformation events were analysed and tannin levels found to be reduced in antisense root cultures. The effect of this antisense construct, (pMAJ2), which consisted of the 5' half of the DFR cDNA sequence, was compared in three different recipient Lotus genotypes. This construct effectively down-regulated tannin biosynthesis in two of the recepient genotypes (s33 and s50); however, this construct was relatively ineffective in a third genotype (s41) which accumulated high levels of condensed tannins in derived transgenic root cultures. Four pMAJ2 antisense and three control lines derived from clonal genotypes s33 and s50 were selected and studied in greater detail. The antisense DFR construct was found to be integrated into the genome of the antisense "hairy root" cultures, and the antisense RNA was shown to be expressed. Tannin levels were much lower in antisense roots compared to the controls and this reduction in tannin levels was accompanied by a change in condensed tannin subunit composition.

  19. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Saito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  20. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  1. Water-absorbent polymer as a carrier for a discrete deposit of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, M; Ichikawa, M; Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Takahashi, M

    1998-09-01

    One of the problems of introducing antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into the central nervous system (CNS) is their rapid disappearance from the target site due to their dispersion and diffusion, which results in poor uptake and/or retention in cells (M. Morris, A.B. Lucion, Antisense oligonucleotides in the study of neuroendocrine systems, J. Neuroendocrinol. 7 (1995) 493-500; S. Ogawa, H.E. Brown, H.J. Okano, D.W. Pfaff, Cellular uptake of intracerebrally administrated oligodeoxynucleotides in mouse brain, Regul. Pept. 59 (1995) 143-149) [2,5]. Recently, we adapted a new method using water-absorbent polymer (WAP; internally cross-linked starch-grafted-polyacrylates) as a carrier for antisense ODN. The polymer forms a hydro-gel after absorbing water which is chemically and biologically inert. In these studies, the polymer (powder-form) is fully swollen by physiological saline containing antisense ODN (0.2 micromol/ml) to make 80-fold volume gel. Hydro-gel (1 microliter) is injected into the target site, and water solutes are assumed to be diffused stoichiometrically into CNS from the surface of the gel. Histological studies indicate that 24 h after the injection, antisense ODN (5'biotinylated-S-oligos of 15 mer) are distributed to within 800 micrometer from the edge of the area where the gel is located and then gradually disappear from this area within days, but still remain within 300-micrometer distance 7 days later. Antisense ODN are effectively incorporated by all the cell types examined, i.e., neurons, astrocytes and microglias, and suppress the synthesis of the target protein. This method can be adapted to slow delivery of antisense ODN and other water soluble substances into the CNS.

  2. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  3. Antisense RNA: a genetic approach to cell resistance against Parvovirus; RNA antisentido: una aproximacion de resistencia genetica a Parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Martinez, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    The Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp), an autonomous Parvovirus that replicates cytolytically in the A9 mouse fibroblast cell line, was interfered by constitutive expression of an antisense RNA targeted against the major non-structural NS-1 protein. Permanently transfected A9 clones expressing NS-1 antisense, showed increased proliferative capacity upon virus infection, and likewise cultures infected at low multiplicity by MVMp reached confluence overcoming virus growth. Correspondingly, an inhibition in virus multiplication was demonstrated by a significant lower virus production and plaque forming ability in clones expressing antisense RNa. At the molecular level, several fold reduction in viral DNA, RNA and proteins was quantitated by respective analysis of Southern, RNase protection and bidimensional gels. Remarkably, the accumulation of all three viral messengers(R1,R2,R3) was decreased both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, suggesting that antisense-mediated inhibition is primarily exerted at the level of viral transcription or nuclear post-transcriptional events. Thus, this system illustrates the possibility to create an antisense-mediated protective stage to highly cytotoxic viruses in permissive cells, by down-modulation the expression of a transactivator of virus genes. (author)180 refs., 25 figs.

  4. Antisense RNA: a genetic approach to cell resistance against Parvovirus. RNA antisentido: una aproximacion de resistencia genetica a Parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Martinez, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp), an autonomous Parvovirus that replicates cytolytically in the A9 mouse fibroblast cell line, was interfered by constitutive expression of an antisense RNA targeted against the major non-structural NS-1 protein. Permanently transfected A9 clones expressing NS-1 antisense, showed increased proliferative capacity upon virus infection, and likewise cultures infected at low multiplicity by MVMp reached confluence overcoming virus growth. Correspondingly, an inhibition in virus multiplication was demonstrated by a significant lower virus production and plaque forming ability in clones expressing antisense RNa. At the molecular level, several fold reduction in viral DNA, RNA and proteins was quantitated by respective analysis of Southern, RNase protection and bidimensional gels. Remarkably, the accumulation of all three viral messengers(R1,R2,R3) was decreased both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, suggesting that antisense-mediated inhibition is primarily exerted at the level of viral transcription or nuclear post-transcriptional events. Thus, this system illustrates the possibility to create an antisense-mediated protective stage to highly cytotoxic viruses in permissive cells, by down-modulation the expression of a transactivator of virus genes. (author)180 refs., 25 figs.

  5. Identification and characterization of a cis-encoded antisense RNA associated with the replication process of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Dadzie

    Full Text Available Antisense RNAs that originate from the complementary strand of protein coding genes are involved in the regulation of gene expression in all domains of life. In bacteria, some of these antisense RNAs are transcriptional noise while others play a vital role to adapt the cell to changing environmental conditions. By deep sequencing analysis of transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a partial RNA sequence encoded in-cis to the dnaA gene was revealed. Northern blot and RACE analysis confirmed the transcription of this antisense RNA which was expressed mostly in the stationary phase of the bacterial growth and also under iron limitation and osmotic stress. Pulse expression analysis showed that overexpression of the antisense RNA resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA levels of dnaA, which will ultimately enhance their translation. Our findings have revealed that antisense RNA of dnaA is indeed transcribed not merely as a by-product of the cell's transcription machinery but plays a vital role as far as stability of dnaA mRNA is concerned.

  6. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-06-26

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3' processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account.

  7. Antisense bcl-2 retrovirus vector increases the sensitivity of a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W G; Ma, L P; Wang, S W; Zhang, Z Y; Cao, G D

    1999-05-01

    The bcl-2 oncoprotein directly prolongs cellular survival by blocking apoptosis and its overexpression is associated with cellular resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic drugs and gamma-irradiation. Meanwhile, it has been shown that bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide can induce apoptosis or increase toxicity of the treatment in tumors in vivo and in vitro. However, it is difficult to obtain stable transfection by this approach and there are no reports about the effect of an antisense bcl-2 on the sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here we investigated the effect of an antisense bcl-2 RNA retrovirus vector transfer on the sensitivity of 2-butylamino-2-demethoxy-hypocrellin A (2-BA-2-DMHA) photosensitization in a human gastric adenocarcinoma MGC803 cell line. The results indicate that antisense bcl-2-infected MGC803 cells expressed exogenous antisense bcl-2 mRNA measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and significantly reduced bcl-2 protein determined by western blotting analysis. The decreased expression of bcl-2 protein was accompanied by increased phototoxicity and susceptibility to apoptosis induced by 2-BA-2-DMHA PDT. Our finding suggests that reduction of bcl-2 protein in gastric cancers, and possibly also in a variety of other tumors, may be a novel and rational approach to improve photosensitivity and the treatment outcome.

  8. Dissociable yet tied inhibitory processes: the structure of inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, George A; Mizzi, Raphaël; Couffe, Cyril; Gálvez-García, Germán

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive and neural models have proposed the existence of a single inhibitory process that regulates behavior and depends on the right frontal operculum (rFO). The aim of this study was to make a contribution to the ongoing debate as to whether inhibition is a single process or is composed of multiple, independent processes. Here, within a single paradigm, we assessed the links between two inhibitory phenomena-namely, resistance to involuntary visual capture by abrupt onsets and resolving of spatial stimulus-response conflict. We did so by conducting three experiments, two involving healthy volunteers (Exps. 1 and 3), and one with the help of a well-documented patient, R.J., with selectively weakened inhibition following a lesion of the rFO. The results suggest that resistance to capture and stimulus-response conflict are independent, because (a) additive effects were found (Exps. 1 and 3), (b) capture did not correlate with compatibility effects (Exp. 1), (c) dual tasking affected the two phenomena differently (Exp. 3), and (d) a dissociation was found between the two in patient R.J. (Exp. 2). However, the results also show that these two phenomena may share some processing components, given that (a) both were affected in patient R.J., but to different degrees (Exp. 2), and (b) increasing the difficulty of dual tasking produced an increasingly negative correlation between capture and compatibility (Exp. 3), which suggests that when resources are withdrawn from the control of the former, they are used to control the latter.

  9. Trigemino-facial inhibitory reflexes in idiopathic hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Giovanni; Cattaneo, Luigi; Chierici, Elisabetta; Mancia, Domenico

    2003-05-01

    We investigated trigemino-facial excitatory and inhibitory responses in perioral muscles in hemifacial spasm (HFS). We examined 15 patients affected with idiopathic HFS and 8 healthy controls. Five patients had spasms mostly limited to the periocular region and 10 had spasms also involving the perioral muscles. Responses were recorded from the resting orbicularis oculi (OOc), levator labii superioris (LLS) and orbicularis oris (OOr) muscles, after supraorbital (SO) nerve stimulation and during isolated voluntary contraction of LLS muscle. Eight patients showed complete or partial preservation of the late silent period (SP2) in activated LLS muscle. The remaining 7 patients showed absence of SP2. Early and late excitatory responses were variably present in LLS muscle at rest. Patients with HFS clinically restricted to periocular muscles had at least partial preservation of the SP2. In conclusion, in HFS patients inhibitory trigemino-facial reflexes are impaired and excitatory trigemino-facial responses are elicited in perioral muscles. These two phenomena seem to develop independently; the degree of trigemino-facial reflex impairment parallels the extension of involuntary movements to the lower facial muscles.

  10. Antisense oligonucleotide against GSK-3β in brain of SAMP8 mice improves learning and memory and decreases oxidative stress: Involvement of transcription factor Nrf2 and implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Susan A; Ripley, Jessica L; Sultana, Rukhsana; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Niehoff, Michael L; Platt, Thomas L; Murphy, M Paul; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in the pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including the heightened levels of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid-beta (Aβ), and neurodegeneration. In this study we used 12-month-old SAMP8 mice, an AD model, to examine the effects GSK-3β may cause regarding the cognitive impairment and oxidative stress associated with AD. To suppress the level of GSK-3β, SAMP8 mice were treated with an antisense oligonucleotide (GAO) directed at this kinase. We measured a decreased level of GSK-3β in the cortex of the mice, indicating the success of the antisense treatment. Learning and memory assessments of the SAMP8 mice were tested post-antisense treatment using an aversive T-maze and object recognition test, both of which observably improved. In cortex samples of the SAMP8 mice, decreased levels of protein carbonyl and protein-bound HNE were measured, indicating decreased oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to increase the level of many antioxidants, including glutathione-S transferase (GST), and is negatively regulated by the activity of GSK-3β. Our results indicated the increased nuclear localization of Nrf2 and level of GST, suggesting the increased activity of the transcription factor as a result of GSK-3β suppression, consistent with the decreased oxidative stress observed. Consistent with the improved learning and memory, and consistent with GSK-3b being a tau kinase, we observed decreased tau phosphorylation in brain of GAO-treated SAMP8 mice compared to that of RAO-treated SAMP8 mice. Lastly, we examined the ability of GAO to cross the blood-brain barrier and determined it to be possible. The results presented in this study demonstrate that reducing GSK-3 with a phosphorothionated antisense against GSK-3 improves learning and memory, reduces oxidative stress, possibly coincident with increased

  11. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-03

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  12. Acute kidney injury during therapy with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poelgeest, Eveline P; Swart, Reinout M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Moerland, Matthijs; Weening, Jan J; Tessier, Yann; Hodges, Michael R; Levin, Arthur A; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2013-10-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have been explored widely in clinical trials and generally are considered to be nontoxic for the kidney, even at high concentrations. We report a case of toxic acute tubular injury in a healthy 56-year-old female volunteer after a pharmacologically active dose of a locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide was administered. The patient received 3 weekly subcutaneous doses of experimental drug SPC5001, an antisense oligonucleotide directed against PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) that is under investigation as an agent to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Five days after the last dose, the patient's serum creatinine level increased from 0.81 mg/dL at baseline (corresponding to an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] of 78 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to 2.67 mg/dL (eGFR, 20 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and this increase coincided with the presence of white blood cells, granular casts, and minimal hematuria on urine microscopy. The patient's serum creatinine level peaked at 3.81 mg/dL (eGFR, 13 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) 1 week after the last oligonucleotide dose. Kidney biopsy showed multifocal tubular necrosis and signs of oligonucleotide accumulation. Upon conservative treatment, the patient's serum creatinine level gradually decreased and reached her baseline level 44 days after the last oligonucleotide was administered. The patient recovered fully and kidney function was normal at every follow-up visit. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-05-24

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented.

  14. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  15. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  16. Antisense-mediated RNA targeting: versatile and expedient genetic manipulation in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eZalachoras

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion, but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g. in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover 1. The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry and efficacy.2. The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity and delivery issues.3. The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the CNS can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized.

  17. Release profile and stability evaluation of optimized chitosan/alginate nanoparticles as EGFR antisense vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebrahim Azizi1,4, Alireza Namazi1, Ismaeil Haririan2,5, Shamileh Fouladdel1, Mohammad R Khoshayand3, Parisa Y Shotorbani6, Alireza Nomani1,7, Taraneh Gazori1,21Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, 3Department of Food and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Biomaterials Research Center (BRC Tehran, Iran; 6Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Azad University, Tehran, Iran; 7Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, IranAbstract: Chitosan/alginate nanoparticles which had been optimized in our previous study using two different N/P ratios were chosen and their ability to release epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antisense was investigated. In addition, the stability of these nanoparticles in aqueous medium and after freeze-drying was investigated. In the case of both N/P ratios (5, 25, nanoparticles started releasing EGFR antisense as soon as they were exposed to the medium and the release lasted for approximately 50 hours. Nanoparticle size, shape, zeta potential, and release profile did not show any significant change after the freeze-drying process (followed by reswelling. The nanoparticles were reswellable again after freeze-drying in phosphate buffer with a pH of 7.4 over a period of six hours. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the nanoparticles with the two different N/P ratios showed that these nanoparticles could protect EGFR antisense molecules for six hours.Keywords: chitosan/alginate nanoparticles, release profile, freeze-drying, agarose gel electrophoresis

  18. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Isabelle; Laverdure, Sylvain; Torresilla, Cynthia; Landry, Sébastien; Borel, Sophie; Vargas, Amandine; Arpin-André, Charlotte; Gay, Bernard; Briant, Laurence; Gross, Antoine; Barbeau, Benoît; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-19

    Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  19. Synthesis of antisense oligonucleotides containing acyclic alkynyl nucleoside analogs and their biophysical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Aya; Maeda, Yusuke; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2017-02-17

    The synthesis of oligonucleotide (ON) analogs, which can be used as antisense molecules, has recently gained much attention. Here, we report the synthesis and properties of an ON analog containing acyclic thymidine and cytidine analogs with a 4-pentyl-1,2-diol instead of the d-ribofuranose moiety. The incorporation of these analogs into the ON improved its nuclease resistance to 3'-exonucleases. Furthermore, it was found that the incorporation of the acyclic thymidine analog into a DNA/RNA duplex accelerates the RNA cleavage of a DNA/RNA duplex by Escherichia coli RNase H.

  20. Evaluation of Amphiphilic Peptide Modified Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mingxing Wang; Bo Wu; Peijuan Lu; Shah, Sapana N.; Jason D. Tucker; Lauren E. Bollinger; Qilong Lu

    2017-01-01

    A series of amphiphilic peptides modified PMO (Pt-PMO) were prepared, and their antisense effect and toxicity were evaluated both in vitro and in mdx mice. The results showed that the exon-skipping performance of Pt-PMO are relative to the structure of the conjugated peptide: the Pt3/Pt4 composed of six/seven arginines and one myristoylation modified PMO showed more efficacy and with less toxicity as compared to others, confirming that appropriate hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) and cati...

  1. Expression of antisense small RNAs in response to stress in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise

    2014-01-01

    regulatory functions. Results: In this study we used RNA-seq to identify 232 antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown under 13 different conditions. The conditions studied include exponential and stationary growth as well as osmotic, oxidative and antibiotic stress...... that the extent of overlap between the studies is very limited. Conclusions: RNA-seq experiments are revealing hundreds of novel transcripts in all bacterial genomes investigated. The comparison between independent studies that used RNA-seq to detect novel asRNAs in P. aeruginosa shows that the overlap between...

  2. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide-Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections in hospital settings, especially with immune compromised patients, and the increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant strains urges search for new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we introduce...... essential bacterial gene involved in fatty acid synthesis) of P. aeruginosa (PA01) and characterized these compounds according to their antimicrobial activity and mode of action. Four antisense PNA oligomers conjugated to the H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-ßala or the H-(R-Ahx)(6)-ßala peptide exhibited complete growth...

  3. Improving the nutritional quality of the barley and wheat grain storage proteins by antisense technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikdar, Md. Shafiqul Islam; Lange, Mette; Aaslo, Per

    2011-01-01

    Prolamins are the predominant storage proteins in barley and wheat grains, accounting for 50 to 80% of total seed protein. However, the prolamins are not optimal feed for monogastric animals as they have a low content of certain essential amino acids such as lysine, threonine and tryptophan...... gliadins) are also available from Germany and UK. We have grown them under different N regimes (high, medium and low N) in semi-field conditions. Previously five different antisense C-hordein lines of barley have been characterized in our laboratory. The analyses revealed that the lysine, threonine...

  4. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection i...

  5. Estimating latency from inhibitory input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levakova, Marie; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2014-01-01

    to the stimulus by an increase in the firing rate. We focus on the estimation of the response latency in the case of inhibitory stimuli. Models used in this paper represent two different descriptions of response latency. We consider either the latency to be constant across trials or to be a random variable......Stimulus response latency is the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the occurrence of a change in the neural firing evoked by the stimulation. The response latency has been explored and estimation methods proposed mostly for excitatory stimuli, which means that the neuron reacts....... In the case of random latency, special attention is given to models with selective interaction. The aim is to propose methods for estimation of the latency or the parameters of its distribution. Parameters are estimated by four different methods: method of moments, maximum-likelihood method, a method...

  6. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Characteristics of transgenic tomatoes antisensed for the ethylene receptor genes LeERT1 and LeERT2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-feng; YING Tie-jin; ZHANG Ying; BAO Bi-li; HUANG Xiao-dan

    2006-01-01

    Two stable transformed lines containing antisense LeERT1 or LeERT2 sequences and their hybridized line were investigated to determine the effect of LeERT1 and LeERT2 specificity in the ethylene receptor family in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) on ethylene signaling. The transgenic line alel containing antisense LeERT1 displayed shorter length of seedling grown in the dark and adult plant in the light, severe epinastic petiole, and accelerated abscission of petiole explant and senescence of flower explant, compared with its wild type B1. The transgenic line ale2 containing antisense LeERT2 also exhibited shorter hypocotyls and slightly accelerated abscission. The phenotypes of cross line dale of LeERT1 and LeERT2 were close to alel in many aspects. These results suggested that LeERT1 probably plays a relatively important role in ethylene signaling of tomato growth and development.

  8. Gene expression visualisation with antisense oligonucleotides; Visualisation de l'expression d'un gene: la strategie antisens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brard, P.Y.; Gauchez, A.S.; Vuillez, J.P. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, INSERM E 03-40, Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques, Faculte de Medecine, 38 (France); Defrancq, E. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, UMR CNRS 5616 - LEDSS, Faculte de Medecine, 38 (France)

    2004-08-01

    Using radiolabelled antisense oligonucleotides to target mRNAs is a very promising method to study gene expression in vivo. This molecular imaging technique has the aim to identify cellular modifications in a very early stage of disease. During the last ten years, the number of published studies concerning in vivo tumor specific imaging is small. This fact depends on numerous biological challenges. In fact, gene specific oligonucleotides must be chemically modified to increase nuclease resistance and permit labelling with radionuclide. To be used as imaging radiopharmaceutical agent, a good antisense oligonucleotide need to valid a lot of steps: in vivo stability, cell membrane passage and durable hybridization to mRNA to obtain a kinetic which depends directly on gene expression level. We can get over these difficulties, we will illustrate with our experience on chemo-resistance imaging with antisense oligonucleotides which target h-mdr 1, in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  9. Antisense EGFR sequence reverses the growth properties of human liver carcinoma cell line BEL-7404 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUYONGHUA; WANLIJIANG; SUFENGPENG; YINGHUACHEN

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a full length human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cDNA sequence in antisense orientation was transferred into cells of a human liver carcinoma cell line BEL-7404. Compared with the control cell clone JX-0 transferred with the vector plasmid and the parent BEL-7404 cells, the antisense EGFR transferred cell clone JX-1 showed a decreased EGFR gene expression and reduced significantly the growth potential either in anchorage-dependent or anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore. JX-1 cells appeared to be distinctly dependent on serum concentration for monolayer growth. The results suggested that antisense EGFR could partly block the EGFR gene ex-pression and reverse the malignant growth properties of human liver carcinoma cells in vitro.

