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Sample records for antirheumatic drug-naive compared

  1. SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION INDUCED BY ANTI-PSYCHOTICS AND ANTI-DEPRESSANTS IN DRUG NAIVE PATIENTS – A COMPARATIVE STUDY

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    M. Mohanalakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine and compare sexual dysfunction caused by anti-psychotics and anti-depressants in drug naïve patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients diagnosed as drug naïve schizophrenic and depression as per DSM-5 criteria & age between 18-45 years were recruited and allocated into group A (n=30–receiving anti-psychotics & group B (n=30 receiving anti-depressants after informed consent by the patients. Sexual dysfunction was assessed by Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX during the initial 2 months of therapy. RESULTS ASEX mean for patients receiving antipsychotics increased from the baseline of 7.97 to 17.23 and the ASEX mean for patients receiving antidepressants increased from baseline of 7.80 to 18.67 with p value of 0.249 which is not statistically significant. Among the antipsychotics haloperidol ASEX mean increased from 7.87 to 18.00 and risperidone mean increased from 8.07 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.335 which is not significant. More patients on haloperidol showed evidence of sexual dysfunction as assessed by ASEX scoring than risperidone though p value was not significant. Among the two antidepressants ASEX score mean for amitriptyline patients increased from 8.07 to 16.47, and that of fluoxetine from 7.53 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.018* statistically significant at α of 0.05 level. CONCLUSION This study shows presence of sexual dysfunction in patients receiving antipsychotics & antidepressants by 2 nd month of therapy though statistically not significant. Fluoxetine group patients developed statistically significant sexual dysfunction. Implications for future research about sexual dysfunction in all new treatments should be strongly taken into account because this side effect adds to the emotional stress and worsening of mental dysfunction.

  2. No change of dopamine transporter density in basal ganglia after risperidone treatment in drug-naive children with Tourette's disorder

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    Ryu, W. K.; Ryu, Y. H.; Yoon, M. J.; Chun, K. A.; Lee, J. D.; Zee, D. Y.; Choi, T. H.

    2003-01-01

    Tourette's disorder (TD), which is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor tics and one or more vocal tics, is known to be associated with abnormalities in the dopaminergic system. To testify our hypothesis that risperidone would improve tic symptoms of TD patients through the change of the dopaminergic system, we measured the DAT densities between drug-naive children with TD and normal children investigated the DAT density before and after treatment with risperidone in drug-naive children with TD, using lodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane(I-123 IPT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). I-123 IPT SPECT imaging and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale-Korean version (YGTSS-K) for assessing the tic symptom severity were carried out before and after treatment with risperidone for 8 weeks in eight drug-naive children with TD. Eight normal children also underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after an intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPECT data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. The drug-naive children with TD had a significantly greater increase in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both basal ganglia compared with the normal children. However, no significant difference in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia before and after treatment with riperidone in children with TD was not found, although tic symptoms were significantly improved with risperidone. These findings suggest that DAT densities are directly associated with the pathophysiology of TD, however, that the effect of risperidone on tic symptoms in children with TD is not attributed to the change of dopaminergic system

  3. EEG microstate analysis in drug-naive patients with panic disorder.

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    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    Full Text Available Patients with panic disorder (PD have a bias to respond to normal stimuli in a fearful way. This may be due to the preactivation of fear-associated networks prior to stimulus perception. Based on EEG, we investigated the difference between patients with PD and normal controls in resting state activity using features of transiently stable brain states (microstates. EEGs from 18 drug-naive patients and 18 healthy controls were analyzed. Microstate analysis showed that one class of microstates (with a right-anterior to left-posterior orientation of the mapped field displayed longer durations and covered more of the total time in the patients than controls. Another microstate class (with a symmetric, anterior-posterior orientation was observed less frequently in the patients compared to controls. The observation that selected microstate classes differ between patients with PD and controls suggests that specific brain functions are altered already during resting condition. The altered resting state may be the starting point of the observed dysfunctional processing of phobic stimuli.

  4. EEG microstate analysis in drug-naive patients with panic disorder.

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    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Koenig, Thomas; Munesue, Toshio; Hanaoka, Akira; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Koshino, Yoshifumi; Minabe, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Patients with panic disorder (PD) have a bias to respond to normal stimuli in a fearful way. This may be due to the preactivation of fear-associated networks prior to stimulus perception. Based on EEG, we investigated the difference between patients with PD and normal controls in resting state activity using features of transiently stable brain states (microstates). EEGs from 18 drug-naive patients and 18 healthy controls were analyzed. Microstate analysis showed that one class of microstates (with a right-anterior to left-posterior orientation of the mapped field) displayed longer durations and covered more of the total time in the patients than controls. Another microstate class (with a symmetric, anterior-posterior orientation) was observed less frequently in the patients compared to controls. The observation that selected microstate classes differ between patients with PD and controls suggests that specific brain functions are altered already during resting condition. The altered resting state may be the starting point of the observed dysfunctional processing of phobic stimuli.

  5. Increased anterior default-mode network homogeneity in first-episode, drug-naive major depressive disorder: A replication study.

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    Guo, Wenbin; Cui, Xilong; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Xie, Guangrong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2018-01-01

    Abnormal default-mode network (DMN) homogeneity has been involved in the neurophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) with inconsistent findings. The inconsistency may be due to clinical and methodological variability, and the reproducibility of the findings is limited. The present study aimed to examine alterations of the DMN homogeneity in two independent samples of patients with first-episode, drug-naive MDD. The samples included 59 patients with MDD and 31 comparison subjects from Sample 1 and 29 patients with MDD and 24 comparison subjects from Sample 2. Network homogeneity (NH) was computed with an overlapping technique, which was employed to define brain regions with abnormal NH common to the MDD samples. Compared with comparison subjects, patients with MDD exhibited increased NH in an overlapped brain region of the left superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). No correlations were found between abnormal NH and HAMD total/subscale scores in the patients of each sample and in the combined patients from both samples. This study is the first to examine alterations of DMN homogeneity in first-episode, drug-naive patients with MDD in two independent samples by using an overlapping technique. Patients with MDD exhibit increased NH in an overlapped region in the anterior DMN. The present study thus highlights the importance of the DMN in the neurophysiology of MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. No change of dopamine transporter density in basal ganglia after risperidone treatment in drug-naive children with Tourette's disorder

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    Ryu, W. K.; Ryu, Y. H.; Yoon, M. J.; Chun, K. A.; Lee, J. D. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zee, D. Y. [Univ. of Inhwa, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, T. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Tourette's disorder (TD), which is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor tics and one or more vocal tics, is known to be associated with abnormalities in the dopaminergic system. To testify our hypothesis that risperidone would improve tic symptoms of TD patients through the change of the dopaminergic system, we measured the DAT densities between drug-naive children with TD and normal children investigated the DAT density before and after treatment with risperidone in drug-naive children with TD, using lodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane(I-123 IPT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). I-123 IPT SPECT imaging and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale-Korean version (YGTSS-K) for assessing the tic symptom severity were carried out before and after treatment with risperidone for 8 weeks in eight drug-naive children with TD. Eight normal children also underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after an intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPECT data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. The drug-naive children with TD had a significantly greater increase in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both basal ganglia compared with the normal children. However, no significant difference in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia before and after treatment with riperidone in children with TD was not found, although tic symptoms were significantly improved with risperidone. These findings suggest that DAT densities are directly associated with the pathophysiology of TD, however, that the effect of risperidone on tic symptoms in children with TD is not attributed to the change of dopaminergic system.

  7. Comparative Effectiveness of Tumor Necrosis Factor Agents and Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Therapy in Children with Enthesitis-related Arthritis: The First Year after Diagnosis.

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    Weiss, Pamela F; Xiao, Rui; Brandon, Timothy G; Pagnini, Ilaria; Wright, Tracey B; Beukelman, Timothy; Morgan-DeWitt, Esi; Feudtner, Chris

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy compared to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) in children with enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) over the first year after diagnosis. We conducted a multicenter retrospective comparative effectiveness study of children diagnosed with ERA. We estimated the effect of anti-TNF therapy on clinical variables (active joint count, tender entheses count) and patient-reported pain and global assessment of disease activity over the first year after diagnosis using state-of-the-art comparative effectiveness analytic methods. During the study period, 217 patients newly diagnosed with ERA had a total of 965 clinic visits the first year after disease diagnosis. Children [median age 11.6 yrs, interquartile range 10-14] were treated with anti-TNF monotherapy (n = 33, 15.2%), csDMARD monotherapy (n = 73, 33.6%), or both (n = 52, 23.9%) in the first year after disease diagnosis. There was a statistically significant improvement in the primary outcome, active joint count, over time in children who received an anti-TNF drug versus those who did not (p = 0.03). Additionally, use of anti-TNF therapy versus no anti-TNF therapy was associated with less patient-reported pain (p exception of tender entheses count, in children treated with an anti-TNF drug versus a csDMARD. During the first year after diagnosis, anti-TNF exposure was associated with benefits for several clinically meaningful outcomes in children with enthesitis-related arthritis.

  8. A comparative study of renal dysfunction in patients with inflammatory arthropathies: strong association with cardiovascular diseases and not with anti-rheumatic therapies, inflammatory markers or duration of arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among comparable patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and to explore any predictive factors for renal impairment. METHODS: Consecutive patients with peripheral joint disease (oligo and polyarthritis) were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. We divided patients in two groups: RA group and seronegative inflammatory arthritis group. The cohort consisted of 183 patients (RA = 107, seronegative arthritis = 76 [psoriatic arthritis = 69, undifferentiated oligoarthritis = 7]). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the established Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Demographic details, disease-specific characteristics, anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of cardiovascular diseases were recorded. RESULTS: In total, 17.48% (n = 32) of the cohort had CKD. There was no statistically significant variation between the two groups as regards baseline demographics, disease characteristics, use of anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of individual cardiovascular diseases. We found that eGFR and the presence of CKD were similar among these groups. Among patients with CKD, 72% had undiagnosed CKD. No association of statistical significance was noted between CKD and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. The association of cardiovascular diseases with CKD remained significant after adjusting for confounders (age, gender, duration of arthritis, high C-reactive protein, use of anti-rheumatic drugs). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis are more prone to have CKD. This could have serious implications, as the majority of rheumatology patients use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and different immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate. No association of kidney dysfunction was noted with inflammatory disease

  9. In Vitro Tolerance of Drug-Naive Staphylococcus aureus Strain FDA209P to Vancomycin

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    Singh, Madhuri; Sasaki, Takashi; Morimoto, Yuh; Hishinuma, Tomomi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms underlying bacterial tolerance to antibiotics are unclear. A possible adaptation strategy was explored by exposure of drug-naive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strain FDA209P to vancomycin in vitro. Strains surviving vancomycin treatment (vancomycin survivor strains), which appeared after 96 h of exposure, were slow-growing derivatives of the parent strain. Although the vancomycin MICs for the survivor strains were within the susceptible range, the cytokilling effects of vancomycin at 20-fold the MIC were significantly lower for the survivor strains than for the parent strain. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated that ileS, encoding isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS), was mutated in two of the three vancomycin survivor strains. The IleRS Y723H mutation is located close to the isoleucyl-tRNA contact site and potentially affects the affinity of IleRS binding to isoleucyl-tRNA, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis and leading to vancomycin tolerance. Introduction of the mutation encoding IleRS Y723H into FDA209P by allelic replacement successfully transferred the vancomycin tolerance phenotype. We have identified mutation of ileS to be one of the bona fide genetic events leading to the acquisition of vancomycin tolerance in S. aureus, potentially acting via inhibition of the function of IleRS. PMID:27855063

  10. Development of Metabolic Syndrome in Drug-Naive Adolescents After 12 Months of Second-Generation Antipsychotic Treatment

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    Sjo, Christina Power; Stenstrøm, Anne Dorte; Bojesen, Anders Bo

    2017-01-01

    if obesity or metabolic aberration starts in childhood or adolescence. METHODS: Drug-naive adolescents were recruited after contact with an outpatient Psychosis Team. Changes relative to baseline in body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), fasting blood glucose (FBG...... months the participants' BMI had increased from 0.5 to 1.57 standard deviation (SD) above the 50th percentile for age and gender (p = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study to include all the aspects of MetS in a sample of drug-naive adolescents followed over the first 12 months...... after starting SGA treatment. A significant shift in all parameters (except BP) toward MetS was found, presumably due to SGA use. Therefore, these adolescents will need proper follow-up, consisting of not only monitoring but also preventive measures to diminish these effects of SGA use....

  11. Abnormal default-mode network homogeneity and its correlations with personality in drug-naive somatization disorder at rest.

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    Wei, Shubao; Su, Qinji; Jiang, Muliang; Liu, Feng; Yao, Dapeng; Dai, Yi; Long, Liling; Song, Yan; Yu, Miaoyu; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhao, Jingping; Guo, Wenbin

    2016-03-15

    While the default-mode network (DMN) appears to play a crucial role in patients suffering from somatization disorder (SD), the abnormalities of the network homogeneity (NH) of the DMN in SD patients have been poorly explored. The aim of this study is to examine DMN NH using an NH approach in patients suffering from SD at rest and determine its correlations with personality as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). A total of 25 drug-naive patients with SD and 28 sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans at rest. The data were analyzed by an automated NH method. Patients showed increased NH in the left superior frontal gyrus and decreased NH in the bilateral precuneus. Moreover, a significantly negative correlation was observed between the NH values in the bilateral precuneus and the EPQ--Neuroticism scores. The present study should be considered preliminary due to a lenient, uncorrected threshold of p<0.01. The results suggest that abnormal DMN NH exists in drug-naive SD and further highlight the importance of the DMN in the pathophysiology of SD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal antirheumatics].

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    Scherak, O; Hirschl, A M; Nemec, H; Amann, B; Kolarz, G; Thumb, N

    1990-08-03

    The frequency of occurrence of Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa was investigated prospectively in a group of 66 patients (17 men, 49 women, mean age 58 +/- 8.4 years) who had been treated with nonsteroidal anti-rheumatic drugs and 33 controls (14 men, 19 women, mean age 60.7 +/- 6.6 years) who had not received these drugs. In the first group the indication for gastroscopy was ingestion of nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs for at least 8 weeks, irrespective of dyspeptic symptoms (present in 25 patients), while in the second group the reason for endoscopy was either clinical symptoms (n = 18) or the presence of blood in the faeces. Helicobacter pylori was demonstrated by culture in 36 out of the 66 patients who had received nonsteroidal antirheumatics (54.5%); these comprised 24 out of 46 patients (52.2%) with chronic inactive gastritis and 12 out of 15 patients (80%) with chronic active gastritis. In the control group H. pylori was detected by culture in 22 out of 33 patients (66.7%); these included 11 out of 19 patients (57.9%) with chronic inactive gastritis and 11 out of 12 patients (91.7%) with chronic active gastritis. H. pylori was not demonstrated in any of the seven patients who had histologically normal gastric mucosa. In both groups there was significant correlation between demonstration of the microorganism and severity of inflammation. There is hence no evidence that nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs have any influence on the colonisation of the antral mucosa by Helicobacter pylori.

  13. Relationship between white matter integrity and serum cortisol levels in drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder: diffusion tensor imaging study using tract-based spatial statistics.

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    Liu, Xiaodan; Watanabe, Keita; Kakeda, Shingo; Yoshimura, Reiji; Abe, Osamu; Ide, Satoru; Hayashi, Kenji; Katsuki, Asuka; Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Watanabe, Rieko; Ueda, Issei; Nakamura, Jun; Korogi, Yukunori

    2016-06-01

    Higher daytime cortisol levels because of a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The elevated glucocorticoids inhibit the proliferation of the oligodendrocytes that are responsible for myelinating the axons of white matter fibre tracts. To evaluate the relationship between white matter integrity and serum cortisol levels during a first depressive episode in drug-naive patients with MDD (MDD group) using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. The MDD group (n = 29) and a healthy control group (n = 47) underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans and an analysis was conducted using TBSS. Morning blood samples were obtained from both groups for cortisol measurement. Compared with the controls, the MDD group had significantly reduced fractional anisotropy values (P<0.05, family-wise error (FWE)-corrected) in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus and anterior thalamic radiation. The fractional anisotropy values of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus and anterior thalamic radiation had significantly negative correlations with the serum cortisol levels in the MDD group (P<0.05, FWE-corrected). Our findings indicate that the elevated cortisol levels in the MDD group may injure the white matter integrity in the frontal-subcortical and frontal-limbic circuits. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  14. Anhedonia correlates with abnormal functional connectivity of the superior temporal gyrus and the caudate nucleus in patients with first-episode drug-naive major depressive disorder.

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    Yang, Xin-Hua; Tian, Kai; Wang, Dong-Fang; Wang, Yi; Cheung, Eric F C; Xie, Guang-Rong; Chan, Raymond C K

    2017-08-15

    Recent empirical findings have suggested that imbalanced neural networks may underlie the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the contribution of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the caudate nucleus to its pathophysiology remains unclear. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) date were acquired from 40 patients with first-episode drug-naive MDD and 36 matched healthy controls during wakeful rest. We used whole-brain voxel-wise statistical maps to quantify within-group resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) and between-group differences of bilateral caudate and STG seeds. Compared with healthy controls, first-episode MDD patients were found to have reduced connectivity between the ventral caudate and several brain regions including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the middle temporal gyrus (MTG), as well as increased connectivity with the cuneus. We also found increased connectivity between the left STG and the precuneus, the angular gyrus and the cuneus. Moreover, we found that increased anhedonia severity was correlated with the magnitude of ventral caudate functional connectivity with the cuneus and the MTG in MDD patients. Due to our small sample size, we did not correct the statistical threshold in the correlation analyses between clinical variables and connectivity abnormalities. The present study suggests that anhedonia is mainly associated with altered ventral caudate-cortical connectivity and highlights the importance of the ventral caudate in the neurobiology of MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Decreased long- and short-range functional connectivity at rest in drug-naive major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Xue, Zhimin; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal functional connectivity has been observed in major depressive disorder. Anatomical distance may affect functional connectivity in patients with major depressive disorder. However, whether and how anatomical distance affects functional connectivity at rest remains unclear in drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder. Forty-four patients with major depressive disorder, as well as 44 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls, underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Regional functional connectivity strength was calculated for each voxel in the whole brain, which was further divided into short- and long-range functional connectivity strength. The patients showed decreased long-range positive functional connectivity strength in the right inferior parietal lobule, as well as decreased short-range positive functional connectivity strength in the right insula and right superior temporal gyrus relative to those of the controls. No significant correlations existed between abnormal functional connectivity strength and the clinical variables of the patients. The findings revealed that anatomical distance decreases long- and short-range functional connectivity strength in patients with major depressive disorder, which may underlie the neurobiology of major depressive disorder. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  16. Analysis of Altered Baseline Brain Activity in Drug-Naive Adult Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Using Resting-State Functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Changjian; Feng, Yuan; Meng, Yajing; Liao, Wei; Huang, Xiaoqi; Lui, Su; Zhu, Chunyan; Chen, Huafu; Gong, Qiyong; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective We hypothesize that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) is involved in the altered regional baseline brain function in social anxiety disorder (SAD). The aim of the study was to analyze the altered baseline brain activity in drug-naive adult patients with SAD. Methods We investigated spontaneous and baseline brain activities by obtaining the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 20 drug-na?ve adult SAD patients and 19 healthy controls. Voxels wer...

  17. Executive Function Features in Drug-naive Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Manfei; Jiang, Wenqing; DU, Yasong; Li, Yan; Fan, Juan

    2017-08-25

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) that is characterized by markedly defiant, disobedient, and disruptive behavior in younger children has been regarded as disruptive behavior disorder (DBD), together with conduct disorder (CD). However, in contrast to CD, ODD does not include severe aggressive or antisocial behavior. This study aimed to examine executive function (EF) features of children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Cross sectional design was used in this study. The EF of children with ODD and pure attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were compared with children without a psychiatric disorder, using the Stroop Color-Word Tests A and B, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (Fourth Edition; WISC-IV), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) corrected for age. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify risk factors for EF deficits characteristic of ODD and ADHD. The ODD group exhibited significantly lower scores in both Stroop Color-Word Tests, the backwards digital span of the WISC-IV, and the categories completed and perseverative responses of the WCST, and significantly higher scores in spatial working memory (SWM) between errors, and the strategy in SWM of the CANTAB compared with the control group. When the ODD group was designated as 1 and the ADHD group was designated as 0, digital span (X1) fit the regression equation very well. Children with ODD perform substantially worse in EF tasks. Responsive inhibition appears to be uniquely associated with ODD development, while responsive inhibition and working memory appear to be associated with ADHD.

  18. Verbal memory in drug-naive, newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease. The retrieval deficit hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Alves, Guido; Aarsland, Dag; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Larsen, Jan Petter

    2011-01-01

    The retrieval deficit hypothesis on memory impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) implies a selective impairment in recall of learned material with normal encoding, retention, and recognition. This hypothesis has been challenged by new data. We have therefore investigated verbal memory and learning in a large sample of newly diagnosed, drug naïve, non-demented patients with PD. From a sample of patients with PD from the Norwegian ParkWest study, 133 PD patients and 133 controls matched on sex, age, and education were included. The California Verbal Learning Test-2 (CVLT-2) was used to assess verbal memory. Patients performed significantly worse than controls on free and cued recall as well as on recognition memory. Patients used the semantic clustering learning strategy significantly less extensively than the controls and the learning slope of the PD patients was significantly less steep. There was no difference in retention when controlling for encoding. Patients did not perform better on the recognition measure or on cued recall (d-prime), as compared to free recall. Executive functions explained a substantial part of the memory deficits. This study suggests that memory impairment in drug naïve early PD to a large degree is a deficit of learning/ encoding and not of retention or retrieval. An implication is that the retrieval deficit hypothesis should be moderated in its general form. Executive deficits and less extensive use of the efficient semantic clustering learning strategy had a strong impact on learning and memory. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Abatacept monotherapy compared with abatacept plus disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis patients: data from the ORA registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Poursac, Nicolas; Barnetche, Thomas; Shipley, Emilie; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Bannwarth, Bernard; Richez, Christophe; Schaeverbeke, Thierry

    2016-03-30

    Retention rate, efficacy, and safety of abatacept (ABA) was compared between patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving ABA as monotherapy to those in combination ABA + conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD). The patients were obtained from the ORA registry. The retention rate was analysed in two ways: (1) therapeutic strategy retention, in which the addition of a csDMARD was considered to indicate failure of the monotherapy strategy; and (2) ABA retention, which was assessed by the discontinuation of ABA regardless of other treatment modifications. Efficacy and safety were compared between ABA initiated alone and ABA used in combination with a csDMARD. The retention rate at month 6 (M6) was evaluated in 569 patients. A significant difference was identified in the retention rate between the ABA monotherapy strategy and the ABA + csDMARD strategy (58.5 % [110/188] vs. 68 % [258/381], respectively, p = 0.031). No significant difference was identified in the ABA retention rate initiated either as a monotherapy or in combination with csDMARDs (75 % [142/188] vs. 76 % [291/381], respectively, p = 0.824). Data regarding ABA efficacy were available for 444 patients. There was no significant difference in the responder proportion after 6 months of treatment between ABA monotherapy and ABA + csDMARD treatment (60.2 % [88/146] vs. 60 % [179/298], respectively, p = 0.967). This "real-life" analysis, which is relevant for bedside practice, emphasised the satisfactory efficacy and safety of ABA used in monotherapy, which provides an acceptable alternative when csDMARDs are undesirable.

  20. Over-Expression of Dopamine D2 Receptor and Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Genes in Drug-Naive Schizophrenic Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Potential Diagnostic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Zvara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3 was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3 were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

  1. Effects of typical antipsychotic, haloperidol on regional cerebral blood flow in drug-naive schizophrenic patients-study with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT

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    Kamoya, Masatoshi [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Ishikawa (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of examining antipsychotic action of haloperidol (HPD), effects of chronic perioral administration of HPD 4.5 mg/day on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT were investigated in 12 drug-naive schizophrenic patients with acute hallucinatory and delusional state. Further, the SPECT examinations were performed on 20 normal adult volunteers to investigate differences in rCBFs between schizophrenics and the normal subjects. Results are itemized as follows. The rCBF values were significantly increased in the bilateral superior and middle frontal, cingulate, middle temporal, pre-and post-central gyri, the left superior temporal gyrus, the bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and the bilateral hippocampal and thalamic cortices in comparison between normal subjects and before the HPD dose in schizophrenics. However, the rCBF values after the HPD dose showed significant increases only in the bilateral pre-and post-central gyri in comparison with the normal subjects. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the bilateral superior, middle and inferior frontal, superior and middle temporal gyri, and the left insular gyrus after the HPD dose in comparison with before the HPD dose. The psychiatric assessment with PANSS showed an improvement of positive symptoms consisting of auditory hallucination and delusions after the HPD dose. Statistical analyses on relationships between the rCBF values and PANSS scores before and after the HPD dose showed positive correlations between the right inferior frontal gyrus and auditory hallucination or positive symptoms, between the right superior temporal gyrus, left thalamus and delusions, and between the left thalamus, insular gyrus and negative symptoms. These results suggest that acute drug-naive schizophrenic patients have widespread cortico-subcortical energic hypermetabolism and HPD reduces the hypermetabolism, leading to whole normalized brain metabolism, in particular with the larger region

  2. Effects of typical antipsychotic, haloperidol on regional cerebral blood flow in drug-naive schizophrenic patients-study with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoya, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of examining antipsychotic action of haloperidol (HPD), effects of chronic perioral administration of HPD 4.5 mg/day on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT were investigated in 12 drug-naive schizophrenic patients with acute hallucinatory and delusional state. Further, the SPECT examinations were performed on 20 normal adult volunteers to investigate differences in rCBFs between schizophrenics and the normal subjects. Results are itemized as follows. The rCBF values were significantly increased in the bilateral superior and middle frontal, cingulate, middle temporal, pre-and post-central gyri, the left superior temporal gyrus, the bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and the bilateral hippocampal and thalamic cortices in comparison between normal subjects and before the HPD dose in schizophrenics. However, the rCBF values after the HPD dose showed significant increases only in the bilateral pre-and post-central gyri in comparison with the normal subjects. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the bilateral superior, middle and inferior frontal, superior and middle temporal gyri, and the left insular gyrus after the HPD dose in comparison with before the HPD dose. The psychiatric assessment with PANSS showed an improvement of positive symptoms consisting of auditory hallucination and delusions after the HPD dose. Statistical analyses on relationships between the rCBF values and PANSS scores before and after the HPD dose showed positive correlations between the right inferior frontal gyrus and auditory hallucination or positive symptoms, between the right superior temporal gyrus, left thalamus and delusions, and between the left thalamus, insular gyrus and negative symptoms. These results suggest that acute drug-naive schizophrenic patients have widespread cortico-subcortical energic hypermetabolism and HPD reduces the hypermetabolism, leading to whole normalized brain metabolism, in particular with the larger region

  3. Decreased left middle temporal gyrus volume in antipsychotic drug-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients and their healthy unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Maorong; Li, Jun; Eyler, Lisa; Guo, Xiaofeng; Wei, Qingling; Tang, Jingsong; Liu, Feng; He, Zhong; Li, Lihua; Jin, Hua; Liu, Zhening; Wang, Juan; Liu, Fang; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2013-03-01

    The shared neuropathological characteristics of patients with schizophrenia and their siblings might represent intermediate phenotypes that could be used to investigate genetic susceptibility to the illness. We sought to discover gray matter volume differences in patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings with voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We recruited antipsychotic drug-naive, first-episode schizophrenia (FES) patients, their unaffected siblings and age-, sex- and handedness-matched healthy controls. We used VBM to investigate differences in gray matter volume among the 3 groups. There were significant gray matter volumetric differences among the 3 groups in bilateral hippocampal and parahippocampal gyri, bilateral middle temporal gyri, and superior temporal gyri (FDR ptemporal gyrus, and volume of this region was not different between siblings and patients. Our findings confirm and extend previous VBM analyses in schizophrenia and it indicate that schizophrenia may be characterized by an abnormal development of cerebral lateralization. Furthermore, these data argue that patients and their unaffected siblings might share decreases in the gray matter volume of the left middle temporal gyrus, and this regional reduction might be a potential endophenotype for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased functional connectivity strength of right inferior temporal gyrus in first-episode, drug-naive somatization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qinji; Yao, Dapeng; Jiang, Muliang; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Jiajing; Xu, Chunxing; Dai, Yi; Yu, Miaoyu; Long, Liling; Li, Hongzheng; Liu, Jianrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Changqing; Guo, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of brain structural and functional alterations have been implicated in patients with somatization disorder (SD). However, little is known about brain functional connectivity in SD. In the present study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and graph theory were used to obtain a comprehensive view of whole-brain functional connectivity and to investigate the changes of voxel-wise functional networks in patients with SD. Twenty-five first-episode, medication-naive patients with SD and 28 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent resting-state fMRI. The graph theory approach was employed to analyze the data. Compared to the HCs, patients with SD showed significantly increased functional connectivity strength in the right inferior temporal gyrus (ITG). There is a significant positive correlation between the z-values of the cluster in the right ITG and Hamilton Anxiety Scale scores. Our findings indicate that there is a disruption of the functional connectivity pattern in the right ITG in first-episode, treatment-naive patients with SD, which bears clinical significance. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  5. A Naturalistic Comparison of Methylphenidate and Risperidone Monotherapy in Drug-Naive Youth With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Comorbid With Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Manfredi, Azzurra; Nieri, Giulia; Muratori, Pietro; Pfanner, Chiara; Milone, Annarita

    2017-10-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) are frequently co-occurring in youth, but data about the pharmacological management of this comorbidity are scarce, especially when impulsive aggression is prominent. Although stimulants are the first-line medication for ADHD, second-generation antipsychotics, namely, risperidone, are frequently used. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of monotherapy with the stimulant methylphenidate (MPH) and risperidone in a consecutive sample of 40 drug-naive male youths diagnosed as having ADHD-combined presentation, comorbid with ODD and aggression, without psychiatric comorbidities, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria and a structured clinical interview (Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version). Twenty males treated with MPH (mean age, 8.95 ± 1.67 years) and 20 males treated with risperidone (mean age, 9.35 ± 2.72 years), followed up to 6 months, were assessed according to efficacy measures (Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL], Clinical Global Impression-Severity [CGI-S] and Improvement [CGI-I], Children Global Assessment Scale), and safety measures. At the end of the follow-up, both medications were similarly effective based on CBCL subscales of aggression and rule-breaking behaviors, on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-oriented oppositional defiant problems and conduct problems, and on CGI-S, CGI-I, and Children Global Assessment Scale, but only MPH was effective on CBCL attention problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems. Risperidone was associated with weight gain and elevated prolactin levels. Although the nonrandomized, nonblind design limits the conclusions of our exploratory study, our findings suggest that when ADHD is comorbid with ODD and aggression MPH and risperidone are both effective on aggressive behavior, but

  6. Study on effects of an atypical antipsychotic, risperidone on regional cerebral blood flow with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in drug-naive and unmedicated schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiwa, Daisuke

    2003-01-01

    To examine the underlying mechanisms of intracerebral or clinical actions of the atypical antipsychotic, risperidone (RIS), the effects of RIS on absolute regional cerebral blood flows (rCBFs) measured with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT and correlations between the rCBFs and psychotic symptoms assessed with positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) were investigated in 10 drug-naive and unmedicated schizophrenic patients with acute hallucinatory and delusional state. Both the SPECT and PANSS were repeated before and after oral 2-week administration of RIS 3 mg/day in all of the 10 patients and after subsequent 2-week administration of RIS 4-6 mg/day in half of the patients. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the left precentral gyrus alone after the low dose of RIS 3 mg/day in comparison with before the RIS dose. The rCBF values were significantly decreased in the right cingulate, postcentral, inferior parietal gyri and the left inferior temporal gyrus after the high dose of RIS 4-6 mg/day in comparison with before the low dose of RIS 3 mg/day. The psychiatric assessment with PANSS showed an improvement of positive and negative symptoms after the low RIS dose and still more after the high RIS dose. Statistical analyses on relationships between the rCBF values and PANSS scores before and after the low RIS dose showed a positive correlation between the rCBF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and hallucinations (mainly auditory hallucination). These results suggest that chronic RIS administration dose-dependently produces a decrease of rCBF in the cerebral cortex in the manner that the low dose decreases rCBF in a few restricted cortical regions, while the high dose induces the rCBF reduction in more widespread cortical regions. The RIS-induced rCBF decrease in the cerebral cortex is considered to be attributable to a secondary inactivation in the cerebral cortex due to D 2 dopamine receptor blockade of RIS in the striatum through the cortico

  7. [Hematotoxic lesions caused by non-steroidal antirheumatic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobbe, H; Hüge, W

    1980-12-01

    Among the lesions of haematopoiesis conditioned by medicaments the lesions by non-steroidal antirheumatic drugs occupy the first place. They get their significance by the fact that they are not so infrequently irreparable and thus show an unfavourable prognosis. On principle in pathogenetic respect lesions by immunologic reactions which vastly do not depend on the dosage, are to be demarcated from the toxically conditioned side-effects which depend on dosage. Conditioned by drugs aplastic syndromes of the bone marrow are not in every case strongly depending on dosage. For this is to be assumed an individual, particular sensitivity of the haematopoietic stem cells (stem cell defect). Of the anti-rheumatic drugs used for the basic therapy chloroquine derivations, gold, D-penicillamine, immunosuppressives and levamisol may effect disturbances of the haematopoiesis, for which facts are examples are given. This concerns also the symptomatically acting antirheumatic drugs. An overestimation of rare side-effects of drugs should not block the application of certain medicaments, however, they should be given only in such a high dosage as it is necessary. In combinations of antirheumatic drugs every individual drug is considered as causative factor. Interactions are particularly be taken into consideration. Control programmes, particularly with certain laboratory parameters, give the early recognition of side-effects and render possible to avoid severe effects.

  8. Anti-Rheumatic Potential of Pakistani Medicinal Plants: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.; Adnan, M.; Murad, W.; Tariq, A.; Bibi, H.; Rahman, H.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Present review aimed to provide a comprehensive documentation of plants used as anti-rheumatic ethnomedicines in Pakistan and to suggest future recommendations. Data on anti-rheumatic plants was collected from published scientific papers, reports and thesis using online searching engines such as Google Scholar PubMed and Science Direct. Five distinct zones in the country were classified on the basis of geography, humidity and rainfall. We used Sorenson similarity index for plants and their parts used between different zones. A total of 137 anti-rheumatic plant species representing 55 families and 104 genera are used in Pakistan. Herbs (87 plants) were the primary source of anti-rheumatic medicinal plants, while leaves (22 % plant species) were the most frequently used part in the preparation of ethnomedicinal recipes. Highest number of 52 medicinal plant species were found in Zone A having high mountains and cold climate where the prevalence of rheumatism was more common. Solanum surattense was found with highest conservation concerns as it was using in 13 different areas against rheumatism. Results of Sorenson index revealed that there is a similarity of plants and its parts uses between different zones. In conclusions, geography and climate have an important role in causing rheumatic disease. Pakistan has a number of anti-rheumatic plants that are used by the local populations through their traditional knowledge. Moreover, inter zonal similarities among plants and its part uses indicate higher pharmacological potency of these medicinal plants. Further, the review will also provide an insight regarding the conservation status of reported plants. (author)

  9. Sick leave and disability pension before and after initiation of antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neovius, M; Simard, J F; Klareskog, L; Askling, J

    2011-08-01

    To investigate sick leave and disability pension in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to the initiation of biological and non-biological antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice. Patients aged 19-60 years initiating non-biological mono (n=2796) or combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy (n=973), or biological agents (n=4787) were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register between 1999 and 2007. Sick leave and disability pension data (1995-2010) were retrieved from national registers. During the year before the start of mono DMARD, combination DMARD and biological treatment, 10%, 12% and 43% of patients received disability pension benefits, respectively. The corresponding combined annual sick leave and disability pension days were 78 (54+25), 132 (105+27) and 190 (79+111). Irrespective of treatment type, initiators were characterised by a history of increasing sick leave and disability pension. Treatment start was associated with a break in this trajectory: sick leave decreased while disability pension increased, resulting in a net stabilisation of total days. Higher levels of days on sick leave and disability pension at treatment start were observed in patients initiating biologics in 1999 (236 days/year) compared with 2007 (150 days/year; pleave and disability pension increased rapidly before the initiation of antirheumatic therapy, which was associated with a halt but not a reversal of this development. Work ability is a metric of importance for clinical practice, signalling large remaining needs in the RA population, and the need for intervention earlier in the disease process.

  10. Drug control of an antirheumatic in Rheumatoid arthritis via scintigraphy of joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafarnik, D.; Semmler, U.; Wiegmann, A.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Stiftung Deutsche Klinik fuer Diagnostik, Wiesbaden

    1979-01-01

    Sixteen rheumatoid arthritis patients each received diclofenac sodium or placebos in a double-blind study. The general assesment of the success of therapy on the part of the physician or the patient, can be corrected to some extent by means of a semiquantitatively evaluated sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetat joint scintigraphy used in the patients and in the controls. In particular, the comparative examinations of the wrists, which were evaluated clinically, semiquantitatively and quantitatively, showed that the sensitivity of joint scintigraphy is sufficient to demonstrate additionally the anti-inflammatory action of an antirheumatic drug even if the drug had been administered for 14 days only. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 BRE [de

  11. short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. IV. Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948 a corticosteroid compound was administered for the first time to a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis by Philip Showalter Hench, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (USA. He was investigating since 1929 the role of adrenal gland-derived substances in rheumatoid arthritis. For the discovery of cortisone and its applications in anti-rheumatic therapy, Hench, along with Edward Calvin Kendall and Tadeusz Reichstein, won the 1950 Nobel Prize for Medicine. In this review we summarize the main stages that led to the identification of the so-called compound E, which was used by Hench. We also consider the subsequent development of steroid therapy in rheumatic diseases, through the introduction of new molecules with less mineralocorticoid effects, such as prednisone, and more recently, deflazacort.

  12. Frontal dopamine D(2/3) receptor binding in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients correlates with positive psychotic symptoms and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthoj, Birte Y; Mackeprang, Torben; Svarer, Claus

    2006-01-01

    of male schizophrenic patients, higher frontal BP values in male (n = 17) compared to female (n = 8) patients, and - in accordance with this - significantly fewer positive schizophrenic symptoms in the female patients. No significant differences in BP values were observed between patients and controls...

  13. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of potential responses to future high levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral drug-naive populations beginning treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Miners, Alec

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With continued roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, evidence is emerging of increasing levels of transmitted drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different potential public health responses to substantial......-effectiveness threshold. Results from our model will help inform WHO recommendations on monitoring of HIV drug resistance in people starting ART. FUNDING: WHO (with funds provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), CHAIN (European Commission)....