  10. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marcela Herrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioural inhibiton, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioural inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioural inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/Nogo and Stop Signal Tasks. Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on the performance of such tasks in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and ADHD. However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory paradigms are rare and consequently, little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and self-control. Here, we probed the effect of reward and reward magnitude on behavioural inhibition using two modified version of the widely used Stop Signal Task. The first task compared no reward with reward, whilst the other compared two different reward magnitudes. The reward magnitude effect was confirmed by the second study, whereas it was less compelling in the first study, possibly due to the effect of having no reward in some conditions. In addition, our results showed a kick start effect over global performance measures. More specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task, when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the protocol. These results demonstrate that individuals’ behavioural inhibition capacities are dynamic not static because they are modulated by the reward magnitude and initial reward history of the task at hand.

  11. The impact of mental workload on inhibitory control subprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Mückschel, Moritz; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-05-15

    The inhibition of inappropriate responses is a function known to rely on prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning. Similarly, working memory processes are known to rely on the PFC. Even though these processes are usually closely intertwined and the functional neuroanatomy underlying these processes is largely overlapping, the influence of working memory load on inhibitory control process has remained largely elusive. In the current study, we therefore examine how response inhibition processes are modulated by working memory load. For this, we systematically increased the working memory load of participants by integrating mental rotation processes in a Go/NoGo paradigm. To examine the system neurophysiology of these processes in detail, and to examine whether there are differential effects of working memory load on distinct response inhibition subprocesses, we applied event-related potentials (ERPs) in combination with source localization techniques. The data shows that after exceeding a certain threshold, inhibitory control processes are aggravated by working memory load. The neurophysiological data paralleled the behavioral data. However, it suggests that distinguishable response inhibition subprocesses are differentially modulated by working memory load: Changes were evident in the NoGo-P3 amplitude but not in the NoGo-N2 amplitude. On a system level, this distinctive modulation of response inhibition subprocesses was related to differences in neural activity in the left inferior and middle frontal gyri. We show that inhibitory control processes are impaired when the working memory load surpasses a certain threshold. This, however only applies to situations in which the necessity of inhibitory control processes cannot be easily detected on the basis of perceptual factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cocaine and amphetamine elicit differential effects in rats with a unilateral injection of dopamine transporter antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, C P; Jaber, M; King, G R; Ellinwood, E H; Caron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We have developed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the dopamine transporter and used it to discriminate the behavioral properties of amphetamine and cocaine. In SK-N-MC cells permanently transfected with the dopamine transporter complementary DNA, treatment with 5 mM antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reduced dopamine uptake by 25% when compared to sense control. Unilateral intranigral administration of dopamine transporter antisense (50 microM) twice daily in freely moving rats for 2.5 days was sufficient to reduce dopamine transporter messenger RNA by 70% as measured by in situ hybridization, but not protein levels as measured by [3H]mazindol binding. However, intranigral treatment via implanted osmotic minipump over a period of seven days produced reductions in both dopamine transporter messenger RNA and protein levels (32%) at a dose of 500 pmol/day. These results indicate a longer half-life for the dopamine transporter than expected. Potassium chloride depolarization of ipsilateral striatal slices showed a greater than 200% increase in dopamine overflow on the antisense-treated side compared to the control side. Since imbalance of dopamine tone is known to induce rotational activity, we tested this behavioral paradigm in rats treated with various oligodeoxynucleotides at different doses and time-points. We have found that antisense-treated animals did not rotate spontaneously under any experimental conditions. Using various psychostimulants that target the dopamine transporter and increase dopamine levels, we found that the antisense-treated animals consistently rotated contralaterally in response to amphetamine (2 mg/kg), but not to cocaine (10 mg/kg) or nomifensine (10 mg/kg). These results bring in vivo evidence for a different mode of action of amphetamine and cocaine on the dopamine transporter and lend direct support to the view that amphetamine acts as a dopamine releaser, whereas cocaine acts by blocking dopamine transport.

  13. Dopamine-induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells: inhibition by nucleic acides antisense to the dopamine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porat, S.; Gabbay, M.; Tauber, M.; Ratovitski, T.; Blinder, E.; Simantov, R. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    1996-09-01

    Human neuroblastoma NMB cells take up [{sup 3}H]dopamine in a selective manner indicating that dopamine transporters are responsible for this uptake. These cells were therefore used as a model to study dopamine neurotoxicity, and to elucidate the role of dopamine transporters in controlling cell death. Treatment with 0.05-0.4 mM dopamine changed cells' morphology within 4 h, accompanied by retraction of processes, shrinkage, apoptosis-like atrophy, accumulation of apoptotic particles, DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cycloheximide inhibited dopamine's effect, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by dopamine was dependent upon protein synthesis. Dopamine cytotoxicity, monitored morphologically by flow cytometric analysis, and by lactate dehydrogenase released, was blocked by cocaine but not by the noradrenaline and serotonin uptake blockers desimipramine and imipramine, respectively. Attempting to inhibit dopamine transport and toxicity in a drug-free and highly selective way, three 18-mer dopamine transporter antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (numbers 1, 2 and 3) and a new plasmid vector expressing the entire rat dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation were prepared and tested. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 inhibited [{sup 3}H]dopamine uptake in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Likewise, transient transfection of NMB cells with the plasmid expressing dopamine transporter complementary DNA in the antisense orientation partially blocked [{sup 3}H]dopamine uptake. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 also decreased, dose-dependently, the toxic effect of dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine. Western blot analysis with newly prepared anti-human dopamine transporter antibodies showed that antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide 3 decreased the transporter protein level. These studies contribute to better understand the mechanism of dopamine-induced apoptosis and neurotoxicity. (Copyright (c) 1996

  14. Effect of NHE1 antisense gene transfection on the biological behavior of SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng Liu; Xiao-Chun Teng; Jing-Chen Zheng; Gang Chen; Xing-Wei Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of type 1 Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) antisense human gene transfection on the biological behavior of gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901.METHODS: Antisense NHE1 eukaryotic expression on vector pcDNA3.1 was constructed by recombinant DNA technique and transfected into gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 with DOTAP liposome transfection method.Morphological changes of cells were observed with optic and electron microscopes. Changes in cell proliferative capacity, apoptosis, intracellular pH (pH1), cell cycle,clone formation in two-layer soft agar, and tumorigenicity in nude mice were examined.RESULTS: Antisense eukaryotic expressing vectors were successfully constructed and transfected into 5GC-7901.The transfectant obtained named 7901-antisense (7901-,45) stablely produced antisense NHE1. There was a significant difference between the pH1 of 7901-AS cells (6.77 ± 0.05) and that of 7901-zeo cells and SGC-7901 cells (7.24 ± 0.03 and 7.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01). Compared with SGC-7901 and 7901-zeo cells, 7901-AS cells mostly showed cell proliferation inhibition, G1/Go phase arrest, increased cell apoptotic rate, recovery of contact inhibition, and density contact. The tumorigenicity in nude mice and cloning efficiency in the two-layer soft agar were dearly inhibited.CONCLUSION: NHE1 antisense gene significantly restrains the malignant behavior of human gastric carcinoma cells, suppresses cell growth and induces cell apoptosis, and partially reverses the malignant phenotypes of SGC-7901. These results suggest a potential role for human tumor gene therapy.

  15. The Divergent Effects of Fear and Disgust on Inhibitory Control: An ERP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Ding, Cody; Zhang, Junhua; Fan, Lingxia; Diao, Liuting; Yang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Negative emotional stimuli have been shown to attract attention and impair executive control. However, two different types of unpleasant stimuli, fearful and disgusting, are often inappropriately treated as a single category in the literature on inhibitory control. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the divergent effects of fearful and disgusting distracters on inhibitory control (both conscious and unconscious inhibition). Specifically, participants were engaged in a masked Go/No-Go task superimposed on fearful, disgusting, or neutral emotional contexts, while event-related potentials were measured concurrently. The results showed that for both conscious and unconscious conditions, disgusting stimuli elicited a larger P2 than fearful ones, and the difference waves of P3 amplitude under disgusting contexts were smaller than that under fearful contexts. These results suggest that disgusting distracters consume more attentional resources and therefore impair subsequent inhibitory control to a greater extent. This study is the first to provide electrophysiological evidence that fear and disgust differently affect inhibitory control. These results expand our understanding of the relationship between emotions and inhibitory control. PMID:26030871

  16. Heat shock protein 70 antisense oligonucleotide inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Zhao; Wen-Lu Shen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Heat shock protein (HSP)70 is over-expressed in human gastric cancer and plays an important role in the progression of this cancer. We investigated the effects of antisense HSP70 oligomer on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, and its potential role in gene therapy for this cancer.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was treated in vitro with various concentrations of antisense HSP70 oligonucleotides at different intervals. Growth inhibition was determined as percentage by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Extracted DNA was electrophoresed on agarose gel, and distribution of cell cycle and kinetics of apoptosis induction were analyzed by propidium iodide DNA incorporation using flow cytometry, which was also used to detect the effects of antisense oligomer pretreatment on the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock in SGC-7901 cells. Proteins were extracted for simultaneous measurement of HSP70 expression level by SDS-PAGE Western blotting.RESULTS: The number of viable cells decreased in a doseand time-dependent manner, and ladder-like patterns of DNA fragments were observed in SGC-7901 cells treated with antisense HSP70 oligomers at a concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h, which were consistent with inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Flow cytometric analysis showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptotic rate by HSP70 antisense oligomers. This response was accompanied with a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, suggesting inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, flow cytometry also showed that pretreatment of SGC-7901 cells with HSP70 antisense oligomers enhanced the subsequent apoptosis induced by heat shock treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that HSP70 antisense oligomers inhibited HSP70 expression, which preceded apoptosis, and HSP70 was undetectable at the concentration of 10 μmol/L for 48 h or 8 μmol/L for 72 h.CONCLUSION: Antisense HSP70 oligomers

  17. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  18. Lipid-Albumin Nanoparticles (LAN) for Therapeutic Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotide against HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Quan, Jishan; Zhang, Mengzi; Yung, Bryant C; Cheng, Xinwei; Liu, Yang; Lee, Young B; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Kim, Deog Joong; Lee, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-albumin nanoparticles (LAN) were synthesized for delivery of RX-0047, an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) against the hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) to solid tumor. These lipid nanoparticles (LNs) incorporated a human serum albumin-pentaethylenehexamine (HSA-PEHA) conjugate, which is cationic and can form electrostatic complexes with negatively charged oligonucleotides. The delivery efficiency of LAN-RX-0047 was investigated in KB cells and a KB murine xenograft model. When KB cells were treated with LAN-RX-0047, significant HIF-1α downregulation and enhanced cellular uptake were observed compared to LN-RX-0047. LN-RX-0047 and LAN-RX-0047 showed similar cytotoxicity against KB cells with IC50 values of 19.3 ± 3.8 and 20.1 ± 4.2 μM, respectively. LAN-RX-0047 was shown to be taken up by the cells via the macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways while LN-RX-0047 was taken up by cells via caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In the KB xenograft tumor model, LAN-RX-0047 exhibited tumor suppressive activity and significantly reduced intratumoral HIF-1α expression compared to LN-RX-0047. Furthermore, LAN-RX-0047 greatly increased survival time of mice bearing KB-1 xenograft tumors at doses of either 3 mg/kg or 16 mg/kg. These results indicated that LAN-RX-0047 is a highly effective vehicle for therapeutic delivery of antisense agents to tumor.

  19. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation.

  20. Efficient inhibition of human telomerase activity by antisense oligonucleotides sensitizes cancer cells to radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-mei JI; Cong-hua XIE; Ming-hao FANG; Fu-xiang ZHOU; Wen-jie ZHANG; Ming-sheng ZHANG; Yun-feng ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of the antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) specific for human telomerase RNA (hTR) on radio sensitization and proliferation inhibition in human neurogliocytoma cells (U251). Methods: U251 cells were transfected with hTR ASODN or nonspecific oligonucleotides (NSODN). Before and after irradiation of 60Co-γray, telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP-PCR-ELISA), and DNA damage and repair were examined by the comet assay. The classical colony assay was used to plot the cell-survival curve, to detect the D0 value. Results: hTR antisense oligonucleotides could downregulate the telomerase activity, increase radiation induced DNA damage and reduce the subsequent repair. Furthermore, it could inhibit the proliferation and decrease the D0 value which demonstrates rising radiosensitivity. However, telomere length was unchanged over a short period of time. Conclusion: These findings suggest that an ASODN-based strategy may be used to develop telomerase inhibitors, which can efficiently sensitize radiotherapy.

  1. Cathepsin B antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses invasive potential of MG-63 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Maolin; Xiao Zengming; Li Shide; Chen Anmin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the biological effects of cathepsin B phosporotbioated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection. Methods A 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) targeted against the cathepsin B mRNA was transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 by lipofectamine 2000. The sense and nonsense oligodeoxynucleotides to cathepsin B and blank vector were used as controls. The expression of cathepsin B mRNA was examined by RT-PCR and the expression of cathepsin B was examined by Western blot. The invasive capability of MG-63 cells was evaluated by the boydern chamber assay. Results The expression of cathcpsin B was obviously inhibited in antlsense oligodeoxynucleotide treated cells compared with the control cells. The number of invading MG-63 cells was significantly lower in the ASODN-treated groups than that in the control groups. Conclusion The cathepsin B ASODN significantly inhibits the expression of cathepsin B and invasive ability of MG-63 cell in osteosarcoma.

  2. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  3. Antisense oligonucleotide therapies: the promise and the challenges from a toxicologic pathologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kendall S

    2015-01-01

    Many antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) from several classes of molecules are currently in drug development. Despite over 20 years of pharmaceutical research, few ASOs have been marketed due to problems with clinical efficacy or preclinical toxicologic challenges. However, a number of recent developments have renewed interest in this class including the registration of mipomersen, the advent of successful screening strategies to eliminate more toxic molecules, and new understanding of the risks of off-target nucleotide binding and mitigation of potential off-target effects. Recent advances in backbone chemistries, conjugation to other moieties, and new delivery systems have allowed better tissue penetration, enhanced intracellular targeting, and less frequent dosing, resulting in fewer toxicities. While these new developments provide invigorated interest in these platforms, a few lingering challenges and preclinical/clinical toxicity issues remain to be completely resolved, including: (1) proinflammatory effects (vasculitis/inflammatory infiltrates); (2) nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity unrelated to lysosomal accumulation; and (3) thrombocytopenia. Recent investigative work by several laboratories have helped elucidate mechanisms for these issues, allowing a better understanding of the clinical relevance and implications of particular toxicities. It is important for toxicologists, pathologists, and regulatory reviewers to be familiar with new developments in the ASO field and their implications, as a greater number of new types of antisense molecules undergo preclinical toxicity testing. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  4. Antisense RNA regulation and application in the development of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinduo; Lei, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of antibiotics and vaccines, infectious diseases remain one of most dangerous threats to humans and animals. The overuse and misuse of antibacterial agents have led to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens. Bacterial cells are often resilient enough to survive in even the most extreme environments. To do so, the organisms have evolved different mechanisms, including a variety of two-component signal transduction systems, which allow the bacteria to sense the surrounding environment and regulate gene expression in order to adapt and respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, some bacteria evolve resistance to antibacterial agents while many bacterial cells are able to acquire resistance genes from other bacterial species to enable them to survive in the presence of toxic antimicrobial agents. The crisis of antimicrobial resistance is an unremitting menace to human health and a burden on public health. The rapid increase in antimicrobial resistant organisms and limited options for development of new classes of antibiotics heighten the urgent need to develop novel potent antibacterial therapeutics in order to combat multidrug resistant infections. In this review, we introduce the regulatory mechanisms of antisense RNA and significant applications of regulated antisense RNA interference technology in early drug discovery. This includes the identification and evaluation of drug targets in vitro and in vivo, the determination of mode of action for antibiotics and new antibacterial agents, as well as the development of peptide-nucleic acid conjugates as novel antibacterials.

  5. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis.

  6. Natural antisense RNAs are involved in the regulation of CD45 expression in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, J; Yin, J; Su, Z

    2015-03-01

    CD45 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells and can initiate signal transduction via the dephosphorylation of tyrosine. Alternatively spliced transcript variants of this gene encode distinct isoforms, which indicate different functional states of CD45. Among these variants, CD45RO, which contains neither exon 4, 5, or 6, is over-expressed in lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type I diabetes. The CD45 RO serves as a marker of the immune response activity and lymphocyte development. Previous studies have indicated that exon splicing is generally correlated with local hypermethylated DNA and acetylated histone modification, while autoimmune diseases are commonly associated with global hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in lymphocytes. Thus, the question arises of how exons 4, 5, and 6 of CD45RO are excluded under the status of global DNA hypomethylation and histone deacetylation in these autoimmune diseases. On the basis of the analyses of the context sequence of CD45 and its natural antisense RNA in GenBank, we proposed that the long noncoding RNA encoded by the natural antisense gene of CD45 contributes to the expressional regulation of the CD45RO splicing variant via recruitment of DNA methyltransferase and histone modification modulators specific to the sense gene CD45; thus, it is associated with the over-expression of CD45RO and the functional regulation of lymphocytes in the pathogenic development of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Suppression of Glioma-Cell Survival by Antisense and Dominant-Negative AKT2 RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiyu Pu; Chunsheng Kang; Jie Li; Guangxiu Wang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Overexpression of growth factors and their receptors such as PDGF, FGF, VEGF, IGF, EGF, TGFα etc. Play a critical role in the development and progression of malignant gliomas. AKT, one of the most potent downstream signaling effectors of these growth factor receptors is usually overactivated in malignant gliomas. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of antisense and dominant negative AKT2 RNA on the survival of glioma cells with overexpression of AKT2.METHODS Antisense and dominant negative AKT2 constructs (AS-AKT2,DN-AKT2) were transfected into human glioblastoma cell line TJ905 with overexpression of AKT2. Using Western blotting, MTT assay, Ki67 labeling index (Ki67 LI), flow cytometry and the TUNEL method, the expression of AKT2 and GFAP, the proliferation rate and apoptosis of glioma cells transfected with AS-AKT2 or DN-AKT2 were compared to those characteristics of parental and glioma cells transfected with an empty vector.RESULTS Cell proliferation was inhibited in glioma cells transfected with ASAKT2 and DN-AKT2 RNA, while GFAP expression and apoptosis were markedly increased in those cells.CONCLUSION AKT is an important mediator in the growth signaling pathway of malignant gliomas and is a potential promising therapeutic target for malignant gliomas.

  8. Translation efficiency of mRNAs is increased by antisense oligonucleotides targeting upstream open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Migawa, Michael T; Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-08-01

    Increasing the levels of therapeutic proteins in vivo remains challenging. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are often used to downregulate gene expression or to modify RNA splicing, but antisense technology has not previously been used to directly increase the production of selected proteins. Here we used a class of modified ASOs that bind to mRNA sequences in upstream open reading frames (uORFs) to specifically increase the amounts of protein translated from a downstream primary ORF (pORF). Using ASO treatment, we increased the amount of proteins expressed from four genes by 30-150% in a dose-dependent manner in both human and mouse cells. Notably, systemic treatment of mice with ASO resulted in an ∼80% protein increase of LRPPRC. The ASO-mediated increase in protein expression was sequence-specific, occurred at the level of translation and was dependent on helicase activity. We also found that the type of RNA modification and the position of modified nucleotides in ASOs affected translation of a pORF. ASOs are a useful class of therapeutic agents with broad utility.

  9. Genomic SELEX for Hfq-binding RNAs identifies genomic aptamers predominantly in antisense transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, C.; Gesell, T.; Zimmermann, B.; Schoeberl, U.; Bilusic, I.; Rajkowitsch, L.; Waldsich, C.; von Haeseler, A.; Schroeder, R.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpectedly high number of regulatory RNAs have been recently discovered that fine-tune the function of genes at all levels of expression. We employed Genomic SELEX, a method to identify protein-binding RNAs encoded in the genome, to search for further regulatory RNAs in Escherichia coli. We used the global regulator protein Hfq as bait, because it can interact with a large number of RNAs, promoting their interaction. The enriched SELEX pool was subjected to deep sequencing, and 8865 sequences were mapped to the E. coli genome. These short sequences represent genomic Hfq-aptamers and are part of potential regulatory elements within RNA molecules. The motif 5′-AAYAAYAA-3′ was enriched in the selected RNAs and confers low-nanomolar affinity to Hfq. The motif was confirmed to bind Hfq by DMS footprinting. The Hfq aptamers are 4-fold more frequent on the antisense strand of protein coding genes than on the sense strand. They were enriched opposite to translation start sites or opposite to intervening sequences between ORFs in operons. These results expand the repertoire of Hfq targets and also suggest that Hfq might regulate the expression of a large number of genes via interaction with cis-antisense RNAs. PMID:20348540

  10. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  11. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  12. Gain of Toxicity from ALS/FTD-Linked Repeat Expansions in C9ORF72 Is Alleviated by Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting GGGGCC-Containing RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Gendron, Tania F; Saberi, Shahram; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Seelman, Amanda; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Drenner, Kevin; Schulte, Derek; Chun, Seung; Sun, Shuying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Myers, Brian; Engelhardt, Jeffery; Katz, Melanie; Baughn, Michael; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Marsala, Martin; Watt, Andy; Heyser, Charles J; Ard, M Colin; De Muynck, Louis; Daughrity, Lillian M; Swing, Deborah A; Tessarollo, Lino; Jung, Chris J; Delpoux, Arnaud; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Hedrick, Stephen M; de Jong, Pieter J; Edbauer, Dieter; Van Damme, Philip; Petrucelli, Leonard; Shaw, Christopher E; Bennett, C Frank; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Cleveland, Don W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2016-05-04

    Hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are the most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Disease mechanisms were evaluated in mice expressing C9ORF72 RNAs with up to 450 GGGGCC repeats or with one or both C9orf72 alleles inactivated. Chronic 50% reduction of C9ORF72 did not provoke disease, while its absence produced splenomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and mild social interaction deficits, but not motor dysfunction. Hexanucleotide expansions caused age-, repeat-length-, and expression-level-dependent accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins synthesized by AUG-independent translation, accompanied by loss of hippocampal neurons, increased anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. Single-dose injection of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target repeat-containing RNAs but preserve levels of mRNAs encoding C9ORF72 produced sustained reductions in RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins, and ameliorated behavioral deficits. These efforts identify gain of toxicity as a central disease mechanism caused by repeat-expanded C9ORF72 and establish the feasibility of ASO-mediated therapy.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Furosemide on Carbonic Anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jianli; ZHAO Tongjin; JIANG Yan; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a high efficiency diuretic, furosemide, on carbonic anhydrase (CA). First, comparing the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide, a low efficiency diuretic, on CA, shows that furosemide or acetazolamide can quickly make CA inactive when its concentration is close to the enzyme concentration, different from the usual inhibitory kinetics in which the concentration of the inhibitor is far higher than the enzyme concentration. Secondly, the reaction of the enzyme indicates that the inhibitory effect of furosemide or acetazolamide on carbonic anhydrase is quickly reversible. Finally, the degree of the inhibitory effect of furosemide and of acetazolamide on CA are compared. The results show that furosemide inhibits CA less than acetazolamide.