  14. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba) were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name "Aspirin". In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Kinase inhibitors: a new class of antirheumatic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyttaris VC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasileios C KyttarisDivision of Rheumatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The outlook for patients with rheumatoid arthritis has improved significantly over the last three decades with the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. However, despite the use of methotrexate, cytokine inhibitors, and molecules targeting T and B cells, a percentage of patients do not respond or lose their response over time. The autoimmune process in rheumatoid arthritis depends on activation of immune cells, which utilize intracellular kinases to respond to external stimuli such as cytokines, immune complexes, and antigens. In the past decade, small molecules targeting several kinases, such as p38 MAPK, Syk, and JAK have been developed. Several p38 MAPK inhibitors proved ineffective in treating rheumatoid arthritis. The Syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, proved superior to placebo in Phase II trials and is currently under Phase III investigation. Tofacitinib, a JAK1/3 inhibitor, was shown to be efficacious in two Phase III trials, while VX-509, a JAK3 inhibitor, showed promising results in a Phase II trial. Fostamatinib and tofacitinib were associated with increased rates of infection, elevation of liver enzymes, and neutropenia. Moreover, fostamatinib caused elevations of blood pressure and diarrhea, while tofacitinib was associated with an increase in creatinine and elevation of lipid levels.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, kinase inhibitors, mitogen-activated phosphokinase p38, spleen tyrosine kinase, Janus kinases

  16. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name “Aspirin”. In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Biologic and oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drug monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Sebba, Anthony; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evidence demonstrates coadministration of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) agents and methotrexate (MTX) is more efficacious than administration of TNFi agents alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, leading to the perception that coadministration of MTX with all biologic agents or oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs is necessary for maximum efficacy. Real-life registry data reveal approximately one-third of patients taking biologic agents use them as monotherapy. Additionally, an analysis of healthcare claims data showed that when MTX was prescribed in conjunction with a biologic agent, as many as 58% of patients did not collect the MTX prescription. Given this discrepancy between perception and real life, we conducted a review of the peer-reviewed literature and rheumatology medical congress abstracts to determine whether data support biologic monotherapy as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our analysis suggests only for tocilizumab is there evidence that the efficacy of biologic monotherapy is comparable with combination therapy with MTX. PMID:23918035

  18. Proposal for a new nomenclature of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; van der Heijde, Desiree; Machold, Klaus P.; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In light of the recent emergence of new therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis, such as kinase inhibitors and biosimilars, a new nomenclature for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which are currently often classified as synthetic (or chemical) DMARDs (sDMARDS) and biological DMARDs

  19. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in pregnancy - Current status and implications for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Fokaline; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; van de Laar, Mart A. J. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Drug use during pregnancy is sometimes unavoidable, especially in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) often starts in the early stage of RA; therefore, women of reproductive age are at risk for exposure to a DMARD

  20. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs til behandling af ankyloserende spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Egsmose, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    , there is no evidence that disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (DMARDs) have a therapeutic effect in AS. Clinical evidence that greater TNF-inhibitor effectiveness can be achieved by combining with a DMARD is lacking, but further studies should be performed. More research is needed to clarify the role of DMARDs...

  1. Trial of a New Antirheumatic Agent | Anderson | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aspirin) and placebo in 10 outpatients with active rheumatoid arthritis, is reported. Both fenoprofen and aspirin were found to be similarly effective agents in rheumatoid arthritis with an average daily dose of 2,1 g fenoprofen compared with 4,5 g ...

  2. Effectiveness of tocilizumab with and without synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabay, Cem; Riek, Myriam; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness of tocilizumab (TCZ) with and without synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) in a large observational study. METHODS: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with TCZ who had a baseline visit and information on concomitant sDMARDs were...... change was analysed with a mixed-effects model for longitudinal data. TCZ retention was analysed with a stratified extended Cox model. RESULTS: Multiple-adjusted analysis suggests that prescription of TCZ as monotherapy varied according to age, corticosteroid use, country of the registry and year...

  3. [Synthesis and physico-chemical properties of lonazolac-Ca, a new antiphlogistic/antirheumatic agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, G; Krüger, U; Klemm, K

    1981-01-01

    Calcium-[3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1-phenylpyrazole-4]-acetate (Lonazolac-Ca, active principle of Irritren) is a new antiinflammatory/antirheumatic agent whose synthesis and physico-chemical properties are described. The physical parameters measured (pKa, partition coefficient P, saturation concentration Cs, surface activity, protein binding) are held against the corresponding values of indomethacin, diclofenac, and phenylbutazone. The size of the permeability coefficient PM of the passive transport through artificial phospholipid collodion membranes as well as the invasion curves calculated from PM indicate a good absorption of lonazolac in man.

  4. Thyroid Autoimmunity and Function after Treatment with Biological Antirheumatic Agents in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Dinsen, Stina; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    With the increased pro-inflammatory response in both rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid autoimmune diseases, treatment with biological antirheumatic agents (BAAs) of the former may affect the course of the latter. In hepatitis C and cancer patients, treatment with biological agents substantially...... increases the risk of developing thyroid autoimmunity. As the use of BAAs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is increasing, this review aimed to investigate if such use affected thyroid status in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We conducted a systematic literature search and included six studies...

  5. Vaccines and Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs: Practical Implications for the Rheumatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Marcia A; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2017-02-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are highly vulnerable to infections because of abnormalities in their immune system, and because of immunosuppressive effects of their medications. Vaccinations in this population are complicated by disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, which also modulate or suppress the immune system and potentially decrease the immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccines. We review the available data regarding the impact of rheumatoid arthritis therapy on the immunogenicity of various common vaccines. We also review rheumatoid arthritis-specific vaccination recommendations, live vaccine safety concerns, and current gaps in our understanding of these issues." Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. I. An introduction on traditional and drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pasero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of anti-rheumatic therapy are very old and mainly related to the use of traditional, sometimes extravagant, treatments, as a part of folk medicine. Spa therapy has long been used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, as well as, in later times, physical treatments, including electrotherapy. Drug treatment has developed beginning from substances of vegetable origin, such as willow and colchicum extracts. Then it has been spread out through the chemical synthesis of compounds with specific action and therefore more effective, owing to the great development of pharmaceutical industry.

  7. Critical appraisal of the guidelines for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Enrique R; Clegg, Daniel O; Lisse, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Surprisingly, little data are available for the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in ankylosing spondylitis. Sulfasalazine has been the best studied. Efficacy data for individual agents (including pamidronate) and combinations of agents are detailed in this review. Intriguingly, these agents continue to be used with some frequency, even in the absence of efficacy data. To answer these questions, additional systematic studies of these agents in ankylosing spondylitis are needed and will likely need to be done by interested collaborative groups such as SPARTAN.

  8. Comparison of Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug Therapy Persistence Between Biologics Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Switching from Another Biologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stephen S; McMorrow, Donna; Farr, Amanda M; Juneau, Paul; Ogale, Sarika

    2015-06-01

    To compare biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy persistence between biologics among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who previously used ≥1 other biologic. Using a large United States administrative claims dataset, we identified adult patients with RA initiating abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, or tocilizumab between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2012 (initiation date = index). Patients were required to have used ≥1 other biologic before index. Outcomes were biologic persistence, defined in two alternative ways: (1) time from initiation until switching to a different biologic (time to switch) and (2) time from initiation until switching or the first occurrence of a 90-day gap in treatment with the initiated biologic (time to switch/discontinuation). Rituximab was excluded from analyses due to retreatment based on clinical evaluation, which complicates the measurement of persistence. Multivariable survival analyses compared persistence outcomes between tocilizumab and the other biologics, adjusting for patient characteristics. The sample comprised 9,782 biologic initiations; mean age 54 years and 82% female. Compared with tocilizumab, the hazards of switching biologic therapy were significantly higher for abatacept [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.19, P = 0.041], adalimumab (HR = 1.39, P biologic therapy were significantly higher for adalimumab (HR = 1.16, P = 0.014) and certolizumab (HR = 1.15, P biologic persistence to focus specifically on patients with RA who are not naïve to biologic treatment. Among patients with RA who previously used ≥1 other biologic, tocilizumab-treated patients had similar or significantly better biologic persistence compared with other biologics.

  9. [Acupuncture Therapy versus Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs for the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis--a Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zheng-tao; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, An-min

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of acupuncture compared to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Four databases including Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and ISI Web of Science were searched in December 2014, taking also the reference section into account. Randomized controlled trials that aimed to assess the efficacy of acupuncture therapy were identified. The inclusion criteria for the outcome measurements were the clinical effect, ESR, occipital wall test, chest expansion, CRP and finger ground distance. Finally, six studies met these inclusion criteria. Two reviewers screened each article independently and were blinded to the findings of each other. We analyzed data from 6 RCTs involving 541 participants. Acupuncture therapy could further improve the clinical effect (OR = 3.01; 95% CI, 1.48-6.13; P = 0.002) and reduce ESR level (SMD = -0.77; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.08; P = 0.03) compared to DMARDs; a combination of acupuncture and DMARDs could further improve clinical effect (OR = 3.20, 95% CI, 1.36-7.54; P = 0.008), occipital-wall distance (SMD = -0.84; 95% CI, -1.37 to -0.31; P = 0.002), chest expansion (SMD = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.60; P = 0.0009), and finger-ground distance (SMD = -0.48; 95% CI, -0.87 to -0.09; P = 0.02) as compared to DMARDs treatment alone. Our findings support that acupuncture therapy could be an option to relieve symptoms associated with AS. These results should be interpreted cautiously due to the generally poor methodological qualities of the included trials. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  10. A PROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF RISK-FACTORS FOR THE DISCONTINUATION OF 2ND-LINE ANTIRHEUMATIC DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNANDS, MJ; VANTHOF, MA; VANLEEUWEN, MA; VANRIJSWIJK, MH; VANDEPUTTE, LBA; VANRIEL, PLCM

    1993-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory factors influencing the discontinuation of second-line antirheumatic drugs were prospectively studied using survival analysis in a consecutive series of 245 patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis. A statistically significant influence of age, sex, serum IgA and

  11. Use of Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs for Inflammatory Arthritis in US Veterans: Effect of Specialty Care and Geographic Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jessica A; Pei, Shaobo; Burningham, Zachary; Penmetsa, Gopi; Cannon, Grant W; Clegg, Daniel O; Sauer, Brian C

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of access to and distance from rheumatology care on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in US veterans with inflammatory arthritis (IA). Provider encounters and DMARD dispensations for IA (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis) were evaluated in national Veterans Affairs (VA) datasets between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015. Among 12,589 veterans with IA, 23.5% saw a rheumatology provider. In the general IA population, 25.3% and 13.6% of veterans were exposed to a synthetic DMARD (sDMARD) and biologic DMARD (bDMARD), respectively. DMARD exposure was 2.6- to 3.4-fold higher in the subpopulation using rheumatology providers, compared to the general IA population. The distance between veterans' homes and the closest VA rheumatology site was < 40 miles (Near) for 55.9%, 40-99 miles (Intermediate) for 31.7%, and ≥ 100 miles (Far) for 12.4%. Veterans in the Intermediate and Far groups were less likely to see a rheumatology provider than veterans in the Near group (RR = 0.72 and RR = 0.49, respectively). Exposure to bDMARD was 34% less frequent in the Far group than the Near group. In the subpopulation who used rheumatology care, the bDMARD exposure discrepancy did not persist between distance groups. Use of rheumatology care and DMARD was low for veterans with IA. DMARD exposure was strongly associated with rheumatology care use. Veterans in the general IA population living far from rheumatology sites accessed rheumatology care and bDMARD less frequently than veterans living close to rheumatology sites.

  12. A Combined Study of SLC6A15 Gene Polymorphism and the Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in First-Episode Drug-Naive Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Liu, Zhifen; Cao, Xiaohua; Li, Jianying; Zhang, Aixia; Sun, Ning; Yang, Chunxia; Zhang, Kerang

    2017-09-01

    The SLC6A15 gene has been identified as a novel candidate gene for major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the mechanism underlying the effects of how the SLC6A15 gene affects functional brain activity of patients with MDD remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the SLC6A15 gene polymorphism, rs1545843, on resting-state brain function in MDD with the imaging genomic technology and the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Sixty-seven MDD patients and 44 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans and genotyping. The differences in ReHo between genotypes were initially tested using the student's t test. We then performed a 2 × 2 (genotypes × disease status) analysis of variance to identify the main effects of genotypes, disease status, and their interactions in MDD. MDD patients with A+ genotypes showed decreased ReHo in the medial cingulum compared with MDD patients with the GG genotype. This was in contrast to normal controls with A+ genotypes who showed increased ReHo in the posterior cingulum and the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes and decreased ReHo in the left corpus callosum, compared with controls with the GG genotypes. The main effect of disease was found in the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. The main effect of genotypes was found in the left corpus callosum and the frontal lobe. There was no interaction between rs1545843 genotypes and disease status. We found that the left corpus callosum ReHo was positively correlated with total scores of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) (p = 0.021), so as was the left inferior parietal gyrus ReHo with cognitive disorder (p = 0.02). In addition, the right middle temporal gyrus had a negative correlation with retardation (p = 0.049). We observed an association between the SLC6A15 rs1545843 and resting-state brain function of the corpus callosum, cingulum and the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes in MDD patients, which may be

  13. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of potential responses to future high levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral drug-naive populations beginning treatment: modelling study and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Miners, Alec; Revill, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Lundgren, Jens D; Bennett, Diane; Raizes, Elliott; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; De Luca, Andrea; Vitoria, Marco; Barcarolo, Jhoney; Perriens, Joseph; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    With continued roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, evidence is emerging of increasing levels of transmitted drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different potential public health responses to substantial levels of transmitted drug resistance. We created a model of HIV transmission, progression, and the effects of ART, which accounted for resistance generation, transmission, and disappearance of resistance from majority virus in the absence of drug pressure. We simulated 5000 ART programmatic scenarios with different prevalence levels of detectable resistance in people starting ART in 2017 (t0) who had not previously been exposed to antiretroviral drugs. We used the model to predict cost-effectiveness of various potential changes in policy triggered by different prevalence levels of resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) measured in the population starting ART. Individual-level resistance testing before ART initiation was not generally a cost-effective option, irrespective of the cost-effectiveness threshold. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of US$500 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), no change in policy was cost effective (ie, no change in policy would involve paying less than $500 per QALY gained), irrespective of the prevalence of pretreatment NNRTI resistance, because of the increased cost of the policy alternatives. At thresholds of $1000 or higher, and with the prevalence of pretreatment NNRTI resistance greater than 10%, a policy to measure viral load 6 months after ART initiation became cost effective. The policy option to change the standard first-line treatment to a boosted protease inhibitor regimen became cost effective at a prevalence of NNRTI resistance higher than 15%, for cost-effectiveness thresholds greater than $2000. Cost-effectiveness of potential policies to adopt in response to different levels of pretreatment HIV drug

  14. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Smiljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS, the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS in untreated patients with MS could play a role in disease progression and degree of functional disability. Methods. The study included 31 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS and 14 healthy controls from the same geographic area matched by age, ethnicity and number of smokers. The glucose tolerance, IS, and IR were examined using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and using basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. The functional disability and disease progression were evaluated by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS. Results. The MS patients tolerated glucose equally well as the healthy controls. Basal concentrations of insulin were significantly higher in the MS group (p < 0.05, as well as insulin plasma level 30 min after oral glucose load (p < 0.01. The patients with MS had significantly higher values of homeostasis model assessment indexes of IR (HOMA-IR (p = 0.027; p = 0.028. The percentage of IS (HOMA2 %S and whole body IS index (ISI Matsuda showed significantly lower values in the MS patients than in the controls (p = 0.005; p = 0.001. The insulinogenic index in the first 30 min of OGTT was significantly higher in MS patients (p = 0.005. The measures of functional disability and MS progression did not correlate significantly with the investigated parameters of IR and IS indexes. Conclusion. This study demonstrates for the first time the existence of hyperinsulinemia, reduced insulin sensitivity and normal glucose tolerance that indicate the initial phase of IR in the natural course of MS. Additional research is necessary in order to define the mechanisms of occurrence and the impact of IR on the complex pathophysiological processes in MS.

  15. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Smiljana; Kolić Ivana; Raičević Ranko; Stojanović Zvezdana; Kostić Dejan; Dinčić Evica

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS), the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR) and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS) in untreated patie...

  16. Bioinformatics Analysis for the Antirheumatic Effects of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang from a Network Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT is a classic TCM formula to clear “heat” and “poison” that exhibits antirheumatic activity. Here we investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of HLJDT at protein network level using bioinformatics approach. It was found that HLJDT shares 5 target proteins with 3 types of anti-RA drugs, and several pathways in immune system and bone formation are significantly regulated by HLJDT’s components, suggesting the therapeutic effect of HLJDT on RA. By defining an antirheumatic effect score to quantitatively measure the therapeutic effect, we found that the score of each HLJDT’s component is very low, while the whole HLJDT achieves a much higher effect score, suggesting a synergistic effect of HLJDT achieved by its multiple components acting on multiple targets. At last, topological analysis on the RA-associated PPI network was conducted to illustrate key roles of HLJDT’s target proteins on this network. Integrating our findings with TCM theory suggests that HLJDT targets on hub nodes and main pathway in the Hot ZENG network, and thus it could be applied as adjuvant treatment for Hot-ZENG-related RA. This study may facilitate our understanding of antirheumatic effect of HLJDT and it may suggest new approach for the study of TCM pharmacology.

  17. Risk of Subsequent Infection Among Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors and Other Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accortt, Neil A; Bonafede, Machaon M; Collier, David H; Iles, Jan; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    To describe the incidence of subsequent serious infections in patients who received systemic drug therapy after an initial serious infection. Patients with rheumatic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis) or psoriasis who experienced a serious infection between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011 were identified in a claims database. Patients were required to be continuously enrolled in the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Database for 12 months prior to and at least 60 days after the date of discharge or the end of intravenous antibiotic therapy for the index serious infection. Subsequent serious infection incidence rates per 100 patient-years with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for up to 18 months post-index, starting 60 days post-index. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment duration, and changes during followup. Among the 21,699 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the majority (84.3%) had RA. Patients who received tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy after their index infection had a lower rate of subsequent serious infections (18.1 per 100 patient-years for those treated with a TNF inhibitor alone and 17.3 per 100 patient-years for those treated with a TNF inhibitor plus a nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug [DMARD]) compared with those treated with a nonbiologic DMARD alone (21.4 per 100 patient-years). Etanercept, either alone (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95% CI 0.77-0.99) or in combination with a nonbiologic DMARD (adjusted HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.66-0.88), and infliximab (only in combination with a nonbiologic DMARD) (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.95) were associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent serious infections compared with a nonbiologic DMARD alone. We did not observe an increased risk of subsequent infection in patients who received TNF inhibitor

  18. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Daniel Rocha-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%. Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT, Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P=0.04. Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5% in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55% in the DMARDs group (P=0.04. Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%.

  19. [Therapeutic Concepts for Treatment of Patients with Non-infectious Uveitis Biologic Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walscheid, Karoline; Pleyer, Uwe; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2018-04-12

    Biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) can be highly efficient in the treatment of various non-infectious uveitis entities. Currently, the TNF-α-inhibitor Adalimumab is the only in-label therapeutic option, whereas, all other bDMARDs need to be given as an off-label therapy. bDMARDs are indicated in diseases refractory to conventional synthetic DMARD therapy and/or systemic steroids, or in patients in whom treatment with those is not possible due to side effects. Therapeutic mechanisms currently employed are cytokine-specific (interferons, inhibition of TNF-α or of interleukin [IL]-1-, IL-6- or IL-17-signalling), inhibit T cell costimulation (CTLA-4 fusion protein), or act via depletion of B cells (anti-CD20). All bDMARDs need to be administered parenterally, and therapy is initiated by the treating internal specialist only after interdisciplinary coordination of all treating subspecialties and after exclusion of contraindications. Regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory for all patients while under bDMARD therapy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Adherence to synthetic disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of the OBSERVAR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Mas, Antonio; Castañeda, Santos; Cantero Santamaría, José I; Baquero, José L; Del Toro Santos, Francisco J

    2017-12-27

    Treatment compliance with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) is essential to achieve the therapeutic goals in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, despite the need for good compliance, there is evidence that patients with RA frequently fail to use DMARD for the control of RA. Thus, the main objective of the OBSERVAR study is to evaluate the reasons for the lack of therapeutic adherence to synthetic DMARD in these patients. A Delphi process involving 18 randomly selected Spanish rheumatologists determined the level of agreement with 66 causes of noncompliance selected from the literature in relation to synthetic DMARD in RA. The reasons for noncompliance were consistent in 75.7%, although 3 reasons (4.5%) were highly consistent: 1) not knowing what to do in the case of an adverse event with DMARD; 2) not having undergone adherence screening by health personnel for early detection of "noncompliant patients"; and 3) not having undergone interventions or strategies that improve adherence. In order to improve adherence to RA treatment with synthetic DMARD, the patient should be adequately informed of each new treatment introduced, the patient's compliance profile should be incorporated into the clinical routine and the patient's motivation for therapeutic compliance be reinforced through the methods available to us. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of coccidioidomycosis in patients receiving biologic response modifiers or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroumian, Sara; Knowles, Susan L; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Yanes, James; Ampel, Neil M; Vaz, Austin; Galgiani, John N; Hoover, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is an endemic fungal infection of the American Southwest, an area with a large population of patients with rheumatic diseases. There are currently no guidelines for management of patients who develop coccidioidomycosis while under treatment with biologic response modifiers (BRMs) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We conducted a retrospective study of how both concurrent diseases were managed and the patient outcomes at 2 centers in Tucson, Arizona. A retrospective chart review identified patients who developed coccidioidomycosis during treatment with DMARDs or BRMs. Patients were seen at least once in a university-affiliated or Veterans Affairs outpatient rheumatology clinic in Tucson, Arizona, between 2007 and 2009. Forty-four patients were identified. Rheumatologic treatment included a BRM alone (n = 11), a DMARD alone (n = 8), or combination therapy (n = 25). Manifestations of coccidioidomycosis included pulmonary infection (n = 29), disseminated disease (n = 9), and asymptomatic positive coccidioidal serologies (n = 6). After the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis, 26 patients had BRMs and DMARDs stopped, 8 patients had BRMs stopped but DMARD therapy continued, and 10 patients had no change in their immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-one patients had antifungal therapy initiated for 1 month or longer. Followup data were available for 38 patients. BRM and/or DMARD therapy was continued or resumed in 33 patients, only 16 of whom continued concurrent antifungal therapy. None of the patients have had subsequent dissemination or complications of coccidioidomycosis. Re-treating rheumatic disease patients with a BRM and/or a DMARD after coccidioidomycosis appears to be safe in some patients. We propose a management strategy based on coccidioidomycosis disease activity. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Short time administration of antirheumatic drugs - Methotrexate as a strong inhibitor of osteoblast's proliferation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annussek Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Due to increasing use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs as first line therapy in rheumatic diseases, dental and maxillofacial practitioner should be aware of drug related adverse events. Especially effects on bone-metabolism and its cells are discussed controversially. Therefore we investigate the in vitro effect of short time administration of low dose methotrexate (MTX on osteoblasts as essential part of bone remodelling cells. Methods Primary bovine osteoblasts (OBs were incubated with various concentrations of MTX, related to tissue concentrations, over a period of fourteen days by using a previously established standard protocol. The effect on cell proliferation as well as mitochondrial activity was assessed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl 2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, imaging and counting of living cells. Additionally, immunostaining of extracellular matrix proteins was used to survey osteogenic differentiation. Results All methods indicate a strong inhibition of osteoblast`s proliferation by short time administration of low dose MTX within therapeutically relevant concentrations of 1 to 1000nM, without affecting cell differentiation of middle-stage differentiated OBs in general. More over a significant decrease of cell numbers and mitochondrial activity was found at these MTX concentrations. The most sensitive method seems to be the MTT-assay. MTX-concentration of 0,01nM and concentrations below had no inhibitory effects anymore. Conclusion Even low dose methotrexate acts as a potent inhibitor of osteoblast’s proliferation and mitochondrial metabolism in vitro, without affecting main differentiation of pre-differentiated osteoblasts. These results suggest possible negative effects of DMARDs concerning bone healing and for example osseointegration of dental implants. Especially the specifics of the jaw bone with its high vascularisation and physiological high tissue metabolism

  3. Analysis of the data on pregnancy and lactation provided by patient information leaflets of anti-rheumatic drugs in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabando, Miguel Ormaza; Saavedra, Maira Arias; Sequeira, Gabriel; Kerzberg, Eduardo

    2018-01-13

    To analyse the level of consistency and updating of the information on pregnancy and lactation provided by patient information leaflets (PILs) of the antirheumatic drugs approved in Argentina. Inconsistencies between the 2016 EULAR Task Force recommendations on the use of anti-rheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation and the information provided by PILs of the same drugs approved in Argentina were analysed along with inconsistencies within the PILs of different registered trademarks of these drugs. Eighty-eight PILs of 32 drugs were analysed. Out of the 88 PILs, 50% presented information inconsistencies as to pregnancy. Medications comprised in this group were: hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, azathioprine, tacrolimus, cyclosporine, NSAIDs (during the first two trimesters), celecoxib, some glucocorticoids, colchicine, and some anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, adalimumab and infliximab) during part of the pregnancy. As for lactation, 56% had information inconsistencies. Medications encompassed in this group were: hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, sulfasalazine, azathioprine, tacrolimus, cyclosporine, NSAIDs, celecoxib, meprednisone, prednisone, colchicine, and anti-TNF drugs. Out of 17 drugs that had more than one registered trademark, information inconsistencies on pregnancy were found in the PILs of sulfasalazine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and methylprednisolone. Concerning lactation, inconsistencies were present in the PILs of hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meprednisone, and colchicine. At least half of the PILs of anti-rheumatic drugs analysed in this study had information inconsistencies on pregnancy and lactation. This is a serious state of affairs because the consensual decision-making process between patient and professional may be compromised, which, in turn, may give rise to medical-legal issues.

  4. Anti-rheumatic treatment is not associated with reduction of pentraxin 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg, Torstein; Bottazzi, Barbara; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Leone, Roberto; Hjeltnes, Gunnbjorg

    2017-01-01

    Background Pentraxin 3 is proposed to be a marker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk, but its role in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs) is still uncertain. Therefore, we wanted to examine if anti-rheumatic treatment reduced serum PTX3 (s-PTX3) levels in IRDs, and if s-PTX3 levels were related to other markers of inflammation and to endothelial function (EF). Methods We examined s-PTX3, EF and established inflammatory biomarkers in 114 IRD patients from the PSARA study before and after 6 weeks and 6 months of treatment with methotrexate (MTX) or anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapy with or without MTX co-medication. Results s-PTX3 levels in all IRD diagnoses were above the upper limit of the reference range. In contrast to established inflammatory markers, in particular CRP and ESR, s-PTX3 levels did not change significantly after 6 weeks and 6 months of anti-rheumatic therapy. There was no difference in change in s-PTX3 levels from baseline to 6 weeks and 6 months between MTX monotherapy and anti-TNF regimens. CRP, ESR and EF were not related to changes in s-PTX3 neither in crude nor adjusted analyses. Conclusion IRD patients have increased s-PTX3 levels, which, in contrast to other inflammatory markers, do not seem to improve within 6 months of therapy with MTX and/or anti-TNF. Thus, s-PTX3 might reflect a persisting immune process, even a causal factor of inflammation, not inhibited by the standard anti-rheumatic treatment. Furthermore, even though s-PTX3 is thought to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular prognosis, it was not related to EF. PMID:28225768

  5. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  6. Factors associated with the initiation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Texas Medicaid patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gilwan; Barner, Jamie C; Rascati, Karen; Richards, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive autoimmune disorder of joints that is associated with high health care costs, yet guidance is lacking on how early to initiate biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), a class of medications that is the major cost driver in RA management. Few studies have examined the factors associated with the transition from nonbiologic DMARDs, the first-line therapy for RA, to biologic DMARDs in RA patients.  To examine patient sociodemographics, medication use patterns, and clinical characteristics associated with initiation of biologic DMARDs.   This was a retrospective study using the Texas Medicaid prescription and medical claims database from July 1, 2003-December 31, 2010. Adults (aged 18-63 years) with an RA diagnosis (ICD-9-CM code 714.xx), no nonbiologic DMARD or biologic DMARD use during the 6-month pre-index period, and a minimum of 2 prescription claims for the same nonbiologic DMARD during the post-index period were included in the study. The index date was defined as the date when the first nonbiologic DMARD claim was made. Predictors of initiation of biologic DMARDs were age, gender, race, adherence (proportion of days covered), persistence to nonbiologic DMARDs, comorbidity (Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]), pain medication use, glucocorticoid use, and rheumatologist visit. Logistic regression was used to examine the factors associated with the initiation of biologic DMARDs.   A total of 2,714 patients were included. After controlling for patient characteristics, logistic regression showed, that compared with methotrexate (MTX) users, sulfasalazine (SSZ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) users were less likely to initiate biologic DMARDs by 69.0% (OR = 0.310, 95% CI = 0.221-0.434, P  less than  0.0001) and 79.9% (OR = 0.201, 95% CI = 0.152-0.265, P  less than  0.0001), respectively. Nonbiologic DMARD dual therapy users were 39.1% less likely to initiate biologic DMARDs compared

  7. Patient-reported outcomes of baricitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and no or limited prior disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiff, Michael; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Fleischmann, Roy; Gaich, Carol L.; DeLozier, Amy M.; Schlichting, Douglas; Kuo, Wen-Ling; Won, Ji-Eon; Carmack, Tara; Rooney, Terence; Durez, Patrick; Shaikh, Saeed; Hidalgo, Rodolfo Pardo; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Zerbini, Cristiano A. F.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a double-blind, phase III study of baricitinib as monotherapy or combined with methotrexate (MTX) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with no or minimal prior conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)

  8. Efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a systematic literature review informing the 2013 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nam, Jackie L.; Ramiro, Sofia; Gaujoux-Viala, Cecile; Takase, Kaoru; Leon-Garcia, Mario; Emery, Paul; Gossec, Laure; Landewe, Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Buch, Maya H.

    2014-01-01

    To update the evidence for the efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to inform the European League Against Rheumatism(EULAR) Task Force treatment recommendations. Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for

  9. Effectiveness of biologic and non-biologic antirheumatic drugs on anaemia markers in 153,788 patients with rheumatoid arthritis: New evidence from real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy Ketan; Montvida, Olga; Best, Jennie H; Gale, Sara; Pethoe-Schramm, Attila; Sarsour, Khaled

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), including IL-6 receptor inhibitor tocilizumab (TCZ), on anaemia markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Using the Centricity Electronic Medical Records from USA, patients with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed between January 2000 and April 2016, who initiated TCZ (n = 3732); tofacitinib (TOFA, n = 3126); other biologic DMARD (obDMARD, n = 55,964); or other non-biologic DMARD (onbDMARD, n = 91,236) were identified. Changes in haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Hct) over 2 years of treatment initiation were evaluated, adjusting and balancing for confounders. Mean (95% CI) adjusted increase in Hb and Hct levels at 24 months in TCZ group were 0.23g/dL (0.14, 0.42) and 0.96% (0.41, 1.52) respectively. Among patients with anaemia in the TCZ group, Hb and Hct increased significantly by 0.72g/dL and 2.06%, respectively. Patients in the TCZ group were 86% (95% CI of OR: 1.43, 2.00) more likely to increase Hb ≥ 1g/dL compared to the other groups combined. No clinically significant changes in Hb were observed in the other groups. The obDMARD group demonstrated lower Hct increase than TCZ group, while no significant changes were observed in the remaining groups. Compared to those who initiated TCZ therapy after 1 year of diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, those who initiated earlier were 95% (OR = 1.95; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.21; p biologic and non-biologic DMARDs. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Impact of Conventional and Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs on Bone Biology. Rheumatoid Arthritis as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Sofia Carvalho; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-08-01

    The bone and the immune system have a very tight interaction. Systemic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induce bone loss, leading to a twofold increase in osteoporosis and an increase of fragility fracture risk of 1.35-2.13 times. This review focuses on the effects of conventional and biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on bone biology, in the context of systemic inflammation, with a focus on RA. Published evidence supports a decrease in osteoclastic activity induced by DMARDs, which leads to positive effects on bone mineral density (BMD). It is unknown if this effect could be translated into fracture risk reduction. The combination with antiosteoclastic drugs can have an additional benefit.

  11. Distribution of Podoplanin in Synovial Tissues in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Using Biologic or Conventional Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Naganuma, Yasushi; Saski, Kan; Sasaki, Akiko; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Suran, Yang; Konta, Tsuneo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) mediates tumor cell migration and invasion, which phenomena might also play a role in severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, the precise cellular distribution of PDPN and it's relationships with inflammation was studied in RA treated with biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) or conventional DMARDs (cDMARD). PDPN+ cells were immunostained by NZ-1 mAb, and scored (3+; >50%/ area, 2+; 20%- 50%, 1+; 5%-20%, 0: <5%) in synovial tissues from RA treated with biologic DMARDs (BIO, n=20) or cDMARD (n=20) for comparison with osteoarthritis (OA, n=5), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell-typing. Inflammatory synovitis score was 1.4 in both BIO and cDMARD, compared to only 0.2 in OA. PDPN+ cells were found in the lining layer (BIO 1.6, cDMARD 1.3, OA 0.2) and lymphoid aggregates (BIO 0.6, cDMRD 0.7, OA 0.2), and correlated with RA-inflammation in BIO- and cDMARD-groups in both area (r=0.7/0.9, r=0.6/0.7, respectively p<0.05). PDPN was expressed in CD68+ type A macrophage-like and 5B5+ type B fibroblast-like cells in the lining layer, and in IL- 17+ cells in lymphoid aggregates in RA. PDPN was markedly increased in the immunologically inflamed RA synovitis, which was surgically treated due to BIO- and cDMARD-resistant RA. PDPN may have potential of a new marker of residual arthritis in local joints for inflammation-associated severe RA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug usage, prescribing patterns and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients in community-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, K; Gingold, M; Boers, A; Littlejohn, G

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the spectrum of disease activity and usage of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients seen over a period of 12 months in community-based rheumatology practice. Data were prospectively collected on 1059 consecutive RA patients who attended two private, community-based rheumatology clinics from 1 May 2007 to 1 May 2008. Information on patient demographics, medication history and disease activity was collected. Life table graphs were developed to track medication retention over time. Statistical significance was determined by log-rank tests. One thousand and fifty-nine patients with RA were entered into the database over a 12-month period. Eight hundred and twenty-six patients (85%) were treated with single or combination conventional DMARD compared with 159 patients (15%) on a biologic DMARD either alone or in combination. Methotrexate monotherapy was the most commonly prescribed DMARD, used in 41% of patients studied. Almost half (47%) were on combination DMARD therapy. Methotrexate and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors had the highest retention rate over 12 and 30 months since first prescription. A large proportion of patients (47%) had moderate disease activity. Rates of biologic DMARD usage were similar to other studies and the predominance of methotrexate use was also in keeping with current recommendations for management of RA. There appears to be a significant unmet need for improved disease control among RA patients with moderate disease activity, which requires further investigation. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Simultaneous Response in Several Domains in Patients with Psoriatic Disease Treated with Etanercept as Monotherapy or in Combination with Conventional Synthetic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Meier, Lothar; Prinz, Jörg C; Jobst, Jürgen; Lippe, Ralph; Löschmann, Peter-Andreas; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) receiving etanercept (ETN) monotherapy or ETN plus conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) to determine the proportion achieving a clinically meaningful response in arthritis, psoriasis, and quality of life simultaneously. A prospective, multicenter, 52-week observational study in patients with active PsA evaluated treatment with ETN in clinical practice (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00293722). This analysis assessed simultaneous achievement of 3 treatment targets: low disease activity (LDA) based on 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28); body surface area (BSA) involvement ≤ 3%; and a score > 45 on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary. Of 579 patients, 380 received ETN monotherapy and 199 received combination ETN plus csDMARD. At 52 weeks, data for all 3 disease domains were available for 251 patients receiving monotherapy and 151 receiving combination therapy. In the monotherapy and combination therapy groups, 61 (24.3%) and 37 (24.5%) patients, respectively, achieved all 3 treatment targets simultaneously. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving monotherapy versus combination therapy achieved SF-12 > 45 (43.0% vs 31.8%; p < 0.05) and DAS28 LDA (72.5% vs 62.3%; p < 0.05). Conversely, BSA ≤ 3% was reached by a significantly greater proportion receiving combination therapy (75.5% vs 56.6%; p < 0.001). However, baseline BSA involvement was higher for the monotherapy group. While nearly half the patients achieved arthritis and psoriasis treatment targets simultaneously and one-fourth reached all 3 treatment targets, combining ETN and csDMARD did not substantially improve clinical response compared with ETN monotherapy in this real-world PsA patient population.

  14. Serum Immunoglobulin G Levels to Porphyromonas gingivalis Peptidylarginine Deiminase Affect Clinical Response to Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kobayashi

    Full Text Available To determine whether serum immunity to Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD affects the clinical response to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.In a retrospective study, rheumatologic and periodontal conditions of 60 patients with RA who had been treated with conventional synthetic DMARD were evaluated before (baseline and after 3 and 6 months of bDMARD therapy. After serum levels of anti-PPAD immunoglobulin G (IgG were determined at baseline, the patients were respectively divided into two groups for high and low anti-PPAD IgG titers according to the median measurements. Genotypes at 8 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to RA were also determined.After 3 and 6 months of therapy, patients with low anti-PPAD IgG titers showed a significantly greater decrease in changes in the Disease Activity Score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP (P = 0.04 for both and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP IgG levels (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04 than patients with high anti-PPAD IgG titers, although these parameter values were comparable at baseline. The anti-PPAD IgG titers were significantly positively correlated with changes in the DAS28-CRP (P = 0.01 for both and the anti-CCP IgG levels (P = 0.02 for both from baseline to 3 and 6 months later. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significantly positive association between the anti-PPAD IgG titers and changes in the DAS28-CRP after 6 months of bDMARD therapy (P = 0.006, after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, periodontal condition, and RA-related SNPs.The serum IgG levels to PPAD affect the clinical response to bDMARD in patients with RA.

  15. Responsiveness and discriminative capacity of the assessments in ankylosing spondylitis disease-controlling antirheumatic therapy core set and other outcome measures in a trial of etanercept in ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Astrid J. B.; Gorman, Jennifer D.; Davis, John C.; Landewe, Robert B. M.; van der Heijde, Désirée M. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the responsiveness and discriminative capacity, and the relationship between both, of instruments selected for the disease-controlling antirheumatic therapy (DC-ART) core set by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis Working Group (ASAS). Responsiveness and discriminative capacity

  16. [Antirheumatic substance and meridian tropism of Loranthus parasiticus based on "syndrome-efficacy-analysis of biological samples"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Ling; Wang, Jing; Cui, Ying; Wen, Pu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Ma, Kai

    2016-05-01

    To study the antirheumatic substance of Loranthus parasiticus and observe the relationship between its in vivo distribution and meridian tropism in rats by establishing adjuvant arthritis models corresponding to effectiveness. All rats except the negative control group were injected with 0.1 mL Freund's complete adjuvant on the left foot. After 8 days, the rats in negative control group and model group were given with normal saline while the rats in positive control group were given with tripterygium glycosides suspension 10 mg•kg-1, and the rats in L. parasiticus treatment groups were given with high(10 g•kg ⁻¹), medium(5 g•kg ⁻¹) and low(2.5 g•kg ⁻¹) dose decoction for 21 days. The left rear ankle joint diameter of rats were measured every 7 days from the 9th day of modeling. On the 22nd day, eyeball blood of part rats in L. parasiticus high-dose group was taken at different time points, and then they were sacrificed to take heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, large intestine, small intestine and brain tissues. For the remaining rats, eyeball blood was taken 30 min after drug treatment, and their left rear ankle joints were taken to detect interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in serum by ELISA method; rutin, avicularin and quercitrin levels in the tissues of high-dose group were detected by HPLC; pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by using DAS 2.0. Our results showed that L. parasiticus decoction could significantly improve the paw edema situation of adjuvant arthritis model rats, and reduce IL-1β and TNF-α levels in rat serum. The in vivo efficacy substance analysis in rats showed that rutin was only present in the stomach with a small amount. AUC0-t of avicularin was stomach > small intestine > kidney, and the duration time in vivo was kidney=stomach > small intestine > lung > heart. AUC0-t of quercitrin was stomach > kidney > liver > heart > lung > spleen > small intestine > brain > large intestine

  17. The effect of newer anti-rheumatic drugs on osteogenic cell proliferation: an in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laing Patrick

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs may interfere with bone healing. Previous studies give conflicting advice regarding discontinuation of these drugs in the peri-operative setting. No consensus exists in current practice especially with the newer DMARDs such as Leflunomide, Etanercept, and Infliximab. The aim of this study was to assess the in-vitro effect of these drugs alone and in relevant clinical combinations on Osteoblast activity. Methods Osteoblasts were cultured from femoral heads obtained from five young otherwise healthy patients undergoing total hip replacement. The cells were cultured using techniques that have been previously described. A full factorial design was used to set up the experiment on samples obtained from the five donors. Normal therapeutic concentrations of the various DMARDs were added alone and in combination to the media. The cell proliferation was estimated after two weeks using spectrophotometric technique using Roche Cell proliferation Kit. Multilevel regression analysis was used to estimate which drugs or combination of drugs significantly affected cell proliferation. Results Infliximab and Leflunomide had an overall significant inhibitory effect (p Conclusion Our study indicates that in-vitro osteoblast proliferation can be inhibited by the presence of certain DMARDs. Combinations of drugs had an influence and could negate the action of a drug on osteoblast proliferation. The response to drugs may be donor-dependent.

  18. The impact of disease and antirheumatic therapy factors on growth retardation in children suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available THE STUDY EVALUATED THE IMPACT OF REFRACTORY JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS (JIA AND INTERFERENCE OF ANTIRHEUMATIC THERAPY ON PHYSICAL STATURE AND GROWTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN. WE OBSERVED 133 PATIENTS WITH JIA WITH AGE FROM 4.6 TO 18 YEARS. WE ASSESSED PATIENTS' PHYSICAL STATURE (DOCUMENTING HEIGHT AND WEIGHT AND FURTHER GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT STARING FROM BIRTH, BEFORE THE ONSET OF JIA, AT THE FIRST YEAR FROM THE ONSET OF THE DISB EASE AND LATER ON. PHYSICAL RETARDATION WAS MARKED IN ALL CHILDREN IN THE FIRST YEAR FROM THE ONSET OF JIA. SYSTEMIC JIA, WHICH IS KNOWN FOR HIGH ACTIVITY AND POLYARTICULAR OR GENERALIZED JOINT LESION, WAS LINKED TO SIGNIFICANT PHYSICAL RETARDATION IN ALL CHILDREN WITH SYSBTEMIC JIA. LONGBTERM GLUCOCORTICOID ADMINISTRATION, EVEN AT LOW DOSES, ACCENTUATED THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF JIA ON GROWTH RESULTING IN MARKED GROWTH DELAY OR ITS' TOTAL ARREST. WE HAVE ELABORATED RISK FACTORS FOR SHORT STATURE IN CHILDREN WITH JIA, WHICH SUGGEST THERAPY GUIDELINES, PRESENTED IN THIS ARTICLE.KEY WORDS: JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS, СHILDREN.

  19. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  20. Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Risk of High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia and Cervical Cancer in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoung C; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Liu, Jun; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Katz, Jeffrey N; Feldman, Sarah; Solomon, Daniel H

    2016-09-01

    Recent research showed an increased risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this study was to examine whether this risk was associated with the use of biologic versus nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We identified RA patients in the US Medicaid and commercial insurance databases (for the years 2000-2012) who were starting treatment with either a biologic or a nonbiologic DMARD. High-grade cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer was identified with a validated claims-based algorithm, and we assessed utilization of gynecologic procedures. To control for potential confounders, those starting therapy with a biologic DMARD were matched 1:1 to those starting therapy with a nonbiologic DMARD according to the propensity score (PS). Hazard ratios (HRs) and rate ratios (RRs) in the PS-matched Medicaid and commercial insurance cohorts were pooled by an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects model. We included 14,729 pairs of patients initiating biologic and nonbiologic DMARDs from the Medicaid cohort and 7,538 pairs from the commercial insurance cohort. During 73,389 person-years of active treatment with either biologic or nonbiologic DMARDs, 95 cases of high-grade cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer occurred in the 2 cohorts. The HR for high-grade cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer associated with biologic DMARD use was 1.25 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.78-2.01) in the Medicaid cohort and 1.63 (95% CI 0.62-4.27) in the commercial insurance cohort, with a pooled HR of 1.32 (95% CI 0.86-2.01). The rate of gynecologic procedures involving the uterine cervix was not different between the 2 groups (pooled RR 0.96 [95% CI 0.90-1.02]). Among women with RA, initiation of therapy with a biologic DMARD was associated with a numerically significant, but not statistically significant, increase in the risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer as compared to

  1. Examining Time to Initiation of Biologic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Medication Adherence and Persistence Among Texas Medicaid Recipients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gilwan; Barner, Jamie C; Rascati, Karen; Richards, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the transition from nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to biologic DMARDs or about individual nonbiologic DMARD use patterns among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined time to initiation of biologic DMARDs and nonbiologic DMARD medication adherence and persistence among Texas Medicaid recipients with RA taking nonbiologic DMARDs. In this retrospective study (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2010) of the Texas Medicaid database, patients were aged 18 to 62 years at index, were diagnosed with RA (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 714.xx), had no claims for nonbiologic or biologic DMARDs in the preindex period, and had a minimum of 2 prescription claims for the same nonbiologic DMARD in the postindex period. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were used to compare time to initiation of biologic DMARDs according to nonbiologic DMARD type and therapy. Adherence and persistence were examined according to nonbiologic type and therapy by using ANOVA models and χ(2), Duncan, and t tests. On average, patients were 47.9 (± 10.4) years of age, mostly female (89.1%) and Hispanic (55.2%). Methotrexate (MTX) and leflunomide (LEF) users took the shortest time to initiate biologic DMARDs (207 [190] days and 188 [205] days, respectively). LEF users had the highest mean adherence of 37.5% (27.5%), which was similar to MTX users (35.7% [26.9%]), whereas dual-therapy users had the lowest mean adherence at 17.1% (14.4%). Sulfasalazine users (108 [121] days) had the lowest persistence, whereas LEF (227 [231] days) and MTX (211 [222] days) users had the longest persistence. Nonbiologic DMARD monotherapy users were more adherent than dual-therapy users (32.6% [25.8%] vs 17.1% [14.4%]). These results should be interpreted in light of some study limitations, such as using proportion of days covered as a proxy for adherence, not having clinical data to control for

  2. Determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in White British and South Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kanta; Raza, Karim; Nightingale, Peter; Horne, Robert; Chapman, Sarah; Greenfield, Sheila; Gill, Paramjit

    2015-12-29

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease causing joint damage, disability, and reduced life expectancy. Highly effective drugs are now available for the treatment of RA. However, poor adherence to drug regimens remains a significant barrier to improving clinical outcomes in RA. Poor adherence has been shown to be linked to patients' beliefs about medicines with a potential impact on adherence. These beliefs are reported to be different between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to identify potential determinants of adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) including an assessment of the influence of beliefs about medicines and satisfaction with information provided about DMARDs and compare determinants of adherence between RA patients of White British and South Asian. RA patients of either White British (n = 91) or South Asian (n = 89) origin were recruited from secondary care. Data were collected via questionnaires on patients': (1) self-reported adherence (Medication Adherence Report Scale-MARS); (2) beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-BMQ); (3) illness perceptions (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-IPQ) and (4) satisfaction with information about DMARDs (Satisfaction with Information about Medicines questionnaire-SIMS). In addition, clinical and demographic data were collected. The results revealed that socio-demographic factors only explained a small amount of variance in adherence whereas illness representations and treatment beliefs were more substantial in explaining non-adherence to DMARDs. Patients' self-reported adherence was higher in White British than South Asian patients (median 28 (interquartile range 26-30) vs median 26 (interquartile range 23-30) respectively; P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney test). Patients who reported lower adherence were more dissatisfied with the information they had received about their DMARDs (P problems subscale) and had more negative beliefs about

  3. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART. A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years; these patients were from a cohort of 1 364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9. The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4% and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1. The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively. The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  4. Scintimetric assessment of synovitis activity during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N; Halberg, P; Halskov, O

    1988-01-01

    In a double blind trial of 36 patients with rheumatoid arthritis a new scintimetric method was applied to three comparable patient groups before and after eight months' treatment with levamisole, penicillamine, or azathioprine. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy of both hands was performed...

  5. A practical procedure for the synthesis of esonarimod, (R,S)-2-acetylthiomethyl-4-(4-methylphenyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid, an antirheumatic agent (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Toshiya; Onodera, Akira; Tomisawa, Kazuyuki; Yokomori, Sadakazu

    2002-10-01

    An efficient and practical procedure for the synthesis of esonarimod, (R,S)-2-acetylthiomethyl-4-(4-methylphenyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid (1), a new antirheumatic drug, has been developed. The intermediate, 2-methylene-4-(4-methylphenyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid (2), was prepared by Friedel-Crafts acylation of toluene with itaconic anhydride (3) in the presence of aluminum trichloride and nitrobenzene in 63% yield without silica gel column purification. Compound 1 was prepared by Michael addition of 2 with thioacetic acid (4) in 74% yield. Overall, 1 was obtained in 47% yield from 3. The structures and synthetic mechanisms of by-products (five compounds) of 2 were also clarified.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis patients without an adequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs): Post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ishida, Kota; Shiraki, Katsuhisa; Yoshiyasu, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) was conducted to assess the safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus (TAC) add-on therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Patients with RA from 180 medical sites across Japan were registered centrally with an electronic investigation system. The observational period was 24 weeks from the first day of TAC administration concomitantly with biological DMARDs. Safety and effectiveness populations included 624 and 566 patients, respectively. Patients were predominantly female (81.1%), with a mean age of 61.9 years. Overall, 125 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred in 94 patients (15.1%), and 15 serious ADRs occurred in 11 patients (1.8%). These incidences were lower compared with previously reported incidences after TAC treatment in PMS, and all of the observed ADRs were already known. A statistically significant improvement was observed in the primary effectiveness variable of Simplified Disease Activity Index after TAC treatment; 62.7% of patients achieved remission or low disease activity at week 24. TAC is well tolerated and effective when used as an add-on to biological DMARDs in Japanese patients with RA who do not achieve an adequate response to biological DMARDs in a real-world clinical setting.

  7. Factors associated with initial or subsequent choice of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinzhu; Desai, Rishi J; Liu, Jun; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2017-07-05

    Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are increasingly used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment. However, little is known based on contemporary data about the factors associated with DMARDs and patterns of use of biologic DMARDs for initial and subsequent RA treatment. We conducted an observational cohort study using claims data from a commercial health plan (2004-2013) and Medicaid (2000-2010) in three study groups: patients with early untreated RA who were naïve to any type of DMARD and patients with prevalent RA with or without prior exposure to one biologic DMARD. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the effect of patient demographics, clinical characteristics and healthcare utilization factors on the initial and subsequent choice of biologic DMARDs for RA. We identified a total of 195,433 RA patients including 78,667 (40%) with early untreated RA and 93,534 (48%) and 23,232 (12%) with prevalent RA, without or with prior biologic DMARD treatment, respectively. Patients in the commercial insurance were 87% more likely to initiate a biologic DMARD versus patients in Medicaid (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.70-2.05). In Medicaid, African-Americans had lower odds of initiating (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.51-0.68 in early untreated RA; OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.61-0.74 in prevalent RA) and switching (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.55-0.90) biologic DMARDs than non-Hispanic whites. Prior use of steroid and non-biologic DMARDs predicted both biologic DMARD initiation and subsequent switching. Etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were the most commonly used first-line and second-line biologic DMARDS; patients on anakinra and golimumab were most likely to be switched to other biologic DMARDS. Insurance type, race, and previous use of steroids and non-biologic DMARDs were strongly associated with initial or subsequent treatment with biologic DMARDs.

  8. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    positive benefit. For biologics, TNF inhibitors already licensed for use were effective and similar benefits were seen with newer agents including ustekinumab, secukinumab, brodalumab, and abatacept, although the latter did not impact on skin problems. Important limitations of the systematic review included, first, the fact that for many agents there were little data and, second, much of the recent data for newer biologics were only available in abstract form. Conclusion: Conventional disease-modifying agents, with the possible exception of leflunomide, do not show clear evidence of disease-modifying effects in psoriatic arthritis, though a newer synthetic disease-modifying agents, apremilast, appears more effective. Biologic agents appear more beneficial, although more evidence is required for newer agents. This review suggests that it may be necessary to review existing national and international management guidelines for psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologics

  9. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS BEFORE DISEASE-MODIFYING ANTIRHEUMATIC THERAPY (PRELIMINARY DATA OF THE REMARCА STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Gorbunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of cardiovascular risk in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA before therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Subjects and methods: Seventy-three patients with early RA who had not previously taken DMARDs or glucocorticoids were examined. Disease activity was assessed by the DAS28, SDAI, and CDAI. All the patients were examined by a cardiologist. The investigators assessed traditional risk factors (RF, by determining the overall coronary risk according tothe modified SCORE scale, the degree of a risk for cardiovascular events (CVE, carried out 24-hour ECG and blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography (EchoCG, and carotid duplex scanning, identified coronary artery calcification by multislice spiral computed tomography, and, if indicated, performed stress EchoCG and coronary angiography.Results. The diagnosis of coronary heart disease was established in 13 patients. NYHA functional class I or II chronic heart failure (HF was diagnosed in 8 patients, systolic HF in 2, HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in 6 cases. There was left ventricular hypertrophy in 22 (30.1% patients, carotid atherosclerotic plaques in 26 (35.6%, coronary artery calcification in 30 (41.1%, hypertension in 38 (52.1%, abdominal obesity in 34 (46.6%, dyslipidemia in 40 (54.8%, hypercholesterolemia in 37 (50.7%, hypoalphalipoproteinemia in 21 (28.8%, hypertriglyceridemia in 12 (16.4%, low physical activity in 30 (41.1%, and smoking in 13 (17.8%. Thirty-three of 53 women weremenopausal. Fasting hyperglycemia was found in 11 (15.1% patients; type 2 diabetes mellitus in 4 (5.5%. Thirty-one (42.5% patients had at least three RFs. In accordance with the current classification of the degree of cardiovascular risk, very high, high, moderate, and low risks for CVE were observed in 58, 8, 8, and 26% of the RA patients, respectively.Conclusion. Most rheumatoid factor- and anticyclic citrullinated

  10. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: 2013 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Landewé, Robert; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Buch, Maya; Burmester, Gerd; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Gossec, Laure; Nam, Jackie; Ramiro, Sofia; Winthrop, Kevin; de Wit, Maarten; Aletaha, Daniel; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Boers, Maarten; Buttgereit, Frank; Combe, Bernard; Cutolo, Maurizio; Damjanov, Nemanja; Hazes, Johanna M W; Kouloumas, Marios; Kvien, Tore K; Mariette, Xavier; Pavelka, Karel; van Riel, Piet L C M; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Scott, David L; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Wong, John B; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the 2010 European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs and bDMARDs, respectively) have been updated. The 2013 update has been developed by an international task force, which based its decisions mostly on evidence from three systematic literature reviews (one each on sDMARDs, including glucocorticoids, bDMARDs and safety aspects of DMARD therapy); treatment strategies were also covered by the searches. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) were determined. Fourteen recommendations were developed (instead of 15 in 2010). Some of the 2010 recommendations were deleted, and others were amended or split. The recommendations cover general aspects, such as attainment of remission or low disease activity using a treat-to-target approach, and the need for shared decision-making between rheumatologists and patients. The more specific items relate to starting DMARD therapy using a conventional sDMARD (csDMARD) strategy in combination with glucocorticoids, followed by the addition of a bDMARD or another csDMARD strategy (after stratification by presence or absence of adverse risk factors) if the treatment target is not reached within 6 months (or improvement not seen at 3 months). Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, biosimilars), abatacept, tocilizumab and, under certain circumstances, rituximab are essentially considered to have similar efficacy and safety. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD may be used. The recommendations also address tofacitinib as a targeted sDMARD (tsDMARD), which is recommended, where licensed, after use of at least

  11. Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in a National, Privately Insured Population: Utilization, Expenditures, and Price Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzinger, Christopher B; Guo, Jeff J

    2017-02-01

    Spending on biologic drugs is a significant driver of drug expenditures for payers in private health plans. Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are some of the most effective and costly treatments in a physician's arsenal. Understanding the total annual expenditure, the average cost per prescription, and the impact of cost-sharing is important for drug benefit managers. To assess drug utilization, expenditures, out-of-pocket (OOP) cost, and price trends of biologic DMARDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a large managed care organization. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of pharmacy claims data from January 2004 to December 2013 using the Optum Clinformatics Data Mart database, which covers 13.3 million lives. Pharmacy claims for 40,373 patients with RA were identified during the study period. In all, 9 biologic DMARDs approved for the treatment of RA, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certoizumab, golimumab, tocilizumab, anakinra, abatacept, and rituximab, and 1 nonbiologic oral, small molecule-targeted synthetic drug, tofacitinib, were included in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the total annual number of prescriptions, the total annual expenditures, the average annual cost per drug (a proxy of drug price), and the average OOP cost (copay plus deductible and coinsurance). All measurements were also stratified by study drugs and by insurance type. Of the 40,373 patients with RA included in the study, approximately 76% were female (mean age, 55 years at diagnosis). Approximately 77% of the patients were white, and almost 48% lived in the South or Midwest region of the United States. Approximately 62% of patients had a point of service insurance plan. Expenditures on biologic DMARDs increased from $166 million in 2004 to $243 million in 2013, and the number of prescriptions and refills increased from 59,960 in 2004 to 105,295 in 2013. Prescriptions for biologic DMARDs increased more

  12. Aggressive combination therapy with intra-articular glucocorticoid injections and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in early rheumatoid arthritis: second-year clinical and radiographic results from the CIMESTRA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, M.L.; Stengaard-Pedersen, K.; Junker, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether clinical and radiographic disease control can be achieved and maintained in patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the second year of aggressive treatment with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and intra-articular c...

  13. 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Springer, Bryan; Guyatt, Gordon; Abdel, Matthew P; Dasa, Vinod; George, Michael; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Giles, Jon T; Johnson, Beverly; Lee, Steve; Mandl, Lisa A; Mont, Michael A; Sculco, Peter; Sporer, Scott; Stryker, Louis; Turgunbaev, Marat; Brause, Barry; Chen, Antonia F; Gililland, Jeremy; Goodman, Mark; Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene; Kirou, Kyriakos; Losina, Elena; MacKenzie, Ronald; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted; Russell, Linda; Sah, Alexander; Miller, Amy S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Yates, Adolph

    2017-08-01

    This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional

  14. Pharmacological treatment of spondyloarthritis: exploring the effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Del Puente, Antonio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Lupoli, Gelsy; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-11-01

    Spondyloarthritis represents a heterogeneous group of articular inflammatory diseases that share common genetic, clinical and radiological features. The therapy target of spondyloarthritis relies mainly in improving patients' quality of life, controlling articular inflammation, preventing the structural joints damage and preserving the functional abilities, autonomy and social participation of patients. Among these, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of peripheral arthritis; moreover, in the last decade, biological therapies have improved the approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors are currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has failed. The aim of this review is to summarize the current experience and evidence about the pharmacological approach in spondyloarthritis patients.

  15. The effect of comedication with conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs on TNF inhibitor drug survival in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Elisabeth; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of comedication with conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) on retention to tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA). METHODS: Data...... on patients with a clinical diagnosis of AS or uSpA starting treatment with adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab as their first TNFi during 2003-2010 were retrieved from the Swedish national biologics register and linked to national population based registers. Five-year drug survival was analysed by Cox...... regression with age, sex, baseline csDMARD comedication, TNFi type, prescription year and covariates representing frailty and socioeconomic status. AS and uSpA were analysed separately. Sensitivity analyses included models with csDMARD as a time-dependent covariate and adjustments for additional potential...

  16. Tocilizumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: subanalysis of Spanish results of an open-label study close to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Gracia, José M; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; García-López, Alicia; Guzmán, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco J; Navarro, Francisco J; Bustabad, Sagrario; Armendáriz, Yolanda; Román-Ivorra, José A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the Spanish experience in an international study which evaluated tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis) in a clinical practice setting. Subanalysis of 170 patients with RA from Spain who participated in a phase IIIb, open-label, international clinical trial. Patients presented inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. They received 8mg/kg of tocilizumab every 4 weeks in combination with a DMARD or as monotherapy during 20 weeks. Safety and efficacy of tocilizumab were analyzed. Special emphasis was placed on differences between failure to a DMARD or to a TNFi and the need to switch to tocilizumab with or without a washout period in patients who had previously received TNFi. The most common adverse events were infections (25%), increased total cholesterol (38%) and transaminases (15%). Five patients discontinued the study due to an adverse event. After six months of tocilizumab treatment, 71/50/30% of patients had ACR 20/50/70 responses, respectively. A higher proportion of TNFi-naive patients presented an ACR20 response: 76% compared to 64% in the TNFi group with previous washout and 66% in the TNFi group without previous washout. Safety results were consistent with previous results in patients with RA and an inadequate response to DMARDs or TNFis. Tocilizumab is more effective in patients who did not respond to conventional DMARDs than in patients who did not respond to TNFis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. O uso de drogas anti-reumáticas na gravidez Use of anti-rheumatic drugs during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Levy

    2005-06-01

    sendo estudada na prevenção do bloqueio cardíaco total da síndrome do lúpus neonatal. O uso de prednisona e prednisolona é limitado a menor dose eficaz, não atinge a circulação fetal, mas pode induzir os efeitos colaterais maternos já conhecidos. Azatioprina e ciclosporina são utilizadas, quando indicadas formalmente, sem aparente risco fetal. Metotrexato e leflunomide devem ser evitados a qualquer custo e o tratamento interrompido três meses antes da tentativa de concepção. Todas as decisões terapêuticas em pacientes grávidas devem ser individualizadas e os riscos e benefícios considerados.The prescription of anti-rheumatic drugs in fertile patients should take into account the current knowledge about their effects on conception, pregnancy and lactation. Judicious advice and pregnancy planning is ideal when possible. With the incorporation of new substances and the constant appearance of recent data in the literature this subject has to be continuously updated. The FDA risk factor rating is sometimes contradictory to our practice, in part because results from animal studies may not be directly applicable to humans. Biologic response modifiers seem to be safely used during pregnancy, since they are large molecules that are not capable of crossing the placenta. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including specific COX-2 inhibitors may impair implantation of the ovum but can be used once pregnancy is under way, they should be avoided after 32 weeks, when there is a relationship with fetal complications. COX-2 inhibitors must be avoided due to its risk of renal mal-formation. Low-dose aspirin can be used safely during pregnancy. Low molecular weight heparins are preferred, since the unfractionated heparins have an increased risk of inducing thrombocytopenia and bleeding. Hydroxychloroquine is used and in fact recommended in lupus pregnancy with patients' benefits and no fetal risk. Warfarin is teratogenic if given between the 6th and 9th gestational

  18. Attenuated neural response to gamble outcomes in drug-naive patients with Parkinson’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Vegt, Joyce P M; Hulme, Oliver J; Zittel, Simone

    2013-01-01

    healthy age-matched control subjects underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed a simple two-choice gambling task resulting in stochastic and parametrically variable monetary gains and losses. In patients with Parkinson's disease, the neural response to reward outcome...

  19. Ofatumumab, a human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I/II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Baslund, Bo; Rigby, William

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug.......To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug....

  20. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of combination and monotherapy treatments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of American College of Rheumatology criteria scores 20, 50, and 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orme ME

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle E Orme,1 Katherine S MacGilchrist,2 Stephen Mitchell,2 Dean Spurden,3 Alex Bird31Icera Consulting, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK; 2Systematic Review Department, Abacus International, Bicester, Oxfordshire, UK; 3Pfizer UK Limited, Tadworth, Surrey, UKBackground: Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs extend the treatment choices for rheumatoid arthritis patients with suboptimal response or intolerance to conventional DMARDs. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of EU-licensed bDMARD combination therapy or monotherapy for patients intolerant of or contraindicated to continued methotrexate.Methods: Comprehensive, structured literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, as well as hand-searching of conference proceedings and reference lists. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials reporting American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria scores of 20, 50, and 70 between 12 and 30 weeks' follow-up and enrolling adult patients meeting ACR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with and with an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs were eligible. To estimate the relative efficacy of treatments whilst preserving the randomized comparisons within each trial, a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted in WinBUGS using fixed and random-effects, logit-link models fitted to the binomial ACR 20/50/70 trial data.Results: The systematic review identified 10,625 citations, and after a review of 2450 full-text papers, there were 29 and 14 eligible studies for the combination and monotherapy meta-analyses, respectively. In the combination analysis, all licensed bDMARD combinations had significantly higher odds of ACR 20/50/70 compared to DMARDs alone, except for the rituximab comparison, which did not reach significance for the ACR 70 outcome (based on the 95% credible interval. The etanercept combination was

  1. 14-3-3η Autoantibodies: Diagnostic Use in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksymowych, Walter P.; Boire, Gilles; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Wichuk, Stephanie; Turk, Samina; Boers, Maarten; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Bykerk, Vivian; Keystone, Ed; Tak, Paul Peter; van Kuijk, Arno W.; Landewé, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree; Murphy, Mairead; Marotta, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    To describe the expression and diagnostic use of 14-3-3η autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 14-3-3η autoantibody levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescent multiplexed assay in 500 subjects (114 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naive patients with early RA, 135 with

  2. Safety of Biologic and Nonbiologic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drug Therapy in Veterans with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mary Jane; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Lang; Singh, Jasvinder A; Mikuls, Ted R; Winthrop, Kevin L; Baddley, John W

    2017-05-01

    To examine the effect of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy on hepatotoxicity among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We identified biologic and nonbiologic treatment episodes of patients with RA using the 1997-2011 national data from the US Veterans Health Administration. Eligible episodes had HCV infection (defined by detectable HCV RNA) and subsequently initiated a new biologic or nonbiologic DMARD. Cohort entry required a baseline alanine aminotransferase (ALT) biologic/DMARD therapy. The primary outcome of interest was hepatotoxicity, defined as ALT elevation ≥ 100 IU/l or increase in HCV RNA of 1 log or more, and was examined within the first year of biologic/DMARD use. Results were reported as the cumulative incidence of treatment episodes achieving predefined hepatotoxicity at 3, 6, and 12 months after biologic/DMARD initiation. RA patients with HCV (n = 748) were identified and contributed 1097 biologic/DMARD treatment episodes. Overall, ALT elevations were uncommon, with 37 (3.4%) hepatotoxicity events occurring within 12 months. Treatment episodes with biologic DMARD demonstrated more frequency of hepatotoxicity than did nonbiologic DMARD (4.8% vs 2.3%, p = 0.03). Among treatment episodes involving hepatotoxicity events, the majority occurred within 6 months of DMARD initiation (29/37, 78%). In US veterans with HCV and RA receiving biologic and nonbiologic DMARD, the frequency of hepatotoxicity (ALT ≥ 100 IU/l) was low, with a higher frequency observed in treatment episodes with current biologic use.

  3. Discovery of the hemifumarate and (alpha-L-alanyloxy)methyl ether as prodrugs of an antirheumatic oxindole: prodrugs for the enolic OH group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R P; Reiter, L A; Barth, W E; Campeta, A M; Cooper, K; Cronin, B J; Destito, R; Donahue, K M; Falkner, F C; Fiese, E F; Johnson, D L; Kuperman, A V; Liston, T E; Malloy, D; Martin, J J; Mitchell, D Y; Rusek, F W; Shamblin, S L; Wright, C F

    1996-01-05

    Ether, ester, and carbonate derivatives of the antirheumatic oxindole 1 were prepared and screened as potential prodrugs of 1. This effort led to the discovery of the (alpha-L-alanyloxy)-methyl ether and hemifumarate derivatives of 1 which deliver the drug efficiently into the circulation of test animals, are stable in the solid state, and possess good stability in solution at low pH as required to ensure gastric stability. Success in achieving acceptable bioavailabilities of 1 across species (rats, dogs, and monkeys) followed the inclusion of ionizable functionality within the promoiety to compensate for masking the polar enolic OH group of the free drug. However, the introduction of ionizable functionality was often associated with decreased stability, as demonstrated by the hemisuccinate, hemiadipate, hemisuberate, and alpha-amino ester derivatives of 1 which could not be isolated. A clear exception was the hemifumarate derivative of 1 which was not only isolable but actually more stable at neutral pH than the nonionizable ester analogues. The solution and solid state stability of the hemifumarate, together with its activity as a prodrug of 1, suggests that hemifumarate be considered as an alternative to hemisuccinate as a prodrug derivative for alcohols, particularly in situations where solution state stability is an issue.

  4. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of combination and monotherapy treatments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of American College of Rheumatology criteria scores 20, 50, and 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michelle E; MacGilchrist, Katherine S; Mitchell, Stephen; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) extend the treatment choices for rheumatoid arthritis patients with suboptimal response or intolerance to conventional DMARDs. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of EU-licensed bDMARD combination therapy or monotherapy for patients intolerant of or contraindicated to continued methotrexate. Methods Comprehensive, structured literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, as well as hand-searching of conference proceedings and reference lists. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials reporting American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria scores of 20, 50, and 70 between 12 and 30 weeks’ follow-up and enrolling adult patients meeting ACR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with and with an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs were eligible. To estimate the relative efficacy of treatments whilst preserving the randomized comparisons within each trial, a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted in WinBUGS using fixed and random-effects, logit-link models fitted to the binomial ACR 20/50/70 trial data. Results The systematic review identified 10,625 citations, and after a review of 2450 full-text papers, there were 29 and 14 eligible studies for the combination and monotherapy meta-analyses, respectively. In the combination analysis, all licensed bDMARD combinations had significantly higher odds of ACR 20/50/70 compared to DMARDs alone, except for the rituximab comparison, which did not reach significance for the ACR 70 outcome (based on the 95% credible interval). The etanercept combination was significantly better than the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors adalimumab and infliximab in improving ACR 20/50/70 outcomes, with no significant differences between the etanercept combination and certolizumab pegol or tocilizumab. Licensed-dose etanercept, adalimumab

  5. 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Springer, Bryan; Guyatt, Gordon; Abdel, Matthew P; Dasa, Vinod; George, Michael; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Giles, Jon T; Johnson, Beverly; Lee, Steve; Mandl, Lisa A; Mont, Michael A; Sculco, Peter; Sporer, Scott; Stryker, Louis; Turgunbaev, Marat; Brause, Barry; Chen, Antonia F; Gililland, Jeremy; Goodman, Mark; Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene; Kirou, Kyriakos; Losina, Elena; MacKenzie, Ronald; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted; Russell, Linda; Sah, Alexander; Miller, Amy S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Yates, Adolph

    2017-09-01

    This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional

  6. Predictors of patient decision to discontinue anti-rheumatic medication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Ontario best practices research initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Vandana; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Movahedi, Mohammad; Cesta, Angela; Li, Xiuying; Sampalis, John S; Bombardier, Claire

    2017-11-01

    Despite the availability of treatment guidelines and effective treatments, real-world effectiveness remains suboptimal partly due to poor patient medication adherence. We evaluated a comprehensive set of sociodemographic, health insurance, and disease-related factors for association with patient decision to discontinue anti-rheumatic medications (ARMs) in a large observational RA cohort in Ontario, Canada. Patients from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative registry were included. The following predictors of ARM discontinuation were evaluated with cox-regression: patient age, gender, education, income, smoking, health insurance type/coverage, RA duration, erosion presence, RF positivity, DAS28-ESR, physician global, HAQ-DI, comorbidity number, ARM types, and physician characteristics (gender, academic position, urban vs. rural, distance from patient's residence). Patients (1762) were included with a mean (SD) age of 57.4 years (13.0). Approximately 80% were female, 29% had early (≤ 1 year) RA, and 70% were RF-positive. Mean (SD) baseline DAS28-ESR and HAQ-DI were 4.5 (1.5) and 1.2 (0.76), respectively. In multivariate analysis, married status (HR [95%CI] 0.73 [0.56-0.96]), RF positivity (0.73 [0.56-0.96]), and higher comorbidity number (0.92 [0.85-0.99]) were significant predictors of ARMs continuation while higher physician global (1.10 [1.04-1.15]), NSAID use (1.75 [1.29-2.38]), and number of ARMs (1.23 [1.07-1.40]) were associated with ARMs discontinuation. In a subset analysis assessing conventional or biologic DMARD discontinuation, higher HAQ-DI and biologic use over time were associated with lower hazard for discontinuation. Several sociodemographic, disease, and treatment parameters were identified as independent predictors of patient discontinuation of ARMs. These results should be considered when developing patient adherence support programs and in the choice of treatment regimens.

  7. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  8. Efficacy and safety of golimumab as add-on therapy to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: results of the GO-MORE study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alberto; González, Carlos M; Ballina, Javier; García Vivar, María L; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Marenco, Jose Luis; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordás, Carmen; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Arteaga, María J; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of golimumab in the 140 patients included in Spain as the first part of the GO-MORE trial, a multinational study involving patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite treatment with different disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The patients received subcutaneous golimumab 50mg once a month during 6 months. The primary endpoint was the percentage of individuals with a good or moderate EULAR DAS28-ESR response after 6 months of treatment. A total of 140 patients were included. Of these, 76.4% had very active disease (DAS28-ESR>5.1). 76.4% were taking methotrexate, 40.0% other DMARDs in monotherapy or combined, and 65.0% received corticosteroids. After 6 months, 82.9% of the patients showed a good or moderate EULAR response, 41.4% had low disease activity, and 30.7% were in remission. The percentage of responders one month after the first dose was 69.3%. The efficacy was similar in patients treated with methotrexate or other DMARDs, with different methotrexate doses, with or without corticosteroids, or in subjects who had failed one or more DMARDs. The response to golimumab was observed from the first dose. Golimumab was well tolerated and its safety profile was consistent with the findings of previous studies. Serious adverse events were reported in 11 patients (7.9%). The addition of subcutaneous golimumab 50 mg once a month to different DMARDs in patients with active RA yielded a moderate or good response after 6 months in 82.9% of the cases. The response was observed early, from the start of the second month, after a single dose of golimumab. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Tocilizumab efficacy and safety in rheumatoid arthritis patients after inadequate response to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs oranti-tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Omer Ahmad Fatheddin; Qushmaq, Khalid; Aljishi, Faiza

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized anti-human IL-6R antibody, a novel therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who fail treatment with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNFs). To assess the safety and efficacy of TCZ monotherapy or in combination with non-biologic DMARDs or anti-TNFs in moderate to severe active RA. Prospective, phase III, multi-center, open-label, single arm, 24-week trial. Three centers in Saudi Arabia. The study included consecutive RA patients infused with TCZ (8 mg/kg) over 60 minutes every 4 weeks (up to 6 times), either alone or with non-biologic DMARDs. Patients were followed for 24 weeks. Patients with good/moderate European League Against Rheumatism responses, continued on TCZ as long as commerically available or for 1 year. Disease activity measured by DAS28 score. Of 28 patients enrolled from 2 November 2011 to 12 May 2013 (18 months), 21 completed (77.8%) and 7 (25%) discontinued TCZ therapy. One patient was excluded from the intent-to-treat analysis. Efficacy analysis showed a significant difference (P modification or death. TCZ monotherapy or in combination with non-biologic DMARDs resulted in a significant effect on the endpoints in moderate to severe RA in Saudi Arabia, which is consistent with other published reports. No information on tapering of steroid therapy, lack of follow-up data of all 28 patients, lack of data on long-term effects of TCZ on lipid levels and the need for statins. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01326962).

  10. A retrospective study of patients with adult-onset Still's disease: is pericarditis a possible predictor for biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Ara, Francesca; Frassi, Micol; Tincani, Angela; Airò, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to look for clinical or serological markers able to predict the use of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bDMARDs in AOSD. In a single-center retrospective study, 39 patients with AOSD were divided into two groups according to whether they were ever treated with bDMARDs or not. Literature was searched for articles dealing with possible predictors of the use of bDMARDs in AOSD. Among the 18 AOSD patients who received at least one bDMARD, the prevalence of pericarditis was higher than that in the other patients [p = 0.014, odds ratio (OR) = 13.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.45 to 122]. Literature search retrieved another paper dealing with predictors of bDMARDs need in AOSD: the analysis pooling data from our series and this previous report confirmed pericarditis at disease onset as a predictor of bDMARDs need (p = 0.028, OR = 3.62, 95 % CI = 1.22 to 10.7). A complete remission was observed in 17 out of 18 patients treated with bDMARDs, allowing withdrawal or tapering of corticosteroid therapy (p Pericarditis at disease onset may be a predictor of bDMARDs need in AOSD. These drugs have a good efficacy and safety profile and should be considered for patients not responding to conventional therapy.

  11. Atherosclerosis is not accelerated in rheumatoid arthritis of low activity or remission, regardless of antirheumatic treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, Aikaterini; Protogerou, Athanasios D; Konstantonis, George; Fragiadaki, Kalliopi; Kitas, George D; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2017-06-01

    RA associates with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis, attributed to both classical risk factors and chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that effective disease control over 3 years modifies acceleration of atherosclerosis in RA. Consecutive, non-diabetic RA patients previously examined by ultrasonography for subclinical atherosclerosis were re-evaluated after 3.2 (0.2) years, provided that they were in remission/low disease activity (DAS28 studied in parallel. Patients and controls (mean age of 56 years at baseline) had a comparable burden of classical CVD risk factors. Patients' pulse wave velocity (reflecting arterial stiffness) changed by 0.07 m/s/year and left carotid intima-media thickness (reflecting wall hypertrophy) increased by 0.009 mm/year; formation of new atheromatic plaques in carotid and/or femoral arterial beds occurred in 22%. Multivariate analysis after correcting for all classical CVD risk factors and anti-hypertensive/lipid-lowering therapies demonstrated no significant differences between patients and controls in any of the subclinical atherosclerosis indices. Changes in all atherosclerosis indices from baseline to end of follow-up were comparable between those 56 patients treated with biologic DMARDs and their demographically matched patients treated with synthetic DMARDs. Effective disease control may abrogate any RA-specific effect on the progression of atherosclerosis regardless of treatment. Whether early and sustained RA control translates to the CVD outcomes expected in the general population should be examined in prospective studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Use and Spending for Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis Among US Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdany, Jinoos; Tonner, Chris; Schmajuk, Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Biologic therapies have assumed an important role in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We sought to investigate use, spending, and patient cost-sharing for Medicare beneficiaries using biologic drugs for RA, comparing patients exposed to minimal cost-sharing because of a Part D low-income subsidy (LIS) to those facing substantial out-of-pocket costs (OOP). We performed a retrospective, nationwide study using 2009 Medicare claims for a 5% random sample of beneficiaries with RA who had at least 1 RA drug dispensed. We analyzed biologic drug utilization and costs across the Part B (medical benefit) and Part D (pharmacy benefit) programs by LIS status using multinomial regression. We also projected OOP costs as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates closure of the Part D coverage gap by 2020. Among 6,932 beneficiaries, 1,812 (26.1%) received a biologic drug. LIS beneficiaries were significantly more likely to obtain Part D home-administered biologics (relative risk ratio [RRR] 2.98, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.50-3.56), while non-LIS beneficiaries were less likely to receive Part D biologic agents (RRR 0.58, 95% CI 0.48-0.69). OOP costs in Part D were lower, as expected, for LIS beneficiaries ($72 versus $3,751 per year for non-LIS). Non-LIS beneficiaries had lower costs for Part B facility-administered biologic agents (range $0-$2,584) than for Part D home-administered biologic agents. ACA reforms will narrow OOP differences between Part D and B for non-LIS beneficiaries. In contrast to LIS beneficiaries who receive mostly Part D home-administered biologic DMARDs, nonsubsidized beneficiaries have significant cost-based incentives to obtain facility-administered biologic DMARDs through Part B. The ACA will result in only slightly lower costs for Part D biologic drugs for these beneficiaries. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Association between use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and diabetes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis: a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 84,989 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Hua Chen,1–7 Der-Yuan Chen,1–6 Chi-Chen Lin,1,2 Yi-Ming Chen,1–4 Kuo-Lung Lai,3,4 Ching-Heng Lin1 1Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Institute of Biomedical Science and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, 3School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 4Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, 6Department of Medical Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, 7Institute of Public Health and Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and diabetes mellitus (DM in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PS/PSA.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study used a nationwide, population-based administrative database to enroll 84,989 cases with AS, RA, or PS/PSA who initiated treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF drugs or nonbiologic DMARDs. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the effect of different therapies on the risk of DM.Results: The incidence rates of DM per 1,000 person-years were 8.3 for users of anti-TNF drugs, 13.3 for users of cyclosporine (CSA, 8.4 for users of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, and 8.1 for users of other nonbiologic DMARDs. Compared with the users of nonbiologic DMARDs, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs for DM were significantly lower for those who used anti-TNF drugs with HCQ (aHR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.66 and those who used HCQ alone (aHR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.63–0.78, but not for those who used anti-TNFs without HCQ (aHR: 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94–1.60 or CSA (aHR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.77–1

  14. Serum Ferritin Levels Are Lower in Children With Tic Disorders Compared with Children Without Tics: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahami, Matan; Barzilay, Ran; HarGil, Miki; Weizman, Abraham; Watemberg, Nathan

    2017-03-01

    Alteration in peripheral iron indices has been reported in a number of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that iron stores may be diminished in children at an early stage of tic disorder. Using data retrieved from electronic medical records, we compared serum ferritin levels, an indicator of body iron store balance, in drug-naive children diagnosed for the first time with tic disorder (study group; N = 47, 32 boys/15 girls, aged 8.66 ± 3.17 years) compared to age- and sex-matched children with headaches (comparison group, n = 100, 62 boys/38 girls, aged 9.51 ± 3.15 years) treated in the same pediatric neurological clinic. Mean serum ferritin levels were significantly lower (-32%, p = 0.01) in the tic disorder group compared to the headache group. No significant differences were detected in circulatory hemoglobin, iron, transferrin, and platelet count between the two groups. Our findings suggest that body iron stores may be reduced in children with recent-onset tic disorder.