  14. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Hong; Wang, Yong; He, Hua-Gang; Li, Xue; Song, Wan; Du, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress. The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions, while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity. Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity. The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions, whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings. Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings, whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  15. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  16. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Unaided cellular uptake of RNA interference agents such as antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA is extremely poor, and in vivo bioavailability is also limited. Thus, effective delivery strategies for such potential drugs are in high demand. Recently, a novel approach using a class of short cationic...

  17. Effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Song; LIN Haiyan; QI Jianguo; WANG Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation. Full-length cenpb cDNA was subcloned into pBI-EGFP eukaryotic expression vector in both sense and antisense orientation. HeLa-Tet-Off cells were transfected with sense or antisense cenpb vectors. Sense transfection of HeLa-Tet-Off cells resulted in the formation of a large centromere/kinetochore complex, and apoptosis of cells following several times of cell division. A stable antisense cenpb transfected cell line, named HACPB, was obtained. The centromere/kinetochore complex of HACPB cells became smaller than control HeLa-Tet-Off cells and scattered, and the expression of CENP-B was down-regulated. In addition, delayed cell cycle progression, inhibited malignant phenotype, restrained ability of tumor formation in nude mice, and delayed entry from G2/M phase into next G1 phase were observed in HACPB cells. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors (CKIs) were modulated during different phases of the cell cycle. CENP-B is an essential protein for the maintenance of the structure and function of centromere/kinetochore complex, and plays important roles in cell cycle regulation.

  18. Subnanomolar antisense activity of phosphonate-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates delivered by cationic lipids to HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hamzavi, Ramin; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    oligomer. This modification of the PNA does not interfere with the nucleic acid target binding affinity based on thermal stability of the PNA/RNA duplexes. When delivered to cultured HeLa pLuc705 cells by Lipofectamine, the PNAs showed dose-dependent nuclear antisense activity in the nanomolar range...

  19. Evaluation of Morpholino Antisense Oligos’ Role on BCR-ABL Gene Silencing in the K562 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Delalat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML develops when a hematopoietic stem cellacquires the BCR/ABL fusion gene. This causes these transformed hematopoietic cellsto have a greater than normal proliferation rate. Scientists attempt to improve the CMLtreatment process by silencing the BCR/ABL oncogene. In this work, we used morpholinoantisense oligos to silence the BCR/ABL oncogene.Materials and Methods: In this study, the K562 was used as a BCR/ABL fusion-genepositive cell line and the Jurkat cell line as a control. We explored the inhibiting capacityof morpholino antisense oligos in the the expression of the BCR/ABL oncogene andstudied their p210 BCR/ABL suppression, inhibition of cell proliferation and stimulation ofapoptosis in the K562 cells after 24 and 48 hours. Endo-Porter was used for delivery ofmorpholino antisense oligos into cell cytosols. Meanwhile, flow cytometric analysis wasperformed in order to determine the appropriate concentration of morpholino antisenseoligos.Results: Prolonged exposure of the K562 cell line to the morpholino antisense oligostargeted against the BCR-ABL gene showed proliferation inhibition as its main feature.After western blotting, we found that complete silencing of BCR/ABL was achieved, butflow cytometric analysis showed no broad apoptosis.Conclusion: The results indicate that the Morpholino antisense oligo is able to inhibitp210 BCR/ABL; however, it cannot induce broad apoptosis due to co-silencing of BCR.

  20. Amphiregulin Antisense RNA Delivered by Adnovirus Suppresses Growth of Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ma; Voahangy Randrianarison; Fabien Calvo

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the therapeutic potential of amphiregulin antisense RNA delivered by adenoviral vector in a human breast cancer model.METHODS Human amphiregulin cDNA was subcloned in the opposite orientation to the cytomegaloviral promoter and inserted into an E1/E3-deleted type 5 adenoviral vector to obtain an AdA4 construct which expresses amphiregulin antisense mRNA. Both in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative effects of the antisense RNA were studied by infecting transformed human breast epithelial NS2T2A1 cells and tumors.RESULTS Amphiregulin protein expression was inhibited dramatically in the NS2T2A1 cells after infection with AdA4. The in vitro cell growth was inhibited significantly at day 4 post-AdA4 infection compared with control empty virus AdC1 at a MOl of 200 and 400 pfu/cell to 69.3% and 49.8%, respectively (P<0.02, P<0.005). After 3 intra-tumoral injections of 109 pfu AdA4, tumor volumes were reduced to 40.6% of that of the control group at day 35 (P<0.005).CONCLUSION The transfer of amphiregulin RNA antisense by adenoviral vector is effective for amphiregulin targeting strategy, leading to an inhibition of in vitro cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth in this breast cancer model.

  1. Regulation of Nav1.7 : A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E; Habib, Abdella M; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conse

  2. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  3. Down-regulation of nerve growth factor expression in the bladder by antisense oligonucleotides as new treatment for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Mahendra; Kawamorita, Naoki; Tyagi, Vikas; Sugino, Yoshio; Chancellor, Michael; Yoshimura, Naoki; Tyagi, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Nerve growth factor over expression in the bladder has a role in overactive bladder symptoms via the mediation of functional changes in bladder afferent pathways. We studied whether blocking nerve growth factor over expression in bladder urothelium by a sequence specific gene silencing mechanism would suppress bladder overactivity and chemokine expression induced by acetic acid. Female Sprague-Dawley® rats anesthetized with isoflurane were instilled with 0.5 ml saline, scrambled or TYE™ 563 labeled antisense oligonucleotide targeting nerve growth factor (12 μM) alone or complexed with cationic liposomes for 30 minutes. The efficacy of nerve growth factor antisense treatments for acetic acid induced bladder overactivity was assessed by cystometry. Bladder nerve growth factor expression levels and cellular distribution were quantified by immunofluorescence staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Effects on bladder chemokine expression were measured by Luminex® xMAP® analysis. Liposomes were needed for bladder uptake of oligonucleotide, as seen by the absence of bright red TYE 563 fluorescence in rats instilled with oligonucleotide alone. At 24 hours after liposome-oligonucleotide treatment baseline bladder activity during saline infusion was indistinct in the sham and antisense treated groups with a mean ± SEM intercontraction interval of 348 ± 55 and 390 ± 120 seconds, respectively. Acetic acid induced bladder overactivity was shown by a decrease in the intercontraction interval to a mean of 33.2% ± 4.0% of baseline in sham treated rats. However, the reduction was blunted to a mean of 75.8% ± 3.4% of baseline in rats treated with liposomal antisense oligonucleotide (p antisense treatment, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reduced nerve growth factor immunoreactivity in the urothelium. Increased nerve growth factor in bladder tissue was associated with sICAM-1, sE-selectin, CXCL-10 and 1, leptin, MCP-1 and vascular endothelial

  4. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  5. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  6. Antisense RNA modulation of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase levels in Helicobacter pylori correlates with organic peroxide toxicity but not infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxen, Matthew A; Ernst, Peter B; Hoffman, Paul S

    2007-05-01

    Much of the gene content of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori ( approximately 1.7-Mb genome) is considered essential. This view is based on the completeness of metabolic pathways, infrequency of nutritional auxotrophies, and paucity of pathway redundancies typically found in bacteria with larger genomes. Thus, genetic analysis of gene function is often hampered by lethality. In the absence of controllable promoters, often used to titrate gene function, we investigated the feasibility of an antisense RNA interference strategy. To test the antisense approach, we targeted alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), one of the most abundant proteins expressed by H. pylori and one whose function is essential for both in vitro growth and gastric colonization. Here, we show that antisense ahpC (as-ahpC) RNA expression from shuttle vector pDH37::as-ahpC achieved an approximately 72% knockdown of AhpC protein levels, which correlated with increased susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide, cumene, and tert-butyl hydroperoxides but not with growth efficiency. Compensatory increases in catalase levels were not observed in the knockdowns. Expression of single-copy antisense constructs (expressed under the urease promoter and containing an fd phage terminator) from the rdxA locus of mouse-colonizing strain X47 achieved a 32% knockdown of AhpC protein levels (relative to wild-type X47 levels), which correlated with increased susceptibility to organic peroxides but not with mouse colonization efficiency. Our studies indicate that high levels of AhpC are not required for in vitro growth or for primary gastric colonization. Perhaps AhpC, like catalase, assumes a greater role in combating exogenous peroxides arising from lifelong chronic inflammation. These studies also demonstrate the utility of antisense RNA interference in the evaluation of gene function in H. pylori.

  7. Specific deletion of NaV1.1 sodium channels in inhibitory interneurons causes seizures and premature death in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Christine S.; Yu, Frank H.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Kalume, Franck K.; Oakley, John C; Potter, Gregory B.; Rubenstein, John L.; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the brain sodium channel NaV1.1 cause Dravet syndrome (DS), a pharmacoresistant infantile-onset epilepsy syndrome with comorbidities of cognitive impairment and premature death. Previous studies using a mouse model of DS revealed reduced sodium currents and impaired excitability in GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus, leading to the hypothesis that impaired excitability of GABAergic inhibitory neurons is the cause of epilepsy and premature deat...

  8. Evaluation of the effects of chemically different linkers on hepatic accumulations, cell tropism and gene silencing ability of cholesterol-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shunsuke; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Fumito; Sawamura, Motoki; Waki, Reiko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2016-03-28

    Cholesterol conjugation of oligonucleotides is an attractive way to deliver the oligonucleotides specifically to the liver. However cholesterol-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) mainly accumulate in non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) such as Kupffer cells. In this study, to increase the hepatic accumulation of cholesterol-conjugated ASOs, we prepared a variety of linkers for cholesterol conjugation to anti-Pcsk9 ASOs and examined their effects on pharmacological parameters. Hepatic accumulation of ASO was dramatically increased with cholesterol conjugation. The increase in hepatic accumulation depended largely on the linker chemistry of each cholesterol-conjugated ASO. In addition to hepatic accumulation, the cell tropism of each cholesterol-conjugated ASO tended to depend on their linker. Although a linker bearing a disulfide bond accumulated mainly in NPCs, hexamethylene succinimide linker accumulated mainly in hepatocytes. To estimate the benefits of releasing ASO from the conjugated cholesterol in hepatocyte, we designed another linker based on hexamethylene succinimide, which has a phosphodiester bond between the linker and the ASO. The cholesterol-conjugated ASO bearing such a phosphodiester bond showed a significantly improved Pcsk9 mRNA inhibitory effect compared to its counterpart, cholesterol-conjugated ASO with a phosphorothioate bond, while the hepatic accumulation of both cholesterol-conjugated ASOs was comparable, indicating the effectiveness of removing the conjugated cholesterol for ASO activity. In toxicity analysis, some of the linkers induced lethal toxicities when they were injected at high concentrations (>600μM). These toxicities were attributed to decreased platelet levels in the blood, suggesting an interaction between cholesterol-conjugated ASO and platelets. Our findings may provide a guideline for the design of molecule-conjugated ASOs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antisense inhibition of microRNA-21 or -221 arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and sensitizes the effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Kook; Lee, Eun Joo; Esau, Christine; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2009-10-01

    The contribution of overexpressed microRNA-21 and -221 (miR-21 and miR-221) to the malignant phenotype was determined by inhibiting these miRNAs using antisense oligonucleotides. The effects of antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, combinatorial effects with gemcitabine, and effects on target protein levels were studied. Low nanomolar concentrations of both antisense oligonucleotides reduced proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Reduced proliferation was less pronounced in the normal ductal epithelial cell line human pancreatic Nestin-expressing cell or in pancreatic cancer cell lines exposed to an irrelevant control oligonucleotide. Inhibition of miR-21 and miR-221 increased the amount of apoptosis in HS766T cells by 3- to 6-fold compared with the control oligonucleotide. HS766T cells exposed to miR-21 antisense resulted in cell cycle arrest (G1 phase). Protein levels of tumor suppressor targets of the miRNAs were increased by antisense to miR-21 (PTEN and RECK) and miR-221 (p27). Antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 sensitized the effects of gemcitabine, and the antisense-gemcitabine combinations were synergistic at high fraction affected. We demonstrate that antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 results in significant cell killing under various conditions and that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to miRNA represents a potential new therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Aptamer and Antisense-Mediated Two-Dimensional Isolation of Specific Cancer Cell Subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Mahmoud; Green, Brenda; Mohamadi, Reza M; Mepham, Adam; Ahmed, Sharif U; Mahmoudian, Laili; Chang, I-Hsin; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-03-02

    Cancer cells, and in particular those found circulating in blood, can have widely varying phenotypes and molecular profiles despite a common origin. New methods are needed that can deconvolute the heterogeneity of cancer cells and sort small numbers of cells to aid in the characterization of cancer cell subpopulations. Here, we describe a new molecular approach to capturing cancer cells that isolates subpopulations using two-dimensional sorting. Using aptamer-mediated capture and antisense-triggered release, the new strategy sorts cells according to levels of two different markers and thereby separates them into their corresponding subpopulations. Using a phenotypic assay, we demonstrate that the subpopulations isolated have markedly different properties. This system provides an important new tool for identifying circulating tumor cell subtypes.

  11. Efficient Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5'-GalNAc Conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Michael E; Yu, Jinghua; Kinberger, Garth A; Wan, W Brad; Migawa, Michael T; Vasquez, Guillermo; Schmidt, Karsten; Gaus, Hans J; Murray, Heather M; Low, Audrey; Swayze, Eric E; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P

    2015-08-19

    Conjugation of triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc) to oligonucleotide therapeutics results in marked improvement in potency for reducing gene targets expressed in hepatocytes. In this report we describe a robust and efficient solution-phase conjugation strategy to attach triantennary GalNAc clusters (mol. wt. ∼2000) activated as PFP (pentafluorophenyl) esters onto 5'-hexylamino modified antisense oligonucleotides (5'-HA ASOs, mol. wt. ∼8000 Da). The conjugation reaction is efficient and was used to prepare GalNAc conjugated ASOs from milligram to multigram scale. The solution phase method avoids loading of GalNAc clusters onto solid-support for automated synthesis and will facilitate evaluation of GalNAc clusters for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Furthermore, we show that transfer of the GalNAc cluster from the 3'-end of an ASO to the 5'-end results in improved potency in cells and animals.

  12. Characteristics of photosynthesis in rice plants transformed with an antisense Rubisco activase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金松恒; 蒋德安; 李雪芹; 孙骏威

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic rice plants with an antisense gene inserted via Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used to explore the impact of the reduction of Rubisco activase (RCA) on Rubisco and photosynthesis. In this study, transformants containing 15% to 35% wild type Rubisco activase were selected, which could survive in ambient CO2 concentration but grew slowly compared with wild type controls. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the rate of photosynthesis decreased sig-nificantly, while stomatal conductance and transpiration rate did not change; and that the intercellular CO2 concentration even increased. Rubisco determination showed that these plants had approximately twice as much Rubisco as the wild types,although they showed 70% lower rate of photosynthesis, whichRubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.was likely an acclimation response to the reduction in Rubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.

  13. Characteristics of photosynthesis in rice plants transformed with an antisense Rubisco activase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金松恒; 蒋德安; 李雪芹; 孙骏威

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic rice plants with an antisense gene inserted via Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used to explore the impact of the reduction of Rubisco activase (RCA) on Rubisco and photosynthesis. In this study, transformants containing 15% to 35% wild type Rubisco activase were selected, which could survive in ambient CO2 concentration but grew slowly compared with wild type controls. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the rate of photosynthesis decreased significantly, while stomatal conductance and transpiration rate did not change; and that the intercellular CO2 concentration even increased. Rubisco determination showed that these plants had approximately twice as much Rubisco as the wild types,although they showed 70% lower rate of photosynthesis, which was likely an acclimation response to the reduction inRubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.

  14. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Antisense and siRNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, RL; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress is being made concerning the development of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Studies with antisense, siRNA, and other forms of oligonucleotides have shown promise in cellular and animal models and in some clinical studies. Nonetheless our understanding of how oligonucleotides function in cells and tissues is really quite limited. One major issue concerns the modes of uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides, whether as ‘free’ molecules, or linked to various delivery moieties such as nanoparticles or targeting ligands. In this review we examine the recent literature on oligonucleotide internalization and subcellular trafficking in the context of current insights into the basic machinery for endocytosis and intracellular vesicular traffic. PMID:21992697

  15. Targeting Long Noncoding RNA with Antisense Oligonucleotide Technology as Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyuan; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent annotation of the human transcriptome revealed that only 2 % of the genome encodes proteins while the majority of human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Although we are just beginning to understand the diverse roles long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play in molecular and cellular processes, they have potentially important roles in human development and pathophysiology. However, targeting of RNA by traditional structure-based design of small molecule inhibitors has been difficult, due to a lack of understanding of the dynamic tertiary structures most RNA molecules adopt. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are capable of targeting specific genes or transcripts directly through Watson-Crick base pairing and thus can be designed based on sequence information alone. These agents have made possible specific targeting of "non-druggable targets" including RNA molecules. Here we describe how ASOs can be applied in preclinical studies to reduce levels of lncRNAs of interest.

  16. Gene silencing by siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides in the laboratory and the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acids are commonly used laboratory tools for modulating gene expression and have the potential to be widely used in the clinic. Progress towards nucleic acid drugs, however, has been slow and many challenges remain to be overcome before their full impact on patient care can be understood. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the two most widely used strategies for silencing gene expression. We first describe these two approaches and contrast their relative strengths and weaknesses for laboratory applications. We then review the choices faced during development of clinical candidates and the current state of clinical trials. Attitudes towards clinical development of nucleic acid silencing strategies have repeatedly swung from optimism to depression during the past twenty years. Our goal is to provide the information needed to design robust studies with oligonucleotides, making use of the strengths of each oligonucleotide technology. PMID:22069063

  17. Os DNA sintéticos anti-sentido Antisense Synthtetic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Cravador

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available One old dream of the chemist in the field of the drug research is to create molecules capable of reaching their target with the precision of a missile. To accomplish it these molecules must have the propriety of distinguishing qualitative differences between healthy and diseased cells. A therapy based on this principle, able of eradicating specifically defective cells, or cells affected by a pathogen has an enormous advantage with the regard to the classical approach in which the cytotoxic drugs merely exploit quantitative biochemical and kinetic differences between abnormal and normal cells. We present in this article a review on the chemical synthesis of analogues of desoxyribonucleotides and on results obtained on the specific and irreversible inhibition of undesired genetic expression using the antisense principle.

  18. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  19. Characteristics of photosynthesis in rice plants transformed with an antisense Rubisco activase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song-Heng; Jiang, De-An; Li, Xue-Qin; Sun, Jun-Wei

    2004-08-01

    Transgenic rice plants with an antisense gene inserted via Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used to explore the impact of the reduction of Rubisco activase (RCA) on Rubisco and photosynthesis. In this study, transformants containing 15% to 35% wild type Rubisco activase were selected, which could survive in ambient CO2 concentration but grew slowly compared with wild type controls. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the rate of photosynthesis decreased significantly, while stomatal conductance and transpiration rate did not change; and that the intercellular CO2 concentration even increased. Rubisco determination showed that these plants had approximately twice as much Rubisco as the wild types, although they showed 70% lower rate of photosynthesis, which was likely an acclimation response to the reduction in Rubsico activase and/or the reduction in carbamylation.