  15. Real-life experience of using conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Retrospective analysis of the efficacy of methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and leflunomide in PsA in comparison to spondyloarthritides other than PsA and literature review of the use of conventional DMARDs in PsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussou, Euthalia; Bouraoui, Aicha

    2017-03-01

    With the aim of assessing the response to treatment with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) used in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), data on methotrexate, sulfasalazine (SSZ), and leflunomide were analyzed from baseline and subsequent follow-up (FU) questionnaires completed by patients with either PsA or other spondyloarthritides (SpAs). A single-center real-life retrospective analysis was performed by obtaining clinical data via questionnaires administered before and after treatment. The indices used were erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Function Index (BASFI), wellbeing (WB), and treatment effect (TxE). The indices measured at baseline were compared with those measured on one occasion in a FU visit at least 1 year later. A total of 73 patients, 51 with PsA (mean age 49.8±12.8 years; male-to-female ratio [M:F]=18:33) and 22 with other SpAs (mean age 50.6±16 years; M:F=2:20), were studied. BASDAI, BASFI, and WB displayed consistent improvements during FU assessments in both PsA patients and controls in comparison to baseline values. SSZ exhibited better efficacy as confirmed by TxE in both PsA patients and controls. ESR and CRP displayed no differences in either the PsA or the SpA group between the cases before and after treatment. Real-life retrospective analysis of three DMARDs used in PsA (and SpAs other than PsA) demonstrated that all three DMARDs that were used brought about improvements in BASDAI, BASFI, TxE, and WB. However, the greatest improvements at FU were seen with SSZ use in both PsA and control cohorts.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors against combination intensive therapy with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: the TACIT trial and associated systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Ma, Margaret; Walker, David; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is initially treated with methotrexate and other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Active RA patients who fail such treatments can receive tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis), which are effective but expensive. We assessed whether or not combination DMARDs (cDMARDs) give equivalent clinical benefits at lower costs in RA patients eligible for TNFis. An open-label, 12-month, pragmatic, randomised, multicentre, two-arm trial [Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors Against Combination Intensive Therapy (TACIT)] compared these treatment strategies. We then systematically reviewed all comparable published trials. The TACIT trial involved 24 English rheumatology clinics. Active RA patients eligible for TNFis. The TACIT trial compared cDMARDs with TNFis plus methotrexate or another DMARD; 6-month non-responders received (a) TNFis if in the cDMARD group; and (b) a second TNFi if in the TNFi group. The Heath Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was the primary outcome measure. The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), joint damage, Disease Activity Score for 28 Joints (DAS28), withdrawals and adverse effects were secondary outcome measures. Economic evaluation linked costs, HAQ changes and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). In total, 432 patients were screened; 104 started on cDMARDs and 101 started on TNFis. The initial demographic and disease assessments were similar between the groups. In total, 16 patients were lost to follow-up (nine in the cDMARD group, seven in the TNFi group) and 42 discontinued their intervention but were followed up (23 in the cDMARD group and 19 in the TNFi group). Intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation methods used for missing data showed greater 12-month HAQ score reductions with initial cDMARDs than with initial TNFis [adjusted linear regression coefficient 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.003 to 0.31; p = 0.046]. Increases in 12-month EQ-5D scores were greater with initial c

  17. HIV-associated neurodegeneration and neuroimmunity: multivoxel MR spectroscopy study in drug-naive and treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boban, Jasmina; Kozic, Dusko; Semnic, Robert; Turkulov, Vesna; Lendak, Dajana; Brkic, Snezana; Ostojic, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test neurobiochemical changes in normal appearing brain tissue in HIV+ patients receiving and not receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and healthy controls, using multivoxel MR spectroscopy (mvMRS). We performed long- and short-echo 3D mvMRS in 110 neuroasymptomatic subjects (32 HIV+ subjects on cART, 28 HIV+ therapy-naive subjects and 50 healthy controls) on a 3T MR scanner, targeting frontal and parietal supracallosal subcortical and deep white matter and cingulate gyrus (NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were analysed). The statistical value was set at p < 0.05. Considering differences between HIV-infected and healthy subjects, there was a significant decrease in the NAA/Cr ratio in HIV+ subjects in all observed locations, an increase in mI/Cr levels in the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), and no significant differences in Cho/Cr ratios, except in ACG, where the increase showed trending towards significance in HIV+ patients. There were no significant differences between HIV+ patients on and without cART in all three ratios. Neuronal loss and dysfunction affects the whole brain volume in HIV-infected patients. Unfortunately, cART appears to be ineffective in halting accelerated neurodegenerative process induced by HIV but is partially effective in preventing glial proliferation. (orig.)

  18. HIV-associated neurodegeneration and neuroimmunity: multivoxel MR spectroscopy study in drug-naive and treated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boban, Jasmina; Kozic, Dusko; Semnic, Robert [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, Vojvodina Institute of Oncology, Diagnostic Imaging Center, Novi Sad (Serbia); Turkulov, Vesna; Lendak, Dajana; Brkic, Snezana [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina, Novi Sad (Serbia); Ostojic, Jelena [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Center of Vojvodina, Department of Radiology, Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2017-10-15

    The aim of this study was to test neurobiochemical changes in normal appearing brain tissue in HIV+ patients receiving and not receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and healthy controls, using multivoxel MR spectroscopy (mvMRS). We performed long- and short-echo 3D mvMRS in 110 neuroasymptomatic subjects (32 HIV+ subjects on cART, 28 HIV+ therapy-naive subjects and 50 healthy controls) on a 3T MR scanner, targeting frontal and parietal supracallosal subcortical and deep white matter and cingulate gyrus (NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were analysed). The statistical value was set at p < 0.05. Considering differences between HIV-infected and healthy subjects, there was a significant decrease in the NAA/Cr ratio in HIV+ subjects in all observed locations, an increase in mI/Cr levels in the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), and no significant differences in Cho/Cr ratios, except in ACG, where the increase showed trending towards significance in HIV+ patients. There were no significant differences between HIV+ patients on and without cART in all three ratios. Neuronal loss and dysfunction affects the whole brain volume in HIV-infected patients. Unfortunately, cART appears to be ineffective in halting accelerated neurodegenerative process induced by HIV but is partially effective in preventing glial proliferation. (orig.)

  19. Further Evidence of Complex Motor Dysfunction in Drug Naive Children with Autism Using Automatic Motion Analysis of Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria; Perego, Paolo; Piccinini, Luigi; Mani, Elisa; Rossi, Agnese; Bellina, Monica; Molteni, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    In order to increase the knowledge of locomotor disturbances in children with autism, and of the mechanism underlying them, the objective of this exploratory study was to reliably and quantitatively evaluate linear gait parameters (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters), upper body kinematic parameters, walk orientation and smoothness using an…

  20. Biologic or tofacitinib monotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis in people with traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) failure: a Cochrane Systematic Review and network meta-analysis (NMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Mudano, Amy S; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A

    2016-11-17

    We performed a systematic review, a standard meta-analysis and network meta-analysis (NMA), which updates the 2009 Cochrane Overview, 'Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)'. This review is focused on biologic monotherapy in people with RA in whom treatment with traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) including methotrexate (MTX) had failed (MTX/other DMARD-experienced). To assess the benefits and harms of biologic monotherapy (includes anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab) or non-TNF (abatacept, anakinra, rituximab, tocilizumab)) or tofacitinib monotherapy (oral small molecule) versus comparator (placebo or MTX/other DMARDs) in adults with RA who were MTX/other DMARD-experienced. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6, June), MEDLINE (via OVID 1946 to June 2015), and Embase (via OVID 1947 to June 2015). Article selection, data extraction and risk of bias and GRADE assessments were done in duplicate. We calculated direct estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using standard meta-analysis. We used a Bayesian mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) approach for NMA estimates with 95% credible intervals (CrI). We converted odds ratios (OR) to risk ratios (RR) for ease of understanding. We calculated absolute measures as risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB). This update includes 40 new RCTs for a total of 46 RCTs, of which 41 studies with 14,049 participants provided data. The comparator was placebo in 16 RCTs (4,532 patients), MTX or other DMARD in 13 RCTs (5,602 patients), and another biologic in 12 RCTs (3,915 patients). Monotherapy versus placeboBased on moderate-quality direct evidence, biologic monotherapy (without concurrent MTX/other DMARDs) was associated with a clinically meaningful and statistically significant

  1. Long-Term Outcomes in Puerto Ricans with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Receiving Early Treatment with Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs using the American College of Rheumatology Definition of Early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rosario, Noemí; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Díaz-Correa, Leyda M; Pérez-Ríos, Naydi; Rodríguez, Noelia; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) results in better long-term outcomes. However, the optimal therapeutic window has not been clearly established. To determine the clinical outcome of Puerto Ricans with RA receiving early treatment with conventional and/or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition of early RA. A cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of Puerto Ricans with RA. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional status, and pharmacotherapy were determined. Early treatment was defined as the initiation of DMARDs (conventional and/or biologic) in less than 6 months from the onset of symptoms attributable to RA. Patients who received early (disease duration was 14.9 years and 337 (87.0%) patients were women. One hundred and twenty one (31.3%) patients received early treatment. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex, early treatment was associated with better functional status, lower probability of joint deformities, intra-articular injections and joint replacement surgeries, and lower scores in the physician's assessments of global health, functional impairment and physical damage of patients. Using the ACR definition of early RA, this group of patients treated with DMARDs within 6 months of disease had better long-term outcomes with less physical damage and functional impairment.

  2. EFFECT OF «TREAT-TO-TARGET» ANTIRHEUMATIC THERAPY ON DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION OF THE LEFT AND RIGHT VENTRICLES IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DURING 18 MONTHS OF OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Kirillova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of «treat-to-target» antirheumatic therapy on diastolic dysfunction of the left (DDLV and right (DDLV ventricles in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA during 18 months of observation.Material and methods. The study included patients with early RA (n=66; 71% women; age - 56 [46; 61] years with moderate/high activity (DAS28 5.3 [5.0; 6.2], seropositive on rheumatoid factor (77% and/or cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (100%, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD and glucocorticoids naive. Treatment with methotrexate (MTX with the escalation of the dose up to 25-30 mg/week subcutaneously was initiated in all the patients. After 3 months in 47 (71% patients biologics were added to MTX due to its inefficiency. In 18 months remission of RA was achieved in 44% of the patients. 51 (77% patients had a cardioprotective therapy. The target blood pressure (BP level was achieved in 38 (58% patients. Evaluation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, 24-hour BP monitoring and echocardiography were performed in all patients initially and in 18 months of MTX/MTX + biologics use.Results. After 18 months DDLV incidence decreased by 7% (from 49% to 42%; p>0.05 and DDRV incidence decreased by 5% (from 24% to 17%; p>0.05. A more significant decrease in DDLV incidence [from 23 (62% to 18 (49%] and of DDRV incidence (from 12 (32% to 6 (16%] (р=0.05, was found in MTX + biologics group than in MTX only group [DDLV incidence remained unchanged - 7 (28%, and DDRV incidence increased from 3(12% to 4 (16%; p>0.05]. The normalization of left ventricle (LV diastolic function in early RA patients depended primarily on the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment, and of right ventricle (RV diastolic function - on the achievement of target BP level and RA remission. Reduced erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP plasma levels were associated with the improved LV diastolic function [E/A LV and

  3. TIME COURSE OF CHANGES IN BLOOD LIPID PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DURING TREAT-TO-TARGET ANTIRHEUMATIC THERAPY: ACCORDING TO 18-MONTH FOLLOW-UP FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Udachkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for lowering a cardiovascular risk (CVR in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA when implementing the treat-to-target strategy remain inadequately investigated.Objective: to estimate the time course of changes in blood lipid parameters in patients with early RA during Treat-totarget antirheumatic therapy at an 18-month follow-up.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients (73% women; median age, 56 years with early RA meeting the respective 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR classification criteria and moderate or high activity (median DAS28-ESR score of 5.4 were examined within the framework of the REMARCA trial. After 6-month treatment, RA activity significantly reduced (p < 0.05. At months 6 to 18, no significant change in RA activity was recorded. After 18 months, remission was observed in 31 (42% patients: in 17 (55% on methotrexate (MTX monotherapy and in 14 (45% on combined therapy with MTX and a biological agent. Blood lipid levels were determined at inclusion in the investigation, 6 and 18 months later. The values of lipid parameters were estimated in terms of the total CVR. 67.6% of the patients were classified as at very high CVR. At 18 months of treatment, 34 (46% patients were treated with statins (median atorvastatin and rosuvastatin doses were 10 mg/day each.Results and discussion. Only 12% of the patients had optimal baseline values of just all lipid parameters. The concentration of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C correlated negatively with C-reactive protein (CRP levels, DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, and HAQ (p < 0.05. After 6-month treatment, there were increases in TC by 7%, LDL-C by 12.5%, and HDL-C by 19.7%, and a decrease in the atherogenic index by 16% (p < 0.05. ΔCRP negatively correlated with ΔTC, ΔLDL-C, and ΔHDL-C (r = -0.3; p < 0.05. A correlation of TC and LDL-C with

  4. Use and Spending on Biologic Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis among U.S. Medicare Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdany, Jinoos; Tonner, Chris; Schmajuk, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biologic therapies have assumed an important role in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We sought to investigate use, spending, and patient cost-sharing for Medicare beneficiaries using biologic drugs for RA, comparing patients exposed to minimal cost-sharing because of a Part D low-income subsidy (LIS) to those facing substantial out-of-pocket costs (OOP). Methods We performed a retrospective, nationwide study using 2009 Medicare claims for a 5% random sample of beneficiaries with RA who had at least one RA drug dispensed. We analyzed biologic drug utilization and costs across the Part B (medical benefit) and Part D (pharmacy benefit) programs by LIS status using multinomial regression. We also projected OOP costs as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates closure of the Part D coverage gap by 2020. Results Among 6932 beneficiaries, 1812 (26.1%) received a biologic drug. LIS beneficiaries were significantly more likely to obtain Part D home-administered biologics (RRR 2.98, 95% CI 2.50–3.56), while non-LIS beneficiaries were less likely to receive Part D biologics (RRR 0.58, 95% CI 0.48–0.69). OOP costs in Part D were lower, as expected, for LIS beneficiaries ($72 vs. $3,751/year for non-LIS). Non-LIS beneficiaries had lower costs for Part B facility-administered biologics (range $0–$2,584) than for Part D home-administered biologics. ACA reforms will narrow OOP differences between Part D and B for non-LIS beneificiaries. Conclusions In contrast to LIS beneficiaries who receive mostly Part D home-administered biologic DMARDs, non-subsidized beneficiaries have significant cost-based incentives to obtain facility-administered biologic DMARDs through Part B. The ACA will result in only slightly lower costs for Part D biologic drugs for these beneficiaries. PMID:25776035

  5. Persistence of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: An analysis of the South Korean National Health Insurance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Young; Shin, Ju-Young; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Donguk; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2018-02-01

    This study examined and compared the persistence of adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, or abatacept as first- and subsequent-line treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in the South Korean clinical practice. We conducted a retrospective cohort study with patients receiving adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, or abatacept between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012, using the nationwide Korean National Health Insurance database. Patients who were receiving a newly initiated biologic treatment and those who switched from other biologic treatment were identified and classified into first- and subsequent-use cohorts, respectively. Treatment patterns during the 1-year after treatment initiation were measured as persistence, and discontinuation including restarting, switching, and stopping. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for discontinuation of biologic treatments. We identified 4114 patients for the first-use cohort and 992 patients for the subsequent-use cohort. Treatment persistence with adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab was observed in 52.5%, 56.1%, and 52.6% of the patients, respectively, in the first-use cohort, without significant differences in duration of persistence among the treatments according to the Cox proportional hazard model. In the subsequent-use cohort, treatment persistence with adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, and abatacept was observed in 45.7%, 58.5%, 43.0%, and 60.4% of the patients, respectively. The Cox proportional hazard model found that the patients who were receiving etanercept (HR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88) and abatacept (HR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.37-0.74) were significantly less likely to discontinue the treatment than those who were receiving infliximab. Adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab had similar levels of persistence during the 1-year after treatment initiation, when used as first-line treatment. However, when used as a subsequent-line treatment

  6. Fluorescence optical imaging and musculoskeletal ultrasonography in juvenile idiopathic polyarticular disease before and during antirheumatic treatment - a multicenter non-interventional diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ariane; Just, Georg Werner; Werner, Stephanie Gabriele; Oommen, Prasad T; Minden, Kirsten; Becker, Ingrid; Langer, Hans-Eckhard; Klee, Dirk; Horneff, Gerd

    2017-06-30

    , synovial thickening or hyperperfusion by US. Because of the high number of negative results, specificity of FOI compared with clinical examination/US/PD was high (84-95%), and sensitivity was only moderate. FOI and US could detect clinical but also subclinical inflammation. FOI detected subclinical inflammation to a higher extent than US. Improvement upon treatment with either methotrexate or a biologic can be visualized by FOI and US. Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien DRKS00011579 . Registered 10 January 2017.

  7. Trial of a New Antirheumatic Agent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-05-04

    aspirin) and placebo in 10 outpatients with active rheumatoid arthritis, is reported. Both fenoprofen and aspirin were found to be similarly effective agents in rheumatoid arthritis with an average daily dose of 2,1 g fenoprofen ...

  8. Basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after short-term treatment with either a typical or an atypical antipsychotic drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthoj, Andreas; Glenthoj, Birte Y; Mackeprang, Torben

    2007-01-01

    and 19 matched controls participated. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either low doses of the typical antipsychotic drug, zuclopenthixol, or the atypical compound, risperidone. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained in patients before and after 12 weeks...... medication groups did not differ significantly with respect to volume changes after 3 months of low dose treatment in any of the VOIs. Nevertheless, when medication groups were examined separately, a significant volume increase in the putamen was evidenced in the risperidone group. The altered asymmetry...

  9. Basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after short-term treatment with either a typical or an atypical antipsychotic drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthoj, Andreas; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Mackeprang, Torben

    2007-01-01

    and 19 matched controls participated. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either low doses of the typical antipsychotic drug, zuclopenthixol, or the atypical compound, risperidone. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained in patients before and after 12 weeks...

  10. Covariation between motor signs and negative symptoms in drug-naive subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders before and after antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Victor; de Jalón, Elena García; Campos, María S; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-08-29

    Objective To examine the covariation between negative symptoms and motor signs in a broad sample of drug-naïve subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses before and after inception of antipsychotic medication. One-hundred and eighty-nine antipsychotic-naïve subjects with DSM-IV schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses were assessed for negative symptoms including affective flattening, alogia, avolition/apathy and anhedonia/associality, and motor signs including catatonia, parkinsonism and dyskinesia. We examined the association between negative and motor features at baseline, 4-weeks after inception of antipsychotic treatment and that of their mean change over the treatment period, such as their trajectories and treatment response pattern. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs were strongly related to affective flattening and alogia (p0.01). Although to a different extent, motor and negative features showed drug-responsive, drug-worsening, of drug-unchanged patterns of response to antipsychotic medication. The main predictors of negative and motor features in treated subjects were their corresponding baseline ratings (p<0.001). Negative and motor features are differentiated, but to some extent, overlapping domains that are meaningfully influenced by antipsychotic medication. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs and the diminished expression domain of negative symptoms may share underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theys, Kristof; Deforche, Koen; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Libin, Pieter; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Albert, Jan; Asjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Bruckova, Marie; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Clotet, Bonaventura; Coughlan, Suzie; Grossman, Zehava; Hamouda, Osamah; Horban, Andrzei; Korn, Klaus; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Kücherer, Claudia; Nielsen, Claus; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stockl, Elisabeth; Riva, Chiara; Ruiz, Lidia; Liitsola, Kirsi; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Schuurman, Rob; Sönnerborg, Anders; Stanekova, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Struck, Daniel; van Laethem, Kristel; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Puchhammer-Stockl, E.; Sarcletti, M.; Schmied, B.; Geit, M.; Balluch, G.; Vandamme, A. -M.; Vercauteren, J.; Derdelinckx, I.; Sasse, A.; Bogaert, M.; Ceunen, H.; de Roo, A.; de Wit, S.; Deforche, K.; Echahidi, F.; Fransen, K.; Goffard, J. -C.; Goubau, P.; Goudeseune, E.; Yombi, J. -C.; Lacor, P.; Liesnard, C.; Moutschen, M.; Pierard, D.; Rens, R.; Schrooten, Y.; Vaira, D.; van den Heuvel, A.; van der Gucht, B.; van Ranst, M.; van Wijngaerden, E.; Vandercam, B.; Vekemans, M.; Verhofstede, C.; Clumeck, N.; van Laethem, K.; Kostrikis, L.; Demetriades, I.; Kousiappa, I.; Demetriou, V.; Hezka, J.; Linka, Marek; Bruckova, M.; Machala, L.; Nielsen, C.; Jrgensen, L. B.; Gerstoft, J.; Mathiesen, L.; Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, H.; Laursen, A.; Kvinesdal, B.; Liitsola, K.; Ristola, M.; Suni, J.; Sutinen, J.; Kücherer, C.; Berg, T.; Braun, P.; Poggensee, G.; Daümer, M.; Eberle, J.; Hamouda, O.; Heiken, H.; Kaiser, R.; Knechten, H.; Müller, H.; Neifer, S.; Schmidt, B.; Walter, H.; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, B.; Harrer, T.; Hatzakis, A.; Paraskevis, D.; Magiorkinis, E.; Hatzitheodorou, E.; Issaris, C.; Haida, C.; Zavitsanou, A.; Magiorkinis, G.; Lazanas, M.; Chini, M.; Magafas, N.; Tsogas, N.; Paparizos, V.; Kourkounti, S.; Antoniadou, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Panagopoulos, P.; Poulakou, G.; Sakka, V.; Chryssos, G.; Drimis, S.; Gargalianos, P.; Lelekis, M.; Xilomenos, G.; Psichogiou, M.; Daikos, G. L.; Panos, G.; Haratsis, G.; Kordossis, T.; Kontos, A.; Koratzanis, G.; Theodoridou, M.; Mostrou, G.; Spoulou, V.; de Gascun, C.; Byrne, C.; Duffy, M.; Bergin, C.; Reidy, D.; Farrell, G.; Lambert, J.; O'Connor, E.; Rochford, A.; Low, J.; Coakely, P.; Coughlan, S.; Grossman, Z.; Levi, I.; Chemtob, D.; Balotta, C.; Riva, C.; Mussini, C.; Caramma, I.; Capetti, A.; Colombo, M. C.; Rossi, C.; Prati, F.; Tramuto, F.; Vitale, F.; Ciccozzi, M.; Angarano, G.; Rezza, G.; Schmit, J. C.; Struck, D.; Hemmer, R.; Arendt, V.; Staub, T.; Schneider, F.; Roman, F.; Wensing, A. M. J.; Boucher, C. A. B.; van de Vijver, D. A. M. C.; van Bentum, P. H. M.; Brinkman, K.; Op de Coul, E. L.; van der Ende, M. E.; Hoepelman, I. M.; van Kasteren, M.; Juttmann, J.; Kuipers, M.; Langebeek, N.; Richter, C.; Santegoets, R. M. W. J.; Schrijnders-Gudde, L.; Schuurman, R.; van de Ven, B. J. M.; Åsjö, B.; Ormaasen, V.; Aavitsland, P.; Horban, A.; Stanczak, J. J.; Stanczak, G. P.; Firlag-Burkacka, E.; Wiercinska-Drapalo, A.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, M.; Szata, W.; Camacho, R.; Palma, C.; Borges, F.; Paixão, T.; Duque, V.; Araújo, F.; Stanojevic, M.; Jevtovic, D. J.; Salemovic, D.; Stanekova, D.; Habekova, M.; Mokras, M.; Truska, P.; Poljak, M.; Babic, D.; Tomazic, J.; Vidmar, L.; Karner, P.; Clotet, B.; Gutiérrez, C.; de Mendoza, C.; Erkicia, I.; Domingo, P.; Camino, X.; Galindo, M. J.; Blanco, J. L.; Leal, M.; Masabeu, A.; Guelar, A.; Llibre, J. M.; Margall, N.; Iribarren, J. A.; Gutierrez, S.; Baldoví, J. F.; Pedreira, J. D.; Gatell, J. M.; Moreno, S.; Soriano, V.; Ruiz, L.; Albert, J.; Blaxhult, A.; Heidarian, A.; Karlsson, A.; Aperia-Peipke, K.; Bergbrant, I. -M.; Gisslén, M.; Svennerholm, B.; Björkman, P.; Bratt, G.; Carlsson, M.; Ekvall, H.; Ericsson, M.; Höfer, M.; Johansson, B.; Sonnerbörg, A.; Kuylenstierna, N.; Ljungberg, B.; Mäkitalo, S.; Strand, A.; Öberg, S.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already

  12. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theys Kristof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences. Results Genotypic correlates of viral load and CD4 cell count were evaluated in subtype B sequences from recently diagnosed treatment-naive patients enrolled in the SPREAD programme. The association of surveillance drug resistance mutations, reported compensatory mutations and fitness estimated from drug selective pressure fitness landscapes with baseline viral load and CD4 cell count was evaluated using regression techniques. Protease genotypic variability estimated to increase fitness during treatment was associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 cell counts also in treatment-naive patients, which could primarily be attributed to well-known compensatory mutations at highly polymorphic positions. By contrast, treatment-related mutations in reverse transcriptase could not explain viral load or CD4 cell count variability. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphic compensatory mutations in protease, reported to be selected during treatment, may improve the replicative capacity of HIV-1 even in absence of drug selective pressure or major resistance mutations. The presence of this polymorphic variation may either reflect a history of drug selective pressure, i.e. transmission from a treated patient, or merely be a result of diversity in wild-type virus. Our findings suggest that transmitted drug resistance has the potential to contribute to faster disease progression in the newly infected host and to shape the HIV-1 epidemic at a population level.

  13. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Theys (Kristof); K. Deforche; J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); P. Libin (Pieter); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); J. Albert (Jan); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); M. Bruckova (Marie); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); Z. Grossman (Zehava); A. Horban (Andrzej); C. Kücherer (Claudia); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); C. Riva (Chiara); L. Ruiz (Lidia); J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); R. Schuurman (Rob); A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); D. Struck (Daniel); K. van Laethem (Kristel); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); E. Puchhammer-Stockl E. (Elisabeth); M. Sarcletti (M.); B. Schmied (B.); M. Geit (M.); G. Balluch (G.); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); I. Derdelinck (Inge); A. Sasse (A.); M. Bogaert (M.); H. Ceunen (H.); A. de Roo (Annie); M. De Wit (Meike); F. Echahidi (F.); K. Fransen (K.); J.-C. Goffard (J.); P. Goubau (Patrick); E. Goudeseune (E.); J.-C. Yombi (J.); P. Lacor (Patrick); C. Liesnard (C.); M. Moutschen (M.); L.A. Pierard; R. Rens (R.); J. Schrooten; D. Vaira (D.); A. van den Heuvel (A.); B. van der Gucht (B.); M. van Ranst (Marc); E. van Wijngaerden (Eric); T. Vandercam; M. Vekemans (M.); C. Verhofstede; N. Clumeck (N.); K. van Laethem (K.); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); I. Demetriades (I.); I. Kousiappa (Ioanna); V.L. Demetriou (Victoria); J. Hezka (Johana); M. Linka (Marek); L. Machala (L.); L.B. Jrgensen (L.); J. Gerstoft (J.); L. Mathiesen (L.); C. Pedersen (Court); C. Nielsen (Claus); A. Laursen (A.); B. Kvinesdal (B.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Ristola (M.); J. Suni (J.); J. Sutinen (J.); K. Korn (Klaus); C. K̈ucherer (C.); P. Braun (P.); G. Poggensee (G.); M. Däumer (M.); D. Eberle (David); O. Hamouda (Osamah); H. Heiken (H.); R. Kaiser (Rolf); H. Knechten (H.); H. M̈uller (H.); S. Neifer (S.); H. Walter (Hauke); B. Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer (B.); T. Harrer (T.); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); E. Hatzitheodorou (E.); C. Issaris (C.); C. Haida (C.); A. Zavitsanou (A.); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); M. Lazanas (M.); L. Chini; N. Magafas (N.); N. Tsogas (N.); V. Paparizos (V.); S. Kourkounti (S.); A. Antoniadou (A.); A. Papadopoulos (A.); P. Panagopoulos (P.); G. Poulakou (G.); V. Sakka (V.); G. Chryssos (G.); S. Drimis (S.); P. Gargalianos (P.); M. Lelekis (M.); G. Xilomenos (G.); M. Psichogiou (M.); G.L. Daikos (G.); G. Panos (G.); G. Haratsis (G.); T. Kordossis (T.); A. Kontos (Angelos); G. Koratzanis (G.); M. Theodoridou (M.); G. Mostrou (G.); V. Spoulou (V.); W. Hall (W.); C. de Gascun (Cillian); C. Byrne (C.); M. Duffy (M.); P. Bergin; D. Reidy (D.); G. Farrell; J. Lambert (Julien); E. O'Connor (E.); A. Rochford (A.); J. Low (J.); P. Coakely (P.); S. Coughlan (Suzie); I. Levi (I.); D. Chemtob (D.); C. Balotta (Claudia); C. Mussini (C.); I. Caramma (I.); A. Capetti (A.); M.C. Colombo (M.); C. Rossi (Cesare); F. Prati (Francesco); F. Tramuto (F.); F. Vitale (F.); M. Ciccozzi (M.); G. Angarano (Guiseppe); G. Rezza (G.); R. Hemmer (R.); V. Arendt (V.); T. Staub (T.); F. Schneider (F.); F. Roman (Francois); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); P.H.M. van Bentum (P. H M); K. Brinkman (Kees); E.L.M. Op de Coul (Eline); M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); I.M. Hoepelman (Ilja Mohandas); M.E.E. van Kasteren (Marjo); J. Juttmann (Job); M. Kuipers (M.); N. Langebeek (Nienke); C. Richter (C.); R.M.W.J. Santegoets (R. M W J); L. Schrijnders-Gudde (L.); R. Schuurman (Rob); B.J.M. van de Ven (B. J M); B. Asjö (Birgitta); V. Ormaasen (Vidar); P. Aavitsland (P.); J. Stanczak (J.); G.P. Stanczak (G.); E. Firlag-Burkacka (E.); A. Wiercinska-Drapalo (A.); E. Jablonowska (E.); E. Malolepsza (E.); M. Leszczyszyn-Pynka (M.); W. Szata (W.); A. de Palma (Andre); F. Borges (F.); T. Paix̃ao (T.); V. Duque (V.); F. Aráujo (F.); M. Stanojevic (Maja); D.J. Jevtovic (D.); D. Salemovic (D.); M. Habekova (M.); M. Mokras (M.); P. Truska (P.); M. Poljak (Mario); D.Z. Babic (Dunja); J. Tomazic (J.); S. Vidmar (Suzanna); P. Karner (P.); C. Gutíerrez (C.); C. deMendoza (C.); I. Erkicia (I.); P. Domingo (P.); X. Camino (X.); M.A. Galindo (Miguel Angel); J.L. Blanco (J.); M. Leal (M.); A. Masabeu (A.); A. Guelar (A.); J.M. Llibre (Josep M.); N. Margall (N.); C. Iribarren (Carlos); S. Gutierrez (S.); J.F. Baldov́i (J.); C.E. Pedreira (Carlos Eduardo); J.M. Gatell (J.); S. Moreno (S.); C. de Mendoza (Carmen); V. Soriano (Virtudes); A. Blaxhult (A.); A. Heidarian (A.); A. Karlsson (A.); K. Aperia-Peipke (K.); I.-M. Bergbrant (I.); M. Gissĺen (M.); M. Svennerholm (M.); P. Bj̈orkman (P.); G. Bratt (G.); M. Carlsson (M.); H. Ekvall (H.); M. Ericsson (M.); M. Ḧofer (M.); B. Johansson (Bert); N. Kuylenstierna (N.); K. Ljungberg (Karl); S. Mäkitalo (S.); A. Strand; K. Öberg (Kjell); T. Berg (Trine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory

  14. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  15. Comparative thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R

    2016-07-11

    A quick guide on comparative thanatology, the study of death and dying, particular how individuals respond to a conspecific's death, across animal phylogeny. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radon as a medicine. Therapeutic effectiveness, biological mechanism and comparative risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deetjen, Peter; Falkenbach, Albrecht; Harder, Dietrich; Joeckel, Hans; Kaul, Alexander; Philipsborn, Henning von

    2014-07-01

    Proofs of the therapeutic efficiency of balneological radon applications administered to patients suffering from rheumatic diseases, investigations into the biological action mechanism associated with the alpha particles emitted by radon and its radioactive daughter products, and the comparative risk assessment of radon treatment and medicinal pain therapy have been the research projects whose results are summarized in this book. Controlled clinical studies, if possible performed as prospective, randomized and placebo-controlled double blind studies, have given evidence that the therapeutic effects of balneological radon applications - long-lasting pain reduction and reduced consumption of medicines compared with controls - are significantly persisting over many post-treatment months. The molecular and cellular mechanism of action underlying these long-lasting therapeutic effects has been identified as the down-regulation of cellular immune responses, initiated by cellular apoptosis sequential to low alpha particle doses and by the subsequent release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The unwanted side-effects of non-steroidal anti-rheumatic drug treatments have to be compared with the absence of side effects from the balneological radon applications which merely involve radiation doses well below the mean value and the fluctuation width of the annual doses attributable to everybody's natural radiation exposure.

  17. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 8. Comparative Genomics - A Powerful New Tool in Biology. Anand K Bachhawat. General Article Volume 11 Issue 8 August 2006 pp 22-40. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Effectiveness of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug co-therapy with methotrexate and leflunomide in rituximab-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients: results of a 1-year follow-up study from the CERERRA collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Lie, Elisabeth; Nasonov, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    were treated with rituximab plus methotrexate, 177 with rituximab plus leflunomide and 505 with rituximab alone. Significantly more patients achieved a European League Against Rheumatism good response at 6 months when treated with rituximab plus leflunomide (29.1%) compared with rituximab plus...

  19. Comparing Effects of Biologic Agents in Treating Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Regression Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Fride Tvete

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis patients have been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and the newer biologic drugs. We sought to compare and rank the biologics with respect to efficacy. We performed a literature search identifying 54 publications encompassing 9 biologics. We conducted a multiple treatment comparison regression analysis letting the number experiencing a 50% improvement on the ACR score be dependent upon dose level and disease duration for assessing the comparable relative effect between biologics and placebo or DMARD. The analysis embraced all treatment and comparator arms over all publications. Hence, all measured effects of any biologic agent contributed to the comparison of all biologic agents relative to each other either given alone or combined with DMARD. We found the drug effect to be dependent on dose level, but not on disease duration, and the impact of a high versus low dose level was the same for all drugs (higher doses indicated a higher frequency of ACR50 scores. The ranking of the drugs when given without DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, etanercept, tocilizumab/ abatacept and adalimumab. The ranking of the drugs when given with DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, tocilizumab, anakinra/rituximab, golimumab/ infliximab/ abatacept, adalimumab/ etanercept [corrected]. Still, all drugs were effective. All biologic agents were effective compared to placebo, with certolizumab the most effective and adalimumab (without DMARD treatment and adalimumab/ etanercept (combined with DMARD treatment the least effective. The drugs were in general more effective, except for etanercept, when given together with DMARDs.

  20. Malignant Neoplasms in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors, Tocilizumab, Abatacept, or Rituximab in Clinical Practice: A Nationwide Cohort Study From Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadström, Hjalmar; Frisell, Thomas; Askling, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Considering the widespread and increasing use of biological immunomodulators (biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs [bDMARDs]) to treat chronic inflammatory conditions, and the concern that immunomodulation may alter cancer risk and progression, the limited available data on use of these therapies as used in clinical practice and cancer risks are a concern. To assess the risk of incident malignant neoplasms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with bDMARDs. This was a national register-based prospective cohort study of the public health care system in Sweden from 2006 to 2015. Cohorts of patients with RA initiating treatment with tocilizumab (n = 1798), abatacept (n = 2021), and rituximab (n = 3586), a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) as first-ever (n = 10 782) or second-ever (n = 4347) bDMARD, a biologics-naive cohort treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) (n = 46 610), and a general population comparator cohort (n = 107 491). Treatment with tocilizumab, abatacept, rituximab, or TNFi. Outcomes included a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm, or skin cancer. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox-regression, adjusted for age, sex, disease and treatment characteristics, and educational level. We identified a total of 15 129 initiations of TNFi as the first or second bDMARD, 7405 initiations of other bDMARDs, and 46 610 csDMARD users. The mean age varied from 58 to 64 years, and the proportion of female patients varied from 71% to 80%, across the 7 cohorts under study. The observed numbers of events (crude incidence per 100 000 person-years) for a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm were 50 (959) for tocilizumab, 61 (1026) for abatacept, 141 (1074) for rituximab, 478 (978) for initiators of TNFi as first bDMARD, and 169 (917) for TNFi as second bDMARD. There were no statistically significant differences between

  1. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  2. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - V. Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of pain has very ancient origins, when plant-derived products were used, including mandrake extracts and opium, a dried latex obtained from Papaver somniferum. In the XVI and XVII centuries opium came into the preparation of two compounds widely used for pain relief: laudanum and Dover’s powder. The analgesic properties of extracts of willow bark were then recognized and later, in the second half of the XIX century, experimental studies on chemically synthesized analgesics were planned, thus promoting the marketing of some derivatives of para-amino-phenol and pyrazole, the predecessors of paracetamol and metamizol. In the XX century, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were synthesized, such as phenylbutazone, which was initially considered primarily a pain medication. The introduction on the market of centrally acting analgesics, such as tramadol, sometimes used in the treatment of rheumatic pain. is quite recent.

  3. Plasma MicroRNA Profiles in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to Adalimumab plus Methotrexate vs Methotrexate Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Krintel, Sophine B; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to identify plasma (i.e., cell-free) microRNA (miRNA) predicting antitumor necrosis and/or methotrexate (MTX) treatment response in patients enrolled in an investigator-initiated, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (The OPERA study, NCT00660647). METHODS......: We included 180 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomized to adalimumab (ADA; n = 89) or placebo (n = 91) in combination with MTX. Plasma samples before and 3 months after treatment initiation were analyzed for 91 specific mi...... multivariate miRNA models were able to predict response to ADA treatment after 3 and 12 months, with 63% and 82% area under the ROC curves, respectively. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-27a-3p as a potential predictive biomarker of ACR/EULAR remission in patients with early RA treated with ADA in combination...

  4. AirCompare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — AirCompare contains air quality information that allows a user to compare conditions in different localities over time and compare conditions in the same location at...

  5. From Comparatism to Comparativity: Comparative Reasoning Reconsidered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Erik Larsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Comparative literature was born with the national paradigm of literary historiography in the early nineteenth century when literary studies, together with other historical and comparative studies, were institutionalized as a particular field of research and higher education. The cognitive pattern generated by this paradigm comprises both national literary studies and comparative literature. They are both instances of comparatism, solidly anchored in a national context as its basic and indispensable point of reference rather than in the border crossing life of literary texts. In contrast, the comparative reasoning of the twenty first century, as exemplified by the emerging interest in world literature studies, attempts to cultivate the comparativity of the literary texts themselves – their potential to engage with several possible contexts of comparison beyond the standard theories and methods of comparatism and without giving an axiomatic priority to one of them. In the traditional aesthetics of imitation, European and non European, the double nature of any text as being organized around both an external centre and a domestic centre is already an integral part of the definition of literature in view, first of all, of their degree of canonicity. Today, more radically, all literary texts, irrespective of canonical position but as part of their status and function as literary texts, are assumed to possess the capacity to be part of several textual and cultural contexts beyond that of their place and time of origin. The paper traces the history of comparative reasoning, leading both to the national paradigm and the nineteenth century inspired comparatism and to the consequences for modern literary studies, opening a broader view of the comparative potentials of texts across time and space.