  20. Gene-specific countermeasures against Ebola virus based on antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Warfield

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus (EBOV quickly outpace host immune responses and cause hemorrhagic fever, resulting in case fatality rates as high as 90% in humans and nearly 100% in nonhuman primates. The development of an effective therapeutic for EBOV is a daunting public health challenge and is hampered by a paucity of knowledge regarding filovirus pathogenesis. This report describes a successful strategy for interfering with EBOV infection using antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs. A combination of EBOV-specific PMOs targeting sequences of viral mRNAs for the viral proteins (VPs VP24, VP35, and RNA polymerase L protected rodents in both pre- and post-exposure therapeutic regimens. In a prophylactic proof-of-principal trial, the PMOs also protected 75% of rhesus macaques from lethal EBOV infection. The work described here may contribute to development of designer, "druggable" countermeasures for filoviruses and other microbial pathogens.

  1. Gene-Specific Countermeasures against Ebola Virus Based on Antisense Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus (EBOV quickly outpace host immune responses and cause hemorrhagic fever, resulting in case fatality rates as high as 90% in humans and nearly 100% in nonhuman primates. The development of an effective therapeutic for EBOV is a daunting public health challenge and is hampered by a paucity of knowledge regarding filovirus pathogenesis. This report describes a successful strategy for interfering with EBOV infection using antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs. A combination of EBOV-specific PMOs targeting sequences of viral mRNAs for the viral proteins (VPs VP24, VP35, and RNA polymerase L protected rodents in both pre- and post-exposure therapeutic regimens. In a prophylactic proof-of-principal trial, the PMOs also protected 75% of rhesus macaques from lethal EBOV infection. The work described here may contribute to development of designer, "druggable" countermeasures for filoviruses and other microbial pathogens.

  2. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    , most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides...... by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA...... and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media....

  3. Manipulation of neuropeptide biosynthesis through the expression of antisense RNA for peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mains, R E; Bloomquist, B T; Eipper, B A

    1991-02-01

    Stable cell lines with significantly elevated or diminished levels of a key neuropeptide processing enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), were generated by transfection of a mouse pituitary cell line with expression vectors containing PAM cDNA in the sense or antisense orientation. By evaluating the ability of these cell lines to alpha-amidate endogenous neuropeptides, a rate-limiting role for PAM in neuropeptide alpha-amidation was demonstrated. Overexpression of either the full-length PAM precursor with its trans-membrane domain or a soluble protein containing only the monooxygenase domain of PAM led to increased alpha-amidation of endogenous neuropeptides. Overexpression of the full-length PAM led to an unexpected decrease in the endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone; conversely, underexpression of PAM led to significantly enhanced endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone. These data suggest that PAM may have additional functions in peptide processing.

  4. Nutrient-regulated antisense and intragenic RNAs modulate a signal transduction pathway in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nishizawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters its gene expression profile in response to a change in nutrient availability. The PHO system is a well-studied case in the transcriptional regulation responding to nutritional changes in which a set of genes (PHO genes is expressed to activate inorganic phosphate (Pi metabolism for adaptation to Pi starvation. Pi starvation triggers an inhibition of Pho85 kinase, leading to migration of unphosphorylated Pho4 transcriptional activator into the nucleus and enabling expression of PHO genes. When Pi is sufficient, the Pho85 kinase phosphorylates Pho4, thereby excluding it from the nucleus and resulting in repression (i.e., lack of transcription of PHO genes. The Pho85 kinase has a role in various cellular functions other than regulation of the PHO system in that Pho85 monitors whether environmental conditions are adequate for cell growth and represses inadequate (untimely responses in these cellular processes. In contrast, Pho4 appears to activate some genes involved in stress response and is required for G1 arrest caused by DNA damage. These facts suggest the antagonistic function of these two players on a more general scale when yeast cells must cope with stress conditions. To explore general involvement of Pho4 in stress response, we tried to identify Pho4-dependent genes by a genome-wide mapping of Pho4 and Rpo21 binding (Rpo21 being the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II using a yeast tiling array. In the course of this study, we found Pi- and Pho4-regulated intragenic and antisense RNAs that could modulate the Pi signal transduction pathway. Low-Pi signal is transmitted via certain inositol polyphosphate (IP species (IP7 that are synthesized by Vip1 IP6 kinase. We have shown that Pho4 activates the transcription of antisense and intragenic RNAs in the KCS1 locus to down-regulate the Kcs1 activity, another IP6 kinase, by producing truncated Kcs1 protein via hybrid formation with the KCS1 m

  5. Dynamics of human telomerase RNA structure revealed by antisense oligonucleotide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkova, Daria V; Azhibek, Dulat M; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Naraikina, Yulia V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Zvereva, Maria I; Rubtsova, Maria P

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are the nucleoprotein complexes that cap the linear chromosome ends. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains telomere length in stem, embryonic and cancer cells. Somatic cells don't contain active telomerase and telomere function as mitotic clock and telomere length determines the number of cell divisions. Telomerase RNA (TER) contains the template for telomere synthesis and serves as a structural scaffold for holoenzyme assembly. We compared different oligonucleotide based methods for telomerase RNA inhibition, such as antisense oligonucleotides, knockdown by transient siRNA transfection and silencing by miRNA derived from short expressed RNA hairpin in HEK293 cells. All of these methods were applied to different TER regions. Our results revealed that CR2/CR3 domain of TER is accessible in vitro and in vivo and could serve as an optimal site for oligonucleotide-based telomerase silencing.

  6. Olfactory interference during inhibitory backward pairing in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Dacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Restrained worker honey bees are a valuable model for studying the behavioral and neural bases of olfactory plasticity. The proboscis extension response (PER; the proboscis is the mouthpart of honey bees is released in response to sucrose stimulation. If sucrose stimulation is preceded one or a few times by an odor (forward pairing, the bee will form a memory for this association, and subsequent presentations of the odor alone are sufficient to elicit the PER. However, backward pairing between the two stimuli (sucrose, then odor has not been studied to any great extent in bees, although the vertebrate literature indicates that it elicits a form of inhibitory plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: If hungry bees are fed with sucrose, they will release a long lasting PER; however, this PER can be interrupted if an odor is presented 15 seconds (but not 7 or 30 seconds after the sucrose (backward pairing. We refer to this previously unreported process as olfactory interference. Bees receiving this 15 second backward pairing show reduced performance after a subsequent single forward pairing (excitatory conditioning trial. Analysis of the results supported a relationship between olfactory interference and a form of backward pairing-induced inhibitory learning/memory. Injecting the drug cimetidine into the deutocerebrum impaired olfactory interference. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Olfactory interference depends on the associative link between odor and PER, rather than between odor and sucrose. Furthermore, pairing an odor with sucrose can lead either to association of this odor to PER or to the inhibition of PER by this odor. Olfactory interference may provide insight into processes that gate how excitatory and inhibitory memories for odor-PER associations are formed.

  7. Antisense expression of PKCα improved sensitivity of SGC7901/VCR cells to doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Da-Long; Sui, Feng-Ying; Du, Cheng; Zhang, Cheng-Wen; Hui, Bin; Xu, Shui-Ling; Lu, Huan-Zhang; Song, Guo-Jie

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether antisense blocking of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) would reverse multi-drug resistance (MDR) in the vincristine (VCR)-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901/VCR. METHODS: SGC7901/VCR cells expressing antisense PKCα, SGC7901/VCR/aPKC, were established by transfection with a recombinant plasmid reversely inserted with PKCα cDNA. Empty vector (PCI-neo)-transfected cell clones, SGC7901/VCR/neo, served as the control. Western blot method was used to detect PKCα content in SGC7901, SGC7901/VCR, SGC7901/VCR/neo and SGC7901/VCR/aPKC cells, using PKCα-specific antibody. The sensitivity of SGC7901, SGC7901/VCR, SGC7901/VCR/neo and SGC7901/VCR/aPKC cells to doxorubicin (DOX) in vitro was determined by MTT assay. The uptake of DOX in these cells was detected with fluorescence spectrophotometer. RESULTS: Western blot analysis showed that the PKCα protein level was about 8.7-fold higher in SGC7901/VCR cells than that in SGC7901 cells, whereas the protein expression of PKCα was reduced by 78% in SGC7901/VCR/aPKC cells when compared with the SGC7901/VCR cells. SGC7901/VCR/aPKC cells had a 4.2-fold increase in DOX cytotoxicity, accompanied by a 1.7-fold increase of DOX accumulation in comparison with SGC7901/VCR cells. CONCLUSION: PKCα positively regulates MDR in SGC7901 cells, and inhibition of PKCα can partially attenuate MDR in human gastric cancer cells. PMID:19291828

  8. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Otero, Carolina

    2016-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  9. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients’ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Harhouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670, are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named “HGPS-like” patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90 at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90 in HGPS-like patients’ cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A, was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients.

  10. Unconventional genomic architecture in the budding yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae masks the nested antisense gene NAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Dobry, Craig J; Krysan, Damian J; Kumar, Anuj

    2008-08-01

    The genomic architecture of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is typical of other eukaryotes in that genes are spatially organized into discrete and nonoverlapping units. Inherent in this organizational model is the assumption that protein-coding sequences do not overlap completely. Here, we present evidence to the contrary, defining a previously overlooked yeast gene, NAG1 (for nested antisense gene) nested entirely within the coding sequence of the YGR031W open reading frame in an antisense orientation on the opposite strand. NAG1 encodes a 19-kDa protein, detected by Western blotting of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Nag1p with anti-HA antibodies and by beta-galactosidase analysis of a NAG1-lacZ fusion. NAG1 is evolutionarily conserved as a unit with YGR031W in bacteria and fungi. Unlike the YGR031WP protein product, however, which localizes to the mitochondria, Nag1p localizes to the cell periphery, exhibiting properties consistent with those of a plasma membrane protein. Phenotypic analysis of a site-directed mutant (nag1-1) disruptive for NAG1 but silent with respect to YGR031W, defines a role for NAG1 in yeast cell wall biogenesis; microarray profiling of nag1-1 indicates decreased expression of genes contributing to cell wall organization, and the nag1-1 mutant is hypersensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent calcofluor white. Furthermore, production of Nag1p is dependent upon the presence of the cell wall integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2p and its downstream transcription factor Rlm1p. Thus, NAG1 is important for two reasons. First, it contributes to yeast cell wall biogenesis. Second, its genomic context is novel, raising the possibility that other nested protein-coding genes may exist in eukaryotic genomes.

  11. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Otero, Carolina

    2016-12-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  12. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  13. Intramural coronary delivery of advanced antisense oligonucleotides reduces neointimal formation in the porcine stent restenosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipshidze, Nicholas N; Kim, Han Soo; Iversen, Patrick; Yazdi, Hamid A; Bhargava, Balram; New, Gishel; Mehran, Roxana; Tio, Fermin; Haudenschild, Christian; Dangas, George; Stone, Gregg W; Iyer, Sriram; Roubin, Gary S; Leon, Martin B; Moses, Jeffrey W

    2002-05-15

    We evaluated the long-term influence of intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense oligonucleotides (Resten-NG) on neointimal hyperplasia after stenting in a pig model. Neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary interventions is one of the key components of the restenotic process. The c-myc is a critical cell division cycle protein involved in the formation of neointima. In short-term experiments, different doses (from 500 microg to 5 mg) of Resten-NG or saline were delivered to the stent implantation site with an infiltrator delivery system (Interventional Technologies, San Diego, California). Animals were euthanized at 2, 6 and 18 h after interventions, and excised vessels were analyzed for c-myc expression by Western blot. In long-term experiments, either saline or a dose of 1, 5 or 10 mg of Resten-NG was delivered in the same fashion, and animals were euthanized at 28 days after the intervention. Western blot analysis demonstrated inhibition of c-myc expression and was dose dependent. Morphometry showed that the intimal area was 3.88 +/- 1.04 mm(2) in the control. There was statistically significant reduction of intimal areas in the 5 and 10 mg groups (2.01 +/- 0.66 and 1.95 +/- 0.91, respectively, p 0.5) in comparison with control. This study demonstrated that intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense morpholino compound completely inhibits c-myc expression and dramatically reduces neointimal formation in a dose dependent fashion in a porcine coronary stent restenosis model, while allowing for complete vascular healing.

  14. Inhibition of allergic airway inflammation by antisense-induced blockade of STAT6 expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xin-rui; TIAN Xin-li; BO Jian-ping; LI Shao-gang; LIU Zhuo-la; NIU Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) expression in lung epithelial cells plays a pivotal role in asthma pathogenesis. Activation of STAT6 expression results in T helper cell type 2 (Th2) cell differentiation leading to Th2-mediated IgE production, development of allergic airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Therefore,antagonizing the expression and/or the function of STAT6 could be used as a mode of therapy for allergic airway inflammation.Methods In this study, we synthesized a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASODN) overlapping the translation starting site of STAT6 and constructed STAT6 antisense RNA (pANTI-STAT6), then transfected them into murine spleen lymphocytes and analyzed the effects of antagonizing STAT6 function in vitro and in a murine model of asthma.Results In vitro, we showed suppression of STAT6 expression and interleukin (IL)-4 production of lymphocytes by STAT6 ASODN. This effect was more prominent when cells were cultured with pANTI-STAT6. In a murine model of asthma associated with allergic pulmonary inflammation in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice, local intranasal administration of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled STAT6 ASODN to DNA uptake in lung cells was accompanied by a reduction of intracellular STAT6 expression. Such intrapulmonary blockade of STAT6 expression abrogated signs of lung inflammation, infiltration of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine production.Conclusion These data suggest a critical role of STAT6 in the pathogenesis of asthma and the use of local delivery of STAT6 ASODN as a novel approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation such as in asthma.

  15. Study on Apoptosis-Inducing Effect of XIAP Antisense Oligonucleotides on Glioblastoma Cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongwei Zhao; Zhengchun Sun; Yunhan Zhang; Ming Zhang; Xudong Ma

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the apoptosis-inducing effect of XIAP antisense oligonucleotides on glioblastoma cells in vitro.METHODS There were 4 groups in our experiment. Group A,as a cell control group, had normal cell culture and no treatment applied. Group B, as a blank control group, had normal cell culture and no liposome control of ASODN. Group C was N-ODN.Group D was the ASODN group. RT-PCR and Western blot assay were conducted to detect the expression of XIAP in all A-172cell groups after treatment with XIAP antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN). MTT assay and flow-cytometry (FCM) detection were used to detect the ability of cell anchoring growth and apoptotic rates of all groups. The processing time was 72 h.RESULTS The expression of XIAP in the A-172 cells was greatly down-regulated, after treated with XIAP-ASODN. Among different concentrations of ASODN, the 300nM was the most optimal one. The down-regulation of XIAP obviously inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of the A-172 cells and the increased apoptotic rate of A-172 cells (87.45%) was significantly higher than that of the A-172 in the control groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups (P < 0.01).CONCLUSION The XIAP-ASODN can effectively regulate the expression of the XIAP down, as a result, inhibit the growth of the glioblastoma cells (A-172) and obviously increase the apoptotic rate of the A-172 cells. The results of the study manifest an overt killing role of XIAP-ASODN to the glioblastoma cells.

  16. Comparison of iNOS inhibition by antisense and pharmacological inhibitors after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, D D; Chatzipanteli, K; Marcillo, A E; Bunge, M B; Dietrich, W D

    2003-11-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key mediator of inflammation during pathological conditions. We examined, through the use of selective iNOS inhibitors, the role of iNOS in specific pathophysiological processes after spinal cord injury (SCI), including astrogliosis, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability, polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Administration of iNOS antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) (intraspinally at 3 h) or the pharmacological inhibitors, N-[3(Aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine (1400 W) (i.v./i.p. 3 and 9 h) or aminoguanidine (i.p. at 3 and 9 h) after moderate contusive injury decreased the number of iNOS immunoreactive cells at the injury site by 65.6% (iNOS ASOs), 62.1% (1400 W), or 59% (aminoguanidine) 24 h postinjury. iNOS activity was reduced 81.8% (iNOS ASOs), 56.7% (1400 W), or 67.9% (aminoguanidine) at this time. All iNOS inhibitors reduced the degree of BSCB disruption (plasma leakage of rat immunoglobulins), with iNOS ASO inhibition being more effective (reduced by 58%). Neutrophil accumulation within the injury site was significantly reduced by iNOS ASOs and 1400 W by 78.8% and 20.9%, respectively. Increased astrogliosis was diminished with iNOS ASOs but enhanced following aminoguanidine. Detection of necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death by propidium iodide and an FITC-conjugated Annexin V antibody showed that iNOS inhibition could significantly retard neuronal cell death rostral and caudal to the injury site. These novel findings indicate that acute inhibition of iNOS is beneficial in reducing several pathophysiological processes after SCI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the antisense inhibition of iNOS is more efficacious than currently available pharmacological agents.

  17. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  18. Differences in Inhibitory Control between Impulsive and Premeditated Aggression in Juvenile Inmates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control dysfunction was considered a universal characteristic of violent offenders. The aim of this study was to examine differences in inhibitory control between two subtypes of violent youth; those displaying predominantly impulsive and those presenting predominantly premeditated aggression (PM. Forty-four juvenile offenders, defined on the basis of the Procedures for the Classification of Aggressive/Violent Acts (Stanford and Barratt, 2001 participated (N = 23: impulsive; N = 21 premeditated. A visual Go/NoGo task was used to compare behavioral responses and event-related potentials (ERPs between groups. The task contained two letters (W and M, W was the Go stimulus and M the NoGo stimulus. The impulsive youth showed a significantly greater decrease in N2 latency for Go relative to NoGo trials than the premeditated aggressive youth. The differentiation in N2 amplitude between Go and NoGo (N2d was negatively correlated with impulsivity of aggression. Both groups showed no significant central NoGo P3. Our findings suggest that impulsive violent youth show stronger prepotent responses and impaired conflict monitoring during early inhibitory control processing relative to premeditated aggressive youth. Both impulsive and premeditated violent youth may show impaired response inhibition at the late processing stage of inhibitory control.

  19. INHIBITORY MOTOR SEIZURES: SEMIOLOGY AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to rare and unique type of epileptic seizures – inhibitory motor seizures, characterized by the inability to execute a voluntary movement with preserved consciousness. The exact prevalence of this type of seizures is not known, but many cases are unrecognized or non-correctly diagnosed as Todd's paralysis. Therefore practical doctors should know the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of this type of seizures andtake them into account in the differential diagnoses . The authors presented a detailed review of the literature, including the historical data, etiology, pathogenesis and proposed mechanisms of formation of inhibitory motor seizures, clinical and EEG characteristics, therapeutic approaches. Antiepileptic drugs of choice used in the treatment of inhibitory motor seizures are valproic acid (preferably depakine chronosphere – original prolonged form of valproate. The authors also presented their observations of patients with inhibitory motor seizures.

  20. Inhibitory actions of Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) on ovarian primordial follicle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Eric E; Schindler, Ryan; Savenkova, Marina I; Skinner, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the actions of Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) on primordial follicle assembly. Ovarian primordial follicles develop from the breakdown of oocyte nests during fetal development for the human and immediately after birth in rodents. AMH was found to inhibit primordial follicle assembly and decrease the initial primordial follicle pool size in a rat ovarian organ culture. The AMH expression was found to be primarily in the stromal tissue of the ovaries at this period of development, suggesting a stromal-epithelial cell interaction for primordial follicle assembly. AMH was found to promote alterations in the ovarian transcriptome during primordial follicle assembly with over 200 genes with altered expression. A gene network was identified suggesting a potential central role for the Fgf2/Nudt6 antisense transcript in the follicle assembly process. A number of signal transduction pathways are regulated by AMH actions on the ovarian transcriptome, in particular the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFß) signaling process. AMH is the first hormone/protein shown to have an inhibitory action on primordial follicle assembly. Due to the critical role of the primordial follicle pool size for female reproduction, elucidation of factors, such as AMH, that regulate the assembly process will provide insights into potential therapeutics to manipulate the pool size and female reproduction.

  1. Inhibitory actions of Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH on ovarian primordial follicle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Nilsson

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate the actions of Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH on primordial follicle assembly. Ovarian primordial follicles develop from the breakdown of oocyte nests during fetal development for the human and immediately after birth in rodents. AMH was found to inhibit primordial follicle assembly and decrease the initial primordial follicle pool size in a rat ovarian organ culture. The AMH expression was found to be primarily in the stromal tissue of the ovaries at this period of development, suggesting a stromal-epithelial cell interaction for primordial follicle assembly. AMH was found to promote alterations in the ovarian transcriptome during primordial follicle assembly with over 200 genes with altered expression. A gene network was identified suggesting a potential central role for the Fgf2/Nudt6 antisense transcript in the follicle assembly process. A number of signal transduction pathways are regulated by AMH actions on the ovarian transcriptome, in particular the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFß signaling process. AMH is the first hormone/protein shown to have an inhibitory action on primordial follicle assembly. Due to the critical role of the primordial follicle pool size for female reproduction, elucidation of factors, such as AMH, that regulate the assembly process will provide insights into potential therapeutics to manipulate the pool size and female reproduction.

  2. Piracetam counteracts the effects of amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance in CD1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everss, Estrella; Arenas, M Carmen; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago; Parra, Andrés

    2005-04-30

    The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of amitriptyline on animal cognition in relation to some characteristics of its therapeutic effects. The modulation of acute and chronic effects of amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance in male and female mice by piracetam was investigated. In Experiment 1, mice were subjected to the training phase of inhibitory avoidance conditioning 60 min after acute piracetam (100 mg/kg) or physiological saline administration. Immediately after the behavioural task, they received a single injection of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (30 mg/kg) or physiological saline. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested for avoidance. In Experiment 2, the same doses of amitriptyline and piracetam were chronically administered. Mice were subjected to the training phase of inhibitory avoidance on the 22nd day, and to the test phase 24 h later. Forty-five minutes after test, subjects explored the elevated plus-maze for 5 min in order to assess whether the effects of amitriptyline on avoidance performance may reflect general behavioural changes. Results obtained were that: (a) acute and chronic amitriptyline impaired inhibitory avoidance of male and female mice, (b) piracetam counteracted the effect of acutely administered amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance, and (c) piracetam counteracted the effects of chronically administered amitriptyline in males but not females in the same learning task. These effects do not seem to be mediated by non-specific drug effects on spontaneous motor activity or anxiety.

  3. Neurophysiological differences in inhibitory control between adults with ADHD and their peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltering, Steven; Liu, Zhongxu; Rokeach, Alan; Tannock, Rosemary

    2013-08-01

    Inhibitory control allows individuals to suppress prepotent responses and resist irrelevant stimuli, and is thought to be a core deficit in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Whereas numerous studies have investigated neural mechanisms underlying inhibitory control deficits in children with ADHD, less is known about underlying mechanisms in young adults with ADHD. This study explores the neural correlates of inhibitory control in college students with ADHD-a population that, despite comparatively high educational attainment, still shows marked functional impairments in academic, social, and occupational functioning. Participants were 54 college students with ADHD and 29 typically developing peers. Specifically the fronto-centrally located N2 and the centro-parietal P3 event-related potential (ERP) components were hypothesized to show decreased amplitudes for the ADHD group due to their known association with inhibitory control. Dense array electroencephalography (EEG) data was collected during a Go/nogo task. Results show lower accuracy rates for the ADHD group and significant reductions in P3 amplitude as well as a trend for reduced N2 amplitude in nogo trials where subjects successfully inhibited a response. Notably, nogo N2 and P3 amplitudes correlated with the number of ADHD symptoms: namely, smaller amplitudes were associated with more symptoms. We conclude that when compared to their typically developing peers, relatively high functioning adults with ADHD still show a deviant neural signature. These results contribute to the growing literature of adult ADHD and increase our understanding of the neural correlates of inhibitory control associated with ADHD.

  4. Different effects of antisense RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 oligonucleotides on the nuclear factor-κB mediated expression of ICAM-1 in human coronary endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Both Anton

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is one of the key events in early atherosclerosis and restenosis. We hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α induced and NF-κB mediated expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 can be inhibited by antisense RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 oligonucleotides (RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. Results Smooth muscle cells (SMC from human coronary plaque material (HCPSMC, plaque material of 52 patients, SMC from the human coronary media (HCMSMC, human endothelial cells (EC from umbilical veins (HUVEC, and human coronary EC (HCAEC were successfully isolated (HCPSMC, HUVEC, identified and cultured (HCPSMC, HCMSMC, HUVEC, HCAEC. 12 hrs prior to TNF-α stimulus (20 ng/mL, 6 hrs RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 (1, 2, 4, 10, 20, and 30 μM and controls were added for a period of 18 hrs. In HUVEC and HCAEC there was a dose dependent inhibition of ICAM-1 expression after adding of both RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. No inhibitory effect was seen after incubation of HCMSMC with RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. A moderate inhibition of ICAM-1 expression was found after simultaneous addition of RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 to HCPSMC, no inhibitory effect was detected after individual addition of RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50. Conclusions The data point out that differences exist in the NF-κB mediated expression of ICAM-1 between EC and SMC. Experimental antisense strategies directed against RelA p65 and NF-κB1 p50 in early atherosclerosis and restenosis are promising in HCAEC but will be confronted with redundant pathways in HCMSMC and HCPSMC.

  5. 细菌染色体编码的反义RNA调节系统%The Regulation System of Antisense RNAs Encoded by Bacterial Chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚阳敏; 高宏

    2011-01-01

    The research progress on regulation systems of antisense RNAs in bacteria was reviewed from several aspects, including the attributes of antisense RNAs Regulation systems of antisense RNAs encoded by the chromosomes of Escherichia coli ,cyanobacteria and gram-positive bacteri-a,and ribonucleases III involved in antisense RNA regulation.%从反义RNA的特征、大肠杆菌、蓝细菌和革兰氏阳性菌染色体编码的反义RNA及其调控系统,以及与反义RNA调控相关的核糖核酸酶Ⅲ等方面介绍了细菌染色体编码的反义RNA调控系统.

  6. Constitutive Expression of Sense & Antisense PtAP3, an AP3 Homologue Gene of Populus tomentosa, Affects Growth and Flowering Time in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the function of PtAP3, an APETALA3 (AP3) homologue gene isolated from Populus tomentosa Carr., the full length sequence (1 797 bp) and a fragment (870 bp) of PtAP3 were fused to a CaMV 35S promoter of pBI121 to generate the sense and antisense constructs of PtAP3. These constructs were transformed into tobacco by Agrobacterium infection of leaf disks and selection on kanamycin medium. Some sense and antisense transgenic tobacco plants were obtained by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Great phenotypic differences in transgenic tobacco plants were observed. Almost all of sense PtAP3 to transgenic tobaccos showed a higher growth rate than those of antisense transformants and a few developed pregnancy earlier than wild type seedlings and antisense transformants under the same conditions.

  7. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Links updated, April 2017 En ... doesn’t wear his glasses. Back to top Visual Impairments in Children Vision is one of our ...

  8. Speech and Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairment. Many children are identified as having a speech or language impairment after they enter the public school system. A teacher may notice difficulties in a child’s speech or communication skills and refer the child for ...

  9. Effect of antisense transfecting of monocarboxylate transporter gene on biological characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gui-zhi; HUANG Gui-jun; GUO Xian-jian; QIAN Gui-sheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of transfecting antisense expression vector of the first subtype of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) gene into lung cancer cells on pHi regulation, lactate transportation and cell growth, Methods: MCT1 antisense gene recombinant vector was introduced into human lung cancer cell line A549 by electroporation. The transfected A549 cells resistant to G418 were selected. Positive clones were examined by using PCR. The changes of intracellular pH and lactate were examined with spectrophotometric method. Cell growth was studied with cell growth curve. Results: Intracellular pH and lactate were remarkably decreased in the cells transfected pLXSN-MCT1 in comparison with A549 cells without transfection (P<0. 001). The growth of A549 cells transfected pLXSN-MCT1 was also inhibited remarkably. Conclusion: MCT1 gene may play an important role in pHi regulation, lactate transportation and cell growth in tumor cells.

  10. Selection of optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin and its application in treatment of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang-Song Tong; Li-Duan Zheng; Fang-Min Chen; Fu-Qing Zeng; Liang Wang; Ji-Hua Dong; Gong-Cheng Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To select the optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin, a highly expressed gene in tumor tissues, in order to explore a novel approach to improve biological therapy of gastric cancer.METHODS: The 20 mer random oligonucleotide library was synthesized, hybridized with in vitro transcribed total survivin cRNA, then digested by RNase H. After primer extension and autoradiography, the antisense accessible sites (AAS) of survivin were selected. Then RNADraw software was used to analyze and choose the AAS with obvious stem-loop structures, according to which the complementary antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) were synthesized and transferred into survivin highly- expressing gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. Survivin expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Cellular growth activities were assayed by tetrazolium bromide (MTT)colorimetry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by electronic microscopy, while apoptosis was detected by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining flow cytometry.RESULTS: Thirteen AAS of survivin were selected in vitro.Four AAS with stem-loop structures were chosen, locating at 207-226 bp, 187-206 bp, 126-145 bp and 44-63 bp of survivin cDNA respectively. When compared with nontranfection controls, their corresponding AS-ODNs (AS-ODN1,AS-ODN2, AS-ODN3 and AS-ODN4) could reduce Survivin mRNA levels in MKN-45 cells by 54.3±1.1% (t= 6.12, P<0.01),86.1±1.0% (t= 5.27, P<0.01), 32.2±1.3% (t= 7.34, P<0.01)and 56.2±0.9% (t= 6.45, P<0.01) respectively, while survivin protein levels were decreased by 42.2±2.5% (t = 6.26,P<0.01), 75.4±3.1% (t= 7.11, P<0.01), 28.3±2.0% (t= 6.04,P<0.01) and 45.8±1.2% (t = 6.38, P<0.01) respectively.After transfection with 600 nmol/L AS-ODN1~AS-ODN4 for24 h, cell growth was inhibited by 28.12±1.54% (t= 7.62,P<0.01), 38.42±3.12% (t = 7.75, P<0.01), 21.46±2.63%(t= 5.94, P<0.01) and 32.12±1.77% (t= 6.17, P<0.01)respectively. Partial cancer cells presented the

  11. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by prov...

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of apolipoprotein C-III reduces plasma triglycerides in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J; Lee, Richard G; Bell, Thomas A; Fu, Wuxia; Mullick, Adam E; Alexander, Veronica J; Singleton, Walter; Viney, Nick; Geary, Richard; Su, John; Baker, Brenda F; Burkey, Jennifer; Crooke, Stanley T; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2013-05-24

    Elevated plasma triglyceride levels have been recognized as a risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) represents both an independent risk factor and a key regulatory factor of plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, elevated apoC-III levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, no selective apoC-III therapeutic agent has been evaluated in the clinic. To test the hypothesis that selective inhibition of apoC-III with antisense drugs in preclinical models and in healthy volunteers would reduce plasma apoC-III and triglyceride levels. Rodent- and human-specific second-generation antisense oligonucleotides were identified and evaluated in preclinical models, including rats, mice, human apoC-III transgenic mice, and nonhuman primates. We demonstrated the selective reduction of both apoC-III and triglyceride in all preclinical pharmacological evaluations. We also showed that inhibition of apoC-III was well tolerated and not associated with increased liver triglyceride deposition or hepatotoxicity. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I clinical study was performed in healthy subjects. Administration of the human apoC-III antisense drug resulted in dose-dependent reductions in plasma apoC-III, concomitant lowering of triglyceride levels, and produced no clinically meaningful signals in the safety evaluations. Antisense inhibition of apoC-III in preclinical models and in a phase I clinical trial with healthy subjects produced potent, selective reductions in plasma apoC-III and triglyceride, 2 known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This compelling pharmacological profile supports further clinical investigations in hypertriglyceridemic subjects.

  13. Targeted Knockdown of Hepatic SOAT2 With Antisense Oligonucleotides Stabilizes Atherosclerotic Plaque in ApoB100-only LDLr-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, John T; Olson, John D; Kelley, Kathryn L; Wilson, Martha D; Sawyer, Janet K; Link, Kerry M; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that the attenuation of cholesterol oleate packaging into apoB-containing lipoproteins will arrest progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions. Atherosclerosis was induced in apoB-100 only, LDLr(-/-) mice by feeding a diet enriched in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids for 24 weeks. A subset of mice was then euthanized to quantify the extent of atherosclerosis. The remaining mice were continued on the same diet (controls) or assigned to the following treatments for 16 weeks: (1) a diet enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, (2) the cis-monounsaturated fatty acid diet plus biweekly injections of an antisense oligonucleotide specific to hepatic sterol-O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2); or (3) the cis-monounsaturated fatty acid diet and biweekly injections of a nontargeting hepatic antisense oligonucleotide. Extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta was monitored morphometrically in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo histologically and immunochemically. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 via antisense oligonucleotide treatment arrested lesion growth and stabilized lesions. Hepatic knockdown of SOAT2 in apoB100-only, LDLr(-/-) mice resulted in remodeling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions into a stable phenotype, suggesting SOAT2 is a viable target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Integrated Safety Assessment of 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotides in NonHuman Primates and Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Baker, Brenda F; Kwoh, T Jesse; Cheng, Wei; Schulz, Dan J; Xia, Shuting; Salgado, Nelson; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Hart, Christopher E; Burel, Sebastien A; Younis, Husam S; Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    The common chemical and biological properties of antisense oligonucleotides provide the opportunity to identify and characterize chemical class effects across species. The chemical class that has proven to be the most versatile and best characterized is the 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. In this report we present an integrated safety assessment of data obtained from controlled dose-ranging studies in nonhuman primates (macaques) and healthy human volunteers for 12 unique 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. Safety was assessed by the incidence of safety signals in standardized laboratory tests for kidney and liver function, hematology, and complement activation; as well as by the mean test results as a function of dose level over time. At high doses a number of toxicities were observed in nonhuman primates. However, no class safety effects were identified in healthy human volunteers from this integrated data analysis. Effects on complement in nonhuman primates were not observed in humans. Nonhuman primates predicted safe doses in humans, but over predicted risk of complement activation and effects on platelets. Although limited to a single chemical class, comparisons from this analysis are considered valid and accurate based on the carefully controlled setting for the specified study populations and within the total exposures studied.

  15. Cationic vesicles based on non-ionic surfactant and synthetic aminolipids mediate delivery of antisense oligonucleotides into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalvo, Santiago; Alagia, Adele; Puras, Gustavo; Zárate, Jon; Pedraz, Jose Luis; Eritja, Ramon

    2014-07-01

    A formulation based on a synthetic aminolipid containing a double-tailed with two saturated alkyl chains along with a non-ionic surfactant polysorbate-80 has been used to form lipoplexes with an antisense oligonucleotide capable of inhibiting the expression of Renilla luciferase mRNA. The resultant lipoplexes were characterized in terms of morphology, Zeta potential, average size, stability and electrophoretic shift assay. The lipoplexes did not show any cytotoxicity in cell culture up to 150 mM concentration. The gene inhibition studies demonstrated that synthetic cationic vesicles based on non-ionic surfactant and the appropriate aminolipid play an important role in enhancing cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides obtaining promising results and efficiencies comparable to commercially available cationic lipids in cultured mammalian cells. Based on these results, this amino lipid moiety could be considered as starting point for the synthesis of novel cationic lipids to obtain potential non-viral carriers for antisense and RNA interference therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antisense downregulation of the barley limit dextrinase inhibitor modulates starch granule size distribution, starch composition and amylopectin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Yvonne; Coates, Steve; Bryce, James H; Morris, Peter C

    2004-08-01

    The barley protein limit dextrinase inhibitor (LDI), structurally related to the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family, is an inhibitor of the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase (LD). In order to investigate the function of LDI, and the consequences for starch metabolism of reduced LDI activity, transgenic barley plants designed to downregulate LDI by antisense were generated. Homozygous antisense lines with reduced LDI protein level and activity were analysed and found to have enhanced free LD activity in both developing and germinating grains. In addition the antisense lines showed unpredicted pleiotropic effects on numerous enzyme activities, for example, alpha- and beta-amylases and starch synthases. Analysis of the starch showed much reduced numbers of the small B-type starch granules, as well as reduced amylose relative to amylopectin levels and reduced total starch. The chain length distribution of the amylopectin was modified with less of the longer chains (>25 units) and enhanced number of medium chains (10-15 units). These results suggest an important role for LDI and LD during starch synthesis as well as during starch breakdown.

  17. Antisense expression of a rice cellular apoptosis susceptibility gene (OsCAS) alters the height of transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chunxiao; HE Chaozu

    2007-01-01

    Cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) gene plays important roles in mitosis, development and export of importin αfrom the nucleus, but its function in plant is unknown. In this study, a rice CAS ortholog (OsCAS), which encodes a predicted protein of 983 amino acids with 62% similarity to human CAS, was identified. DNA gel blot analysis revealed a single copy of OsCAS in the rice genome. A 973 bp fragment at the 3' end of OsCAS cDNA was cloned from rice cDNA library and transferred into rice in the antisense direction under the control of CaMV 35S promoter via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, 105 transgenic lines were obtained. Expression of OsCAS was suppressed in the antisense transgenic lines as revealed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The antisense transgenic lines showed dwarf phenotypes. The results indicated that OsCAS was involved in culm development of rice.

  18. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  19. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid E C Verhaart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks. Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days. Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days. Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD.

  20. Antisense suppression of an acid invertase gene (MAI1) in muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wenqian; Qian, Tingting; Tang, Guimin; Guo, Yankui; Zheng, Chengchao

    2008-01-01

    To unravel the roles of soluble acid invertase in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants was reduced by an antisense approach. For this purpose, a 1038 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon soluble acid invertase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the stems were obviously thinner. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that degradation of the chloroplast membrane occurred in transgenic leaves and the number of grana in the chloroplast was significantly reduced, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of the transgenic plants may be due to damage to the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn resulted in a decrease in net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration increased and levels of acid invertase decreased in transgenic fruit, and the fruit size was 60% smaller than that of the control. In addition, transgenic fruit reached full-slip at 25 d after pollination (DAP), approximately 5 d before the control fruit (full-slip at 30 DAP), and this accelerated maturity correlated with a dramatic elevation of ethylene production at the later stages of fruit development. Together, these results suggest that soluble acid invertase not only plays an important role during muskmelon plant and fruit development but also controls the sucrose content in muskmelon fruit.

  1. Electroporation-based delivery of cell-penetrating peptide conjugates of peptide nucleic acids for antisense inhibition of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sai; Schroeder, Betsy; Sun, Chen; Loufakis, Despina Nelie; Cao, Zhenning; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been used for a myriad of cellular delivery applications and were recently explored for delivery of antisense agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) for bacterial inhibition. Although these molecular systems (i.e. CPP-PNAs) have shown ability to inhibit growth of bacterial cultures in vitro, they show limited effectiveness in killing encapsulated intracellular bacteria in mammalian cells such as macrophages, presumably due to difficulty involved in the endosomal escape of the reagents. In this report, we show that electroporation delivery dramatically increases the bioavailability of CPP-PNAs to kill Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 inside macrophages. Electroporation delivers the molecules without involving endocytosis and greatly increases the antisense effect. The decrease in the average number of Salmonella per macrophage under a 1200 V cm(-1) and 5 ms pulse was a factor of 9 higher than that without electroporation (in an experiment with a multiplicity of infection of 2 : 1). Our results suggest that electroporation is an effective approach for a wide range of applications involving CPP-based delivery. The microfluidic format will allow convenient functional screening and testing of PNA-based reagents for antisense applications.

  2. Investigating Inhibitory Control in Children with Epilepsy: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Regina L.; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Gaillard, William D.; Asato, Miya R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Deficits in executive function are increasingly noted in children with epilepsy and have been associated with poor academic and psychosocial outcomes. Impaired inhibitory control contributes to executive dysfunction in children with epilepsy; however, its neuroanatomic basis has not yet been investigated. We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to probe the integrity of activation in brain regions underlying inhibitory control in children with epilepsy. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 34 children aged 8 to 17 years: 17 with well-controlled epilepsy and 17 age-and sex-matched controls. Participants performed the antisaccade (AS) task, representative of inhibitory control, during fMRI scanning. We compared AS performance during neutral and reward task conditions and evaluated task-related blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation. Results Children with epilepsy demonstrated impaired AS performance compared to controls during both neutral (non-reward) and reward trials, but exhibited significant task improvement during reward trials. Post-hoc analysis revealed that younger patients made more errors than older patients and all controls. fMRI results showed preserved activation in task-relevant regions in patients and controls, with the exception of increased activation in the left posterior cingulate gyrus in patients specifically with generalized epilepsy across neutral and reward trials. Significance Despite impaired inhibitory control, children with epilepsy accessed typical neural pathways as did their peers without epilepsy. Children with epilepsy showed improved behavioral performance in response to the reward condition, suggesting potential benefits of the use of incentives in cognitive remediation. PMID:25223606

  3. Analysis of antisense expression by whole genome tiling microarrays and siRNAs suggests mis-annotation of Arabidopsis orphan protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey R Richardson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs and trans-acting small-interfering RNAs (tasi-RNAs are small (20-22 nt long RNAs (smRNAs generated from hairpin secondary structures or antisense transcripts, respectively, that regulate gene expression by Watson-Crick pairing to a target mRNA and altering expression by mechanisms related to RNA interference. The high sequence homology of plant miRNAs to their targets has been the mainstay of miRNA prediction algorithms, which are limited in their predictive power for other kingdoms because miRNA complementarity is less conserved yet transitive processes (production of antisense smRNAs are active in eukaryotes. We hypothesize that antisense transcription and associated smRNAs are biomarkers which can be computationally modeled for gene discovery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored rice (Oryza sativa sense and antisense gene expression in publicly available whole genome tiling array transcriptome data and sequenced smRNA libraries (as well as C. elegans and found evidence of transitivity of MIRNA genes similar to that found in Arabidopsis. Statistical analysis of antisense transcript abundances, presence of antisense ESTs, and association with smRNAs suggests several hundred Arabidopsis 'orphan' hypothetical genes are non-coding RNAs. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found novel Arabidopsis homologues of some MIRNA genes on the antisense strand of previously annotated protein-coding genes. A Support Vector Machine (SVM was applied using thermodynamic energy of binding plus novel expression features of sense/antisense transcription topology and siRNA abundances to build a prediction model of miRNA targets. The SVM when trained on targets could predict the "ancient" (deeply conserved class of validated Arabidopsis MIRNA genes with an accuracy of 84%, and 76% for "new" rapidly-evolving MIRNA genes. CONCLUSIONS: Antisense and smRNA expression features and computational methods may identify novel MIRNA genes and other non

  4. Global transcriptional start site mapping using differential RNA sequencing reveals novel antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Maureen K; Bischler, Thorsten; Eisenbart, Sara K; Förstner, Konrad U; Zhang, Aixia; Herbig, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    While the model organism Escherichia coli has been the subject of intense study for decades, the full complement of its RNAs is only now being examined. Here we describe a survey of the E. coli transcriptome carried out using a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts, and an automated prediction algorithm for transcriptional start sites (TSS). With the criterion of expression under at least one of three growth conditions examined, we predicted 14,868 TSS candidates, including 5,574 internal to annotated genes (iTSS) and 5,495 TSS corresponding to potential antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We examined expression of 14 candidate asRNAs by Northern analysis using RNA from wild-type E. coli and from strains defective for RNases III and E, two RNases reported to be involved in asRNA processing. Interestingly, nine asRNAs detected as distinct bands by Northern analysis were differentially affected by the rnc and rne mutations. We also compared our asRNA candidates with previously published asRNA annotations from RNA-seq data and discuss the challenges associated with these cross-comparisons. Our global transcriptional start site map represents a valuable resource for identification of transcription start sites, promoters, and novel transcripts in E. coli and is easily accessible, together with the cDNA coverage plots, in an online genome browser.