  6. Comparative Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    This document includes the specification on the IEA task of evaluation building energy simulation computer programs for the Double Skin Facades (DSF) constructions. There are two approaches involved into this procedure, one is the comparative approach and another is the empirical one. In the comp....... In the comparative approach the outcomes of different software tools are compared, while in the empirical approach the modelling results are compared with the results of experimental test cases. The comparative test cases include: ventilation, shading and geometry....

  7. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  8. The Comparative Safety of TNF Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis-a Meta-Analysis Update of 14 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Qiong; Jiang, Ga-Xue; Chen, Yan-Fei; Yang, Xi-Mei; Meng, Lei; Xue, Miao; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Chen, Xi-Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-07-17

    TNF inhibitors have been used in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The efficacy of TNF inhibitors was already evaluated by meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the safety of TNF inhibitors is still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate and update the safety data from RCTs of TNF inhibitors in patients treated for AS. A systematic literature search was conducted from 1990 through May 31, 2016. All studies included were randomized, double-blind, controlled trials of patients with ankylosing spondylitis that evaluated adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab treatment. The overall serious adverse events, the risk of serious infection events, and the risk of malignancy and discontinuation rates were abstracted, and risk estimates were calculated by Peto odds ratios (ORs). Fourteen randomized controlled trials involving 2032 subjects receiving TNF inhibitors and 1030 subjects receiving placebo and/or traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were included. The overall serious adverse events (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 0.87-2.05), the risk of serious infection events (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 0.63-4.01), the risk of malignancy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.25-3.85), and discontinuation due to adverse events (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.95-2.54) in patients treated with TNF inhibitors as a group were not significantly different from those treated with placebo in the control group. TNF inhibitors were generally safe for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. These data may help guide clinical comparative decision making in the management of AS.

  9. Comparative Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

     This document includes a definition of the comparative test cases DSF200_3 and DSF200_4, which previously described in the comparative test case specification for the test cases DSF100_3 and DSF200_3 [Ref.1]....... This document includes a definition of the comparative test cases DSF200_3 and DSF200_4, which previously described in the comparative test case specification for the test cases DSF100_3 and DSF200_3 [Ref.1]....

  10. Text File Comparator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    File Comparator program IFCOMP, is text file comparator for IBM OS/VScompatable systems. IFCOMP accepts as input two text files and produces listing of differences in pseudo-update form. IFCOMP is very useful in monitoring changes made to software at the source code level.

  11. Postcolonialism And Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikly, Leon

    1999-11-01

    The article considers the relevance of recent developments in postcolonial theory for comparative education research. The article starts with an account of these developments. This account is then used as a basis for a critical discussion of previous theoretical frameworks that have been used by comparative researchers to explain the colonial legacy. The implications of adopting a postcolonial approach in comparative education are discussed in relation to issues of race, culture, language and the curriculum. The article concludes by arguing that a consideration of the postcolonial condition is necessary for developing a more holistic and less eurocentric understanding of the relationship between globalisation and education.

  12. Remission induction by Raising the dose of Remicade in RA (RRRR study: Rationale and study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing for sustained clinical remission after discontinuation of infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Oba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infliximab, an inhibitor of TNF-α, is one of the most widely used biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Recent studies indicated that baseline serum TNF-α could be considered as a key indicator for optimal dosing of infliximab for RA treatment to achieve the clinical response and its sustained remission. The Remission induction by Raising the dose of Remicade in RA (RRRR study is an open-label, parallel group, multicenter randomized controlled trial to compare the proportions of clinical remission based on the simplified disease activity index (SDAI after 1 year of treatment and its sustained remission rate after another 1 year between the investigational treatment strategy (for which the dose of infliximab was chosen based on the baseline serum TNF and the standard strategy of 3 mg/kg per 8 weeks of infliximab administration in infliximab-naïve patients with RA showing an inadequate response to MTX. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients who kept discontinuation of infliximab 1 year after discontinued infliximab at the time of 54 weeks after the first administration of infliximab. The secondary endpoints are the proportion of clinical remission based on SDAI and changes in SDAI from baseline at each time point, other clinical parameters, quality of life measures and adverse events. Target sample size of randomized patients is 400 patients in total. The main results of the RRRR study are expected to be published at the end of 2017.

  13. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  14. Hospital Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Hospital Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you to...

  15. Home Health Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Home Health Compare has information about the quality of care provided by Medicare-certified home health agencies throughout the nation. Medicare-certified means the...

  16. Towards Comparative Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Merete Storgaard

    Globalization is the imitation and adaptation of knowledgesolutions or innovations, as they are diffused from one country to another” (Peter Jarvis 2007) Conducting comparative, educational research of school leadership that effects student achievement in an international perspective is of scient......Globalization is the imitation and adaptation of knowledgesolutions or innovations, as they are diffused from one country to another” (Peter Jarvis 2007) Conducting comparative, educational research of school leadership that effects student achievement in an international perspective...... is of scientific value in qualifying the international and national knowledgebase on effective school leadership. In a methodological perspective comparative analysis in an international setting creates specifically a scientific demand of comparability and a theory based leadership - framework to guide...... the empirical, qualitative research of effective leadership....

  17. Physician Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the official dataset associated with the Medicare.gov Physician Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). These data...

  18. Home Health Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Home Health Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you...

  19. Comparative Climatic Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Comparative Climatic Data is a publication containing data tables of meteorological elements; the publication outlines the climatic conditions at major weather...

  20. Hospital Compare - Archived Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare is a consumer-oriented website that provides information on how well hospitals provide recommended care to their patients. This information can help...

  1. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  2. Comparing Political Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Pfetsch, Barbara; Esser, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the maturation of comparative political communications as a sub-discipline and defines its conceptual core. It then lays out the concept of “political communication system”. At the macro-level, this model captures the patterns of interaction between media and politics as social systems; at the micro-level it captures the interactions between media and political actors as individuals or organizations. Comparative research in this tradition focuses on the structure of pol...

  3. Comparative approaches to gentrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Martin; Smith, Darren P

    2018-01-01

    The epistemologies and politics of comparative research are prominently debated within urban studies, with ‘comparative urbanism’ emerging as a contemporary lexicon of urban studies. The study of urban gentrification has, after some delay, come to engage with these debates, which can be seen to pose a major challenge to the very concept of gentrification. To date, similar debates or developments have not unfolded within the study of rural gentrification. This article seeks to address some of the challenges posed to gentrification studies through an examination of strategies of comparison and how they might be employed within a comparative study of rural gentrification. Drawing on Tilly (Big structures Large Processes Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage), examples of four ‘strategies of comparison’ are identified within studies of urban and rural gentrification, before the paper explores how ‘geographies of the concept’ and ‘geographies of the phenomenon’ of rural gentrification in the United Kingdom, United States and France may be investigated using Latour’s (Pandora’s Hope. London: Harvard University Press) notion of ‘circulatory sociologies of translation’. The aim of our comparative discussion is to open up dialogues on the challenges of comparative studies that employ conceptions of gentrification and also to promote reflections of the metrocentricity of recent discussions of comparative research. PMID:29657708

  4. Comparing Political Journalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comparing Political Journalism is a systematic, in-depth study of the factors that shape and influence political news coverage today. Using techniques drawn from the growing field of comparative political communication, an international group of contributors analyse political news content drawn f...... Comparing Political Journalism offers an unparalleled scope in assessing the implications for the ongoing transformation of Western media systems, and addresses core concepts of central importance to students and scholars of political communication world-wide.......Comparing Political Journalism is a systematic, in-depth study of the factors that shape and influence political news coverage today. Using techniques drawn from the growing field of comparative political communication, an international group of contributors analyse political news content drawn...... from newspapers, television news, and news websites from 16 countries, to assess what kinds of media systems are most conducive to producing quality journalism. Underpinned by key conceptual themes, such as the role that the media are expected to play in democracies and quality of coverage...

  5. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach....... Comparative citizenship analyses need to be considered in relation to multipleinequalities and their intersections and to multiple governance and trans-national organisinf. This, in turn, suggests that comparative citizenship analysis needs to consider new spaces in which struggles for equal citizenship occur...

  6. Comparative Nivkh Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortescue, Michael David

    This dictionary undertakes to reconstruct the lexis and morphology of the Nivkh proto-language by marshaling and organizing all the data available in published form on the contemporary dialects. It builds upon a considerable body of descriptive and comparative work carried out by scholars who have...... World is a subject of continuing interest to both linguists and anthropologists. The dictionary does not address this question directly. Reconstructing the proto-language is an essential step, however, to any further comparative work – in particular to sorting out the relationship between Nivkh...

  7. Comparing East and West

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razeto, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the archaeological and literary evidence for marketplaces and urban forms connected to the manufacturing of bricks and metalworking in the capital cities of the contemporary empires of Rome and Han China (ca. 200 BC-200 AD). The comparative analysis of the physical aspects...... was involved in the social and political processes that characterized the production of space in ancient cities....

  8. Dermatologia comparativa Comparative Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Larangeira de Almeida Jr

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Demonstra-se o quadro exuberante dos angiofibromas faciais em paciente do sexo masculino, de 32 anos, com esclerose tuberosa, os quais podem ser comparados com amoras.The impressive facial angiofibromas, from a 32 year-old male paciente, with the classical features of tuberous sclerosis, were compared with mulberries.

  9. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms...

  10. Comparative Contract Law & Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovac, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work is a search for deeper understanding of established differences and similarities among compared legal systems. The application of economically inspired optimal model rule as a uniform term of comparison provides additional insights into some of the most often discussed legal issues. The

  11. Comparative International Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorge, Arndt; Noorderhaven, Niels; Koen, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The use of comparisons to explain, analyze and understand social and economic phenomena is recognized as a valuable social science tool. This textbook deals with the differences in management and organization between nations and their effects on multinational enterprises. In comparing management

  12. Comparing Information Access Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Presents a broad view of information access, drawing from philosophy and semiology in constructing a framework for comparative discussion that is used to examine the information representations that underlie four approaches to information access--information retrieval, workflow, collaborative filtering, and the path model. Contains 32 references.…

  13. Comparing Active Vision Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  14. Comparing active vision models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  15. Comparative and Translatorly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosen Guercio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available World literature’s natural home is comparative literature, a discipline born from and shaped by, as Vilashini Cooppan elegantly puts it, “scholarly engagements with the categories of migration, exile, diaspora, and globalization” (15. However, world literature has frequently been framed as a problem for the discipline, in large part because of its dependence on the ever-vexing and still mistrusted specter of translation. In light of the long-standing anxiety toward both world literature and translation, I propose here that comparatists do ourselves a terrible disservice if we do not urgently take up the questions raised by this disciplinary tension. Translation – in all of its attendant struggles with ethics, aesthetics, appropriation, authority – is not the problem, but, rather, should be understood as a key critical lens for comparative and world literature.In order to establish academia’s frustration with this subject, one need look no further than the “Three Reports to the America Comparative Literature Association on ‘Professional Standards’” (dating from 1965, 1975, and 1993, which return repeatedly to the problem of reading translated literature, circling around it with intense ambivalence. The moral of their story seems to be that translated texts are integral to comparative literature at the same time that they threaten its existence by undermining disciplinary exclusivity in foreign language expertise and by shining a sort of spotlight on all that literature which comparative literature may sometimes “condone” (as one of the reports puts it but to which it does not often actively attend. Even Goethe had Western European languages and literatures firmly in mind when he coined the term, “Weltliteratur.” Translations can’t help but point up the limits of the “four [likely European] languages” proposed as minimal standards for graduate students by the Green and Bernheimer reports, and on the strength of

  16. Comparing contracting performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian

    One key question for the last three decades of public management reforms is whether country differences between radical and modest reform approaches make a difference for performance in a reformed public sector. This paper compares differences in the implementation and performance of contracting....... Hypotheses are suggested for the role of culture, competition, contracts, capabilities and collaboration for contracting performance between and across the countries. Arguments are tested against data from on four comparable national surveys of private delivery of park and road maintenance services in local...... governments. Contracting performance is found to be higher in the United Kingdom due to a stronger overall combination of institutional features while performance differences across the countries in ranked order are found to be collaboration, contracts, capabilities and competition. Overall, the study support...

  17. Banking: shop and compare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jennifer A; DeJarnette, Sherry

    2014-01-01

    There are many reasons to take a critical look at the practice's banking relationship(s)--technology advancements, security measures, improvements in available services, recent banking enhancements designed specifically for medical practices, the impact of the financial crisis on bank ratings and stability, changing practice needs, opportunities for operational automation at the practice--and it is just simply smart to periodically evaluate and compare the features, pricing, and potential savings offered by vendors.

  18. Comparative pharmacognosy of Pashanbhed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Poonam; Gauttam, Vinod; Kalia, Ajudhia N

    2014-04-01

    Pashanbhed is a commercially available diuretic and lithotropic drug, used to treat renal problems. It is a controversial name as it is assigned to various plants such as Bergenia ligulata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Coleus aromaticus and Rotula aquatica. To perform the comparative preliminary phytochemical screening, diuretic activity, and thin layer chromatography (TLC) finger printing profile of three plants (B. ligulata, C. aromaticus, and K. pinnata), most commonly used as Pashanbhed. Diuretic potential of methanolic extract (ME) of three plants were evaluated at two dose levels (500 and 1,000 mg/kg p.o.), using normal Wistar rats (Lipschitz method). Furosemide (20 mg/kg p.o.) was used as a standard drug. The effect on urine output and electrolyte changes were measured for 24 h and compared. All MEs were screened preliminarily for their constituents and their TLC finger printing profiles were prepared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni's multiple comparison test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The MEs of all three plants have shown diuresis in normal rats. However, in intercomparison of the ME C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o.) produced more significant diuresis (P < 0.05) and electrolyte excretion compared to other test groups, the effect was at par with furosemide. The ME of these plants showed presence of alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, etc. The ME of C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o.) has showed highest diuretic action (4.2) among the tested extracts. This suggests the use of C. aromaticus leaves as "Pashanbhed"; the most effective diuretic drug.

  19. Comparative pharmacognosy of Pashanbhed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pashanbhed is a commercially available diuretic and lithotropic drug, used to treat renal problems. It is a controversial name as it is assigned to various plants such as Bergenia ligulata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Coleus aromaticus and Rotula aquatica. Objective: To perform the comparative preliminary phytochemical screening, diuretic activity, and thin layer chromatography (TLC finger printing profile of three plants (B. ligulata, C. aromaticus, and K. pinnata, most commonly used as Pashanbhed. Materials and Methods: Diuretic potential of methanolic extract (ME of three plants were evaluated at two dose levels (500 and 1,000 mg/kg p.o., using normal Wistar rats (Lipschitz method. Furosemide (20 mg/kg p.o. was used as a standard drug. The effect on urine output and electrolyte changes were measured for 24 h and compared. All MEs were screened preliminarily for their constituents and their TLC finger printing profiles were prepared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni′s multiple comparison test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The MEs of all three plants have shown diuresis in normal rats. However, in intercomparison of the ME C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o. produced more significant diuresis (P < 0.05 and electrolyte excretion compared to other test groups, the effect was at par with furosemide. The ME of these plants showed presence of alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, etc. Conclusion: The ME of C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o. has showed highest diuretic action (4.2 among the tested extracts. This suggests the use of C. aromaticus leaves as "Pashanbhed"; the most effective diuretic drug.

  20. Comparative pharmacognosy of Pashanbhed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Poonam; Gauttam, Vinod; Kalia, Ajudhia N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pashanbhed is a commercially available diuretic and lithotropic drug, used to treat renal problems. It is a controversial name as it is assigned to various plants such as Bergenia ligulata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Coleus aromaticus and Rotula aquatica. Objective: To perform the comparative preliminary phytochemical screening, diuretic activity, and thin layer chromatography (TLC) finger printing profile of three plants (B. ligulata, C. aromaticus, and K. pinnata), most commonly used as Pashanbhed. Materials and Methods: Diuretic potential of methanolic extract (ME) of three plants were evaluated at two dose levels (500 and 1,000 mg/kg p.o.), using normal Wistar rats (Lipschitz method). Furosemide (20 mg/kg p.o.) was used as a standard drug. The effect on urine output and electrolyte changes were measured for 24 h and compared. All MEs were screened preliminarily for their constituents and their TLC finger printing profiles were prepared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni's multiple comparison test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The MEs of all three plants have shown diuresis in normal rats. However, in intercomparison of the ME C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o.) produced more significant diuresis (P < 0.05) and electrolyte excretion compared to other test groups, the effect was at par with furosemide. The ME of these plants showed presence of alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, etc. Conclusion: The ME of C. aromaticus (1,000 mg/kg p.o.) has showed highest diuretic action (4.2) among the tested extracts. This suggests the use of C. aromaticus leaves as “Pashanbhed”; the most effective diuretic drug. PMID:24948861

  1. Factors that influence fatigue status in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and good disease outcome following 6 months of TNF inhibitor therapy: a comparative analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Minnock, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the factors associated with persistent fatigue in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and good disease response to 6 months of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor therapy. Eligible patients with either persistent (PF) or no fatigue (NF) were compared. Using validated questionnaires and bivariate analysis, this cross-sectional survey explored if clinical characteristics, pain, self-efficacy, sleep and mood\\/depression differed between groups. Patients with PF (PF; NF) (n = 28; 28) reported significantly more overall pain (11.3 ± 9.4 (0-33); 6.9 ± 8.9 (0-33)), more recent and current pain intensity (41.4 ± 26.6 (0-80) 24.4 ± 26.6 (0-100) and depression (11.8 ± 7.5 (1-35); 8.2 ± 6.6 (0-26)), than the NF group. There was no significant difference between groups in self-efficacy and both groups experienced poor sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index >5). Despite having good disease response, the PF group had significantly higher rheumatoid factor incidence, disease activity score-28, early morning stiffness duration and lower incidence of ever-failing disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs than the NF group. These findings enhance the fatigue literature in patients with RA prescribed tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibition therapy, identifying the potentially modifiable factors of pain and depression, previously demonstrated to be strongly associated with fatigue in non-biologic populations. In addition, this study highlights the association between persistent fatigue and an on-going state of low disease activity. This infers that more judicious disease management could minimise the symptom burden of pain and depression and consequentially fatigue.

  2. Comparative RNA genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2018-01-01

    small RNAs is their reliance of conserved secondary structures. Large scale sequencing projects, on the other hand, have profoundly changed our understanding of eukaryotic genomes. Pervasively transcribed, they give rise to a plethora of large and evolutionarily extremely flexible noncoding RNAs...... that exert a vastly diverse array of molecule functions. In this chapter we provide a—necessarily incomplete—overview of the current state of comparative analysis of noncoding RNAs, emphasizing computational approaches as a means to gain a global picture of the modern RNA world....

  3. Comparative Genome Viewer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineris, I.; Sales, G.

    2009-01-01

    The amount of information about genomes, both in the form of complete sequences and annotations, has been exponentially increasing in the last few years. As a result there is the need for tools providing a graphical representation of such information that should be comprehensive and intuitive. Visual representation is especially important in the comparative genomics field since it should provide a combined view of data belonging to different genomes. We believe that existing tools are limited in this respect as they focus on a single genome at a time (conservation histograms) or compress alignment representation to a single dimension. We have therefore developed a web-based tool called Comparative Genome Viewer (Cgv): it integrates a bidimensional representation of alignments between two regions, both at small and big scales, with the richness of annotations present in other genome browsers. We give access to our system through a web-based interface that provides the user with an interactive representation that can be updated in real time using the mouse to move from region to region and to zoom in on interesting details.

  4. Comparative Studies for What?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Guedes de Carvalho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ISCPES stands for International Society for Comparative Physical Education and Sports and it is going to celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2018. Since the beginning (Israel 1978 the main goals of the Society were established under a worldwide mind set considering five continents and no discrimination of any kind. The founders wanted to compare Physical Education and Sports across the world, searching for the best practices deserving consideration and applied on the purpose of improving citizen quality of life. The mission still stands for “Compare to learn and improve”. As all the organizations lasting for 39 years, ISCPES experienced several vicissitudes, usually correlated with world economic cycles, social and sports changes, which are in ISS journal articles - International Sport Studies. ISS journal is Scopus indexed, aiming to improve its quality (under evaluation to reach more qualified students, experts, professionals and researchers; doing so it will raise its indexation, which we know it is nowadays a more difficult task. First, because there are more journals trying to compete on this academic fierce competitive market; secondly, because the basic requirements are getting more and more hard to gather in the publishing environment around Physical Education and Sports issues. However, we can promise this will be one of our main strategic goals. Another goal I would like to address on this Editorial is the language issue. We have this second strategic goal, which is to reach most of languages spoken in different continents; besides the English language, we will reach Chinese, Spanish and Portuguese speaking countries. For that reason, we already defined that all the abstracts in English will be translated into Chinese, Spanish and Portuguese words so people can find them on any search browser. That will expand the demand for our journal and articles, increasing the number of potential readers. Of course this opportunity, given by

  5. Manipulator comparative testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.; Fujita, Y.; Maeda, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Manipulator Comparative Testing Program examined differences among manipulator systems from the United States and Japan. The manipulator systems included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, the Model M-2 of Central Research Laboratories Division of Sargent Industries (CRL), and the GCA Corporation PaR Systems Model 6000. The site of testing was the Remote Operations Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) facility, operated by the Fuel Recycle Division in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In all stages of testing, operators using the CRL Model M-2 manipulator had consistently lower times to completion and error rates than they did using other machines. Performance was second best with the Meidensha BILARM 83A in master-slave mode. Performance with the BILARM in switchbox mode and the PaR 6000 manipulator was approximately equivalent in terms of criteria recorded in testing. These data show no impact of force reflection on task performance

  6. Comparative Failure in Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A perennial problem for some scientists is their feeling of comparative failure as scientists. This problem becomes clearer if we consider two major sources of this feeling that are inherent in the vary nature of scientific work. (i In science, strong emphasis is placed on the achievement of recognition; (ii the typical basic scientist works in a community filled with “great men” who have made important and decisive discoveries in their respective fields; they are the acknowledge guiding lights. These esteemed scientists, who have attained honors beyond the reach of most of their colleagues, tend to become models for those who have been trained by them or who have worked under them. As Eiduson has put it in her recent psychological study of basic research scientists “Scientists: are idols-oriented.”

  7. Comparative Failure in Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney Glaser, PhD, Hon Phd

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A perennial problem for some scientists is their feeling of comparative failure as scientists. This problem becomes clearer if we consider two major sources of this feeling that are inherent in the vary nature of scientific work. (i In science, strong emphasis is placed on the achievement of recognition; (ii the typical basic scientist works in a community filled with “great men” who have made important and decisive discoveries in their respective fields; they are the acknowledge guiding lights. These esteemed scientists, who have attained honors beyond the reach of most of their colleagues, tend to become models for those who have been trained by them or who have worked under them. As Eiduson has put it in her recent psychological study of basic research scientists “Scientists: are idols-oriented.”

  8. Comparative Supreme Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditlev Tamm

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the great variety of Supreme Courts in the world today and presents some selected courts. Supreme Courts are found in most countries both as only apex courts or in a courts’ system where also supreme administrative courts or constitutional courts are found. The starting point is the variation of supreme justice in the Nordic countries where one apex court is the system of Denmark and Norway whereas administrative courts are found in Sweden and Finland. Constitutional courts stem from the European tradition and are most abundant in Europe and in countries with a civil law system but especially in Africa they are also found in common law countries. Mexico is mentioned as a specific example of a Supreme Court that has taken upon itself to be a main player in the endeavour to communicate the law to a general audience. The article is a presentation with samples of what is going to be a project on comparative supreme justice in which the position of supreme courts in the various states, the recruitment scheme and competence of the courts and other such factors will be analyzed on a global basis.

  9. Operations dashboard: comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramly, Noor Nashriq; Ismail, Ahmad Zuhairi; Aziz, Mohd Haris; Ahmad, Nurul Haszeli

    2011-10-01

    In this present days and age, there are increasing needs for companies to monitor application and infrastructure health. Apart from having proactive measures to secure their application and infrastructure, many see monitoring dashboards as crucial investment in disaster preparedness. As companies struggle to find the best solution to cater for their needs and interest for monitoring their application and infrastructure's health, this paper summarizes the studies made on several known off-the-shelf operations dashboard and in-house developed dashboard. A few criteria of good dashboard are collected from previous studies carried out by several researchers and rank them according to importance and business needs. The finalized criteria that will be discussed in later sections are data visualization, performance indicator, dashboard personalization, audit capability and alert/ notification. Comparative studies between several popular dashboards were then carried out to determine whether they met these criteria that we derived from the first exercise. The findings hopefully can be used to educate and provide an overview of selecting the best IT application and infrastructure operations dashboard that suit business needs, thus become the main contribution of this paper.

  10. Comparative Genomics of Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien J. Mazurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the apicomplexan parasites, Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, were considered the same species. However, the two parasites, now considered distinct species, exhibit significant differences in host range, infectivity, and pathogenicity, and their sequenced genomes exhibit only 95–97% identity. The availability of the complete genome sequences of these organisms provides the potential to identify the genetic variations that are responsible for the phenotypic differences between the two parasites. We compared the genome organization and structure, gene composition, the metabolic and other pathways, and the local sequence identity between the genes of these two Cryptosporidium species. Our observations show that the phenotypic differences between C. hominis and C. parvum are not due to gross genome rearrangements, structural alterations, gene deletions or insertions, metabolic capabilities, or other obvious genomic alterations. Rather, the results indicate that these genomes exhibit a remarkable structural and compositional conservation and suggest that the phenotypic differences observed are due to subtle variations in the sequences of proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and its host.

  11. Non-comparative and comparative advertising in oligopolistic markets

    OpenAIRE

    Alipranti, Maria; Mitrokostas, Evangelos; Petrakis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We study firms' advertising strategies in an oligopolistic market in which both non-comparative and comparative advertising are present. We show that in equilibrium firms mix over the two types of advertising, with the intensity of comparative advertising exceeding that of non-comparative advertising; moreover, that the intensity of comparative increases relatively to non-comparative advertising as market competition intensifies. Interestingly, the use of comparative advertising may lead to h...

  12. Comparative Healthcare: Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Mohammed Ali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the third in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to diabetes inBangaldesh and Australia respectively. The social and medical consequences of this chronic conditionare highlighted through the approach to patients at various stages of the disease from two nationalperspectives. An astonishing 7% of the 153 million people are reported to have diabetes in Bangladesh. Manyremain undiagnosed. Delays in diagnosis or management of diabetes have life limiting consequences for thosewho can ill afford private health care in the poorer nation. Screening and early intervention appear to bedenied to many in the developing country. The context is very different with Australians very fortunate to havea coordinated primary health care sector. The outlook for Bangladeshis with uncontrolled diabetes or withtreatable sequela would be unacceptable in Australia. At every stage in the disease trajectory the doctorsemphasise the importance of life style modification, a particular challenge in affluent Australia with its growingincidence of life style related pre morbid conditions in an increasingly sedentary population. A corner stone ofthe support of people with diabetes is the role of nurses and allied health professionals. With a fundedcommitment to multidisciplinary care in the community people with diabetes in Australia have access tosupport closer to home whereas those in Bangladesh remain heavily dependent on specialist, hospital basedservices. One can only speculate how Bangladesh will cope as its population ages and there are an everincreasing proportion of people who require urgent and expensive medical interventions. At the very leastthere is a strong case for greater investment in primary care especially to limit the economic consequences ofdiabetes and other chronic conditions. Finally as in other articles in this series we would like to emphasise that,the views expressed are those of the authors and do

  13. Comparative waste forms study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, J.W.; Lokken, R.O.; Shade, J.W.; Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A number of alternative process and waste form options exist for the immobilization of nuclear wastes. Although data exists on the characterization of these alternative waste forms, a straightforward comparison of product properties is difficult, due to the lack of standardized testing procedures. The characterization study described in this report involved the application of the same volatility, mechanical strength and leach tests to ten alternative waste forms, to assess product durability. Bulk property, phase analysis and microstructural examination of the simulated products, whose waste loading varied from 5% to 100% was also conducted. The specific waste forms investigated were as follows: Cold Pressed and Sintered PW-9 Calcine; Hot Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Hot Isostatic Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Cold Pressed and Sintered SPC-5B Supercalcine; Hot Isostatic pressed SPC-5B Supercalcine; Sintered PW-9 and 50% Glass Frit; Glass 76-68; Celsian Glass Ceramic; Type II Portland Cement and 10% PW-9 Calcine; and Type II Portland Cement and 10% SPC-5B Supercalcine. Bulk property data were used to calculate and compare the relative quantities of waste form volume produced at a spent fuel processing rate of 5 metric ton uranium/day. This quantity ranged from 3173 L/day (5280 Kg/day) for 10% SPC-5B supercalcine in cement to 83 L/day (294 Kg/day) for 100% calcine. Mechanical strength, volatility, and leach resistance tests provide data related to waste form durability. Glass, glass-ceramic and supercalcine ranked high in waste form durability where as the 100% PW-9 calcine ranked low. All other materials ranked between these two groupings

  14. Differences in prefrontal blood oxygenation during an acute multitasking stressor in ecstasy polydrug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C A; Wetherell, M A; Fisk, J E; Montgomery, C

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are well documented in ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) users, with such deficits being taken as evidence of dysregulation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system. More recently neuroimaging has been used to corroborate these deficits. The present study aimed to assess multitasking performance in ecstasy polydrug users, polydrug users and drug-naive individuals. It was predicted that ecstasy polydrug users would perform worse than non-users on the behavioural measure and this would be supported by differences in cortical blood oxygenation. In the study, 20 ecstasy-polydrug users, 17 polydrug users and 19 drug-naive individuals took part. On day 1, drug use history was taken and questionnaire measures were completed. On day 2, participants completed a 20-min multitasking stressor while brain blood oxygenation was measured using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). There were no significant differences between the three groups on the subscales of the multitasking stressor. In addition, there were no significant differences on self-report measures of perceived workload (NASA Task Load Index). In terms of mood, ecstasy users were significantly less calm and less relaxed compared with drug-naive controls. There were also significant differences at three voxels on the fNIRS, indicating decreased blood oxygenation in ecstasy users compared with drug-naive controls at voxel 2 (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), voxel 14 and voxel 16 (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), and compared with polydrug controls at V14. The results of the present study provide support for changes in brain activation during performance of demanding tasks in ecstasy polydrug users, which could be related to cerebral vasoconstriction.

  15. Comparative law as method and the method of comparative law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, J.C.; Adams, M.; Heirbaut, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses both the justificatory role of comparative law within legal research (comparative law as method) and the method of comparative law itself. In this connection two questions will be answered: 1. Is comparative law a method, or a set of methods, for legal research? 2. Does

  16. Dopamine transporter density assessed with [123]IPT SPECT before and after risperidone treatment in children with tourette's disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Won Gee

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's disorder (TD), which is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor tics and one or more vocal tics, is known to be associated with abnormalities in the dopaminergic system. To testify our hypothesis that risperidone would improve tic symptoms of TD patients through the change of the dopaminergic system, we measured the dopamine transporter (DAT) densities between drug-naive children with TD and normal children, and investigated the DAT density before and after treatment with risperidone in drug-naive children with TD, using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]IPT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [ 123I ]IPT SPECT imaging and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale-Korean version (YGTSS-K) for assessing the tic symptom severity were carried out before and after treatment with risperidone for 8 weeks in nine drug-naive children with TD. Eleven normal children also underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after an intravenous administration of [ 123 I]IPT. Drug-naive children with TD had a significantly greater increase in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both basal ganglia compared with the normal children. However, no significant difference in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia before and after treatment with risperidone in children with TD was found, although tic symptoms were significantly improved with risperidone. These findings suggest that DAT densities are directly associated with the pathophysiology of TD, however, that the effect of risperidone on tic symptoms in children with TD is not attributed to the change of dopaminergic system

  17. Dopamine transporter density assessed with [{sup 123}]IPT SPECT before and after risperidone treatment in children with tourette's disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Won Gee [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2004-02-01

    Tourette's disorder (TD), which is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor tics and one or more vocal tics, is known to be associated with abnormalities in the dopaminergic system. To testify our hypothesis that risperidone would improve tic symptoms of TD patients through the change of the dopaminergic system, we measured the dopamine transporter (DAT) densities between drug-naive children with TD and normal children, and investigated the DAT density before and after treatment with risperidone in drug-naive children with TD, using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane ([{sup 123}I]IPT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [{sup 123I}]IPT SPECT imaging and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale-Korean version (YGTSS-K) for assessing the tic symptom severity were carried out before and after treatment with risperidone for 8 weeks in nine drug-naive children with TD. Eleven normal children also underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after an intravenous administration of [{sup 123}I]IPT. Drug-naive children with TD had a significantly greater increase in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both basal ganglia compared with the normal children. However, no significant difference in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia before and after treatment with risperidone in children with TD was found, although tic symptoms were significantly improved with risperidone. These findings suggest that DAT densities are directly associated with the pathophysiology of TD, however, that the effect of risperidone on tic symptoms in children with TD is not attributed to the change of dopaminergic system.

  18. Dopamine transporter density in the basal ganglia assessed with {sup 123}I-IPT SPECT in children with Tourette's deosoder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y. H.; Cheon, K. A.; Yoon, M. J.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, J. D. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. H.; Choi, T. H. [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Previous studies in patients with Tourette's disorder (TD) provided evidences of presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction, demonstrating increased dopamine transporter densities. We investigated dopamine transporter densities using {sup 123}I-IPT SPECT in drug-naive children with TD and postulated that dopamine transporter density reflected dopamine concentrations. 9 drug-naive children with ADHD and 8 normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT 2 hours after administration of {sup 123}I-IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses for assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG. We then investigated correlation between the severity of tics in children with TD assessed with the YGTSS and specific/nonspecific binding ratio on BG. Drug-naive children with TD showed a significantly increased specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG compared with normal children. We found no significant correlation between severity of tics assessed with YGTSS in children with TD and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in BG. These findings support the hypothesis of dopamine dysregulation in presynaptic dopamine function of BG being involved in pathophysiology of TD.

  19. Dopamine transporter density in the basal ganglia assessed with 123I-IPT SPECT in children with Tourette's deosoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Y. H.; Cheon, K. A.; Yoon, M. J.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, H. H.; Choi, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies in patients with Tourette's disorder (TD) provided evidences of presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction, demonstrating increased dopamine transporter densities. We investigated dopamine transporter densities using 123 I-IPT SPECT in drug-naive children with TD and postulated that dopamine transporter density reflected dopamine concentrations. 9 drug-naive children with ADHD and 8 normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT 2 hours after administration of 123 I-IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses for assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG. We then investigated correlation between the severity of tics in children with TD assessed with the YGTSS and specific/nonspecific binding ratio on BG. Drug-naive children with TD showed a significantly increased specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG compared with normal children. We found no significant correlation between severity of tics assessed with YGTSS in children with TD and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in BG. These findings support the hypothesis of dopamine dysregulation in presynaptic dopamine function of BG being involved in pathophysiology of TD

  20. Site compare scripts and output

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Monthly site compare scripts and output used to generate the model/ob plots and statistics in the manuscript. The AQS hourly site compare output files are not...

  1. Comparative Canadian-American Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, Macel D.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines topics for comparative study of Canada and the United States. Includes geography, politics, settlement patterns, economics, education, religion, and sports. Suggests materials to aid teachers in formulating comparative approaches to Canadian and U.S. studies. (DB)

  2. Comparators in nanometer CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Goll, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the complete spectrum of the fundamentals of clocked, regenerative comparators, their state-of-the-art, advanced CMOS technologies, innovative comparators inclusive circuit aspects, their characterization and properties. Starting from the basics of comparators and the transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS, seven high-performance comparators developed by the authors in 120nm and 65nm CMOS are described extensively. Methods and measurement circuits for the characterization of advanced comparators are introduced. A synthesis of the largely differing aspects of demands on modern comparators and the properties of devices being available in nanometer CMOS, which are posed by the so-called nanometer hell of physics, is accomplished. The book summarizes the state of the art in integrated comparators. Advanced measurement circuits for characterization will be introduced as well as the method of characterization by bit-error analysis usually being used for characterization of optical receivers. ...

  3. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs. This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  4. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs). This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  5. A case study of illicit preparation of antirheumatic analgesic with phenylbutazone as active ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, C E; Huat, L B

    1989-06-01

    The abuse of phenylbutazone among rheumatoid arthritis patients has recently become a subject of interest. Unscrupulous manufacturers take advantage of the miraculous analgesic property of phenylbutazone and deliberately add this toxic drug in their preparations without declaring its presence on the label. In a recent survey, many such illicit preparations were seized from Chinese medical halls in Johor and sent to the Department of Chemistry, Johor Bahru for analysis. Here a Gas Chromatograph Mass Selective Detector (GC-MSD) method was developed for the determination of phenylbutazone in illicit traditional preparations.

  6. Patient participation in decisions about disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nota, Ingrid; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2014-01-01

    Background Involvement of patients in decision-making about medication is currently being advocated. This study examined (the concordance between) inflammatory arthritis patients’ preferred and perceived involvement in decision-making in general, and in four specific decisions about

  7. Manejo perioperatorio de la terapia antirreumática = Perioperative management of antirheumatic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Naranjo, Luis Alonso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cuando se somete a cirugía a los pacientes con enfermedades reumáticas, una decisión difícil es si se suspende o no la medicación antirreumática durante el período perioperatorio. La mayor dificultad reside en lograr un equilibrio entre mantener el control de la enfermedad y optimizar la cicatrización de la herida quirúrgica, así como reducir al mínimo el riesgo de in­fección postoperatoria y el de otros tipos de morbilidad. En el presente manuscrito revisamos los datos disponibles sobre el uso de los glucocorticoides (GC, los medicamentos antirreu­máticos modificadores de la enfermedad (DMARD y los productos biológicos en el período perioperatorio de pacientes con enfermedades reumáticas.

  8. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - VII. Biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gatto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of biological agents has been a major turning-point in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. This review describes the principle milestones that have led, through the knowledge of the structure and functions of nucleic acids, to the development of production techniques of the three major families of biological agents: proteins, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. A brief history has also been traced of the cytokines most involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IL-1 and TNF and the steps which have led to the use of the main biological drugs in rheumatology: anakinra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and rituximab.

  9. Constitutions compared : An introduction to comparative constitutional law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Aalt Willem

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to comparative constitutional law. For each area of constitutional law, a general introduction and a comparative overview is provided, which is then followed by more detailed country chapters on that specific area. The subjects covered are the origins

  10. Comparative Education Histories: A Postscript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzon, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Comparative education is two centuries old. Many mainstream historical narratives claim that the field began with the iconic opus of Marc-Antoine Jullien de Paris (1817). This article offers to re-theorise the histories of comparative education. It suggests casting a far-sighted and panoramic look at the field's origins. An underlying assumption…

  11. Comparable Worth (The Saga Continues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Defines four distinct theories of wage discrimination: equal pay for equal work, equal pay for similar work, equal pay for equal or comparable worth, and pay parity. Court cases involving comparable worth are discussed and statistics cited. The effect of job evaluations and the power of the marketplace are examined also. (CT)

  12. Decreased prolactin response to hypoglycaemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with disease activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsbouts, A.M.M.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Putte, L.B.A. van de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare basal and stimulated prolactin levels between patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls, and to assess the effects of antirheumatic treatment on prolactin concentrations. METHODS: Serum prolactin was assessed under basal conditions and during an insulin tolerance

  13. Risk of serious infection in biological treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Cameron, Chris; Noorbaloochi, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serious infections are a major concern for patients considering treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence is inconsistent as to whether biological drugs are associated with an increased risk of serious infection compared with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMAR...

  14. Selective involvement of ERK and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in early rheumatoid arthritis (1987 ACR criteria compared to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria): a prospective study aimed at identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Launay, Daphne; van de Sande, Marleen G. H.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Grabiec, Aleksander M.; van de Sande, Gijs P. M.; Lehmann, K. Aad; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; van Baarsen, Lisa G. M.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the expression and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in patients with early arthritis who are disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naive. Methods A total of 50 patients with early arthritis who were DMARD naive (disease duration <1 year) were

  15. Physician Compare National Downloadable File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Physician Compare National Downloadable File is organized at the individual eligible professional level; each line is unique at the professional/enrollment...