  5. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-03-31

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3'-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUG(exp)) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUG(exp)/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUG(exp) foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUG(exp)-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1.

  6. Serial incorporation of a monovalent GalNAc phosphoramidite unit into hepatocyte-targeting antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Sawamura, Motoki; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The targeting of abundant hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) with trivalent N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) is a reliable strategy for efficiently delivering antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to the liver. We here experimentally demonstrate the high systemic potential of the synthetically-accessible, phosphodiester-linked monovalent GalNAc unit when tethered to the 5'-terminus of well-characterised 2',4'-bridged nucleic acid (also known as locked nucleic acid)-modified apolipoprotein B-targeting ASO via a bio-labile linker. Quantitative analysis of the hepatic disposition of the ASOs revealed that phosphodiester is preferable to phosphorothioate as an interunit linkage in terms of ASGPR binding of the GalNAc moiety, as well as the subcellular behavior of the ASO. The flexibility of this monomeric unit was demonstrated by attaching up to 5 GalNAc units in a serial manner and showing that knockdown activity improves as the number of GalNAc units increases. Our study suggests the structural requirements for efficient hepatocellular targeting using monovalent GalNAc and could contribute to a new molecular design for suitably modifying ASO.

  7. Cymbidium mosaic virus coat protein gene in antisense confers resistance to transgenic Nicotiana occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Ko, M K; Lee, S J; La, Y J; Kim, B D

    1999-12-31

    The nucleotide sequence of the 3'-terminal region of the Korean isolate of cymbidium mosaic virus (CyMV-Ca) from a naturally infected cattleya was determined. The sequence contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for the viral coat protein (CP) at the 3'-end and three other ORFs (triple gene block or movement protein) of CyMV. The CP gene encodes a polypeptide chain of 220 amino acids with a molecular mass of 23,760 Da. The deduced CP sequence showed a strong homology with those of two CyMVs reported. A construct of the CyMV-Ca CP gene in the antisense orientation in the plant expression vector pMBP1 was transferred via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation into Nicotiana occidentalis which is a propagation host of CyMV. The T1 progeny of the transgenic plants were inoculated with CyMV and found to be highly resistant to CyMV infection.

  8. A Short Antisense Oligonucleotide Ameliorates Symptoms of Severe Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Keil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports underscore the unparalleled potential of antisense-oligonucleotide (ASO-based approaches to ameliorate various pathological conditions. However, in vivo studies validating the effectiveness of a short ASO (<10-mer in the context of a human disease have not been performed. One disease with proven amenability to ASO-based therapy is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. SMA is a neuromuscular disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene. Correction of aberrant splicing of the remaining paralog, SMN2, can rescue mouse models of SMA. Here, we report the therapeutic efficacy of an 8-mer ASO (3UP8i in two severe models of SMA. While 3UP8i modestly improved survival and function in the more severe Taiwanese SMA model, it dramatically increased survival, improved neuromuscular junction pathology, and tempered cardiac deficits in a new, less severe model of SMA. Our results expand the repertoire of ASO-based compounds for SMA therapy, and for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of a short ASO in the context of a human disease.

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  10. Allele-Selective Inhibition of Mutant Huntingtin Expression with Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Expanded CAG Repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Pendergraff, Hannah M.; Deleavey, Glen F.; Swayze, Eric E.; Potier, Pierre; Randolph, John; Roesch, Eric B.; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Damha, Masad J.; Bennett, C. Frank; Montaillier, Christophe; Lemaitre, Marc; Corey, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Therapeutic approaches include selectively inhibiting the expression of the mutated HTT allele while conserving function of the normal allele. We have evaluated a series of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the expanded CAG repeat within HTT mRNA for their ability to selectively inhibit expression of mutant HTT protein. Several ASOs incorporating a variety of modifications, including bridged nucleic acids and phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages, exhibited allele-selective silencing in patient-derived fibroblasts. Allele-selective ASOs did not affect the expression of other CAG repeat-containing genes and selectivity was observed in cell lines containing minimal CAG repeat lengths representative of most HD patients. Allele-selective ASOs left HTT mRNA intact and did not support ribonuclease H activity in vitro. We observed cooperative binding of multiple ASO molecules to CAG repeat-containing HTT mRNA transcripts in vitro. These results are consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition at the level of translation. ASOs targeted to the CAG repeat of HTT provide a starting point for the development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics that can inhibit gene expression with allelic discrimination in patients with HD. PMID:21028906

  11. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid--modified antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Hollingshead, Brett D; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S; Reed, Lori A; Davis, John W; Whiteley, Laurence O

    2014-04-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure-toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure-toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing.

  12. Sequence motifs associated with hepatotoxicity of locked nucleic acid—modified antisense oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Andrew D.; Sciabola, Simone; Mantena, Srinivasa R.; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Stanton, Robert; Warneke, James A.; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Makarov, Sergei S.; Reed, Lori A.; Davis, John W.; Whiteley, Laurence O.

    2014-01-01

    Fully phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with locked nucleic acids (LNAs) improve target affinity, RNase H activation and stability. LNA modified ASOs can cause hepatotoxicity, and this risk is currently not fully understood. In vitro cytotoxicity screens have not been reliable predictors of hepatic toxicity in non-clinical testing; however, mice are considered to be a sensitive test species. To better understand the relationship between nucleotide sequence and hepatotoxicity, a structure–toxicity analysis was performed using results from 2 week repeated-dose-tolerability studies in mice administered LNA-modified ASOs. ASOs targeting human Apolipoprotien C3 (Apoc3), CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) Regulated Transcription Coactivator 2 (Crtc2) or Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1) were classified based upon the presence or absence of hepatotoxicity in mice. From these data, a random-decision forest-classification model generated from nucleotide sequence descriptors identified two trinucleotide motifs (TCC and TGC) that were present only in hepatotoxic sequences. We found that motif containing sequences were more likely to bind to hepatocellular proteins in vitro and increased P53 and NRF2 stress pathway activity in vivo. These results suggest in silico approaches can be utilized to establish structure–toxicity relationships of LNA-modified ASOs and decrease the likelihood of hepatotoxicity in preclinical testing. PMID:24550163

  13. PRO-051, an antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Suzan M; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-08-01

    PRO-051 (GSK-2402968), being developed by GlaxoSmithKline plc, under license from Leiden University Medical Center and Prosensa Therapeutics BV, is a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The PRO-051 oligonucleotide sequence induces skipping of exon 51 of the dystrophin gene by binding to a sequence within the dystrophin pre-mRNA and masking the exon inclusion signals that are used for splicing. Removal of exon 51 from an exon 45 to 50, 47 to 50, 48 to 50, 49 to 50, 50, 52 or 52 to 63 deleted transcript allows restoration of the open reading frame and synthesis of an internally truncated, semi-functional dystrophin protein. By targeting exon 51, approximately 13% of patients with DMD could be treated, the largest proportion of patients that could benefit from targeting a single dystrophin exon. A proof-of-concept clinical trial of PRO-051 in patients with DMD demonstrated that a single intramuscular administration of PRO-051 induced exon skipping within muscle fibers adjacent to the injection site, while biopsies revealed dystrophin expression in treated but not control muscle fibers. At the time of publication, a phase I/IIa trial to evaluate subcutaneous delivery of PRO-051 had been completed, although full results were yet to be published.

  14. Emerging LDL therapies: Mipomersen-antisense oligonucleotide therapy in the management of hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter P

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by severe elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and poses considerable treatment challenges. Substantive LDL-C reductions are difficult to achieve with standard therapies, and many patients with FH do not tolerate currently available lipid-lowering medications. Mipomersen is an antisense oligonucleotide injectable drug that was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of homozygous FH. It is complementary in sequence to a segment of the human apolipoprotein (Apo) B-100 messenger RNA and specifically binds to it, blocking translation of the gene product. Reducing the production of Apo B-100 reduces hepatic production of very low-density lipoprotein, consequently decreasing circulating levels of atherogenic very low-density lipoprotein remnants, intermediate-density lipoproteins, LDL, and lipoprotein(a) particles. Results from a pivotal trial conducted in patients with homozygous FH, and supporting trials in patients with heterozygous FH with coronary artery disease (CAD) (LDL-C ≥ 100 mg/dL, triglycerides 100 mg/dL in homozygous FH and severe hypercholesterolemia populations. The main on-treatment adverse events were mild-to-moderate injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. Available data regarding the efficacy, safety and tolerability of mipomersen, including results at up to 104 weeks of therapy, support the use of mipomersen for the treatment of FH. Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing antisense efficacy with multimers and multi-targeting oligonucleotides (MTOs) using cleavable linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Romesh R; Wysk, Mark A; Ogilvie, Kathleen M; Bhat, Abhijit; Kuang, Bing; Rockel, Thomas D; Weber, Markus; Uhlmann, Eugen; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-10-30

    The in vivo potency of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) has been significantly increased by reducing their length to 8-15 nucleotides and by the incorporation of high affinity RNA binders such as 2', 4'-bridged nucleic acids (also known as locked nucleic acid or LNA, and 2',4'-constrained ethyl [cET]). We now report the development of a novel ASO design in which such short ASO monomers to one or more targets are co-synthesized as homo- or heterodimers or multimers via phosphodiester linkers that are stable in plasma, but cleaved inside cells, releasing the active ASO monomers. Compared to current ASOs, these multimers and multi-targeting oligonucleotides (MTOs) provide increased plasma protein binding and biodistribution to liver, and increased in vivo efficacy against single or multiple targets with a single construct. In vivo, MTOs synthesized in both RNase H-activating and steric-blocking oligonucleotide designs provide ≈4-5-fold increased potency and ≈2-fold increased efficacy, suggesting broad therapeutic applications. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Use of antisense oligonucleotides to correct the splicing error in ISCU myopathy patient cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Crooks, Daniel R; Haller, Ronald G; Guo, Shuling; Freier, Susan M; Monia, Brett P; Rouault, Tracey A

    2016-12-01

    ISCU myopathy is an inherited disease that primarily affects individuals of northern Swedish descent who share a single point mutation in the fourth intron of the ISCU gene. The current study shows correction of specific phenotypes associated with disease following treatment with an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the site of the mutation. We have shown that ASO treatment diminished aberrant splicing and increased ISCU protein levels in both patient fibroblasts and patient myotubes in a concentration dependent fashion. Upon ASO treatment, levels of SDHB in patient myotubular cell lines increased to levels observed in control myotubular cell lines. Additionally, we have shown that both patient fibroblast and myotubular cell lines displayed an increase in complex II activity with a concomitant decrease in succinate levels in patient myotubular cell lines after ASO treatment. Mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase activities increased significantly following ASO treatment in patient myotubes. The current study suggests that ASO treatment may serve as a viable approach to correcting ISCU myopathy in patients. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. The small molecule Retro-1 enhances the pharmacological actions of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Fisher, Michael; Noel, Romain; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Barbier, Julien; Cao, Canhong; Bauman, John; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2013-04-01

    The attainment of strong pharmacological effects with oligonucleotides is hampered by inefficient access of these molecules to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Attempts to address this problem with lipid or polymeric delivery systems have been only partially successful. Here, we describe a novel alternative approach involving the use of a non-toxic small molecule to enhance the pharmacological effects of oligonucleotides. The compound Retro-1 was discovered in a screen for small molecules that reduce the actions of bacterial toxins and has been shown to block the retrograde trafficking pathway. We demonstrate that Retro-1 can also substantially enhance the effectiveness of antisense and splice switching oligonucleotides in cell culture. This effect occurs at the level of intracellular trafficking or processing and is correlated with increased oligonucleotide accumulation in the nucleus but does not involve the perturbation of lysosomal compartments. We also show that Retro-1 can alter the effectiveness of splice switching oligonucleotides in the in vivo setting. These observations indicate that it is possible to enhance the pharmacological actions of oligonucleotides using non-toxic and non-lysosomotropic small molecule adjuncts.

  18. Antisense Oligonucleotide Mediated Splice Correction of a Deep Intronic Mutation in OPA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bonifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited optic neuropathies (ION present an important cause of blindness in the European working-age population. Recently we reported the discovery of four independent families with deep intronic mutations in the main inherited optic neuropathies gene OPA1. These deep intronic mutations cause mis-splicing of the OPA1 pre-messenger-RNA transcripts by creating cryptic acceptor splice sites. As a rescue strategy we sought to prevent mis-splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA by applying 2′O-methyl-antisense oligonucleotides (AONs with a full-length phosphorothioate backbone that target the cryptic acceptor splice sites and the predicted novel branch point created by the deep intronic mutations, respectively. Transfection of patient-derived primary fibroblasts with these AONs induced correct splicing of the mutant pre-messenger-RNA in a time and concentration dependent mode of action, as detected by pyrosequencing of informative heterozygous variants. The treatment showed strong rescue effects (≃55% using the cryptic acceptor splice sites targeting AON and moderate rescue (≃16% using the branch point targeting AON. The highest efficacy of Splice correction could be observed 4 days after treatment however, significant effects were still seen 14 days post-transfection. Western blot analysis revealed increased amounts of OPA1 protein with maximum amounts at ≃3 days post-treatment. In summary, we provide the first mutation-specific in vitro rescue strategy for OPA1 deficiency using synthetic AONs.

  19. Managing the sequence-specificity of antisense oligonucleotides in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Hansen, Bo R; Koch, Troels; Lindow, Morten

    2017-03-17

    All drugs perturb the expression of many genes in the cells that are exposed to them. These gene expression changes can be divided into effects resulting from engaging the intended target and effects resulting from engaging unintended targets. For antisense oligonucleotides, developments in bioinformatics algorithms, and the quality of sequence databases, allow oligonucleotide sequences to be analyzed computationally, in terms of the predictability of their interactions with intended and unintended RNA targets. Applying these tools enables selection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides where no- or only few unintended RNA targets are expected. To evaluate oligonucleotide sequence-specificity experimentally, we recommend a transcriptomics protocol where two or more oligonucleotides targeting the same RNA molecule, but with entirely different sequences, are evaluated together. This helps to clarify which changes in cellular RNA levels result from downstream processes of engaging the intended target, and which are likely to be related to engaging unintended targets. As required for all classes of drugs, the toxic potential of oligonucleotides must be evaluated in cell- and animal models before clinical testing. Since potential adverse effects related to unintended targeting are sequence-dependent and therefore species-specific, in vitro toxicology assays in human cells are especially relevant in oligonucleotide drug discovery. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Efficient SMN Rescue following Subcutaneous Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Robin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene, which encodes the protein survival motor neuron (SMN, whose absence dramatically affects the survival of motor neurons. In humans, the severity of the disease is lessened by the presence of a gene copy, SMN2. SMN2 differs from SMN1 by a C-to-T transition in exon 7, which modifies pre-mRNA splicing and prevents successful SMN synthesis. Splice-switching approaches using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs have already been shown to correct this SMN2 gene transition, providing a therapeutic avenue for SMA. However, AON administration to the CNS presents additional hurdles. In this study, we show that systemic delivery of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA AONs in a type III SMA mouse augments retention of exon 7 in SMN2 mRNA both in peripheral organs and the CNS. Mild type III SMA mice were selected as opposed to the severe type I model in order to test tcDNA efficacy and their ability to enter the CNS after maturation of the blood brain barrier (BBB. Furthermore, subcutaneous treatment significantly improved the necrosis phenotype and respiratory function. In summary, our data support that tcDNA oligomers effectively cross the blood-brain barrier and offer a promising systemic alternative for treating SMA.

  1. Target gene knockdown by 2',4'-BNA/LNA antisense oligonucleotides in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Motoyuki; Nakaura, Mizuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    Gene knockdowns using oligonucleotide-based approaches are useful for studying gene function in both in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo animal models. We evaluated the efficacy of 2',4'-bridged nucleic acids (BNA)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) for gene knockdown in zebrafish. We used the tcf7l1a gene as a model for testing the knockdown efficacy of 2',4'-BNA AONs and examined how the target sites/affinity and RNase H induction activity of 2',4'-BNA AONs affect knockdown efficacy. We found that tcf7l1a gene function was knocked down by 2',4'-BNA AONs that target the start codon and induce RNase H activity. Although nonspecific p53-mediated developmental defects were observed at higher doses, the effective dose of the 2',4'-BNA AONs for tcf7l1a is much lower than that of morpholino oligonucleotides. Our data thus show a potential application for 2',4'-BNA AONs in the downregulation of specific genes in zebrafish.

  2. Synthesis, biophysical properties and biological activity of second generation antisense oligonucleotides containing chiral phosphorothioate linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W Brad; Migawa, Michael T; Vasquez, Guillermo; Murray, Heather M; Nichols, Josh G; Gaus, Hans; Berdeja, Andres; Lee, Sam; Hart, Christopher E; Lima, Walt F; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2014-12-16

    Bicyclic oxazaphospholidine monomers were used to prepare a series of phosphorothioate (PS)-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with control of the chirality of each of the PS linkages within the 10-base gap. The stereoselectivity was determined to be 98% for each coupling. The objective of this work was to study how PS chirality influences biophysical and biological properties of the ASO including binding affinity (Tm), nuclease stability, activity in vitro and in vivo, RNase H activation and cleavage patterns (both human and E. coli) in a gapmer context. Compounds that had nine or more Sp-linkages in the gap were found to be poorly active in vitro, while compounds with uniform Rp-gaps exhibited activity very similar to that of the stereo-random parent ASOs. Conversely, when tested in vivo, the full Rp-gap compound was found to be quickly metabolized resulting in low activity. A total of 31 ASOs were prepared with control of the PS chirally of each linkage within the gap in an attempt to identify favorable Rp/Sp positions. We conclude that a mix of Rp and Sp is required to achieve a balance between good activity and nuclease stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2008-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C3F8, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C3F8 microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C3F8-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  4. Factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yingzheng [General Hospital of Beijing Military Command of PLA, Department of Clinical Pharmacology (China)], E-mail: lctuua@yahoo.com.cn; Lu Cuitao [Madam Medical Management Group (China)

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To investigate the factors that affect the efficiency of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide(AS-ODNs) transfection by insonated gas-filled lipid microbubbles. Methods: Lipid microbubbles filled with two types of gases-air and C{sub 3}F{sub 8}, were prepared respectively. An AS-ODNs sequence HA824 and a breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 were used to define the various operating variables determining the transfection efficiency of insonated microbubbles. Two mixing methods, three levels of mixing speed, different mixing durations and various ultrasound initiation time after mixing were examined respectively. Transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Results: C{sub 3}F{sub 8} microbubbles gave higher levels of AS-ODNs transfection efficiency than air microbubbles in all test conditions. Transfection efficiency resulted from mixing method A (incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells) did not show significant difference with that of mixing method B (without incubation of HA824 and microbubbles before mixing cells). Mixing speed, duration of mixing and ultrasound initiation time after mixing were central to determining HA824 transfection efficiency in vitro. The optimum parameters for SK-BR-3 cells were found at a mixing speed of 40-50 rpm for 30-60 s with less than 60 s delay before ultrasound. Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated AS-ODNs transfection enhanced by C{sub 3}F{sub 8}-filled lipid microbubbles represents an effective avenue for AS-ODNs transfer.