  16. CompareTests-R package

    Science.gov (United States)

    CompareTests is an R package to estimate agreement and diagnostic accuracy statistics for two diagnostic tests when one is conducted on only a subsample of specimens. A standard test is observed on all specimens.

  17. Comparative cost of risk survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the annual cost of risk to the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and to compare it with that of other state transportation agencies. ADOT is charged with the responsibility of designing, build...

  18. Comparative genomics for biodiversity conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Grueber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic approaches are gathering momentum in biology and emerging opportunities lie in the creative use of comparative molecular methods for revealing the processes that influence diversity of wildlife. However, few comparative genomic studies are performed with explicit and specific objectives to aid conservation of wild populations. Here I provide a brief overview of comparative genomic approaches that offer specific benefits to biodiversity conservation. Because conservation examples are few, I draw on research from other areas to demonstrate how comparing genomic data across taxa may be used to inform the characterisation of conservation units and studies of hybridisation, as well as studies that provide conservation outcomes from a better understanding of the drivers of divergence. A comparative approach can also provide valuable insight into the threatening processes that impact rare species, such as emerging diseases and their management in conservation. In addition to these opportunities, I note areas where additional research is warranted. Overall, comparing and contrasting the genomic composition of threatened and other species provide several useful tools for helping to preserve the molecular biodiversity of the global ecosystem.

  19. Indirect treatment comparison of abatacept with methotrexate versus other biologic agents for active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy in the United kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyot, Patricia; Taylor, Peter C; Christensen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of abatacept and alternative biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) in the United Kingdom.......To compare the efficacy of abatacept and alternative biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) in the United Kingdom....

  20. Impact of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor treatment on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bøyesen, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice.......To compare radiographic progression during treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and subsequent treatment with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNF-I) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in clinical practice....

  1. Non-Comparative versus Comparative Advertising of Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Winand Emons; Claude Fluet

    2011-01-01

    Two firms produce a good with a horizontal and a vertical character- istic called quality. The difference in the unobservable quality levels determines how the firms share the market. We consider two scenar- ios: In the first one, firms disclose quality; in the second one, they send costly signals thereof. Under non-comparative advertising a firm advertises its own quality, under comparative advertising a firm adver- tises the quality differential. In either scenario, under comparat...

  2. .Compar~ive Economic Advantage Analysis of Ahernative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The objecth'e l?f this paper was to analyze the comparative agricultural economic advantage and extellt of policy distortion in alternative agricultural production activities in various agro-ecological zones andfamling systems, in Tanzania. The Domestic Resource Cosf (DRC) ratio den'vedfrom the. Policy. Analysis ...

  3. Nuclear power ecology: comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.; Lips'ka, A.Yi.; Pisanko, Zh.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    Ecological effects of different energy sources are compared. Main actions for further nuclear power development - safety increase and waste management, are noted. Reasons of restrained public position to nuclear power and role of social and political factors in it are analyzed. An attempt is undertaken to separate real difficulties of nuclear power from imaginary ones that appear in some mass media. International actions of environment protection are noted. Risk factors at different energy source using are compared. The results of analysis indicate that ecological influence and risk for nuclear power are of minimum

  4. BOOK REVIEW: The Current Comparator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersons, Oskars

    1989-01-01

    This 120-page book is a concise, yet comprehensive, clearly-written and well-illustrated monograph that covers the subject matter from basic principles through design, construction and calibration details to the principal applications. The book will be useful, as a primer, to the uninitiated and, as a reference book to the practitioner involved with transformer-type ratio devices. The length of the book and the style of presentation will not overburden any informed reader. The described techniques and the cited references are primarily from the work at the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Any omissions, however, are not serious with respect to coverage of the subject matter, since most of the development work has been done at NRC. The role of transformers and transformer-like devices for establishing accurate voltage and current ratios has been recognized for over half a century. Transformer techniques were much explored and developed in the fifties and sixties for accuracy levels suitable for standards laboratories. Three-winding voltage transformers were developed for scaling of impedances in connection with the calculable Thompson Lampard capacitor; three-winding current transformers or current comparators were initially explored for the calibration of current transformers and later for specialized impedance measurements. Extensive development of the current comparator and its applications has been and is still being conducted at the NRC by a team that was started and, until his retirement, led by N L Kusters. The team is now led by W J M Moore. He and P N Miljanic, the authors of this book, have had the principal roles in the development of the current comparator. It is fortunate for the field of metrology that considerabe resources and a talented group of researchers were available to do this development along with mechanisms that were available to transfer this technology to a private sector instrument manufacturer and, thus, disseminate it world wide

  5. Comparative assembly hubs: Web-accessible browsers for comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Raney, Brian J.; Armstrong, Joel; Clawson, Hiram; Zweig, Ann; Karolchik, Donna; Kent, William James; Haussler, David; Paten, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Researchers now have access to large volumes of genome sequences for comparative analysis, some generated by the plethora of public sequencing projects and, increasingly, from individual efforts. It is not possible, or necessarily desirable, that the public genome browsers attempt to curate all these data. Instead, a wealth of powerful tools is emerging to empower users to create their own visualizations and browsers. Results: We introduce a pipeline to easily generate collections of Web-accessible UCSC Genome Browsers interrelated by an alignment. It is intended to democratize our comparative genomic browser resources, serving the broad and growing community of evolutionary genomicists and facilitating easy public sharing via the Internet. Using the alignment, all annotations and the alignment itself can be efficiently viewed with reference to any genome in the collection, symmetrically. A new, intelligently scaled alignment display makes it simple to view all changes between the genomes at all levels of resolution, from substitutions to complex structural rearrangements, including duplications. To demonstrate this work, we create a comparative assembly hub containing 57 Escherichia coli and 9 Shigella genomes and show examples that highlight their unique biology. Availability and implementation: The source code is available as open source at: https://github.com/glennhickey/progressiveCactus The E.coli and Shigella genome hub is now a public hub listed on the UCSC browser public hubs Web page. Contact: benedict@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25138168

  6. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions--Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of metiers mainly…

  7. Job satisfaction in fisheries compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnac, R.; Bavinck, M.; Monnereau, I.

    2012-01-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions—Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and

  8. Paracetamol suppositories: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, S; Kenny, D; Ward, O C; Sabra, K

    1989-01-01

    Paracetamol suppositories in two different bases were given to children who had fever after operations. Plasma concentrations and the effect on temperature were compared. There was a significant correlation between peak plasma concentrations and maximum drop in temperature. A lipophilic base produced better results than a hydrophilic base. PMID:2817936

  9. Paracetamol suppositories: a comparative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, S; Kenny, D; Ward, O C; Sabra, K

    1989-01-01

    Paracetamol suppositories in two different bases were given to children who had fever after operations. Plasma concentrations and the effect on temperature were compared. There was a significant correlation between peak plasma concentrations and maximum drop in temperature. A lipophilic base produced better results than a hydrophilic base.

  10. Higher holonomies: comparing two constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaetz, Florian; Arias Abad, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    We compare two different constructions of higher-dimensional parallel transport. On the one hand, there is the two-dimensional parallel transport associated with 2-connections on 2-bundles studied by Baez–Schreiber [2], Faria Martins–Picken [11] and Schreiber–Waldorf [12]. On the other hand...

  11. Analysing and Comparing Encodability Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Peters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Encodings or the proof of their absence are the main way to compare process calculi. To analyse the quality of encodings and to rule out trivial or meaningless encodings, they are augmented with quality criteria. There exists a bunch of different criteria and different variants of criteria in order to reason in different settings. This leads to incomparable results. Moreover it is not always clear whether the criteria used to obtain a result in a particular setting do indeed fit to this setting. We show how to formally reason about and compare encodability criteria by mapping them on requirements on a relation between source and target terms that is induced by the encoding function. In particular we analyse the common criteria full abstraction, operational correspondence, divergence reflection, success sensitiveness, and respect of barbs; e.g. we analyse the exact nature of the simulation relation (coupled simulation versus bisimulation that is induced by different variants of operational correspondence. This way we reduce the problem of analysing or comparing encodability criteria to the better understood problem of comparing relations on processes.

  12. Comparability of happiness across nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCross-national research on happiness is soaring, but doubts about the comparability of happiness remain. One source of doubt is the possibility of cultural measurement bias. Another source of doubt is the theory that happiness depends on standards of the good life that differ widely

  13. Time in internationally comparative studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Luyten, Johannes W.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, illustrative internationally comparative data about time at school, time spent in out-of-school programs, and homework/ individual study time are presented. In the first section this is done in a more descriptive way, while in the second and third sections, the association between

  14. Comparative genomic hybridization: practical guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuken, J.W.M.; Sprenger, S.H.; Wesseling, P.

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a technique used to identify copy number changes throughout a genome. Until now, hundreds of CGH studies have been published reporting chromosomal imbalances in a large variety of human neoplasms. Additionally, technical improvements of specific steps in a

  15. Teaching Strategy: Comparing Rights Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Engages students in comparing the rights proclaimed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) with those present in the United States Bill of Rights and other constitutional amendments. Challenges the students to explore reasons for the presence or absence of certain rights and to reflect on the role of the government. (CMK)

  16. A Law of Comparative Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurstone, L. L.

    1994-01-01

    The law of comparative judgment is described, and applications in the measurement of psychological values are reviewed. The law defines the psychological continuum and expresses the experimentally observed proportion of judgments as a function of scale values of stimuli, their respective discriminal dispersions, and the correlation between paired…

  17. Countries compared on public performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jedid-Jah Jonker

    2012-01-01

    How well is the public sector performing? Are citizens being well served? This report compares the performance of nine public services in 28 developed countries over the period 1995-2009. Four sectors - education, health care, social safety and housing - are studied in some detail, while the

  18. Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization, polyphenol composition and cytotoxicity of the leaf and stem of Cissus multistriata. ... standard anti-inflammatory drug (Indomethacin) used. The extracts are less toxic to the cell (Arthenia salina) with their LC/EC50 higher than that of standard potassium dichromate ...

  19. Comparative Genomics of the Cucurbitaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome size for watermelon, melon, cucumber, and pumpkin is 425, 454, 367, and 502 Mbp, respectively, and considered medium size as compared with most other crops. Whole-genome duplication is common in angiosperm plants. Research has revealed a paleohexaploidy (') event in the common ancestor of...

  20. Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... In this present study, a comparative evaluation of the antioxidant capacities, phenol and polyphenol composition, membrane stabilization, and cytotoxicity to brine shrimps (Arthemia salina) of the leaf and stem extracts of Cissus multistriata were carried out. 2,2- Diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical.

  1. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ANTHROPOMETRIC DIMENSIONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the anthropometric body dimensions of the male and female agricultural workers was conducted in South-Eastern Nigeria to ascertain the variations that exist among the body characteristics/dimensions of the male and female agricultural workers in the area. Thirty (30) anthropometric dimensions ...

  2. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: comparative effectiveness of tocilizumab with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka T

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Toshio Tanaka,1,2 Yoshihiro Hishitani,3 Atsushi Ogata2,3 1Department of Clinical Application of Biologics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Immunopathology, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatic Diseases, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation, systemic inflammation, and immunological abnormalities. Because cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 play a major role in the development of RA, their targeting could constitute a reasonable novel therapeutic strategy for treating RA. Indeed, worldwide clinical trials of TNF inhibiting biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs including infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, and etanercept as well as the humanized anti-human IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, have demonstrated outstanding clinical efficacy and tolerable safety profiles, resulting in worldwide approval for using these bDMARDs to treat moderate to severe active RA in patients with an inadequate response to synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs. Although bDMARDs have elicited to a paradigm shift in the treatment of RA due to the prominent efficacy that had not been previously achieved by sDMARDs, a substantial percentage of patients failed primary or secondary responses to bDMARD therapy. Because RA is a heterogeneous disease in which TNF-α and IL-6 play overlapping but distinct pathological roles, further studies are required to determine the best use of TNF inhibitors and tocilizumab in individual RA patients. Keywords: interleukin-6, rheumatoid arthritis, adalimumab, biologic

  4. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  5. Episodic Memory: A Comparative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Historically, episodic memory has been described as autonoetic, personally relevant, complex, context-rich, and allowing mental time travel. In contrast, semantic memory, which is theorized to be free of context and personal relevance, is noetic and consists of general knowledge of facts about the world. The field of comparative psychology has adopted this distinction in order to study episodic memory in non-human animals. Our aim in this article is not only to reflect on the concept of episodic memory and the experimental approaches used in comparative psychology to study this phenomenon, but also to provide a critical analysis of these paradigms. We conclude the article by providing new avenues for future research. PMID:23781179

  6. Becoming fit for transnational comparability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John Benedicto; Ulf, Olsson; Kenneth, Petersson

    2018-01-01

    of modern nations, if they are to succeed in “an increasingly competitive global race among knowledge economies.” In the case of the Bologna Process, the transformative effects are often rather direct. More often, however, effects touch upon national educational agendas in indirect ways, in terms...... of an emerging, overarching logic and governance technologies like comparisons, stocktaking, standards, performance indicators, benchmarking, and best practice. These transnational templates make national teacher education programs comparable. They are fueled by mutual peer pressure among competing nations....... Consequently, Danish teacher education discourse has emerged from a distinctly national vocational seminary tradition, into a modernized university college discourse that increasingly fits the transnational templates of comparability, albeit at a slower pace than her Swedish neighbor. It is often difficult...

  7. Comparative Genomics in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, Martin; Sammeth, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Genomes can be compared at different levels of divergence, either between species or within species. Within species genomes can be compared between different subpopulations, such as human subpopulations from different continents. Investigating the genomic differences between different human subpopulations is important when studying complex diseases that are affected by many genetic variants, as the variants involved can differ between populations. The 1000 Genomes Project collected genome-scale variation data for 2504 human individuals from 26 different populations, enabling a systematic comparison of variation between human subpopulations. In this chapter, we present step-by-step a basic protocol for the identification of population-specific variants employing the 1000 Genomes data. These variants are subsequently further investigated for those that affect the proteome or RNA splice sites, to investigate potentially biologically relevant differences between the populations.

  8. Introduction to SamplerCompare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine B. Thompson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SamplerCompare is an R package for comparing the performance of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC samplers. It samples from a collection of distributions with a collection of MCMC methods over a range of tuning parameters. Then, using log density evaluations per uncorrelated observation as a figure of merit, it generates a grid of plots showing the results of the simulation. It comes with a collection of predefined distributions and samplers and provides R and C interfaces for defining additional ones. It also provides the means to import simulation data generated by external systems. This document provides background on the package and demonstrates the basics of running simulations, visualizing results, and defining distributions and samplers in R.

  9. Comparative constructions in old Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Brăescu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyse degree adjectival constructions in old Romanian texts. We focus on the comparative of superiority, taking into account in the first place the grammaticalization stage of the degree markers. The structures from the old texts contain polyfunctional units in competition; some of them enter a complex process of specialisation (mai ‘more’, while others disappear (camai. Afterwards, we focus on the realizations of the comparative complement in the corpus analysed: prepositional phrases headed by the prepositions ca, decît, de ‘than’. We want to see if we can establish any constraints in the use of these prepositions. We pay attention to the word order disharmonies encountered in the old texts. The configurations with pre-adjectival complements are related to the existence of certain relics of the non-configurational syntax in old Romanian.

  10. A comparative perspective on erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takashi; Maekawa, Shun; Nagasawa, Kazumichi; Okui, Takehito; Tanizaki, Yuta

    2016-07-01

    The acquisition of fundamental information by the use of recent technologies, including omics-based molecular analyses and total RNA sequencing, has opened the door to further advances in physiological studies on new animal models. Currently, we are endeavoring to develop a comparative hematology protocol in order to build a discovery platform. All vertebrates, with the exception of a few species, have universally peripheral erythrocytes and hemoglobin, suggesting erythropoiesis to be an evolutionary index.

  11. Comparability of happiness across nations

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhoven, Ruut

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCross-national research on happiness is soaring, but doubts about the comparability of happiness remain. One source of doubt is the possibility of cultural measurement bias. Another source of doubt is the theory that happiness depends on standards of the good life that differ widely across cultures. These qualms are checked using the available data on differences in average happiness across nations. It appears that cultural measurement bias is modest at best. The data show meaning...

  12. Comparative study of mountain sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Cuba Caparó, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In order to make a comparative study of Mountain Sickness affecting humans and cattle and sheep has been reviewed briefly the clinical, hematologic and pathologic aspects found in the literature. The anatomic correlation of clinical symptoms and major injuries in the bovine and ovine, emphasizing, among other things, the similarity of symptoms and lesions observed in the myocardium and the adrenal cortex does. Mountain Sickness In the three species considered in this study polycythemia is one...

  13. Umanesimo contemporaneo e letterature comparate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lombardi

    2013-12-01

    È a tale fine che si vuole mettere in luce il ruolo delle Letterature Comparate: in un rapporto che si auspica collaborativo e non competitivo con le altre discipline umanistiche, la disciplina può dare un contributo fondamentale nell’orientare questo sguardo ad ampio raggio e, attraverso l’insegnamento e la ricerca, nel costruire una cultura autonoma, duratura e critica per le moderne democrazie

  14. Comparative Opinion Mining: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Varathan, Kasturi Dewi; Giachanou, Anastasia; Crestani, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Opinion mining refers to the use of natural language processing, text analysis and computational linguistics to identify and extract subjective information in textual material. Opinion mining, also known as sentiment analysis, has received a lot of attention in recent times, as it provides a number of tools to analyse the public opinion on a number of different topics. Comparative opinion mining is a subfield of opinion mining that deals with identifying and extracting information that is exp...

  15. Detecting selection needs comparative data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hubisz, Melissa J.

    2005-01-01

    Positive selection at the molecular level is usually indicated by an increase in the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) in comparative data. However, Plotkin et al. 1 describe a new method for detecting positive selection based on a single nucleotide sequence. We show here...... that this method is particularly sensitive to assumptions regarding the underlying mutational processes and does not provide a reliable way to identify positive selection....

  16. BANK RATING. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batrancea Ioan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Banks in Romania offers its customers a wide range of products but which involves both risk taking. Therefore researchers seek to build rating models to help managers of banks to risk of non-recovery of loans and interest. In the following we highlight rating Raiffeisen Bank, BCR-ERSTE Bank and Transilvania Bank, based on the models CAAMPL and Stickney making a comparative analysis of the two rating models.

  17. Comparative optimism about healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Gudrun; Klusmann, Verena; Schupp, Harald T; Renner, Britta

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated people's perception of their own as compared to their peers' healthy eating and related these perceptions to actual healthy eating, BMI, and subsequent healthy eating behavior. Data were collected within the framework of the longitudinal cohort study Konstanz Life Study (T1: N = 770; T2: N = 510). Our results demonstrated an optimistic bias on the group level. Specifically, people rated their own eating behavior as healthier on average than that of their average peers. This comparative optimism occurred even when actual healthy eating was unfavorable and BMI was high. However, it increased with actual healthy eating behavior. Importantly, optimistic perceptions were positively related to the intention to eat healthily and healthy eating six months later. Hence, the results suggest that an optimistic comparative view of one's own healthy eating is grounded in reality and boosts rather than deters subsequent health behavior. This implies that there might not be a need to reduce optimistic perceptions of healthy eating behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Body mass in comparative primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R J; Jungers, W L

    1997-06-01

    Data are presented on adult body mass for 230 of 249 primate species, based on a review of the literature and previously unpublished data. The issues involved in collecting data on adult body mass are discussed, including the definition of adults, the effects of habitat and pregnancy, the strategy for pooling data on single species from multiple studies, and use of an appropriate number of significant figures. An analysis of variability in body mass indicates that the coefficient of variation for body mass increases with increasing species mean mass. Evaluation of several previous body mass reviews reveals a number of shortcomings with data that have been used often in comparative studies.

  19. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  20. Comparing India and the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Balagangadhara

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, I have been pursuing an unorthodox way of studying cultural differences, focusing mainly on the Indian and the western cultures. Because I believe that one can answer questions about the circumscription of the words ‘Indian’ and ‘western’ cultures satisfactorily (Balangangadhara, 1994, I will assume their intelligibility in what follows. In this paper, I want to raise a rather intriguing problem about comparing these two cultures. I shall do that without looking at other approaches to the issue and in the form of an argument. In order to come to the point quickly, let me make use of Said’s 'Orientalism.'

  1. Building and using comparable corpora

    CERN Document Server

    Sharoff, Serge; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Fung, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The 1990s saw a paradigm change in the use of corpus-driven methods in NLP. In the field of multilingual NLP (such as machine translation and terminology mining) this implied the use of parallel corpora. However, parallel resources are relatively scarce: many more texts are produced daily by native speakers of any given language than translated. This situation resulted in a natural drive towards the use of comparable corpora, i.e. non-parallel texts in the same domain or genre. Nevertheless, this research direction has not produced a single authoritative source suitable for researchers and stu

  2. Airline Safety: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    S.TP OFR O T PEIDCV E Airline Safety: A Comparative Analysis TRlES IS1j0’~fJ 6. PERFORMING 01G. REPORT NUMBER AU TNOR( ) Sign . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...accidents. Perhaps because of an airline’s understandable sensitivity to public knowledge of its accidents, one has little assurance that each airline...62,169 0 Royal Air Maroc 81,451 0 80,861 0 (Morocco) Royal Nepal 11,885 0 19,785 0 SAA (South Africa) 57,226 0 61,618 0 SAHSA (Honduras) 32,658 0 34,894 0

  3. Forest ownership in comparative law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Üstüner Birben

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and sustainable use of forest resources depend on various factors. However, one of the most emphasized and discussed topics among these factors is forest ownership. Comparative law is an important way of analyzing and understanding legal systems of different countries, and identifying different aspects of the current legal systems. This study tries to analyze forest ownership with regard to comparative law. France for the Continental-European legal system, Great Britain for the Anglo-Saxon legal system, and Russia Federation for the Socialist legal system are taken respectively as a base. Thus, how right to ownership is evaluated in different legal systems and what are the main features of that are indicated. As a result, private forest ownership is common in the Continental-European legal system and Anglo-Saxon legal system while state ownership is common in the Socialist legal system. Prevalence of private forest ownership in the Continental-European and the Anglo-Saxon legal systems is also closely related to the previous use rights transferred into right to ownership. In addition, it is concluded regarding the historical process that many changes occurred on forest ownership types without considering differences in legal systems.

  4. Comparing categories among geographic ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouras, Marinos; Kokla, Margarita; Tomai, Eleni

    2005-03-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to generate semantic "mappings" between different ontologies, or create aligned/integrated ones. An essential step towards their success is the ability to compare the categories involved. This paper introduces a systematic methodology for comparing categories met in geographic ontologies. The methodology explores/extracts semantic information provided by categories' definitions. The first step towards this goal is the recognition of syntactic and lexical patterns in definitions, which help to identify (a) semantic properties such as purpose, location, cover, and (b) semantic relations such as hypernym, part of, has-parts, etc. At the second step, a similarity measure among categories is applied, in order to explore how (the) extracted properties and relations interrelate. This framework enables us to (a) better understand the impact of context in cross-ontology "mappings", (b) evaluate the "quality" of definitions as to whether they respect mere ontological aspects (such as unambiguous taxonomies), and (c) deal more effectively with the problem of semantic translation among geographic ontologies.

  5. Comparative energy storage assessment item

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudici, B.

    1984-11-01

    This analysis, a Space Station application study, rediscovered Integrated Power and Attitude Control (IPAC) and found the approach to have lower initial and resupply weight and lower initial and resupply cost than either battery/CMG or regenerative fuel cell/CMG systems. Preliminary trade studies were performed comparing (IPAC) with equivalent independent electrochemical power and control moment gyro (CMG) control approaches. Technologies considered to have adequate status for an initial Space Station were: (1) nickel cadmium batteries (NiCd batteries), (2) regenerative fuel cells (RFC), (3) Skylab class CMG's, and (4) state of the art IPAC using metal wheels and ball bearing suspension (SOA-IPAC). An advanced IPAC (ADV-IPAC) employing composite rotor material and magnetic suspension was included in the comparisons to illustrate a possible range of performance and cost of inertial systems. The candidates were compared on the basis of initial weight and cost and on the basis of resupply weight and cost for a 15 year mission. Thus, SOA-IPAC would appear to be an attractive approach for the initial Space Station and possible technology improvements would further the appeal for the initial and/or growth Space Station.

  6. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  7. Comparing Methods for Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2018-01-01

    tomography (CT) angiography. Sixty-two patients, scheduled for elective heart surgery, were included; 1 was subsequently excluded for logistic reasons. Inclusion criteria were coronary artery bypass surgery (N = 42) and aortic valve replacement (N = 19). Exclusion criteria were chronic atrial fibrillation...... of the left ventricular outflow tract. METHODS: The primary aim was a systematic comparison of CO with Doppler-derived 3D TEE and CO by thermodilution in a broad population of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A subanalysis was performed comparing cross-sectional area by TEE with cardiac computed......, left ventricular ejection fraction below 0.40 and intracardiac shunts. Nineteen randomly selected patients had a cardiac CT the day before surgery. All images were stored for blinded post hoc analyses, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between measurement methods, defined as the bias...

  8. Functional categories in comparative linguistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    ’, meaning-based categories. The use of meaning-based or semantic categories, however, does not necessarily result in the identification of cross-linguistically comparable data either, as was already shown by Greenberg (1966: 88) himself. Whereas formal categories are too narrow in that they do not cover all......). Furthermore certain ‘ontological categories’ are language-specific (Malt 1995). For example, speakers of Kalam (New Guinea) do not classify the cassowary as a bird, because they believe it has a mythical kinship relation with humans (Bulmer 1967).       In this talk I will discuss the role of functional......-linguistic ‘coverage’ then formal or semantic categories. Finally it will be shown that functional categories have their own distinct grammatical properties (Rijkhoff 2008, 2009b, forthcoming). References Bulmer, Ralph. 1967. Why is the cassowary not a bird? A problem of zoological taxonomy among the Karam of the New...

  9. Military Retention. A Comparative Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Sminchise

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals for human resources management structures and for armed forces leaders is to maintain all necessary personnel, both qualitatively and quantitatively for operational needs or for full required capabilities. The retention of military personnel is essential to keep morale and unit readiness and to reduce the costs for recruiting, training, replacement of manpower. Retention rates depend not only on money or other social measures. The goal for retention is to keep in use the most valuable resource that belongs to an organization: the human beings and their knowledge. The aim pf this paper is to provide a comparative analysis of retention measures in various countries based on Research and Technology Organisation report released in 2007 and, thus, provide more examples of retention measures as far as the Romanian military system is concerned.

  10. Comparative molecular cytogenetics in Cetartiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubes, J; Musilova, P; Kopecna, O; Kubickova, S; Cernohorska, H; Kulemsina, A I

    2012-01-01

    Cetartiodactyla comprises Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates) and Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises). Artiodactyla is a large taxon represented by about 200 living species ranked in 10 families. Cetacea are classified into 13 families with almost 80 species. Many publications concerning karyotypic relationships in Cetartiodactyla have been published in previous decades. Formerly, the karyotypes of closely related species were compared by chromosome banding. Introduction of molecular cytogenetic methods facilitated comparative mapping between species with highly rearranged karyotypes and distantly related species. Such information is a prerequisite for the understanding of karyotypic phylogeny and the reconstruction of the karyotypes of common ancestors. This study summarizes the data on chromosome evolution in Cetartiodactyla, mainly derived from molecular cytogenetic studies. Traditionally, phylogenetic relationships of most groups have been estimated using morphological data. However, the results of some molecular studies of mammalian phylogeny are discordant with traditional conceptions of phylogeny. Cetartiodactyls provide several examples of incongruence between traditional morphological and molecular data. Such cases of conflict include the relationships of the major clades of artiodactyls, the relationships among the extant families of the suborder Ruminantia or the phylogeny of the family Bovidae. The most unexpected aspect of the molecular phylogeny was the recognition that Cetacea is a deeply nested member of Artiodactyla. The largest living order of terrestrial hoofed mammals is the even-toed hoofed mammals, or Artiodactyla. The artiodactyls are composed of over 190 living species including pigs, peccaries, hippos, camels, llamas, deer, pronghorns, giraffes, sheep, goats, cattle and antelopes. Cetacea is an order of wholly aquatic mammals, which include whales, dolphins and porpoises. Cetartiodactyla has become the generally accepted name for the

  11. COMPARATIVE HABITABILITY OF TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Rory; Meadows, Victoria S.; Evans, Nicole, E-mail: rory@astro.washington.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 951580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanet habitability is traditionally assessed by comparing a planet’s semimajor axis to the location of its host star’s “habitable zone,” the shell around a star for which Earth-like planets can possess liquid surface water. The Kepler space telescope has discovered numerous planet candidates near the habitable zone, and many more are expected from missions such as K2, TESS, and PLATO. These candidates often require significant follow-up observations for validation, so prioritizing planets for habitability from transit data has become an important aspect of the search for life in the universe. We propose a method to compare transiting planets for their potential to support life based on transit data, stellar properties and previously reported limits on planetary emitted flux. For a planet in radiative equilibrium, the emitted flux increases with eccentricity, but decreases with albedo. As these parameters are often unconstrained, there is an “eccentricity-albedo degeneracy” for the habitability of transiting exoplanets. Our method mitigates this degeneracy, includes a penalty for large-radius planets, uses terrestrial mass–radius relationships, and, when available, constraints on eccentricity to compute a number we call the “habitability index for transiting exoplanets” that represents the relative probability that an exoplanet could support liquid surface water. We calculate it for Kepler objects of interest and find that planets that receive between 60% and 90% of the Earth’s incident radiation, assuming circular orbits, are most likely to be habitable. Finally, we make predictions for the upcoming TESS and James Webb Space Telescope missions.

  12. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species

  13. Sonourethrography compared to retrograde urethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Chang, Nam Sik; Park, Cheong Hee; Rhee, Byung Chul; Kong, Jae Chul; Park, Jong Yoon

    1989-01-01

    A total of 15 patients with suspected urethral stricture or fistula underwent conventional retrograde urethrography and following sonourethrography with saline infusion or voiding against Eschmann penile clamp, in Gyeongsang and Chungnam National University Hospital from July, 1989 to June, 1989. The sonographic findings were as diagnostic as the roentgen findings in 12 patients. When the length of the strictures assessed by each imaging modality was compared to measurement at open urothroplasty of 2 patients, sonourethrography was consistently more accurate. Urethroscopy was done in all cases. Sonourethrography using distension technique of the urethra enabled classification of the degree of spongiofibrosis, thus provided the guidance of direct vision internal urethrotomy in 9 patients. In 2 patients, the sonourethrogram identified periurethral tumor and urethral polyp which were not definitely analysed on the retrograde urethrogram. In the patient of posttraumatic postoperative urethrorectal fistula, residual fistuous tract was seen on both examinations. In 1 patient of stricture with severe periurethral scar, urethral stricture recurred after graft. No patient reported significant discomfort during the sonourethrogram. The sonourethrogram provided valuable, dynamic. 3 dimensional information about the luminal and extraluminal anatomy and pathology of the anterior urethra. The new method of sonourethrogram allows for the appropriate decision to be made easier for optimal treatment of urethal stricture, etc, and can be used as a follow up study

  14. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  15. Cats, Cancer and Comparative Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Cannon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring tumors in dogs are well-established models for several human cancers. Domestic cats share many of the benefits of dogs as a model (spontaneous cancers developing in an immunocompetent animal sharing the same environment as humans, shorter lifespan allowing more rapid trial completion and data collection, lack of standard of care for many cancers allowing evaluation of therapies in treatment-naïve populations, but have not been utilized to the same degree in the One Medicine approach to cancer. There are both challenges and opportunities in feline compared to canine models. This review will discuss three specific tumor types where cats may offer insights into human cancers. Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is common, shares both clinical and molecular features with human head and neck cancer and is an attractive model for evaluating new therapies. Feline mammary tumors are usually malignant and aggressive, with the ‘triple-negative’ phenotype being more common than in humans, offering an enriched population in which to examine potential targets and treatments. Finally, although there is not an exact corollary in humans, feline injection site sarcoma may be a model for inflammation-driven tumorigenesis, offering opportunities for studying variations in individual susceptibility as well as preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Combination therapy containing ritonavir plus saquinavir has superior short-term antiretroviral efficacy: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Katzenstein, T L; Gerstoft, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of indinavir 800 mg three times a day, ritonavir 600 mg twice a day, and a combination of ritonavir 400 mg twice a day and saquinavir 400 mg twice a day, when administered with two nucleoside analogues. DESIGN: A randomized, open-labelled, controlled...... is generally safe, and has superior short-term antiviral efficacy compared with indinavir and ritonavir also combined with two nucleoside analogues in antiretroviral drug-naive patients. Further follow-up is needed to determine the durability of the viral response....

  17. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Cohen

    Full Text Available Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome: a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-Cas (CRISPR-associated systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a

  18. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    to a future volume. Our authors have taken on the task to look at climate on the terrestrial planets in the broadest sense possible — by comparing the atmospheric processes at work on the four terrestrial bodies, Earth, Venus, Mars, and Titan (Titan is included because it hosts many of the common processes), and on terrestrial planets around other stars. These processes include the interactions of shortwave and thermal radiation with the atmosphere, condensation and vaporization of volatiles, atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and aerosol formation, and the role of the surface and interior in the long-term evolution of climate. Chapters herein compare the scientific questions, analysis methods, numerical models, and spacecraft remote sensing experiments of Earth and the other terrestrial planets, emphasizing the underlying commonality of physical processes. We look to the future by identifying objectives for ongoing research and new missions. Through these pages we challenge practicing planetary scientists, and most importantly new students of any age, to find pathways and synergies for advancing the field. In Part I, Foundations, we introduce the fundamental physics of climate on terrestrial planets. Starting with the best studied planet by far, Earth, the first chapters discuss what is known and what is not known about the atmospheres and climates of the terrestrial planets of the solar system and beyond. In Part II, Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Dynamics, we focus on the processes that govern atmospheric motion and the role that general circulation models play in our current understanding. In Part III, Clouds and Hazes, we provide an in-depth look at the many effects of clouds and aerosols on planetary climate. Although this is a vigorous area of research in the Earth sciences, and very strongly influences climate modeling, the important role that aerosols and clouds play in the climate of all planets is not yet well constrained. This section is intended to

  19. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan E; Wang, Rong; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wu, Wells W; Keller, James E

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome): a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a common ancestor.

  20. Comparing recent uranium supply scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, N.; Gufler, K.

    2014-01-01

    For more than one decade – even after the Fukushima accidents - an increase in global nuclear energy generation capacity is widely expected. At the same time a variety of uranium supply scenarios were published by industry, academics or international organizations, drawing different pictures of future uranium supply. They were created with the background of a uranium market facing several challenges. First an excursion in the uranium market price, in 2007, then reduced nuclear growth expectations after 2011, at least in non-Asian countries, also implying considerable changes to the supply side. For this publication a meta-study was carried out identifying, evaluating and comparing different recent scenarios on the availability of uranium. While there are some differences in the frame conditions (e.g. the expected uranium demand, the time fame, the considered mining projects,..), there are also notable similarities in these scenarios. This concerns long lead times for mine openings as well as the dependence on large mining projects (e.g. Olympic Dam, Cigar Lake). Generally, a decline in production in about 10 years is assumed, and thus the necessity of the timely development of mining projects is pointed out. In addition the omission of uranium from Russian nuclear weapons and the chances of keeping the changes in secondary supplies in balance with primary production have been widely discussed. Here, the production growth in Kazakhstan but also the role of the current market situation are central aspects. As another aspect the possible contribution from unconventional resources is of interest, particularly against the background of rising production costs for conventional resources. Finally, it shall be reflected how well older scenarios were able to map the reality and which trends could or could not be anticipated. It is relevant to identify which aspects in the development of mining capacities are essential for security of supply, and can therefore be regarded

  1. Comparative metagenomics of Daphnia symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston James F

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shotgun sequences of DNA extracts from whole organisms allow a comprehensive assessment of possible symbionts. The current project makes use of four shotgun datasets from three species of the planktonic freshwater crustaceans Daphnia: one dataset from clones of D. pulex and D. pulicaria and two datasets from one clone of D. magna. We analyzed these datasets with three aims: First, we search for bacterial symbionts, which are present in all three species. Second, we search for evidence for Cyanobacteria and plastids, which had been suggested to occur as symbionts in a related Daphnia species. Third, we compare the metacommunities revealed by two different 454 pyrosequencing methods (GS 20 and GS FLX. Results In all datasets we found evidence for a large number of bacteria belonging to diverse taxa. The vast majority of these were Proteobacteria. Of those, most sequences were assigned to different genera of the Betaproteobacteria family Comamonadaceae. Other taxa represented in all datasets included the genera Flavobacterium, Rhodobacter, Chromobacterium, Methylibium, Bordetella, Burkholderia and Cupriavidus. A few taxa matched sequences only from the D. pulex and the D. pulicaria datasets: Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Delftia. Taxa with many hits specific to a single dataset were rare. For most of the identified taxa earlier studies reported the finding of related taxa in aquatic environmental samples. We found no clear evidence for the presence of symbiotic Cyanobacteria or plastids. The apparent similarity of the symbiont communities of the three Daphnia species breaks down on a species and strain level. Communities have a similar composition at a higher taxonomic level, but the actual sequences found are divergent. The two Daphnia magna datasets obtained from two different pyrosequencing platforms revealed rather similar results. Conclusion Three clones from three species of the genus Daphnia were found to harbor a rich

  2. Additional diagnostic and clinical value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies compared with rheumatoid factor isotypes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbracht, Inka; Helmke, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    In the past decade significant advantages have been made in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and therapeutic strategies have changed a lot. These days, highly effective disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs enable intervention early in the disease process, in order to prevent major joint damage. For years, serological support in the diagnosis of RA has been limited to the presence of rheumatoid factors, although not very specific for RA. During the last years a variety of circulating non-RF antibodies have been discovered and reported to be of potential diagnostic value. CCP2 proved to be a very disease-specific and even sensitive marker for RA. In addition to the diagnostic properties, CCP showed to be a good prognostic marker, CCP helps to predict the erosive or nonerosive progression of the disease, and CCP is already present early in the disease. This diagnostic tool enables the clinician to choose the optimal therapeutic management for each single RA patient.

  3. Changes in insomnia subtypes in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholfsen, Lena K; Larsen, Jan P; Schulz, Jörn; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Gjerstad, Michaela D

    2017-01-24

    To examine the development of factors associated with insomnia in a cohort of originally drug-naive patients with incident Parkinson disease (PD) during the first 5 years after diagnosis. One hundred eighty-two drug-naive patients with PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 202 control participants were assessed for insomnia before treatment initiation and were repeatedly examined after 1, 3, and 5 years. Insomnia was diagnosed according to the Stavanger Sleepiness Questionnaire. The Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale was used to differentiate sleep initiation problems from problems of sleep maintenance. Generalized estimating equation models were applied for statistical measures. The prevalence of insomnia in general was not higher in patients with PD compared to controls at the 5-year follow-up. There were changes in the prevalence of the different insomnia subtypes over the 5-year follow-up. The prevalence of solitary problems in sleep maintenance increased from 31% (n = 18) in the drug-naive patients at baseline to 49% (n = 29) after 1 year and were associated with the use of dopamine agonists and higher Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores. The prevalence of solitary sleep initiation problems decreased continuously from 21% (n = 12) at baseline to 7.4% (n = 4) after 5 years; these were associated with less daytime sleepiness. The prevalence rates of the different insomnia subtypes changed notably in patients with early PD. The frequency of sleep maintenance problems increased, and these problems were associated with dopamine agonist use and depressive symptoms, while the total number of patients with insomnia remained stable. Our findings reflect the need for early individual assessments of insomnia subtypes and raise the possibility of intervention to reduce these symptoms in patients with early PD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Comparative Physical Education and Sport. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Bruce L.; And Others

    Educational theories and practice in the field of physical education and sport in various countries are discussed and compared. Chapters address: (1) comparative physical education and sport; (2) history and methodology of comparative education; (3) history and methodolog of comparative physical education and sport; (4) physical education in the…

  5. An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Clinical Significance of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Non-Antirheumatic Drugs According to Rheumatologists and Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, Eric N.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Jansen, Tim L. Th. A.; Houtman, Nella M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    Background: Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) must be recognized in a timely manner and managed appropriately to prevent adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. Because the evidence for most DDIs is based on case reports or poorly documented clinical information, there is a

  6. Comparative cardiovascular safety of dementia medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Peterson, Eric D; Holm, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark.......To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark....