  5. Huntingtin-lowering strategies in Huntington's disease: antisense oligonucleotides, small RNAs, and gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-09-15

    The idea to lower mutant huntingtin is especially appealing in Huntington's disease (HD). It is autosomal dominant, so that expression of the mutant allele causes the disease. Advances in RNA and gene regulation provide foundations for the huntingtin gene (both normal and mutant alleles) and possibly the mutant allele only. There is much preclinical animal work to support the concept of gene and RNA silencing, but, to date, no clinical studies have been attempted in HD. Preventing expression of mutant huntingtin protein is at the cusp for a human trial. Antisense oligonucleotides delivered to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been well tolerated; small RNAs administered to rodent and nonhuman primate brain knocked down huntingtin messenger RNA (mRNA); short-hairpin complementary DNA of microRNAs can be expressed in adeno-associated virus to provide long-term silencing of huntingtin mRNA and protein. We expect that these approaches will be ready for clinical studies in the near future, once safety has been validated. Our understanding of gene editing-changing the huntingtin gene itself-is rapidly progressing. Harnessing our knowledge of transcription and translation should push scientific creativity to new and exciting advances that overcome the lethality of the mutant gene in HD. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Optimizing RNA/ENA chimeric antisense oligonucleotides using in vitro splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Mariko; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A molecular therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that converts dystrophin mRNA from out-of-frame to in-frame transcripts by inducing exon skipping with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) is now approaching clinical application. To exploit the broad therapeutic applicability of exon skipping therapy, it is necessary to identify AOs that are able to induce efficient and specific exon skipping. To optimize AOs, we have established an in vitro splicing system using cultured DMD myocytes. Here, we describe the process of identifying the best AO.Cultured DMD myocytes are established from a biopsy sample and the target exon is chosen. A series of AOs are designed to cover the whole target exon sequence. As AOs, we use 15-20-mer chimeric oligonucleotides consisting of 2'-O-methyl RNA and modified nucleic acid (2'-O, 4'-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid). Each AO is transfected individually into cultured DMD myocytes, and the resulting mRNA is analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. The ability of each AO to induce exon skipping is examined by comparing the amount of cDNA with and without exon skipping. If necessary, having roughly localized the target region, another set of AOs are designed and the exon skipping abilities of the new AOs are examined. Finally, one AO is determined as the best for the molecular therapy.Our simple and reliable methods using an in vitro splicing system have enabled us to identify optimized AOs against many exons of the DMD gene.

  7. A lignin-specific peroxidase in tobacco whose antisense suppression leads to vascular tissue modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Kristopher A.; Choi, Joon W.; O'Connell, Ann P.; Schuch, Wolfgang; Lewis, Norman G.; Bolwell, G. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A tobacco peroxidase isoenzyme (TP60) was down-regulated in tobacco using an antisense strategy, this affording transformants with lignin reductions of up to 40-50% of wild type (control) plants. Significantly, both guaiacyl and syringyl levels decreased in essentially a linear manner with the reductions in lignin amounts, as determined by both thioacidolysis and nitrobenzene oxidative analyses. These data provisionally suggest that a feedback mechanism is operative in lignifying cells, which prevents build-up of monolignols should oxidative capacity for their subsequent metabolism be reduced. Prior to this study, the only known rate-limiting processes in the monolignol/lignin pathways involved that of Phe supply and the relative activities of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, respectively. These transformants thus provide an additional experimental means in which to further dissect and delineate the factors involved in monolignol targeting to precise regions in the cell wall, and of subsequent lignin assembly. Interestingly, the lignin down-regulated tobacco phenotypes displayed no readily observable differences in overall growth and development profiles, although the vascular apparatus was modified.

  8. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  9. Msx1 expression regulation by its own antisense RNA: consequence on tooth development and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajko, Sylvie; Petit, Stéphane; Fernandes, Isabelle; Méary, Fleur; LeBihan, Johanne; Pibouin, Laurence; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Msx homeogenes play an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions leading development. Msx1 is relevant for dental and craniofacial morphogenesis, as suggested by phenotypes of Msx1 mutations in human and Msx1 KO mice. During adulthood, Msx1 is still expressed in the skeleton where its role is largely unknown. Our group showed that the Msx1 gene is submitted to bidirectional transcription generating a long noncoding antisense (AS) RNA. During tooth development, Msx1 sense (S) and AS RNAs showed specific patterns of expression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the relation between Msx1 S and AS RNAs. In vivo mapping in adult mice showed that both Msx1 RNAs were detected in tested tissues such as bone. In vitro, Msx1 AS RNA decreased endogenous Msx1 S expression and modified Msx1 protein cell distribution. Regulations of Dlx5 and Bmp4 expression involving Msx1 S and AS RNAs showed that Msx1 AS RNA could modulate Msx1 function. The study of Msx1 S and AS RNA status is interesting in the case of tooth agenesis and bone loss to see if a disturbance of this balance could be associated with a disturbance of bone homeostasis. In that sense, our current results suggest a clear involvement of Msx1 in alveolar bone.

  10. Changes in Oleic Acid Content of Transgenic Soybeans by Antisense RNA Mediated Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Delta-12 oleate desaturase gene (FAD2-1, which converts oleic acid into linoleic acid, is the key enzyme determining the fatty acid composition of seed oil. In this study, we inhibited the expression of endogenous Delta-12 oleate desaturase GmFad2-1b gene by using antisense RNA in soybean Williams 82. By employing the soybean cotyledonary-node method, a part of the cDNA of soybean GmFad2-1b 801 bp was cloned for the construction of a pCAMBIA3300 vector under the soybean seed promoter BCSP. Leaf painting, LibertyLink strip, PCR, Southern blot, qRT-PCR, and fatty acid analysis were used to detect the insertion and expression of GmFad2-1b in the transgenic soybean lines. The results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 51.71% and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3% in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and the nontransgenic oil extracts.

  11. Silencing of the AV2 gene by antisense RNA protects transgenic plants against a bipartite begomovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (genus Begomovirus are phytopathogens that cause heavy losses to crops worldwide. Efforts to engineer resistance against these viruses are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a virion-sense gene (AV2 to develop resistance against Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus, a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that tobacco plants transformed with an antisense construct targeting this gene are resistant to the virus. Following challenged with the virus, transgenic plants remained symptomless, although viral DNA could be detected in some plants by PCR. This is the first report of transgenic resistance against a bipartite begomovirus obtained by targeting a virion-sense gene. The relatively conserved nature of the gene suggests that the technology may be useful to develop broad-spectrum resistance which is required because of the fact that plants are often infected with multiple begomoviruses in the field.

  12. Thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant for permeation enhancement in nasal delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, A; Martien, R; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thiolated polycarbophil as an adjuvant to enhance the permeation and improve the stability of a phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (PTO-ODN) on the nasal mucosa. Polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) was synthesized by the covalent attachment of L-cysteine to the polymeric backbone. Cytotoxicity tests were examined on human nasal epithelial cells from surgery of nasal polyps confirmed by histological studies. Deoxyribonuclease I activity in respiratory region of the porcine nasal cavity was analyzed by an enzymatic assay. The enzymatic degradation of PTO-ODNs on freshly excised porcine nasal mucosa was analyzed and protection of PCP-cysteine toward DNase I degradation was evaluated. Permeation studies were performed in Ussing-type diffusion chambers. PCP-Cys/GSH did not arise a remarkable mortal effect. Porcine respiratory mucosa was shown to possess nuclease activity corresponding to 0.69 Kunitz units/mL. PTO-ODNs were degraded by incubation with nasal mucosa. In the presence of 0.45% thiolated polycarbophil and 0.5% glutathione (GSH), this degradation process could be lowered. In the presence of thiolated polycarbophil and GSH the uptake of PTO-ODNs from the nasal mucosa was 1.7-fold improved. According to these results thiolated polycarbophil/GSH might be a promising excipient for nasal administration of PTO-ODNs.

  13. The Effects of Aerosolized STAT1 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Rat Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjun Wang; Bin Liao; Ming Zeng; Chen Zhu; Xianming Fan

    2009-01-01

    Previous study showed that aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASON) inhibited the expression of STATI and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein in alveolar macrophages (Ams) and decreased the concentrations of TGF-β, PDGF and TNF-α in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Administration of STAT1 ASON ameliorated alveolitis in rat pulmonary fibrosis. However, further investigations are needed to determine whether there is an effect from administration of STAT1 ASON on fibrosis. This study investigated the effect of aerosolized STAT1 ASON on the expressions of inflammatory mediators, hydroxyproline and type Ⅰ and type Ⅲ collagen mRNA in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that STAT1 ASON applied by aerosolization could ameliorate alveolitis and fibrosis, inhibit the expressions of inflammatory mediators, decrease the content of hydroxyproline, and suppress the expressions of type Ⅰ and type Ⅲ collagen mRNA in lung tissue in BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. These results suggest that aerosolized STAT1 ASON might be considered as a promising new strategy in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. Ultra deep sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA transcriptome revealed new antisense RNAs.

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    Sebastian Behrens

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from 150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes.

  15. Ultra Deep Sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA Transcriptome Revealed New Antisense RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Sebastian; Widder, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Kefer, Nathalie; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Rattei, Thomas; Hain, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from 150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs) associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24498259

  16. Prenatal hypoxia-ischemia induces abnormalities in CA3 microstructure, potassium chloride cotransporter 2 expression and inhibitory tone

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    Lauren L Jantzie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems such as anxiety, inattention and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl- reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia-ischemia, diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased IPSCs during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic hypoxia-ischemia in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury.

  17. Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiying; Wu, Hanrong

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia (DD) was investigated to explore the cognitive mechanism underlying DD. According to the definition of developmental dyscalculia, 19 children with DD-only and 10 children with DD&RD (DD combined with reading disability) were selected step by step, children in two control groups were matched with children in case groups by gender and age, and the match ratio was 1:1. Psychological testing software named DMDX was used to measure inhibitory ability of the subjects. The differences of reaction time in number Stroop tasks and differences of accuracy in incongruent condition of color-word Stroop tasks and object inhibition tasks between DD-only children and their controls reached significant levels (P<0.05), and the differences of reaction time in number Stroop tasks between dyscalculic and normal children did not disappear after controlling the non-executive components. The difference of accuracy in color-word incongruent tasks between children with DD&RD and normal children reached significant levels (P<0.05). Children with DD-only confronted with general inhibitory deficits, while children with DD&RD confronted with word inhibitory deficits only.

  18. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Protozoan Infections

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    Marcelo T. Bozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. In the present paper, we discussed the participation of MIF in the immune response to protozoan parasite infections. As a general trend, MIF participates in the control of parasite burden at the expense of promoting tissue damage due to increased inflammation.

  19. Neuraminidase inhibitory terpenes from endophytic Cochliobolus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao-Fei; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Wang, Wei; Cui, Jiang-Tao; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Ge, Hui-Ming

    2011-08-01

    The chemical study of endophytic fungus of Cochliobolus led to the isolation of 10 terpenes (1-10), including one new compound named isocochlioquinone B (1). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 5-7 showed significant neuraminidase inhibitory activity with IC(50) values of 0.79-1.75 μM.

  20. Repeated administration of histamine improves memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by lithium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Parsaei, Leila; Ahmadi, Shamseddin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of repeated administration of histamine on lithium-induced state dependency has been investigated. A single-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task was used to assess memory in adult male NMRI mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lithium (10 mg/kg), immediately after training (post-training), impaired inhibitory avoidance memory on the test day. Pre-test administration of lithium reversed amnesia induced by the drug given after training, with the maximum response at a dose of 10 mg/kg. Repeated intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine (20 microg/mouse) for 3 consecutive days followed by 5 days of no drug treatment improved memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by a pre-test lower dose (5 mg/kg i.p.) of lithium. In contrast, 3 days of i.c.v. injections of both the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine (40 microg/mouse) and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (6.25 and 12.5 microg/mouse) prevented the improving effect of pre-test lithium (10 mg/kg i.p.) on memory retrieval. The results suggest that the repeated administration of histaminergic agents may induce a sensitization which affects the memory impairment induced by lithium.

  1. Toluene decreases Purkinje cell output by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmaz, Jimmie M; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-02-07

    Toluene belongs to a class of psychoactive drugs known as inhalants. Found in common household products such as adhesives, paint products, and aerosols, toluene is inhaled for its intoxicating and euphoric properties. Additionally, exposure to toluene disrupts motor behaviors in a manner consistent with impairments to cerebellar function. Previous work has suggested a role of GABA in mediating toluene's neurobehavioral effects, but how this manifests in the cerebellar cortex is not yet understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of toluene on cerebellar Purkinje cell action potential output and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells using patch clamp electrophysiology in acute rat cerebellar slices. Toluene (1mM) reduced the frequency of Purkinje cell action potential output without affecting input resistance. Furthermore, toluene dose-dependently enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells, increasing the amplitude and frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents; no change in the frequency of action potentials from molecular layer interneurons was noted. The observed decreases in Purkinje cell action potential output could contribute to toluene-evoked impairments in cerebellar and motor functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Brain GLUT4 Knockout Mice Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, Decreased Insulin Sensitivity, and Impaired Hypoglycemic Counterregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Candace M; Puente, Erwin C; Sheng, Zhenyu; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Bree, Adam J; Routh, Vanessa H; Kahn, Barbara B; Fisher, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    GLUT4 in muscle and adipose tissue is important in maintaining glucose homeostasis. However, the role of insulin-responsive GLUT4 in the central nervous system has not been well characterized. To assess its importance, a selective knockout of brain GLUT4 (BG4KO) was generated by crossing Nestin-Cre mice with GLUT4-floxed mice. BG4KO mice had a 99% reduction in GLUT4 protein expression throughout the brain. Despite normal feeding and fasting glycemia, BG4KO mice were glucose intolerant, demonstrated hepatic insulin resistance, and had reduced glucose uptake in the brain. In response to hypoglycemia, BG4KO mice had impaired glucose sensing, noted by impaired epinephrine and glucagon responses and impaired c-fos activation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Moreover, in vitro glucose sensing of glucose-inhibitory neurons from the ventromedial hypothalamus was impaired in BG4KO mice. In summary, BG4KO mice are glucose intolerant, insulin resistant, and have impaired glucose sensing, indicating a critical role for brain GLUT4 in sensing and responding to changes in blood glucose.

  3. Inhibitory coupling between inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn

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    Ribeiro-da-Silva Alfredo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Local inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn play an important role in the control of excitability at the segmental level and thus determine how nociceptive information is relayed to higher structures. Regulation of inhibitory interneuron activity may therefore have critical consequences on pain perception. Indeed, disinhibition of dorsal horn neuronal networks disrupts the balance between excitation and inhibition and is believed to be a key mechanism underlying different forms of pain hypersensitivity and chronic pain states. In this context, studying the source and the synaptic properties of the inhibitory inputs that the inhibitory interneurons receive is important in order to predict the impact of drug action at the network level. To address this, we studied inhibitory synaptic transmission in lamina II inhibitory interneurons identified under visual guidance in spinal slices taken from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of the GAD promoter. The majority of these cells fired tonically to a long depolarizing current pulse. Monosynaptically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs in these cells were mediated by both GABAA and glycine receptors. Consistent with this, both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated miniature IPSCs were recorded in all of the cells. These inhibitory inputs originated at least in part from local lamina II interneurons as verified by simultaneous recordings from pairs of EGFP+ cells. These synapses appeared to have low release probability and displayed potentiation and asynchronous release upon repeated activation. In summary, we report on a previously unexamined component of the dorsal horn circuitry that likely constitutes an essential element of the fine tuning of nociception.

  4. Effect of the Antisense BcMF12 Driven by the BcA9 Promoter on Gene Silencing in Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The study analyzed the silencing of BcMF12 gene regulated by BcA9 promoter in the transgenic pakchoi and confirmed the effect of antisense BcMF12 gene on the pollen development. A conserved BcMF12 gene fragment was amplified from the cDNA of flower buds in pakchoi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis, syn. B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis) and was fused to the anther specific BcA9 promoter. The plant antisense expression vector was constructed and then introduced into pakchoi via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenic plants were screened by antibiotics and molecular analysis. PCR and Southern blot revealed that the antisense BcMF12-GUS fusion gene regulated by BcA9 promoter was integrated into transgenic plants. Northern blot suggested that the expression of BcMF12 gene was down-regulated significantly. The pollen germination rate of transgenic plants with antisense BcMF12 gene decreased as compared with that of the control plants. The expression of the gene BcMF12 related to the pollen development was inhibited by the antisense BcMF12 driven by BcA9 promoter, which consequently affected the pollen development in pakchoi.

  5. THE EFFECT OF ANTISENSE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR) RNA ON THE PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN GLIOMA CELLS AND INDUCTION OF CELL APOPTOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Pei-yu; LIU Xu-wen; LIU Ai-xue; WANG Chun-yan; WANG Guang-xiu

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antisense EGFR RNA on the growth of human glioma cells in vitro and evaluate the feasibility of targeting EGFR gene for gene therapy of gliomas. Methods: Southern and Northern blot analysis,in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect the integration and expression of antisense EGFR constructs. MTT assay and the average number of AgNOR for evaluation of cell proliferation, and the TUNEL method and ultrastructural change for observation of cell apoptosis. Results: Exogenous antisense EGFR cDNA was integrated into the genome of glioma cells and highly expressed, which resulted in a dramatic decrease of endogenous EGFR mRNA and GEPR protein levels.Clones with high expression of the antisense construct showed a lower proliferation activity and the induction of apoptosis in vitro. Conclusion: This study suggests that EGFR plays an important role in the genesis of gliomas; it may be used as a target for antisense gene therapy of gliomas.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  7. Inhibition of vascular permeability by antisense-mediated inhibition of plasma kallikrein and coagulation factor 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Revenko, Alexey S; Crosby, Jeffrey R; May, Chris; Gao, Dacao; Zhao, Chenguang; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent, acute, and painful episodes of swelling involving multiple tissues. Deficiency or malfunction of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) results in HAE types 1 and 2, respectively, whereas mutations in coagulation factor 12 (f12) have been associated with HAE type 3. C1-INH is the primary inhibitor of multiple plasma cascade pathways known to be altered in HAE patients, including the complement, fibrinolytic, coagulation, and kinin-kallikrein pathways. We have selectively inhibited several components of both the kinin-kallikrein system and the coagulation cascades with potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to investigate their relative contributions to vascular permeability. We have also developed ASO inhibitors of C1-INH and characterized their effects on vascular permeability in mice as an inducible model of HAE. Our studies demonstrate that ASO-mediated reduction in C1-INH plasma levels results in increased vascular permeability and that inhibition of proteases of the kinin-kallikrein system, either f12 or prekallikrein (PKK) reverse the effects of C1-INH depletion with similar effects on both basal and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced permeability. In contrast, inhibition of coagulation factors 11 (f11) or 7 (f7) had no effect. These results suggest that the vascular defects observed in C1-INH deficiency are dependent on the kinin-kallikrein system proteases f12 and PKK, and not mediated through the coagulation pathways. In addition, our results highlight a novel therapeutic modality that can potentially be employed prophylactically to prevent attacks in HAE patients.

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide induced exon skipping and the dystrophin gene transcript: cocktails and chemistries

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    Fletcher Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs can interfere with exon recognition and intron removal during pre-mRNA processing, and induce excision of a targeted exon from the mature gene transcript. AOs have been used in vitro and in vivo to redirect dystrophin pre-mRNA processing in human and animal cells. Targeted exon skipping of selected exons in the dystrophin gene transcript can remove nonsense or frame-shifting mutations that would otherwise have lead to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the most common childhood form of muscle wasting. Results Although many dystrophin exons can be excised using a single AO, several exons require two motifs to be masked for efficient or specific exon skipping. Some AOs were inactive when applied individually, yet pronounced exon excision was induced in transfected cells when the AOs were used in select combinations, clearly indicating synergistic rather than cumulative effects on splicing. The necessity for AO cocktails to induce efficient exon removal was observed with 2 different chemistries, 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Similarly, other trends in exon skipping, as a consequence of 2'-O-methyl AO action, such as removal of additional flanking exons or variations in exon skipping efficiency with overlapping AOs, were also seen when the corresponding sequences were prepared as phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Conclusion The combination of 2 AOs, directed at appropriate motifs in target exons was found to induce very efficient targeted exon skipping during processing of the dystrophin pre-mRNA. This combinatorial effect is clearly synergistic and is not influenced by the chemistry of the AOs used to induce exon excision. A hierarchy in exon skipping efficiency, observed with overlapping AOs composed of 2'-O-methyl modified bases, was also observed when these same sequences were evaluated as phosphorodiamidate morpholino

  9. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-08

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotides Internally Labeled with Peptides Show Improved Target Recognition and Stability to Enzymatic Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskova, Maria; Madsen, Charlotte S; Jensen, Knud J; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-03-15

    Specific target binding and stability in diverse biological media is of crucial importance for applications of synthetic oligonucleotides as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. So far, these issues have been addressed by chemical modification of oligonucleotides and by conjugation with a peptide, most often at the terminal position of the oligonucleotide. Herein, we for the first time systematically investigate the influence of internally attached short peptides on the properties of antisense oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis and internal double labeling of 21-mer oligonucleotides that target the BRAF V600E oncogene, with a library of rationally designed peptides employing CuAAC "click" chemistry. The peptide sequence has an influence on the specificity and affinity of target DNA/RNA binding. We also investigated the impact of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) on the latter. Lysine residues improve binding of POCs to target DNA and RNA, whereas the distance to lysine correlates exclusively with a decrease in binding of mismatched RNA targets. Glycine and tyrosine residues affect target binding as well. Importantly, the resistance of POCs to enzymatic degradation is dramatically improved by the internal attachment of peptides but not by LNA alone. Independently of the peptide sequence, the conjugates are stable for up to 24 h in 90% human serum and duplexes of POCs with complementary DNA for up to 160 h in 90% human serum. Such excellent stability has not been previously reported for DNA and makes internally labeled POCs an exciting object of study, i.e., showing high target specificity and simultaneous stability in biological media.