  7. Weber, Durkheim, and the comparative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsis, R E

    1977-10-01

    This essay compares and contrasts the means by which Durkheim and Weber dealt with methodological issues peculiar to the comparative study of societies, what Smelser has called "the problem of sociocultural variability and complexity." More specifically, it examines how Weber and Durkheim chose appropriate comparative units for their empirical studies. The approaches that Weber and Durkheim brought to theproblem of cross-cultural comparison have critical implications for more current procedures used in the comparative study of contemporary and historical societies.

  8. The Method of Adaptive Comparative Judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Comparative Judgement (ACJ) is a modification of Thurstone's method of comparative judgement that exploits the power of adaptivity, but in scoring rather than testing. Professional judgement by teachers replaces the marking of tests; a judge is asked to compare the work of two students and simply to decide which of them is the better.…

  9. 27 CFR 5.66 - Comparative advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 5..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Advertising of Distilled Spirits § 5.66 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative advertising shall not be disparaging of a...

  10. 27 CFR 7.55 - Comparative advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 7..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Advertising of Malt Beverages § 7.55 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative advertising shall not be disparaging of a...

  11. 27 CFR 4.65 - Comparative advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 4..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Advertising of Wine § 4.65 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative adverstising shall not be disparaging of a competitor's product. (b...

  12. Systems Study on the Antirheumatic Mechanism of Tibetan Medicated-Bath Therapy Using Wuwei-Ganlu-Yaoyu-Keli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice at Tibetan area of China, Traditional Tibetan Medicine formula Wuwei-Ganlu-Yaoyu-Keli (WGYK is commonly added in warm water of bath therapy to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its mechanism of action is not well interpreted yet. In this paper, we first verify WGYK’s anti-RA effect by an animal experiment. Then, based on gene expression data from microarray experiments, we apply approaches of network pharmacology to further reveal the mechanism of action for WGYK to treat RA by analyzing protein-protein interactions and pathways. This study may facilitate our understanding of anti-RA effect of WGYK from perspective of network pharmacology.

  13. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu, E-mail: uzari02@hotmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rull-Gabayet, Marina, E-mail: rull.marina@gmail.com [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge, E-mail: docjvlradiologo@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pascual-Ramos, Virginia, E-mail: virtichu@gmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with {<=}12 months of disease duration, {>=}3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 {+-} 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  14. Randomized, placebo controlled trial of withdrawal of slow-acting antirheumatic drugs and of observer bias in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, P C; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in stable treatment with methotrexate, penicillamine, or sulfasalazine, were randomized in a double-blind fashion either to continuation of their usual treatment or to placebo. 112 patients were included; 52 patients who refused participation had no more severe...... disease than the others. The patients felt worse on placebo than on active drug (p = 0.002). The mean differences in number of tender, painful and swollen joints after one month were 2.4 (p = 0.08), 3.0 (p = 0.12) and 2.2 (p = 0.03), respectively. Treatment failure occurred for 42 patients of whom 33...... received placebo (p = 0.000,001). There was no difference in the severity of side effects (p = 0.91). The patients guessed their treatment correctly more often than expected (p = 0.02) because of the perceived effect. None of the two observers guessed better than chance, and there were no differences...

  15. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu; Rull-Gabayet, Marina; Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with ≤12 months of disease duration, ≥3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 ± 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  16. Efficacy of VX-509 (decernotinib) in combination with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Mark C.; Yang, Fang; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    and inadequate DMARD response to VX-509 100â €..mg (n=11), 200â €..mg (n=10) or 300â €..mg (n=10) or placebo (n=12) once daily for 12â €..weeks. Outcome measures included American College of Rheumatology score (ACR20; improvement of ≥20%) and disease activity score (DAS28) using C reactive protein (CRP...... to a DMARD alone. MRI responses were detected at week 12. Treatment was generally well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT01754935; results....

  17. Patients’ views about treatment with combination therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis: a comparative qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lempp Heidi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combinations of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs are increasingly used to control active rheumatoid arthritis (RA; however there is little information about patients’ perspectives, their expectations, concerns and experiences of this intensive treatment. Method We interviewed a quota sample of 18 patients from a single tertiary outpatient clinic, stratified by gender, ethnicity and age, based on the outpatient clinic population. Patients with early RA (2 years received combined conventional DMARDs or DMARDs with biologics. Results Four main themes emerged from the analytical framework: (i patients’ expectations about the combined treatment focuses mainly on physical symptoms; (ii the impact of the treatment on quality of life varied with the new medication in both groups (iii concerns about new interventions concentrated mainly on potential side effects; and (iv combination therapy can be self-managed in close collaboration with clinic staff, but this requires individualised management approaches. These themes resonate with von Korff’s collaborative management of chronic illness model. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first qualitative study that examined systematically in patients with early and established RA their expectations, impact on quality of life, concerns about side effects and the management of the treatment when taking combined medication with DMARDs or DMARDs and biologics. Patients have generally positive views of combination DMARDs. Within routine practice settings, achieving medication concordance with complex combined DMARD regimens is challenging, and the concerns vary between patients; careful individual assessments are essential to successfully deliver such intensive treatment.

  18. A Comparative Study on Error Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    of the grammatical errors with using comparative sentences is developed, which include comparative item-related errors, comparative result-related errors and blend errors. The results further indicate that these errors could attribute to negative L1 transfer and overgeneralization of grammatical rule and structures......Title: A Comparative Study on Error Analysis Subtitle: - Belgian (L1) and Danish (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production Xiaoli Wu, Chun Zhang Abstract: Making errors is an inevitable and necessary part of learning. The collection, classification and analysis...... the occurrence of errors either in linguistic or pedagogical terms. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate the theoretical and practical relevance of error analysis approach in CFL by investigating two cases - (1) Belgian (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production...

  19. Comparative education and the ?new? sociologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusz, Andrew R.; Parks-Trusz, Sandra L.

    1981-12-01

    The authors examine the impact of the `new' sociologies on comparative education by reviewing five comparative readers published during the past twenty years. While the `new' sociologies have had considerable impact within sociology and the sociology of education, minimal impact is found within comparative education. The authors further show that while critical new sociologies such as Marxism, neo-Marxism, and Critical theory have had some penetration into comparative education, use of the interpretative sociologies such as symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and semiotics has generally been absent. The authors conclude by suggesting that a synthesis of the critical and interpretative modes would prove fruitful for further work in comparative education. The five texts are: Halsey, Floud and Anderson (eds.), Education, Economy and Society (1961); Eckstein and Noah (eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education (1969); Beck, Perspectives on World Education (1970); Karabel and Halsey (eds.), Power and Ideology in Education (1977); and Altbach and Kelly (eds.), Education and Colonialism (1978).

  20. About the Chinese School of Comparative Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, He; Huang, Danqing

    2015-01-01

    In their article "About the Chinese School of Comparative Literature" He Lin and Danqing Huang discuss the development of the Chinese school of comparative literature since the 1980s. Lin and Huang describe how based on traditions in Chinese literary history, comparatists constructed a system of theoretical frameworks and methods. They argue that the Chinese School should not be criticized as "Chinacentric" just for the fact that its practitioners perform Chinese-Western comparative studies w...

  1. Comparability Effects of Mandatory IFRS Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Cascino; Joachim Gassen

    2012-01-01

    The mandatory adoption of IFRS by many countries worldwide fuels the expectation that financial accounting information might become more comparable across countries. This expectation is opposed to an alternative view that stresses the importance of incentives in shaping accounting information. We provide early evidence on this debate by investigating the effects of mandatory IFRS adoption on the comparability of financial accounting information around the world. Using two comparability proxie...

  2. Comparative Advantage, Trade and Labour Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Busse

    2002-01-01

    This paper empirically explores the relationship between labour standards and comparative advantage. Focusing on unskilled-labour-intensive goods and core labour standards, the results show that the effects of low standards depend on the type of standard: Weaker basic union rights are associated with a stronger comparative advantage. Forced and child labour also lead to an increase in the endowment of unskilled labour, and hence improve comparative advantage in unskilled-labour-intensive good...

  3. Comparing macrophyte herbivory by introduced Louisiana crayfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparing macrophyte herbivory by introduced Louisiana crayfish ( Procambarus clarkii ) (Crustacea: Cambaridae) and native Dytiscid beetles ( Cybister tripunctatus ) (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), in Kenya.

  4. Randomized, interventional, prospective, comparative study to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Randomized, interventional, prospective, comparative study to evaluate the antihypertensive efficacy and tolerability of ramipril versus telmisartan in stage 1 hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus.

  5. Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation system using pectin extracted from mango, orange and pineapple peels as carbon sources.

  6. Comparative qualitative research in Cultural Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Fatigante, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims to provide an approach that allows to study the interplay of culture and psychological human functioning in comparative study designs. Starting out with a brief overview of how qualitative, cultural, and comparative research is addressed in the field of psychology we...... will take a Cultural Psychology approach to suggest that the unit of analysis for comparative research needs to be situated social interaction. We will then suggest an integrative approach that allows us to study social interaction both on a micro- and on a macro-level by combining discourse analysis...... some criteria of validity that particularly apply to the field of comparative research in Cultural Psychology....

  7. Comparing Evaluation Metrics for Sentence Boundary Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yang; Shriberg, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper compares alternative evaluation metrics including the NIST error rate, classification error rate per word boundary, precision and recall, ROC curves, DET curves, precision-recall curves...

  8. Comparative Searching of Computer Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Beauchamp, R. O., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for retrieval of information on chemical compounds utilizing several computer data bases are compared to determine scope of data base coverage. Preparation of search questions is outlined and comparative results are reported indicating the yield from each data base. (6 references) (Author/NH)

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON SPECIFIC AND EARLY DETECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of smear and culture methods with rapid serological EIA myco kits manufactured by Omega diagnostics, for the early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex. Sera from various categories of smear and culture results were compared ...

  10. Comparative Analysis of Imipramine Hydrochloride by UV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative evaluation of two spectrophotometric methods for the assay of imipramine is described. The first method, based on UV spectrophotometry was compared with a second method which is based on the molecular interaction between imipramine and chloranilic acid, to form charge-transfer complexes in which the ...

  11. Comparative Elections: Building a Basic Reference Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalen, James E.

    2001-01-01

    This annotated bibliography focuses on resources for the study of international elections and electoral systems and outcomes that will be useful for collection development and for answering reference questions about foreign elections. Discusses comparative politics, comparative elections, and possible electoral reform. (LRW)

  12. Defining, Measuring, and Comparing Organisational Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Peter T.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    La littérature portant sur la culture des organisations souffre d’un manque manifeste d’enquêtes extensives débouchant sur des études comparatives. Afin de rendre plus comparables les cultures organisationnelles, nous proposons une définition et une série de dimensions. La culture organisationnelle

  13. Comparability of IQ scores over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Must, O.; te Nijenhuis, J.; Must, A.; van Vianen, A.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is.79 SD. The mean .16 SD increase in the last 8 years

  14. Comparative Economic Advantage Analysis of Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile country has comparative disadvantage ill production of northern highlands co.ffee and Morogoro maize. Wide variations in comparative advantage shown emanate from differences in resource and biophysical conditions, farming systems, technology levels and tenure arrangements. In general the measures of distortion ...

  15. Tanzania's Revealed Comparative Advantage and Structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines Tanzania's structural transformation by using the revealed comparative approach using export data for 2001, 2002 and 2011, at the second level of the Harmonised. System (HS). Using global data, the study finds that for 2002 and 2011, agricultural products, fish and minerals have comparative ...

  16. 13 CFR 113.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 113.410 Section 113.410 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.410 Comparable facilities...

  17. Comparative and International Education: A Bibliography (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative Education Review, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 "Comparative Education Review" bibliography of refereed journal articles on topics relevant to comparative and international education covers all 12 months in 2014 and includes 3,389 entries--a full 30 percent increase over the set of references assembled in the 2013 bibliography. They are drawn from 280 refereed journals, both…

  18. Equal Pay for Work of Comparable Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutari, Ellen; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Discusses occupational segregation and other barriers to equal job opportunities for women and examines two approaches toward correcting pay inequities: equal pay for equal work and equal pay for work of comparable value. Legal cases, job evaluation studies, and other steps toward comparable worth are described. A 64-item reference list is…

  19. Ethnic Dilemmas in Comparative Perspective: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, James H. Jr.; Oliver, Melvin L.

    1988-01-01

    The papers which comprise this volume were produced by a group of these nationally known scholars who are engaged in research on comparative aspects of ethnicity and ethnic group behavior. Organized around a series of themes which run through the extant comparative ethnicity literature and which reflect the expertise and current research foci of the conference presenters, the volume i...

  20. Analysis of a Hybrid DC Comparator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Web

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional controllable saturation reactor (CSR consists of single toroidal core, DC (direct current controlled loop (including DC controlled winding and DC biasing source and AC (alternating current excitation loop (including excitation winding and AC source. A detection winding and secondary winding are added up to the CSR configuration and form a hybrid DC comparator. The excitation current is asymmetric waveform when the CSR core is commonly stimulated by both AC and DC biasing sources, which just is the fundamental characteristic for the proposed comparator. Research shows the terminal voltage of the detection winding is asymmetric waveform when the secondary winding of the comparator is open and the CSR core is stimulated both by AC and DC biasing sources. Both theory analysis and experiment verify the feasibility of the differential RMS (root-mean-square between positive and negative half waves of the terminal voltage from the detection winding fitting for the feedback variance to balance DC biasing magnetic potential and form a self-balancing comparator. The zero-flux technique that the primary ampere-turn is equal to the secondary is the function base for the comparator. The operation details of the comparator including the control characteristics both of open-loop and close loop, the satiability judgment criterion, static error property and test range are introduced. The experimental results testify to the truth of the principle of the proposed DC comparator.

  1. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/jbsc/040/05/0891-0907. Keywords. Asian elephant; comparative genomics; gene prediction; transcriptome. Abstract. The Asian elephant Elephas maximus and the African elephant Loxodonta africana that diverged 5-7 million years ...

  2. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  3. Phytochemical Composition and Comparative Evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical Composition and Comparative Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activities of the Juice Extract of Citrus Aurantifolia and its Silver Nanoparticles. ... varying antimicrobial activities against some selected pathogens including Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 10031, Bacillus sp, ...

  4. Comparing Laboratory and Field Measured Bioaccumulation Endpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, L. P.; Arnot, J. A.; Embry, M. R.; Farley, K. J.; Hoke, R. A.; Kitano, M.; Leslie, H.A.; Lotufo, G. R.; Parkerton, T.F.; Sappington, K.G.; Tomy, G. T.; Woodburn, K.B.

    2011-01-01

    An approach for comparing laboratory and field measures of bioaccumulation is presented to facilitate the interpretation of different sources of bioaccumulation data. Differences in numerical scales and units are eliminated by converting the data to dimensionless fugacity (or

  5. Criteria for Comparing Children's Web Search Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Presents criteria for evaluating and comparing Web search tools designed for children. Highlights include database size; accountability; categorization; search access methods; help files; spell check; URL searching; links to alternative search services; advertising; privacy policy; and layout and design. (LRW)

  6. ecco: An error correcting comparator theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlanda, Stefano

    2018-03-08

    Building on the work of Ralph Miller and coworkers (Miller and Matzel, 1988; Denniston et al., 2001; Stout and Miller, 2007), I propose a new formalization of the comparator hypothesis that seeks to overcome some shortcomings of existing formalizations. The new model, dubbed ecco for "Error-Correcting COmparisons," retains the comparator process and the learning of CS-CS associations based on contingency. ecco assumes, however, that learning of CS-US associations is driven by total error correction, as first introduced by Rescorla and Wagner (1972). I explore ecco's behavior in acquisition, compound conditioning, blocking, backward blocking, and unovershadowing. In these paradigms, ecco appears capable of avoiding the problems of current comparator models, such as the inability to solve some discriminations and some paradoxical effects of stimulus salience. At the same time, ecco exhibits the retrospective revaluation phenomena that are characteristic of comparator theory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative Validation of Building Simulation Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    _2 and DSF200_4, the third empirical test case is also specified as DSF400_3, but it's completion is under consideration. The comparative test cases can not be directly used for the validation of the software due to often disagreement of the results, however the result of the exercises...... is that the comparative validation can be regarded as the main argument to continue the validation of the building simulation software for the buildings with the double skin façade with the empirical validation test cases.......The scope of this subtask is to perform a comparative validation of the building simulation software for the buildings with the double skin façade. The outline of the results in the comparative validation identifies the areas where is no correspondence achieved, i.e. calculation of the air flow...

  8. A comparative analysis of information acquisition, information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of information acquisition, information management capacity and administrators' decision-making effectiveness in tertiary institutions in ... communication facilities as well as modernise their methods of storage and processing of information by computerising their management information systems.

  9. Gramene database: navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationship...

  10. Mandatory IFRS adoption and accounting comparability

    OpenAIRE

    Cascino, Stefano; Gassen, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    The adoption of IFRS by many countries worldwide fuels the expectation that financial accounting might become more comparable across countries. This expectation is opposed to an alternative view that stresses the importance of incentives in shaping accounting information. We provide early evidence on this debate by investigating the effects of mandatory IFRS adoption on the comparability of financial accounting information around the world. Our results suggest that while mandatory adoption of...

  11. Comparability of IQ Scores over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Must, Olev; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Must, Aasa; van Vianen, Annelies E. M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is 0.79 SD. The mean 0.16 SD increase in the last 8 years suggests a rapid increase of the Flynn Effect (FE)…

  12. Schumpeter School International Comparative Institutions Database

    OpenAIRE

    Jovicic, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    For our international comparative research on the impact of institutions on economic trends, we put together the Schumpeter School International Comparative Institutions Database.1 The database comprises the panel data set on various indicators of employment, inequality and labor market institutions in twenty-one OECD countries during the time period 1970-2013. Countries included in the dataset are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy,...

  13. Comparative Analysis of Competitive Strategy Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Maina A. S. Waweru

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents research findings on Competitive Strategy Implementation which compared the levels of strategy implementation achieved by different generic strategy groups, comprising firms inclined towards low cost leadership, differentiation or dual strategic advantage. The study sought to determine the preferences for use of implementation armaments and compared how such armaments related to the level of implementation achieved. Respondents comprised 71 top executives from 59 companies...

  14. Count it! fun with counting and comparing

    CERN Document Server

    First, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Make math fun with Count It! Fun photographs, colorful graphics, and simple text are used to teach young readers basic math concepts. From counting groups to comparing to estimating this book will help kids develop the skills they need. A simple activity at the end of the book encourages kids to put counting and comparing to use! Aligned to Common Core standards and correlated to state standards. Sandcastle is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  15. Consistency and Comparability of International Property Valuations

    OpenAIRE

    Lynne Michael; Guowei Gu

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates whether international property investors can rely on comparability and consistency in international property valuations.A survey was conducted with further secondary data analysis to investigate the drivers, risks and confounding factors affecting global property valuations. Major risks identified were political instability, a comparative lack of transparency in property markets and inferior property rights including titles, rights to minerals, water and land use. The ...

  16. A fibre optic, four channel comparative photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E. N.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a four channel comparative photometer is described. Tests have shown that it is stable from night to night and is capable of working in very poor sky conditions. Even when the sky conditions are so poor that stars are barely visible, light curves can still be obtained with an r.m.s. value of 0.0016 mag., provided that integration times that are long compared with the transparancy changes are possible.

  17. Comparing P-stars with Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Cea, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    P-stars are compact stars made of up and down quarks in $\\beta$-equilibrium with electrons in a chromomagnetic condensate. P-stars are able to account for compact stars as well as stars with radius comparable with canonical neutron stars. We compare p-stars with different available observations. Our results indicate that p-stars are able to reproduce in a natural manner several observations from isolated and binary pulsars.

  18. Comparative Theology as Liberal and Confessional Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus von Stosch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available For most European scholars, the scope of Comparative Theology is not very clear. They see big differences between the notion of Comparative Theology among its protagonists, e.g., between Keith Ward or Robert Neville and Francis Clooney or James Fredericks. That is why I will try to define a certain understanding of Comparative Theology which can be defended in accordance with strong European theological traditions. I want to show that Comparative Theology can be understood as one of the best fruits of liberal theology and of a Wittgensteinian interpretation of transcendental philosophy—and that it opens new perspectives for confessional theology. The current development of Islamic theology in Germany is especially challenging for Comparative Theology and the best opportunity to develop it into a project undertaken by scholars of different religions and different intellectual traditions. I will argue that Comparative Theology is not a new discipline within the old disciplines of theology, but that it can give new perspectives to all theological disciplines and thoroughly change their character.

  19. What comparative family law should entail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Boele-Woelki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since globalization is not only restricted to economic and political relationships, but literally ‘hits home’, it has become indispensable to look beyond national boundaries and to take international developments into account in the field of family law. Hence, comparative family law is blooming. The core part of this contribution to the special issue on ‘Current Debates in Family Law around the Globe’ is aimed at framing the context of comparative family law. The main questions are: How is comparative family law perceived by the academic community and practitioners alike? What should it entail? In the attempt to find answers to these questions, several comparative family law projects, which have been carried out both in Europe and in the United States, have been compared. Whereas family law experts in Europe decidedly contribute to the comparative law methodology debate, similar discussions seemingly do not take place in the United States. It has been examined why this may be the case.

  20. Comparative Medicine: An Inclusive Crossover Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, James; Horvath, Tamas L

    2017-09-01

    Comparative Medicine is typically defined as a discipline which relates and leverages the biological similarities and differences among animal species to better understand the mechanism of human and animal disease. It has also been defined as a field of study concentrating on similarities and differences between human and veterinary medicine and is increasingly associated with animal models of human disease, including the critical role veterinarians, animal resource centers, and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees play in facilitating and ensuring humane and reproducible laboratory animal care and use. To this end, comparative medicine plays a pivotal role in reduction, refinement, and replacement in animals in biomedical research. On many levels, comparative medicine facilitates the translation of basic science knowledge into clinical applications; applying comparative medicine concepts throughout the translation process is critical for success. In addition to the supportive role of comparative medicine in the research enterprise, its role as a distinct and independent scientific discipline should not be lost. Although comparative medicine's research "niche" is not one particular discipline or disease process, rather, it is the investigative mindset that seeks to reveal common threads that weave different pathophysiologic processes into translatable approaches and outcomes using various models.

  1. Effect of carbamazepine on the sleep microstructure of temporal lobe epilepsy patients: a cyclic alternating pattern-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chetan S; Sinha, Sanjib; Nagappa, Madhu; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Taly, Arun B

    Studies looking at the effect of anti-epileptic drugs on the sleep microstructure of patients with epilepsy are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare the sleep microstructural characteristics of drug-naive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and those on carbamazepine (CBZ) monotherapy. Three age-matched (p = 0.286) and sex-matched (p = 0.398) groups were studied: drug-naive TLE (n = 20); TLE on CBZ (n = 20); and healthy controls (n = 40). All groups underwent overnight polysomnography. Scoring and analysis of arousals and cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) parameters were performed. Comparison of arousal parameters and CAP parameters was performed using either one-way analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by pairwise comparisons (p ≤ 0.05). Rapid eye movement (REM) arousal indices and overall CAP rates were higher in patients with TLE (group 1, p sleep quality and continuity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dopamine transporter density in the basal ganglia assessed with [123I]IPT SPET in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Keun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kee; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Chan-Hyung; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Jong Doo

    2003-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric disorder in childhood that is known to be associated with dopamine dysregulation. In this study, we investigated dopamine transporter (DAT) density in children with ADHD using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane ([ 123 I]IPT) single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and postulated that an alteration in DAT density in the basal ganglia is responsible for dopaminergic dysfunction in children with ADHD. Nine drug-naive children with ADHD and six normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPET 2 h after the intravenous administration of [ 123 I]IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPET data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. We then investigated the correlation between the severity scores of ADHD symptoms in children with ADHD assessed with ADHD rating scale-IV and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. Drug-naive children with ADHD showed a significantly increased specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia compared with normal children. However, no significant correlation was found between the severity scores of ADHD symptoms in children with ADHD and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. Our findings support the complex dysregulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in children with ADHD. (orig.)

  3. Dopamine transporter density in the basal ganglia assessed with [{sup 123}I]IPT SPET in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Keun-Ah; Kim, Young-Kee; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Chan-Hyung [Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Jong Doo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 146-92 Dogokdong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul, 135-720 (Korea)

    2003-02-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric disorder in childhood that is known to be associated with dopamine dysregulation. In this study, we investigated dopamine transporter (DAT) density in children with ADHD using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane ([{sup 123}I]IPT) single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and postulated that an alteration in DAT density in the basal ganglia is responsible for dopaminergic dysfunction in children with ADHD. Nine drug-naive children with ADHD and six normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPET 2 h after the intravenous administration of [{sup 123}I]IPT and carried out both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPET data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. We then investigated the correlation between the severity scores of ADHD symptoms in children with ADHD assessed with ADHD rating scale-IV and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. Drug-naive children with ADHD showed a significantly increased specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia compared with normal children. However, no significant correlation was found between the severity scores of ADHD symptoms in children with ADHD and the specific/non-specific DAT binding ratio in the basal ganglia. Our findings support the complex dysregulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in children with ADHD. (orig.)

  4. Exploratory analysis of diffusion tensor imaging in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: evidence of abnormal white matter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastura, Giuseppe; Doering, Thomas; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Mattos, Paulo; Araújo, Alexandra Prüfer

    2016-06-01

    Abnormalities in the white matter microstructure of the attentional system have been implicated in the aetiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a promising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology that has increasingly been used in studies of white matter microstructure in the brain. The main objective of this work was to perform an exploratory analysis of white matter tracts in a sample of children with ADHD versus typically developing children (TDC). For this purpose, 13 drug-naive children with ADHD of both genders underwent MRI using DTI acquisition methodology and tract-based spatial statistics. The results were compared to those of a sample of 14 age- and gender-matched TDC. Lower fractional anisotropy was observed in the splenium of the corpus callosum, right superior longitudinal fasciculus, bilateral retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, bilateral inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left external capsule and posterior thalamic radiation (including right optic radiation). We conclude that white matter tracts in attentional and motor control systems exhibited signs of abnormal microstructure in this sample of drug-naive children with ADHD.

  5. A comparative study of Averrhoabilimbi extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulhaimi, H. I.; Rosli, I. R.; Kasim, K. F.; Akmal, H. Muhammad; Nuradibah, M. A.; Sam, S. T.

    2017-09-01

    In recent year, bioactive compound in plant has become a limelight in the food and pharmaceutical market, leading to research interest to implement effective technologies for extracting bioactive substance. Therefore, this study is focusing on extraction of Averrhoabilimbi by different extraction technique namely, maceration and ultrasound-assisted extraction. Fewplant partsof Averrhoabilimbiweretaken as extraction samples which are fruits, leaves and twig. Different solvents such as methanol, ethanol and distilled water were utilized in the process. Fruit extractsresult in highest extraction yield compared to other plant parts. Ethanol and distilled water have significant role compared to methanol in all parts and both extraction technique. The result also shows that ultrasound-assisted extraction gave comparable result with maceration. Besides, the shorter period on extraction process gives useful in term of implementation to industries.

  6. Comparative diagnostic accuracy in virtual dermatopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mooney, E.; Hood, A.F.; Lampros, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Virtual microscopy can be used to teach histology and pathology and for in-training and certification examinations. A few online consultation websites already utilize virtual microscopy, thereby expanding the role of telemedicine in dermatopathology. There are, however, relatively few...... studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy and acceptability of virtual slides compared to traditional glass slides. Methods: Ten Nordic dermatopathologists and pathologists were given a randomized combination of 20 virtual and glass slides and asked to identify the diagnoses. They were then asked to give...... their impressions about the virtual images. Descriptive data analysis and comparison of groups using Fisher's exact test were performed. Objective: To compare the diagnostic ability of dermatopathologists and pathologists in two image formats: the traditional (glass) microscopic slides, and whole mount digitized...

  7. Comparative mitochondrial proteomics: perspective in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondria are the most complex and the most important organelles of eukaryotic cells, which are involved in many cellular processes, including energy metabolism, apoptosis, and aging. And mitochondria have been identified as the "hot spot" by researchers for exploring relevant associated dysfunctions in many fields. The emergence of comparative proteomics enables us to have a close look at the mitochondrial proteome in a comprehensive and effective manner under various conditions and cellular circumstances. Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry is still the most popular techniques to study comparative mitochondrial proteomics. Furthermore, many new techniques, such as ICAT, MudPIT, and SILAC, equip researchers with more flexibilities inselecting proper methods. This article also reviews the recent development of comparative mitochondrial proteomics on diverse human diseases. And the results of mitochondrial proteomics enhance a better understanding of the pathogenesis associated with mitochondria and provide promising therapeutic targets.

  8. The comparative method as a breaching experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David

    of the implicit cultural dimension of news comprehension. With respect to the third point (c), the reliance on the comparative method appeared valuable in three ways. 1) The cross-cultural comparison allowed to ‘make culture visible’ in the empirical study. The rationale of having a group (e.g. Danes) reading...... of an empirical comparative study of the cultural, cognitive and linguistic determinants of news comprehension and a discussion of the challenges, issues and benefits found in engaging with a comparative methodology in the context of reception and discourse analyses. The research project on which this paper...... is based sought to understand the processes by which mediated discourse such as news is comprehended by its audience (Mathieu, 2009). The empirical study consisted in a cross-cultural comparison of the reading processes between Danes and Canadians over a set of news texts from both countries...

  9. Developmental and comparative perspectives of contagious yawning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Contagious yawning (i.e. yawning triggered by perceiving others' yawning) is a well-documented phenomenon, but the mechanism underlying it is still unclear. In this chapter, I review the current evidence about: (1) developmental studies with typically and atypically developing populations, and (2) comparative studies in non-human animals. Developmental studies have revealed that contagious yawning is disturbed in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, suggesting that contagious yawning may share a developmental basis with the capacity for theory of mind. Comparative studies have suggested that contagious yawning can be observed in non-primate species, such as domestic dogs. As dogs are known to have exceptional skills in communicating with humans, it has also been suggested that contagious yawning may be related to the capacity for social communication. These results from developmental and comparative studies are consistent with the claim that the mechanism underlying contagious yawning relates to the capacity for empathy. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  11. Social acceptance of comparative optimism and realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhabet, I; Verlhiac, J F

    2011-10-01

    Studies of optimism and realism (the accuracy of people's outlook on the future) seek to understand the respective effects of these elements on social approbation. Two experiments examined how comparative optimism (vs. pessimism) and realism (vs. unrealism) interacted to influence the targets' social acceptance based on their perceptions about the future. The results showed that realism, or accuracy of prediction, increased the positive social effects of a comparatively optimistic outlook on the future. In contrast, targets who exhibited comparative pessimism were more socially acceptable when their predictions were unrealistic rather than realistic. This phenomenon was examined by also considering the polarity of the events about which judgments were expressed. These results contribute to the body of research about the relationship between optimism and pessimism and the relationship between optimism and realism.

  12. Comparative Assessment Of Natural Gas Accident Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S.

    2005-01-01

    The study utilizes a hierarchical approach including (1) comparative analyses of different energy chains, (2) specific evaluations for the natural gas chain, and (3) a detailed overview of the German situation, based on an extensive data set provided by Deutsche Vereinigung des Gas- und Wasserfaches (DVGW). According to SVGW-expertise DVGW-data can be regarded as fully representative for Swiss conditions due to very similar technologies, management, regulations and safety culture, but has a substantially stronger statistical basis because the German gas grid is about 30 times larger compared to Switzerland. Specifically, the following tasks were carried out by PSI to accomplish the objectives of this project: (1) Consolidation of existing ENSAD data, (2) identification and evaluation of additional sources, (3) comparative assessment of accident risks, and (4) detailed evaluations of specific issues and technical aspects for severe and smaller accidents in the natural gas chain that are relevant under Swiss conditions. (author)

  13. A Comparative Study on Error Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Title: A Comparative Study on Error Analysis Subtitle: - Belgian (L1) and Danish (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production Xiaoli Wu, Chun Zhang Abstract: Making errors is an inevitable and necessary part of learning. The collection, classification and analysis...... of errors in the written and spoken production of L2 learners has a long tradition in L2 pedagogy. Yet, in teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language (CFL), only handful studies have been made either to define the ‘error’ in a pedagogically insightful way or to empirically investigate...... the occurrence of errors either in linguistic or pedagogical terms. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate the theoretical and practical relevance of error analysis approach in CFL by investigating two cases - (1) Belgian (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production...

  14. Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ulrich; Karlson, Kristian Bernt; Holm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general decomposi......In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general...

  15. Comparing teacher roles in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Peter; Dorf, Hans; Pratt, Nick

    2014-01-01

    was the ease with which competent English teachers moved between roles. The English teachers observed adopted roles consistent with a wider techno-rationalist discourse. There was a greater subject emphasis by Danish teachers, whose work was set predominantly within a democratic humanist discourse, whilst...... the English teachers placed a greater emphasis on applied skills.......This article reports the findings of a comparative study of teaching in Denmark and England. Its broader aim is to help develop an approach for comparing pedagogy. Lesson observations and interviews identified the range of goals towards which teachers in each country worked and the actions...

  16. Comparing corrective actions with anomaly resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.; Harms, N.L.

    1986-01-01

    Quality control and assurance are essential to any system to safeguard nuclear materials. Formalization of quality assurance activities for safeguards under the name of quality assurance has begun at several organizations. The approach to quality assurance for safeguards differs from quality assurance for facilities and hardware both in the definition and use of the product, which is information. Anomaly resolution is comparable to corrective actions in quality assurance of a hardware product, but is also part of the product of safeguards and, therefore, has its own quality assurance. This paper reviews corrective actions as compared to anomaly resolution

  17. Comparing formal verification approaches of interlocking systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Nguyen, Hoang Nga; Roggenbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The verification of railway interlocking systems is a challenging task, and therefore several research groups have suggested to improve this task by using formal methods, but they use different modelling and verification approaches. To advance this research, there is a need to compare...... these approaches. As a first step towards this, in this paper we suggest a way to compare different formal approaches for verifying designs of route-based interlocking systems and we demonstrate it on modelling and verification approaches developed within the research groups at DTU/Bremen and at Surrey...

  18. Mathematics education and comparative historical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RODRIGUES VALENTE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper has as its aims: to characterize the area of research «history of mathematics education» and to defend the idea that mathematics education has constituted a privileged research theme within the field of comparative historical studies. To achieve these aims, the text includes references to a review of the literature concerning comparative studies, the analysis of two fundamental moments focused on attempts to internationalize the mathematics curriculum, both of which occurred during the 20th century, and, to end, a case study emanating from an international cooperation between researchers in Brazil and Portugal.

  19. Comparing Stage Presence and Virtual Reality Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Xavier Samur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on the impending release of new Head Mounted Display virtual reality (VR technologies, the article examines definitions and techniques for digital presence, and compares them with research into stage presence. It opens with an outline of definitions of digital presence, comparing them with Cormac Power’s fictional, auratic, and literal modes of presence in performance. The article then looks at techniques used in VR and on stage to achieve presence. Finally, performance examples that use virtual reality technologies are presented. The article concludes that even if the technology falls short, discourse on digital presence is useful in providing insights into presence on stage.

  20. Old people in pain : a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Ulf; Klevsgård, Rosemarie; Westergren, Albert; Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of pain in older people (75+), compare those in pain to those without regarding demographics, social network, functional limitations, fatigue, sleeping problems, depressed mood and quality of life (QOL), and identify variables associated with pain, a cross-sectional, prospective survey was conducted in an age-stratified sample of 4,093 people aged 75-105 years old. Those reporting pain (n=1,654) were compared with those who did not (n=2,439). Pain was more common...

  1. Comparing Results from Constant Comparative and Computer Software Methods: A Reflection about Qualitative Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putten, Jim Vander; Nolen, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared qualitative research results obtained by manual constant comparative analysis with results obtained by computer software analysis of the same data. An investigated about issues of trustworthiness and accuracy ensued. Results indicated that the inductive constant comparative data analysis generated 51 codes and two coding levels…

  2. Comparing clusters and supercomputers for lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Since the development of the Beowulf project to build a parallel computer from commodity PC components, there have been many such clusters built. The MILC QCD code has been run on a variety of clusters and supercomputers. Key design features are identified, and the cost effectiveness of clusters and supercomputers are compared

  3. Parkinson's disease incidence: magnitude, comparability, time trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro-Cuesta, J; Stawiarz, L

    1991-11-01

    In this study, we reviewed incidence surveys of Parkinson's Disease (PD) from all over the world, published during the period 1945-1989, using reported quality criteria. In addition, we compared age-specific PD incidences from selected observations by stratified analysis. Crude incidences were described for 11 populations, and age-specific incidences for three of them: Iceland, Rochester (Minn, USA), and Turku (Finland). Effect modification by age was detected: a) by comparing incidences by age at diagnosis with incidence by age at clinical disease onset; and b) when only data on onset of disease was computed. For disease onsets, the incidences in Rochester for the period 1955-1966, and in Turku (Finland) during the interval 1968-1970, were lower than that in Iceland for the period 1958-1960: RR = 0.58 95% CI (0.41, 0.83), and RR = 0.67 95% CI (0.51, 0.87), respectively. For the Rochester population aged 40-69 years, a statistically significant 56% decrease in the incidences of Parkinsonism onsets during the period 1945-1966 was found. Validity problems in comparing PD incidences and the role of PD underdiagnosis were emphasized. We concluded that: a) stratified analysis is more suitable than standardization when comparing incidences for etiological purposes; b) the incidence of PD was highest in Iceland; and c) in Rochester, PD incidence under the age of 70 decreased with time.

  4. Comparative analysis on temperature reduction effectiveness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis on temperature reduction effectiveness of ornamental tree species in University of Port Harcourt. ... The process of urbanization causes alterations in the landscape, affects the environment negatively and the community is placed at risk. In an attempt to sustain urban growth, urban areas have now ...

  5. ' ' :'.: ',,' ,~ '.'~.: ~ Comparative Analysis of Partial Suckling and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Margin Analysis (GMA) showed that PSS has a higher gross margin (Shs. 46, 024.9) than BFS (Shs. -. 153,825.20). It was concluded that PSS is a better system in terms of surplus (marketable) milk and growth of kids compared with BFS. Key words: Bucket feeding, partial suckling, goat kids. Introduction. Tanzania's goat ...

  6. Comparing Syntactic and Semantics Action Refinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goltz, Ursula; Gorrieri, Roberto; Rensink, Arend

    The semantic definition of action refinement on labelled configuration structures is compared with the notion of syntactic substitution, which can be used as another notion of action refinement in a process algebraic setting. The comparison is done by studying a process algebra equipped with

  7. A comparative study of microbiological and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of water distributed from two water treatment plants in Rwanda. ... Thus, as recommendation to WASAC authority, there is a need for improvement in the water management strategy for better water quality especially along the distribution network.

  8. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and morphology of adult Wistar rats fed either low or normal protein-energy diets and orally dosed with ... of adult Wistar rats orally dosed aqueous extracts of C. australis seed (LPSE and NPSE) and stem (LPST and NPST), 300mg of extract/kg body weight of rat/day, ...

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous analysis showed that cavity size and number on one hand and combinations thickness affect the compressive strength of hollow sandcrete blocks. Series arrangement of the cavities is common but parallel arrangement has been recommended. This research performed a comparative analysis of the compressive ...

  10. Comparative Dissolution Profiles of Representative Quinolones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The %Q of Ciprofloxacin(CP) and 3 0 Sparfloxacin(SP) was found to conform entirely to both USP2004 and FDA specifications. Sparfloxacin was found to be unstable due to cloudiness observed in 0.1N HCl medium. The CP and SP showed highest %Q in 0.1M max acetic acid compared to other media. This result has

  11. Comparing proportional compositions of geospatial technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Today, graduates seek employment in a global marketplace, regardless of the country in which they studied. Comparing academic programs helps students, academics and employers to make informed decisions about study options, program offerings and the employment of recent graduates. In this study, we juxtapose ...