  11. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Osmolality of antisense oligonucleotide parenteral formulations: Implications on counterion dissociation and recommended osmometry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Marc; Dibble, Andrew

    2016-12-30

    The intrinsic osmolality of aqueous solutions of sodium salt antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) has been studied to inform formulation practices, understand the molecular basis underlying the difference between theoretical and empirical results, and determine suitable measurement methods. It was found that regardless of nucleotide sequence, ASO concentration of ∼140mg/mL has isotonic osmolality of ∼290mOsm/kg water (SI unit: mmol osmotically-active particles/kg water), such that lower concentration formulations require excipients for tonicity adjustment. The range of osmolality values at a given active ingredient concentration can be ascribed to drug substance lot-to-lot purity differences impacting total oligonucleotide content (i.e., including oligonucleotide-related impurities). Empirical osmolality measurements were found to be ∼70% of theoretical values, which corresponds to an osmotic coefficient value of ∼0.7, thus inferring incomplete counterion dissociation. When comparing theoretical (ideal) osmolality of multiple sequences with various nucleotide compositions and chemistries at the same w/v concentration, the "average osmolar mass" (molar mass of the oligonucleotide, including the sodium counterions, divided by the ideal Van't Hoff factor, i(id)) appears to be the strongest factor governing theoretical osmolality values. Other factors examined were the sequence length, backbone chemistry, 2' sugar chemistry, and nucleotide composition. A head-to-head comparison between two osmolality techniques showed that vapor pressure osmometry is generally more suitable than freezing point osmometry for oligonucleotide solutions greater than ∼150mg/mL due to viscosity effects, but the two techniques are comparable otherwise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby S Shemesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3 is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of 3H-radiolabeled (3H placed in THA or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5′-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs.

  14. A single administration of morpholino antisense oligomer rescues spinal muscular atrophy in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porensky, Paul N; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; McGovern, Vicki L; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; Kaspar, Brain K; Wilton, Stephen D; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2012-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by α-motor neuron loss in the spinal cord anterior horn. SMA results from deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene (SMN1) and retention of SMN2. A single nucleotide difference between SMN1 and SMN2 results in exclusion of exon 7 from the majority of SMN2 transcripts, leading to decreased SMN protein levels and development of SMA. A series of splice enhancers and silencers regulate incorporation of SMN2 exon 7; these splice motifs can be blocked with antisense oligomers (ASOs) to alter SMN2 transcript splicing. We have evaluated a morpholino (MO) oligomer against ISS-N1 [HSMN2Ex7D(-10,-29)], and delivered this MO to postnatal day 0 (P0) SMA pups (Smn-/-, SMN2+/+, SMNΔ7+/+) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Survival was increased markedly from 15 days to >100 days. Delayed CNS MO injection has moderate efficacy, and delayed peripheral injection has mild survival advantage, suggesting that early CNS ASO administration is essential for SMA therapy consideration. ICV treatment increased full-length SMN2 transcript as well as SMN protein in neural tissue, but only minimally in peripheral tissue. Interval analysis shows a decrease in alternative splice modification over time. We suggest that CNS increases of SMN will have a major impact on SMA, and an early increase of the SMN level results in correction of motor phenotypes. Finally, the early introduction by intrathecal delivery of MO oligomers is a potential treatment for SMA patients.

  15. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-09

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  16. Brain injury impairs working memory and prefrontal circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin James Smith

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 2.5 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year. Even mild to moderate traumatic brain injury causes long-lasting neurological effects. Despite its prevalence, no therapy currently exists to treat the underlying cause of cognitive impairment suffered by TBI patients. Following lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI, the most widely used experimental model of TBI, we investigated alterations in working memory and excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the prefrontal cortex. LFPI impaired working memory as assessed with a T-maze behavioral task. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials recorded in the prefrontal cortex were reduced in slices derived from brain-injured mice. Spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were more frequent in slices derived from LFPI mice while inhibitory currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were smaller after LFPI. Additionally, an increase in action potential threshold and concomitant decrease in firing rate was observed in layer 2/3 neurons in slices from injured animals. Conversely, no differences in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic transmission onto layer 5 neurons were observed; however, layer 5 neurons demonstrated a decrease in input resistance and action potential duration after LFPI. These results demonstrate synaptic and intrinsic alterations in prefrontal circuitry that may underlie working memory impairment caused by TBI.

  17. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  18. Mast Cell and Immune Inhibitory Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LixinLi; ZhengbinYao

    2004-01-01

    Modulation by balancing activating and inhibitory receptors constitutes an important mechanism for regulating immune responses. Cells that are activated following ligation of receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) can be negatively regulated by other receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). Human mast cells (MCs) are the major effector cells of type I hypersensitivity and important participants in a number of disease processes. Antigen-mediated aggregation of IgE bound to its high-affinity receptor on MCs initiates a complex series of biochemical events leading to MC activation. With great detailed description and analysis of several inhibitory receptors on human MCs, a central paradigm of negative regulation of human MC activation by these receptors has emerged. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):408-415.

  19. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian-Tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy.

  20. Development or Impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  1. Development or Impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  2. Inflammatory markers are associated with inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esumi, L A; Palma, B D; Gomes, V L; Tufik, S; Hipólide, D C

    2011-08-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) causes detrimental effects to the body, such as memory impairment and weight loss. SD also changes the concentration of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, which, in turn, can affect cognitive functioning. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of these inflammatory mediators in inhibitory avoidance memory deficit in sleep-deprived rats. Male Wistar rats were deprived of sleep by the modified multiple platform method for 96 h, while their respective controls remained in their housing cages. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training, followed by the inhibitory avoidance task test 24h later. Also, the weight of each animal was recorded daily. In the first experiment, animals received an acute administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 or 75 μg/kg i.p.) 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training. In the experiment 2, the animals received acute or chronic administration of anti-IL-6 antibody (Ab, 2 μg/kg i.p.). The acute administration was performed 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training, while the chronic treatment administrations were performed daily during the SD period. The 75 μg/kg dose of LPS, but not the 50 μg/kg dose, caused a significant attenuation of memory impairment in the sleep-deprived animals. Although the treatments with the anti-IL-6 Ab did not produce any significant changes in cognitive performance, the Ab attenuated weight loss in sleep-deprived animals. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the modulation of memory deficit and weight loss that are observed in sleep-deprived rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Two networks of electrically coupled inhibitory neurons in neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jay R.; Beierlein, Michael; Connors, Barry W.

    1999-11-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are critical to sensory transformations, plasticity and synchronous activity in the neocortex. There are many types of inhibitory neurons, but their synaptic organization is poorly understood. Here we describe two functionally distinct inhibitory networks comprising either fast-spiking (FS) or low-threshold spiking (LTS) neurons. Paired-cell recordings showed that inhibitory neurons of the same type were strongly interconnected by electrical synapses, but electrical synapses between different inhibitory cell types were rare. The electrical synapses were strong enough to synchronize spikes in coupled interneurons. Inhibitory chemical synapses were also common between FS cells, and between FS and LTS cells, but LTS cells rarely inhibited one another. Thalamocortical synapses, which convey sensory information to the cortex, specifically and strongly excited only the FS cell network. The electrical and chemical synaptic connections of different types of inhibitory neurons are specific, and may allow each inhibitory network to function independently.

  4. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xian Yu

    Full Text Available Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4 in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  5. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  6. Modulation of γ2-MSH hepatoprotection by antisense peptides and melanocortin subtype 3 and 4 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcic, Petra; Stambuk, Nikola; Konjevoda, Pasko; Kelava, Tomislav; Gabricevic, Mario; Stojkovic, Ranko; Aralica, Gorana

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortins, i.e., melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) are peptides with strong antiinflammatory effects. The most investigated aspects of γ2-MSH are related to cardiovascular effects and natriuresis, with limited research available about its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. The aims of this study were: 1) to examine the effects of γ2-MSH and its derivative [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH on the acetaminophen model of liver damage in CBA mice; 2) to evaluate the modulation of γ2-MSH hepatoprotection by melanocortin subtypes 3 and 4 receptor antagonists SHU 9119 and HS 024; 3) to define the importance of central MSH pharmacophore region (HFRW) by using antisense peptides LVKAT and VKAT. In this study, specific antagonists and antisense peptides were used to target central pharmacophore region of γ2-MSH and [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH, enabling the evaluation of hepatoprotection from the standpoint of the receptor and pharmacophore blockade. The criteria for monitoring the effects of the hormones on the liver damage were alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase activities (U/L), and pathohistological scoring of liver necrosis (scale 0-5). γ2-MSH (0.24 mg/kg) indicated hepatoprotective effects in comparison to control (p < 0.001). In contrast, [D-Trp(8)]-γ2-MSH did not show any hepatoprotective effects. Application of antagonists SHU 9119 and HS 024, and antisense peptides LVKAT and VKAT, also did not show any hepatoprotective effects. In fact, when combined with γ2-MSH, it annulled its hepatoprotective effect. The results provide evidence for hepatoprotective and antiinflammatory effects of the γ2-MSH in the liver.

  7. Long noncoding RNA FGFR3-AS1 promotes osteosarcoma growth through regulating its natural antisense transcript FGFR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiabing; Wang, Xuming; Fu, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zou, Jilong; Hua, Hanbing; Bi, Zhenggang

    2016-05-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new class of RNAs with no protein-coding potential, have been reported to have crucial roles in the regulation of a variety of tumors. However, the functions and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs to osteosarcoma are still largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine the expression, functions and molecular mechanisms of a new lncRNA FGFR3 antisense transcript 1 (FGFR3-AS1) in osteosarcoma. The expression of FGFR3-AS1 was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The regulation of FGFR3 by FGFR3-AS1 was examined by RNase protection assay, real-time quantitative PCR, western blotting, and luciferase reporter assay. The effects of FGFR3-AS1 on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and cell cycle were determined by Cell Counting Kit-8, Ethynyl deoxyuridine incorporation assay and flow cytometry. FGFR3-AS1 was upregulated in osteosarcoma. Increased FGFR3-AS1 expression correlates with large tumor size, advanced Enneking stage, metastasis and poor survival. Through antisense pairing with FGFR3 3'UTR, FGFR3-AS1 increases FGFR3 mRNA stability and upregulates FGFR3 expression. The expression of FGFR3-AS1 and FGFR3 is positively correlated in osteosarcoma tissues. Knockdown of FGFR3-AS1 inhibits the proliferation and cell cycle progression of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of FGFR3-AS1 inhibits xenograft tumor growth of osteosarcoma cells in vivo. These data demonstrate the mechanisms of how antisense noncoding RNA regulate the expression of sense genes, and show the pivotal functions of FGFR3-AS1 in osteosarcoma.

  8. Evaluation of cystine transport in cultured human kidney cells and establishment of cystinuria type I phenotype by antisense technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar; Sagi, Sreedhar; Bolenz, Christian; Alken, Peter; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Knoll, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Cystinuria is a rare hereditary disease resulting in recurrent stone formation and the need for repeated invasive interventions. So far, two responsible genes have been identified which encode the two transporters, rBAT and b(0,+)AT forming a heterodimer to transport cystine in proximal tubular cells (PTC) and whose defect results in increased excretion of cystine. A human cell line mimicing the phenotype of cystinuria in vitro is yet to be developed. Human kidney (HK)-2 is a PTC line derived from normal HK. After determining the presence of rBAT gene by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, radioactively labeled cystine (S(35)) was used to evaluate the functional presence of the amino acid transport in HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. To achieve a cystinuria type I phenotype in HK-2 cells, the rBAT gene was silenced using antisense oligonucleotides complimentary to human rBAT mRNA. The reduced transport activity of cystine was then determined by radiolabeled cystine uptake measurements. RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed the expression of the rBAT gene in HK-2 cells. Considerable transport of the radio labeled cystine was observed in HK-2 cells and was linearly dependent on the incubation time with the amino acid. The cystine transport in rBAT knockdown cells after incubation with antisense oligonucleotides was significantly lower compared to control (0.76 vs. 0.98%; P=0.0008), proving a transient knock-down of the rBAT gene. This study demonstrates the presence of the b(0,+) amino acid transport system in human proximal tubular HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. Inhibition of this transport system is possible by using antisense technology. A permanent inhibition of the cystine transport, based on our model, would be useful for the development and evaluation gene therapeutic approaches.

  9. Hfq restructures RNA-IN and RNA-OUT and facilitates antisense pairing in the Tn10/IS10 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph A; Ellis, Michael J; Hossain, Shahan; Haniford, David B

    2013-05-01

    Hfq functions in post-transcriptional gene regulation in a wide range of bacteria, usually by promoting base-pairing of mRNAs and trans-encoded sRNAs that share partial sequence complementarity. It is less clear if Hfq is required for pairing of cis-encoded RNAs (i.e., antisense RNAs) with their target mRNAs. In the current work, we have characterized the interactions between Escherichia coli Hfq and the components of the Tn10/IS10 antisense system, RNA-IN and RNA-OUT. We show that Hfq interacts with RNA-OUT through its proximal RNA-binding surface, as is typical for Hfq and trans-encoded sRNAs. In contrast, RNA-IN binds both proximal and distal RNA-binding surfaces in Hfq with a higher affinity for the latter, as is typical for mRNA interactions in canonical sRNA-mRNA pairs. Importantly, an amino acid substitution in Hfq that interferes with RNA binding to the proximal site negatively impacts RNA-IN:OUT pairing in vitro and suppresses the ability of Hfq to negatively regulate IS10 transposition in vivo. We also show that Hfq binding to RNA-IN and RNA-OUT alters secondary structure elements in both of these RNAs and speculate that this could be important in how Hfq facilitates RNA-IN:OUT pairing. Based on the results presented here, we suggest that Hfq could be involved in regulating RNA pairing in other antisense systems, including systems encoded by other transposable elements.

  10. Inhibitory mechanisms of glabridin on tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianmin; Yu, Xiaojing; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosinase is an oxidase that is the rate-limiting enzyme for controlling the production of melanin in the human body. Overproduction of melanin could lead to a variety of skin disorders. Glabridin, an isoflavan, isolated from the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn, has exhibited several pharmacological activities, including excellent inhibitory effects on tyrosinase. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of glabridin on tyrosinase and their binding mechanisms were determined using spectroscopic, zebrafish model and molecular docking techniques. The results indicate that glabridin reversibly inhibits tyrosinase in a noncompetitive manner through a multiphase kinetic process with the IC50 of 0.43 μmol/L. It has been shown that glabridin had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of tyrosinase mainly through a static quenching procedure, suggesting a stable glabridin-tyrosinase complex may be generated. The results of molecular docking suggest that glabridin did not directly bind to the active site of tyrosinase. Moreover, according to the results of zebrafish model system, glabridin shows no effects on melanin synthesis in zebrafish but presents toxicity to zebrafish embryo. The possible inhibitory mechanisms, which will help to design and search for tyrosinase inhibitors especially for glabridin analogues, were proposed.

  11. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented.

  12. MODULATING EXCITATION THROUGH PLASTICITY AT INHIBITORY SYNAPSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien eChevaleyre

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning is believed to depend on lasting changes in synaptic efficacy such as long-term potentiation and long-term depression. As a result, a profusion of studies has tried to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these forms of plasticity. Traditionally, experience-dependent changes at excitatory synapses were assumed to underlie learning and memory formation. However, with the relatively more recent investigation of inhibitory transmission, it had become evident that inhibitory synapses are not only plastic, but also provide an additional way to modulate excitatory transmission and the induction of plasticity at excitatory synapses.Thanks to recent technological advances, progress has been made in understanding synaptic transmission and plasticity from particular interneuron subtypes. In this review article, we will describe various forms of synaptic plasticity that have been ascribed to two fairly well characterized populations of interneurons in the hippocampus, those expressing cholecystokinin (CCK and parvalbumin (PV. We will discuss the resulting changes in the strength and plasticity of excitatory transmission that occur in the local circuit as a result of the modulation of inhibitory transmission. We will focus on the hippocampus because this region has a relatively well-understood circuitry, numerous forms of activity-dependent plasticity and a multitude of identified interneuron subclasses.

  13. Inhibitory processes and spoken word recognition in young and older adults: the interaction of lexical competition and semantic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, M S; Danielson, S M

    1999-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the importance of inhibitory abilities and semantic context to spoken word recognition in older and young adults. In Experiment 1, identification scores were obtained in 3 contexts: single words, low-predictability sentences, and high-predictability sentences. Additionally, identification performance was examined as a function of neighborhood density (number of items phonetically similar to a target word). Older adults had greater difficulty than young adults recognizing words with many neighbors (hard words). However, older adults also exhibited greater benefits as a result of adding contextual information. Individual differences in inhibitory abilities contributed significantly to recognition performance for lexically hard words but not for lexically easy words. The roles of inhibitory abilities and linguistic knowledge in explaining age-related impairments in spoken word recognition are discussed.

  14. Evidence for the antisense transcription in the proviral R29-127 strain of bovine immunodeficiency virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin; Liu; Xuechao; Zhao; Wenyuan; Shen; Xiaohong; Kong

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,In the late stages of the retroviral life cycle,the transcription of viral pre-m RNA is initiated at the 5′long terminal repeat(5′LTR)and terminated at the 3′LTR;the full-length and spliced viral RNAs are transported out of the nucleus and serve as templates for the translation of viral proteins or alternatively as the full-length viral genome to be packaged into virus particles.Antisense

  15. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotide into cells using synthetic peptide; Gosei pepuchido wo mochiita anchisensu origonukureochido no saibounai donyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niidome, Takuro [Nagasaki University, Nagasaki (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-12-16

    Much attention has been attracted to the antisense oligonucleotide as a novel nucleic acid medicine. However, many problems to be solved such as delivery system in vivo and permeation through cell membrane are pointed out. In this study, we found out that some cationic peptides were useful as an oligonucleotide-carrier molecule into cells. Furthermore, to develop a cell specific gene delivery system using the cationic peptide, we modified the peptides with several galactose residues. As a result, the modified peptides showed high transfer efficiencies into hepatoma cells, and then, it was clear that the internalization into cells was mediated by asialoglycoprotein receptor on hepatoma cell. (author)

  16. A Novel Vector for Abundant Expression of Antisense RNA, Triplex-forming RNA and Ribozyme in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For abundant expression of antisense RNA, triplex-forming RNA and Ribozyme in vivo, a novel vector pBSKneorU6' was constructed by PCR cloning. This vector contains the intact human snRNA U6 gene expression unit, yet replacing the 61-nt-sequence in the middle of U6 snRNA coding region with three restriction enzyme sites. Hela nuclear extract in vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that this vector can effectively express U6 mutant RNA. Containing neor at the same time, stably transfected pBSKneorU6' can be selected easily.

  17. Abrupt decrease of c—myc expression by antisense transcripts induses terminal differentiation and apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia HL—60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAOXIUJUAN; PEIHSIENTANG; 等

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed using c-myc antisense transcripts to evaluate how alteration of c-myc expression in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells could influence the myelomonocytic differentiation and induction of apoptosis.The recombinant plasmid pDACx expressing antisense transcripts to c-myc fragment containing a part of intron 1 and 137 nt exon 2 was constructed.pDACx was transfected into HL-60 cell line by lipofectin reagent.Cytochemical stainings including NBT reduction,peroxidase and α-NAE as well as detection of CD13 and CD33 antigens by flow cytometric analysis indicated occurrence of myelomonocytic differentiation in cells expressing antisense transcripts to c-myc.DNA degradation measured by DNA gel electrophoresis and typical morphological changes observed under electron microscope proved the swith-on of apoptosis in terminally differentiating HL-60 cells.

  18. Antisense-mediated suppression of C-hordein biosynthesis in the barley grain results in correlated changes in the transcriptome, protein profile, and amino acid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Lange, Marianne; Friis, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    C-hordein. The production of the S-rich B/gamma- and D-hordeins was increased and significantly higher steady-state expression levels of the corresponding genes were observed. The increased synthesis of S-rich hordeins appeared to increase the demand for sulphur and the S-rich amino acids (cysteine......Antisense- or RNAi-mediated suppression of the biosynthesis of nutritionally inferior storage proteins is a promising strategy for improving the amino acid profile of seeds. However, the potential pleiotropic effects of this on interconnected pathways and the agronomic quality traits need...... to be addressed. In the current study, a transcriptomic analysis of an antisense C-hordein line of barley was performed, using a grain-specific cDNA array. The C-hordein antisense line is characterized by marked changes in storage protein and amino acid profiles, while the seed weight is within the normal range...

  19. Developmental changes in inhibitory processing: Evidence from psychophysiological measures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Two major theories of the development of inhibitory functioning are discussed that assume a close relation between inhibitory ability and the maturation of the frontal lobes. It is argued that a psychophysiological approach may add considerably to the study of developmental change in inhibitory proc

  20. Experienced stress produces inhibitory deficits in old adults' Flanker task performance: First evidence for lifetime stress effects beyond memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amanda C; Cooper, Nicholas R; Geeraert, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Studies regarding aged individuals' performance on the Flanker task differ with respect to reporting impaired or intact executive control. Past work has explained this discrepancy by hypothesising that elderly individuals use increased top-down control mechanisms advantageous to Flanker performance. This study investigated this mechanism, focussing on cumulative experienced stress as a factor that may impact on its execution, thereby leading to impaired performance. Thirty elderly and thirty young participants completed a version of the Flanker task paired with electroencephalographic recordings of the alpha frequency, whose increased synchronisation indexes inhibitory processes. Among high stress elderly individuals, findings revealed a general slowing of reaction times for congruent and incongruent stimuli, which correlated with alpha desynchronisation for both stimulus categories. Results found high performing (low stress) elderly revealed neither a behavioural nor electrophysiological difference compared to young participants. Therefore, rather than impacting on top-down compensatory mechanisms, findings indicate that stress may affect elderly participants' inhibitory control in attentional and sensorimotor domains.