  12. On the measurement of comparative advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, A.R.; Oosterhaven, J.

    This paper shows-that the standard measure of revealed comparative advantage (RCA), ranging from 0 to infinity, has problematic properties. Due to its multiplicative specification, it has a moving mean larger than its expected value of 1, while its distribution strongly depends on the number of

  13. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SCANDINAVIAN AND ETHIOPIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    modes of housing developments in Scandinavian countries and to draw lessons for the urban housing problems in Ethiopian. A critical review. ·of the develoment of housing theories is presented as a prelude to the comparative analysis. The scope of the study is limited to the analysis of housing tenure and housing finance.

  14. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation agents for treatment-resistant depression: A multiple-treatments meta-analysis. ... Web of Science, Embase, CBM-disc, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and relevant websites (up to August 2013) were searched for randomised controlled trials ...

  15. Comparative studies on organoleptic and nutritional characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low consumption of meat is associated with high poverty level, and protein deficiency in Nigeria. Meat analogue (Texturized Vegetable Protein – TVP) was processed from protein concentrate and defatted soybean flour, and was flavoured as beef and compared to beef from animal source. The nutritional composition of ...

  16. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  17. Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice services in a tertiary and primary healthcare settings. ... A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Result: Study ... Other predictors of satisfaction were younger age, male gender, married, higher education, and those of the Moslem religious faith.

  18. Comparative studies in Chelicerata III. Opilionida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative study is made of the three groups (Cyphophthalmi, Laniatores and Palpatores) into which Opilionida are currently subdivided. Methods, principles and terminology, adopted in this paper, correspond with those of parts I and II of the present series of studies in Chelicerata. Special

  19. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-12-15

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my.

  20. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are diverse reports on the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive persons. Few studies have been carried out in developing countries in Sub.Saharan Africa. This study was aimed at comparing the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis of ...

  1. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  2. Comparative evaluation of modified pulse width modulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simple boost control, maximum boost control, constant boost control and modified space vector modulation based control methods have been presented by world wide researchers for various types of loads and applications. However, the detailed comparative evaluation has not been reported to select the suitable control ...

  3. Comparative genomics using data mining tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1 | February 2002. Comparative genomics using data mining tools. 17 where L is the length of the concerned protein in amino acids and fi is the average frequency of occurrence of the ith amino acid in the set of proteins that are of high sequence complexity and are predicted to have globular fold within the same genome.

  4. Comparative Studies on Some Physicochemical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Industrial and nutritional processes have increased the demands for oil and this in turn has led to the search for oils from different types of seeds. It is in this vein that baobab seed oil was extracted, analyzed and some of it physicochemical properties compared with those of vegetable, peanut and palm oils. The percentage ...

  5. A comparative analysis of existing oligonucleotides selection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    technology at the front and back ends, respectively, are the selection of optimal DNA oligonucleotides (henceforth oligos) and computational analysis of the genes expression data. A computational comparative analysis of the methods used to select oligos is important since the design and quality of the microarray probes ...

  6. Planning a Comparative Experiment in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Herle M.

    2011-01-01

    A well-designed experiment is the best method for establishing efficacy of any intervention, be it medical, behavioral, or educational in nature. This paper reviews the steps necessary in conducting a comparative experiment in an educational setting, and illustrates how these steps might be fulfilled within the context of a large-scale randomized…

  7. Overcoming Violence through Local Institutions: A Comparative ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Overcoming Violence through Local Institutions: A Comparative Study of Households and Communities in Colombia. Violent conflicts have lasting effects on social norms, institutions, and governance at the local level. Two conditions must take place for societies to sustain an end to large-scale violence: -the nature of ...

  8. A Compared Aproach: ASP versus PHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana-Maria STANCA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development process of electronic business theory, we attributed a very important role to technologies of business projection on the Internet. Starting with this idea, in the following article we will compare the most used technologies in the development of electronic business application like ASP and PHP.

  9. Comparable indicators of inequality across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolan, B.; Marx, I.; Salverda, W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the key issue for the GINI project of how best to approach the measurement of income inequality and wage inequality to enhance comparability across different studies. It focuses fi rst on income inequality, dealing with the defi nition of income, the income recipient unit, and the

  10. Comparative study of bioethanol production from sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to compare the bioethanol production from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using molasses as production medium. The focus was on the retention time at lab scale. Bioethanol and petroleum blend can be used in existing gasoline engines. Present study showed a more ...

  11. Higher Education in Greece Compared to Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliotis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares and contrasts higher education in Canada and Greece. An overview of the systems in place is followed by an analysis centred on the triad of funding, access and quality. Similarities and differences are highlighted, and the current challenges and issues faced by both nations will be examined, especially in terms of world…

  12. Broader perspectives for comparing different greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Martin; Reisinger, Andy

    2011-05-28

    Over the last 20 years, different greenhouse gases have been compared, in the context of climate change, primarily through the concept of global warming potentials (GWPs). This considers the climate forcing caused by pulse emissions and integrated over a fixed time horizon. Recent studies have shown that uncertainties in GWP values are significantly larger than previously thought and, while past literature in this area has raised alternative means of comparison, there is not yet any clear alternative. We propose that a broader framework for comparing greenhouse gases has become necessary and that this cannot be addressed by using simple fixed exchange rates. From a policy perspective, the framework needs to be clearly aligned with the goal of climate stabilization, and we show that comparisons between gases can be better addressed in this context by the forcing equivalence index (FEI). From a science perspective, a framework for comparing greenhouse gases should also consider the full range of processes that affect atmospheric composition and how these may alter for climate stabilization at different levels. We cover a basis for a broader approach to comparing greenhouse gases by summarizing the uncertainties in GWPs, linking those to uncertainties in the FEIs consistent with stabilization, and then to a framework for addressing uncertainties in the corresponding biogeochemical processes. © 2011 The Royal Society

  13. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and morphology of adult Wistar rats fed either low or normal protein-energy diets and orally dosed with aqueous Cuscuta australis extracts. 1. Omirinde, J.O., *. 1. Ozegbe, P.C. and. 2. Oyeyemi, M.O.. Departments of 1Veterinary Anatomy and 2Veterinary Surgery and ...

  14. Comparing uncertainty aversion towards different sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baillon, Aurélien; Liu, Ning; van Dolder, Dennie

    2017-01-01

    We propose simple behavioral definitions of comparative uncertainty aversion for a single agent towards different sources of uncertainty. Our definitions allow for the comparison of utility curvature for different sources if the agent’s choices satisfy subjective expected utility towards each

  15. A comparative assessment of commonly employed staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following an increase in the number of reports of Cryptosporidium infections and the problems encountered in detecting these organisms in faecal smears, a comparative assessment of a modification of the Sheather's flotation technique and other commonly employed staining procedures proved the modified Sheather's ...

  16. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF Acorus calamus POWDER AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of the powder of a natural plant product (Acorus calamus L.) and two synthetic insecticides (i.e. Pirimiphos methyl and Rotenone) was compared in the laboratory for the control Sitophilus oryzea (L), Rhizopertha dominica (F) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) in stored wheat grains. Seven concentrations of the ...

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrasonography and Intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal ultrasonography an easily available procedure was compared to intravenous urogram (IVU) to determine its suitability as an alternative to the latter, which is a relatively invasive test for demonstrating hydronephrosis/ or ureteric obstruction in cervical cancer staging. Study design: Thirty five histologically ...

  18. Gender and Learning: Comparing Two Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severiens, Sabine; ten Dam, Geert

    1998-01-01

    Two theories of learning (Vermunt's learning conceptions and Baxter Magolda's ways of knowing and patterns of reasoning) are compared using a general perspective and a gender perspective, with the aim of combining and extending them. Comparison suggests a number of relationships between theories on a conceptual level, but these could not be…

  19. Comparing laparoscopic appendectomy to open appendectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective of the study was to compare the outcomes of patients with generalised purulent peritonitis from complicated appendicitis diagnosed intraoperatively who were managed laparoscopically to those managed via the open approach in a single institution. Methods: Data were collected from all cases ...

  20. Tanzania's Revealed Comparative Advantage and Structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... agricultural products dominate Tanzania's comparative advantage for both years, although minerals assume the first rank in 2011. Specifically, 70% of the product groups are agricultural, with the rest being mineral products. These findings suggest that no structural transformation has occurred in the Tanzanian economy ...

  1. Comparing Development Trajectories in India and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    This presentation intends to explore why the two development models in India and China differ fundamentally but also why they share a number of similarities. The aim is to entangle the internal dynamics and mutual relations between the two countries by utilizing a critical comparative political...

  2. Comparative efficacy of Levamisole, Mebendalzole and Pyrantel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study assessed the comparative efficacy of selected anthelmintic drugs namely Mebendazole, pyrantel pamoate and levamisole-against common intestinal nematodes namely Ascaris lumbricoides, Hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator amer icanus) and Trichuris trichuria in children in Calabar ...

  3. Comparative antitrypanosomal screening of methanolic extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vitro and in vivo activities of methanolic extracts of defatted leaves and stems of Khaya senegalensis and Moringa oleifera on Trypanosoma brucei brucei were investigated and compared. The in vitro assessment involved incubating the parasite (in triplicate) in the presence of various extract concentrations in a ...

  4. Comparative analysis of technical efficiencies between compound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to compare the level of technical efficiency in the compound and non compound farms in Imo state. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select 120 food crop farmers from two out of the three agricultural zones in Imo state. Using the Chow (1960) analysis of covariance technique ...

  5. Traveling Chaucer: Comparative Translation and Cosmopolitan Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Through the comparative study of non-Anglophone translations of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," we can achieve the progressive goals of Emily Apter's "translational transnationalism" and Edward Said's "cosmopolitan humanism." Both translation and humanism were intrinsic to Chaucer's…

  6. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  7. Comparing transformation methods for DNA microarray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thygesen, Helene H.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: When DNA microarray data are used for gene clustering, genotype/phenotype correlation studies, or tissue classification the signal intensities are usually transformed and normalized in several steps in order to improve comparability and signal/noise ratio. These steps may include

  8. Comparative analysis of aggregate agricultural productivity between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared the aggregate agricultural productivity between the Low External Input Technology (LEIT) and High External Input Technology (HEIT) Farms in Imo State of Nigeria. The state is divided into three agricultural zones, out of which two were randomly selected for the study. Using a multistage sampling ...

  9. Imagining Comparative Education: Past, Present, Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Rolland

    2000-01-01

    Presents a study questioning how comparative educators use their imaginations to construct new knowledge/understanding on representing educational phenomenon; the genres and forms of representations and how these code choices influenced ways of seeing and thinking; and how the self-reflexive history of imagination is patterned as an intertextual…

  10. 45 CFR 86.33 - Comparable facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.33 Comparable facilities. A recipient... the other sex. (Secs. 901, 902, Education Amendments of 1972, 86 Stat. 373, 374) ...

  11. A Comparative Study of Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, R.J.; Overmars, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    The probabilistic roadmap approach is one of the leading motion planning techniques. Over the past eight years the technique has been studied by many different researchers. This has led to a large number of variants of the approach, each with its own merits. It is difficult to compare the different

  12. Comparative effects of imipramine, sertraline, nifedipine, furosemide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the comparative effects of imipramine, sertraline, nifedipine, furosemide and bumetanide on ingestive behavior in rodents. Twelve groups (with six in each group) of male mice (25 to 35 g) were used in the experiments. They were housed in labelled plastic cages in the departmental ...

  13. Comparative Economic Analysis of Beekeeping Using Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out in Tabora and Katavi regions in the miombo woodlands of Tanzania. The overall objective of the study was to undertake a comparative economic analysis of beekeeping using improved or traditional beehives. Data were collected from 198 beekeepers that were randomly selected from a sampling ...

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE STARCH PASTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past~ng properties (gelatinization temperature, gelatinization time, viscosity, ease of cooking and starch stat;ility) of cassava, plantain and banana flours have been found to be affected by processing. Roasting and boiling, reduced peak .... and compare the effect of the afore mentioned processing methods on the pasting ...

  15. Data base to compare calculations and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological and climatological data bases were compared with known tritium release points and diffusion calculations to determine if calculated concentrations could replace measure concentrations at the monitoring stations. Daily tritium concentrations were monitored at 8 stations and 16 possible receptors. Automated data retrieval strategies are listed. (PSB)

  16. Comparative physicochemical and genotoxicity assessments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The textile industry has become indispensable in view of its basic and social importance to human life, but its environmental impact has continued to be a subject of concern. The objectives of the present study were to assess and compare the physico-chemical and genotoxicity properties of a corporate textile mill effluent ...

  17. Comparative evaluation of organic formulations of Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of organic formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens based biopesticides and their application in the management of bacterial wilt of brinjal ... Effective management of bacterial wilt of brinjal by P. fluorescens under local conditions signifies its potentiality and scope as a plant growth promoting ...

  18. Comparative effects of undigested and anaerobically digested ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of the effects of undigested and anaerobically digested poultry manure and conventional inorganic fertilizer on the growth characteristics and yield of maize was investigated at Ibadan, Nigeria. The pot experiment consisted of sixty (60) nursery bags, set out in the greenhouse. The treatments, thoroughly ...

  19. Comparative morphology on leaves of Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, M.-S.; Yang, Y.-P.; Sheue, C.-R.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative anatomical study on the leaves of nine out of 29 species of the genus Daphniphyllum was performed to seek support for the present infrageneric classification. Daphniphyllum is composed of two sections, Lunata (with one subsection Lunata) and Daphniphyllum (with two subsections,

  20. Comparative evaluation of haemoglobin estimation amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-05-30

    May 30, 2006 ... workers without the luxury of laboratory services handled by trained personnel7. As such these women do not have the opportunity of objective assessment of the clinical status by haemoglobin estimation. Studies have shown that clinical assessment of anaemia is very unreliable when compared to other ...

  1. Comparative Efficacy Of Topical Ciprofloxacin On Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ciprofloxacinis often considered drug of first choice in the treatment of bacterial keratitis.Most of the ocular infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study set to compare the efficacy of ciprofloxacin on these two microorganisms in vitro. The “agar well diffusion” and the 10-fold ...

  2. Comparative oncology: Integrating human and veterinary medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer constitutes the major health problem both in human and veterinary medicine. Comparative oncology as an integrative approach offers to learn more about naturally occurring cancers across different species. Canine models have many advantages as they experience spontaneous disease, have many genes similar ...

  3. Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence characteristics around translation initiation codon in four eukaryotes. Qingpo Liu and Qingzhong Xue. J. Genet. 84, 317–322. Table 1. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 39 base positions around the AUG codon in the four eukaryotic species studied. – 30.

  4. Comparative Immunologic Activities of Polyclonal Antibodies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three types of Vibrio cholerae (El tor, Ogawa) whole cell antigens constituted with liquid paraffin adjuvant (LPA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) and physiological saline (SA) were used for polyclonal antisera production in adult rabbits. Antisera were compared for serologic reactivities with homologous and ...

  5. Comparative insect mitochondrial genomes: Differences despite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a comparative analysis of select insect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) representing four insect orders (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera and Coleoptera) consisting of 12 different species in an effort to study a common set of genes and to understand the evolution of mitochondrial genome. A functional analysis of ...

  6. Comparative haematological changes in experimentally infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of haematological changes in Savannah brown goats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma vivax was carried out using thirty (30) goats aged between 20 and 48 months and average weight of 13.00 kg. The parameters determined before and after infection included ...

  7. What comparative family law should entail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele-Woelki, K.

    2008-01-01

    Since globalization is not only restricted to economic and political relationships, but literally ‘hits home’, it has become indispensable to look beyond national boundaries and to take international developments into account in the field of family law. Hence, comparative family law is blooming. The

  8. Intramuscular compared to intravenous midazolam for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sedation in children remains a controversial issue in emergency departments (ED). Midazolam, as a benzodiazepine is widely used for procedural sedation among paediatrics. We compared the effectiveness and safety of two forms of midazolam prescription; intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV). Patients ...

  9. Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Lopes, Mariana R; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Göker, Markus; Salamov, Asaf A; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Long, Tanya M; Calvey, Christopher H; Aerts, Andrea L; Barry, Kerrie W; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; Coughlan, Aisling Y; Deshpande, Shweta; Douglass, Alexander P; Hanson, Sara J; Klenk, Hans-Peter; LaButti, Kurt M; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna M; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Ohm, Robin A; Otillar, Robert P; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L; Peng, Yi; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos A; Scheuner, Carmen; Sibirny, Andriy A; Slot, Jason C; Stielow, J Benjamin; Sun, Hui; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor V; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Ascomycete yeasts are metabolically diverse, with great potential for biotechnology. Here, we report the comparative genome analysis of 29 taxonomically and biotechnologically important yeasts, including 16 newly sequenced. We identify a genetic code change, CUG-Ala, in Pachysolen tannophilus in the

  10. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION (SI) Synthesis and comparing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and comparing the antibacterial activities of pyrimidine derivatives. ANDREWS B*,a,b, KOMATHI Kb and MOHAN Sb. aPG and Research Department of Chemistry, Islamiah College, Vaniyambadi 635 752, India. Affiliated to Thiruvalluvar University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. bPriyadarshini Engineering College, ...

  11. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  12. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    remedy for after-effects of drunkenness (Morton,. 1987a). The calyx extract is used in the treatment ... Comparative evaluation of bioactive compounds. 181 to room/ambient temperature before analysis. The .... steam-distillation with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution contained in a 50 ml conical flask for 60 min.

  13. Comparative evaluation on some available Newcastle disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newcastle disease vaccines from three different countries were compared in terms of the level of protection conferred on domestic chickens against Newcastle disease (ND) following routine vaccinations. One hundred and fifty day old chicks were acquired and divided into three groups, with each group of fifty chickens ...

  14. Energy band offset extraction - a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, J.P.J.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    Structural quantum confinement in thin silicon double-gate MOSFETs has been quantified using the temperature dependence of the subthreshold current. The results were compared with the shifts in threshold voltage. Data was obtained from simulations after initial verification with experimental data.

  15. Comparative evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MTA) as an apical barrier material are limited, and no studies have so far examined the clinical performance of BioAggregate as apical barrier material in nonvital immature teeth. Aim: This study was aimed to provide a comparative evaluation of ...

  16. Comparative phylogeography of endemic Azorean arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Rigal, François; Mourikis, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    Background: For a remote oceanic archipelago of up to 8 Myr age, the Azores have a comparatively low level of endemism. We present an analysis of phylogeographic patterns of endemic Azorean island arthropods aimed at testing patterns of diversification in relation to the ontogeny of the archipelago...

  17. Comparative analysis of aggregate agricultural productivity between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... The study compared the aggregate agricultural productivity between the Low External Input. Technology (LEIT) and ... Key words: Aggregate agricultural productivity, low and high external input technology farms. INTRODUCTION ... 2003). The realignment of the naira exchange rate, which resulted in the ...

  18. Data base to compare calculations and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological and climatological data bases were compared with known tritium release points and diffusion calculations to determine if calculated concentrations could replace measure concentrations at the monitoring stations. Daily tritium concentrations were monitored at 8 stations and 16 possible receptors. Automated data retrieval strategies are listed

  19. Papers from the International Conference on Comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first International Conference on Comparative Physiol- ogy and Biochemistry to be held in South Africa in the new democratic era took place at Skukuza Rest Camp, Kruger. National Park, from 31 August to 5 September 1997. The aims of the conference were: (i) To enable historically underpriveleged African scientists.

  20. A comparative study of map use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvin, Niels Olof; Brodersen, Ann Christina; Bødker, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    We present a study comparing the handling of three kinds of maps, each on a physical device: a paper map, a tablet-PC based map, and a cellular phone based one. Six groups of users were asked to locate eight landmarks, looking out a window, and using a particular map. We have begun analyzing video...

  1. Comparing the achievement goal orientation of mathematics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparing the achievement goal orientation of mathematics learners with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. ... in recognising methods to direct learners' goals for better engagement with and improved results in mathematics, which could support learners to develop to their full potential in the subject.

  2. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    degradation in the humus accumulative horizon of up to 8.7 times, compared to the eluvial horizon, which shows a slightly slower rate of degradation. ... oil contamination, leading to a shift in the ecological balance, and the deterioration of the ... ecosystems forecasting; and in the microbiology laboratory of the Russian State ...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Computer Network Security Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Sergeevich Gorbatov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the analysis of the problem of comparison of security scanners computer network. A common comprehensive assessment of security control is developed on the base of comparative analysis of data security controls. We have tested security scanners available on the market.

  4. Comparative efficacy of progressive resistance exercise and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE) and Biomechanical Ankle Platform System (BAPS) are two of the protocols available in managing children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). The comparative effects of these modalities on selected functional indices of ambulatory type CP were the focus of this study. Methods: ...

  5. Prospective comparative assessment of ultrasonography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from January 2008 to December 2009. The ethical research committee of both institutions approved the study design. All patients underwent preoperative US using a 10MHz linear transducer. Preoperative sono .... cannula for insufflation when compared with a failure rate of 4.4% in passing the laparoscopic port in the study ...

  6. Comparative Assessment of Pathological Condition of Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study comparatively investigated the pathological status of selected mahogany trees (Khaya senegalensis and Entandrophragma cylindricum. Diseased samples of the tree species were collected from a mahogany forest located in Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State, Nigeria. Data were collected through laboratory analysis of the ...

  7. Comparative effectiveness of malaria preventive measures on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of malaria and its associated problems in pregnancy can be reduced by the use of different malaria preventive measures. This study was conducted to determine the comparative effectiveness of three different malaria preventive measures on populations of parturient in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria.

  8. comparative developmental effects of tramadol hydrochloride and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekrane T. and Odo P. E.

    laboratory research such as in toxicological and forensic sciences. (Goff et al., 1999; Hedouim et al.,1999). This study compares effects of cypermethrin (a pyrethroid pesticide) and tramadol (an opioid) on the development pattern of. Chrysomyia albiceps (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from intoxicated rabbit (Orctylagus cunicunus) ...

  9. Emil Kraepelin and comparative sociocultural psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilek, W G

    1995-01-01

    Emil Kraepelin, well known as the principal designer of modern psychiatric nosology, is less well known for his pioneering work in comparative sociocultural psychiatry. This paper is trying to document Kraepelin's role as the inaugurator of systematic investigations into culture-dependent differences in psychopathology. Despite his many responsibilities as clinician, teacher, hospital administrator and scientific author, Kraepelin considered cross-cultural comparison of such importance that he spent considerable time on the preparation of then very cumbersome overseas expeditions. His first research journey in 1904 to Southeast Asia led to the programmatic formulation of comparative psychiatry as a scientific endeavour designed to contribute to the better understanding of psychopathological processes and to a comprehensive comparative ethnopsychology ("Voelkerpsychologie"). Kraepelin's main cross-cultural research project, planned to extend to seven non-European countries and to involve many foreign colleagues, was prevented by World War I and postwar complications. One year before his unexpected death, Kraepelin conducted comparative studies with American Indian, Afro-American and Latin American patients at psychiatric institutions in the United States, Mexico and Cuba in 1925. In his writings Kraepelin commented on certain differences in the incidence and presentation of psychopathological phenomena that he considered to be due to ethnic-cultural characteristics or social conditions. This paper discusses in detail Kraepelin's observations on the pathoplastic and pathogenic effects of cultural and social factors, and demonstrates the influence of his ideas on the development of modern social and transcultural psychiatry.

  10. Comparative study of environmental impact assessment methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... components (in the construction or operation of the pro- ject). iv) Lack of unity. v) Lack of consideration of the comparative impacts of the components result from the changes happened in the environment. vi) Lack of possibility of benefiting from aggregative opi- nions of experts. In fact, there is no unity ...

  11. Comparative Studies on Some Physicochemical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Industrial and nutritional processes have increased the demands for oil and this in turn has led to the search for oils from different types of seeds. It is in this vein that baobab seed oil was extracted, analyzed and some of it physicochemical properties compared with those of vegetable, peanut and palm oils.

  12. Counseling in Costa Rica: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    With one of the world's most comprehensive universal healthcare systems, medical tourism in Costa Rica has increased significantly over the past few decades. American tourists save up to 80% of comparative costs for procedures, from heart surgery to root canal treatment. Although many Costa Rican healthcare professionals receive training in North…

  13. Comparative Erythrocytes Osmotic Fragility Test and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erythrocytes osmotic fragility and haematological parameters of subjects with HbAS (sickle cell trait) and HbSS (sickle cell anaemia) were determined and compared with subjects with HbAA (normal adult haemoglobin), which acted as control. They were divided into three groups of 40 subjects for HbAA, 35 subjects for ...

  14. Comparative assessment of university chemistry undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the structure of undergraduate chemistry curricula of universities in the southwest of Nigeria with a view to establishing the relative proportion of the different areas of chemistry each curriculum accommodates. It is a qualitative research, involving content analysis with a partial quantitative analysis ...

  15. comparing performance of amoxicillin and intramus- cular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-01

    Dec 1, 2014 ... SUMMARY. Objective: To compare clinical and bacteriologic re- sponses to intramuscular benzathine penicillin G. (BPG) and single dose of amoxicillin in Group A strep- tococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Design: This study included 571 children from 6 to 15 years old age, with pharyngitis, who were admitted to.

  16. Comparative Antioxidant, Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine and compare the antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of leaf infusions of Ilex laurina and Ilex paraguariensis in colon cancer cells. Methods: Antioxidant activity was determined by ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power). Cytotoxic ...

  17. Comparing Electrochemical and Biological Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Dimitrievski, Kristian; Siegbahn, P.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we compare the free energies of key intermediates in the water splitting reaction over transition metal oxide surfaces to those of the Mn cluster in photo system II. In spite of the very different environments in the enzyme system...

  18. A Comparative Study of Navigation Meshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Toll, W.G.; Triesscheijn, Roy; Kallmann, Marcelo; Oliva, Ramon; Pelechano, Nuria; Pettré, Julien; Geraerts, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A navigation mesh is a representation of a 2D or 3D virtual environment that enables path planning and crowd simulation for walking characters. Various state-of-the-art navigation meshes exist, but there is no standardized way of evaluating or comparing them. Each implementation is in a different

  19. Gramene database: Navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Gupta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gramene (http://www.gramene.org is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationships to enrich the annotation of genomic data and provides tools to perform powerful comparative analyses across a wide spectrum of plant species. It consists of an integrated portal for querying, visualizing and analyzing data for 44 plant reference genomes, genetic variation data sets for 12 species, expression data for 16 species, curated rice pathways and orthology-based pathway projections for 66 plant species including various crops. Here we briefly describe the functions and uses of the Gramene database.

  20. Comparing methods for single paragraph similarity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin; Dennis, Simon; Kwantes, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is two-fold. First, similarities generated from six semantic models were compared to human ratings of paragraph similarity on two datasets-23 World Entertainment News Network paragraphs and 50 ABC newswire paragraphs. Contrary to findings on smaller textual units such as word associations (Griffiths, Tenenbaum, & Steyvers, 2007), our results suggest that when single paragraphs are compared, simple nonreductive models (word overlap and vector space) can provide better similarity estimates than more complex models (LSA, Topic Model, SpNMF, and CSM). Second, various methods of corpus creation were explored to facilitate the semantic models' similarity estimates. Removing numeric and single characters, and also truncating document length improved performance. Automated construction of smaller Wikipedia-based corpora proved to be very effective, even improving upon the performance of corpora that had been chosen for the domain. Model performance was further improved by augmenting corpora with dataset paragraphs. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Diagnosing MOV problems using comparative trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of comparative trace analysis and shows it to be very effective in diagnosing motor operated valve (MOV) problems. Comparative trace analysis is simply the process of interpreting simultaneously gathered traces, each presenting a different perspective on the same series of events. The opening and closing of a motor operated valve is such a series of events. The simultaneous traces are obtained using Liberty Technologies' Valve Operation Test and Evaluation System (VOTES)reg-sign. The traces include stem thrust, motor current, motor power factor, motor power, switch actuations, vibration in three different frequency bands, spring pack displacement, and spring pack force. Spare and auxiliary channels enable additional key parameters to be measured, such as differential pressure and stem displacement. Though not specifically illustrated in this paper, the VOTES system also provides for FFT analysis on all traces except switches

  2. Evolutionary computation techniques a comparative perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas, Erik; Oliva, Diego

    2017-01-01

    This book compares the performance of various evolutionary computation (EC) techniques when they are faced with complex optimization problems extracted from different engineering domains. Particularly focusing on recently developed algorithms, it is designed so that each chapter can be read independently. Several comparisons among EC techniques have been reported in the literature, however, they all suffer from one limitation: their conclusions are based on the performance of popular evolutionary approaches over a set of synthetic functions with exact solutions and well-known behaviors, without considering the application context or including recent developments. In each chapter, a complex engineering optimization problem is posed, and then a particular EC technique is presented as the best choice, according to its search characteristics. Lastly, a set of experiments is conducted in order to compare its performance to other popular EC methods.

  3. Isotope Geochemistry for Comparative Planetology of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Atreya, S.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mousis, O.; Simon, A.; Hofstadter, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Isotope geochemistry has played a critical role in understanding processes at work in and the history of solar system bodies. Application of these techniques to exoplanets would be revolutionary and would allow comparative planetology with the formation and evolution of exoplanet systems. The roadmap for comparative planetology of the origins and workings of exoplanets involves isotopic geochemistry efforts in three areas: (1) technology development to expand observations of the isotopic composition of solar system bodies and expand observations to isotopic composition of exoplanet atmospheres; (2) theoretical modeling of how isotopes fractionate and the role they play in evolution of exoplanetary systems, atmospheres, surfaces and interiors; and (3) laboratory studies to constrain isotopic fractionation due to processes at work throughout the solar system.

  4. Comparing location memory for 4 sensory modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferstein, Hendrik N J; Smeets, Monique A M; Postma, Albert

    2010-02-01

    Stimuli from all sensory modalities can be linked to places and thus might serve as navigation cues. We compared performance for 4 sensory modalities in a location memory task: Black-and-white drawings of free forms (vision), 1-s manipulated environmental sounds (audition), surface textures of natural and artificial materials (touch), and unfamiliar smells (olfaction) were presented in 10 cubes. In the learning stage, participants walked to a cube, opened it, and perceived its content. Subsequently, in a relocation task, they placed each stimulus back in its original location. Although the proportion of correct locations selected just failed to yield significant differences between the modalities, the proportion of stimuli placed in the vicinity of the correct location or on the correct side of the room was significantly higher for vision than for touch, olfaction, and audition. These outcomes suggest that approximate location memory is superior for vision compared with other sensory modalities.

  5. Phrenic pacing compared with mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Packert; Laub, Michael; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Comparable case series. OBJECTIVES: High-cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) may disrupt the ability to breathe sufficiently. To restore respiration a phrenic nerve pacer can be implanted. The aims of this study were to describe the use of phrenic nerve pacing in tetraplegics in Denmark...... mechanical ventilator dependent tetraplegics met the inclusion criteria. Data were retrieved from medical records and a structured follow-up interview with seven individuals from each group. RESULTS: No significant differences were found when comparing age at injury, time since injury, length...... of hospitalization, incidence of pneumonia, number of pneumonia hospitalizations, number of tracheal suctions, speech quality and activities of daily living or quality of life. On the Short Form Health Survey (SF36) mental health summary the median for both users of phrenic nerve pacing and users of mechanical...

  6. Comparative Study of Bancruptcy Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isye Arieshanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Early indication of bancruptcy is important for a company. If companies aware of  potency of their bancruptcy, they can take a preventive action to anticipate the bancruptcy. In order to detect the potency of a bancruptcy, a company can utilize a a model of bancruptcy prediction. The prediction model can be built using a machine learning methods. However, the choice of machine learning methods should be performed carefully. Because the suitability of a model depends on the problem specifically. Therefore, in this paper we perform a comparative study of several machine leaning methods for bancruptcy prediction. According to the comparative study, the performance of several models that based on machine learning methods (k-NN, fuzzy k-NN, SVM, Bagging Nearest Neighbour SVM, Multilayer Perceptron(MLP, Hybrid of MLP + Multiple Linear Regression, it can be showed that fuzzy k-NN method achieve the best performance with accuracy 77.5%

  7. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices.

  8. Conference this! Lead Pipers compare conference experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As library travel budgets are increasingly slashed around the country, it’s a tough time for conference-going. In this group post, we compare notes about the conferences we’ve attended, which have been our favorites, and why. We hope this will generate creative ideas on good conferences (online or in-person to look forward to, and maybe offer [...

  9. Taking history seriously in comparative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmenegger, Patrick; Petersen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Methodological approaches that rely exclusively on medium- to large-N cross-sectional correlations among variables as the source of causal inference are generally not suitable for analyzing comparative research questions in which the main acting agents are collective actors, such as political par...... on electoral system choice in the period before 1939 shows, these methodological approaches are inadequate for the causal analysis of institutional change without complementary analyses of within-case variation....

  10. THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikova E.V.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis of ecological indicators designed and specified for Moldova and similar indicators of the countries of CIS is made in the work. Some general items of information about power systems of the countries of CIS (the established capacities, manufacture of the electric power are given, the analysis of dynamics of emissions GHG- СО2, NOx, SO2 in Moldova and comparison with the emissions level in other countries of CIS is made.

  11. Water thermostatic bath to compare gallium cells

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, José Felipe Neves; Petkovic, Slavolhub Garcia; Moreira, Valquimar Marvila

    2001-01-01

    In general, gallium cells can be realised in any water thermostatic bath, however, some manufactures have developed air furnaces or heat-cooling ovens (with peltier cells and heating resistors) to avoid mechanic vibrations, electromagnetic interference, and to allow for easier and dedicated operation mode. Generally, all of these devices are dedicated and they are used with only one cell. As we want to compare two different gallium cells, we have developed a water thermostatic bath, whi...

  12. COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS. CONVERGENCE VERSUS DIVERGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae ECOBICI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I compared the Romanian financial statements with the US GAAP financial statements in terms of two criteria: first the reference period and secondly the shape, structure and content of financial statements. Nowadays the two accounting systems, the French and Anglo-Saxon, tend to harmonize. I will present the convergences and the divergences between the financial statements of Romania, subject to OMFP 3055/2009, in parallel with the Anglo-Saxon accounting system.

  13. Comparative evaluation of different histoprocessing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Kartesh; Sandhu, Simarpreet Virk; Pal, Rana A G K; Bansal, Himanta; Bhullar, Ramanpreet Kaur; Kaur, Preetinder

    2017-01-01

    Tissue processing for years is carried out by the conventional method, which is a time-consuming technique resulting in 1-day delay in diagnosis. However, in this area of modernization and managed care, rapid diagnosis is increasingly desirable to fulfill the needs of clinicians. The objective of the present study was to compare and determine the positive impact on turnaround times of different tissue processing methods by comparing the color intensity, cytoplasmic details, and nuclear details of the tissues processed by three methods. A total of sixty biopsied tissues were grossed and cut into three equal parts. One part was processed by conventional method, second by rapid manual, and third by microwave-assisted method. The slides obtained after processing were circulated among four observers for evaluation. Sections processed by the three techniques were subjected to statistical analysis by Kruskal-Wallis test. Cronbach's alpha reliability test was applied to assess the reliability among observers. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for comparing mean shrinkage before and after processing. All observers were assumed to be reliable as the Cronbach's reliability test was statistically significant. The results were statistically non-significant as observed by Kruskal-Wallis test. One-way ANOVA revealed a significant value on comparison of the tissue shrinkage processed by the three techniques. The histological evaluation of the tissues revealed that the nuclear-cytoplasmic contrast was good in tissues processed by microwave, followed by conventional and rapid manual processing techniques. The color intensity of the tissues processed by microwave was crisper, and there was a good contrast between the hematoxylin and eosin-stained areas as compared to manual methods. The overall quality of tissues from all the three methods was similar. It was not feasible to distinguish between the three techniques by observing the tissue sections. Microwave

  14. Business Sustainability: How Does Tourism Compare?

    OpenAIRE

    Char-lee Moyle; Brent Moyle; Lisa Ruhanen; Alexandra Bec; Betty Weiler

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to empirically compare the adoption of business sustainability amongst 291 randomly-selected tourism and non-tourism businesses in New South Wales, Australia. Tourism businesses were found to be more committed to environmentally-sustainable practices than other types of businesses with there being a clear correlation with their ability to learn and adapt. This contradicts criticisms in the literature that tourism businesses are slow adopters of sustainability. This study highl...

  15. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  16. Comparative morphology on leaves of Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, M.-S.; Yang, Y.-P.; Sheue, C.-R.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative anatomical study on the leaves of nine out of 29 species of the genus Daphniphyllum was performed to seek support for the present infrageneric classification. Daphniphyllum is composed of two sections, Lunata (with one subsection Lunata) and Daphniphyllum (with two subsections, Daphniphyllum and Staminodia). The glabrous leaves with brachyparacytic stomata appear in all species in this study; hemiparacytic, laterocytic or anomocytic stomata occur in some taxa. Two (out of three)...

  17. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  18. Comparative integrated manufacturing efficiency in production engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Koriath, Hans-Joachim; Kuznetsov, Alexandr; Kalyashina, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    At present a plurality of manufacturing methods, different manufacturing processes and manufacturing equipment are known in order to produce and customize work pieces and products. A new systematic approaches for the analysis and evaluation of manufacturing methods bases on the energy-information model as a conceptual approach to the comparative integrated manufacturing efficiency in production engineering. The integrated manufacturing efficiency is equal to the product of the efficiencies of...

  19. Comparative advantage in Bangladesh crop production

    OpenAIRE

    Shahabuddin, Quazi; Dorosh, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    "This study uses data from 1996/97 through 1998/99 to examine the relative efficiency of production of crops in Bangladesh and their comparative advantage in international trade as measured by net economic profitability (the profitability using economic, rather than financial costs and prices), and the domestic resource cost ratio, (the amount of value of non-tradable domestic resources used in production divided by the value of tradable products). The economic profitability analysis demonstr...

  20. Comparing nuclear power with other energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Francisco C.

    2001-01-01

    The economics of electric generation of nuclear, hydro, oil and gas origin are compared. A similar comparison is also made from the health and environment standpoint for the fossil, nuclear, solar and wind generation. A risk assessment for energies of different origin is outlined and the significance of the greenhouse effect is emphasised. A comprehensive economic and environmental evaluation is recommended for the energy planning

  1. Comparative genomics of chondrichthyan Hoxa clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ying-Fu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondrichthyan or cartilaginous fish (chimeras, sharks, skates and rays occupy an important phylogenetic position as the sister group to all other jawed vertebrates and as an early lineage to diverge from the vertebrate lineage following two whole genome duplication events in vertebrate evolution. There have been few comparative genomic analyses incorporating data from chondrichthyan fish and none comparing genomic information from within the group. We have sequenced the complete Hoxa cluster of the Little Skate (Leucoraja erinacea and compared to the published Hoxa cluster of the Horn Shark (Heterodontus francisci and to available data from the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii genome project. Results A BAC clone containing the full Little Skate Hoxa cluster was fully sequenced and assembled. Analyses of coding sequences and conserved non-coding elements reveal a strikingly high level of conservation across the cartilaginous fish, with twenty ultraconserved elements (100%,100 bp found between Skate and Horn Shark, compared to three between human and marsupials. We have also identified novel potential non-coding RNAs in the Skate BAC clone, some of which are conserved to other species. Conclusion We find that the Little Skate Hoxa cluster is remarkably similar to the previously published Horn Shark Hoxa cluster with respect to sequence identity, gene size and intergenic distance despite over 180 million years of separation between the two lineages. We suggest that the genomes of cartilaginous fish are more highly conserved than those of tetrapods or teleost fish and so are more likely to have retained ancestral non-coding elements. While useful for isolating homologous DNA, this complicates bioinformatic approaches to identify chondrichthyan-specific non-coding DNA elements

  2. Solar tower and farming plants compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinecke, W.; Becker, M.; Klaiss, H.

    1991-01-01

    The article gives an abbreviated version of a study under the guidance of the DLR, comparing solar tower and farming plants (channel collectors) for electricity generation, in respect of technical and economical aspects. The comparison considers various influencing factors such as for instance: Meteorological conditions, characteristic technical differences, unit size, and permits conclusions, which are important for the development and construction of future plants. (orig.) [de

  3. Comparative analysis of enterprise architecture frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Oblak, Danica

    2012-01-01

    Today's enterprises are facing a competitive power in the dynamically changing business environment. With increasing complexity of enterprise, enterprise architecture have become an important field. Creating an enterprise architecture can be complex task, so enterprise architecture framework were created to simplify the process and guide an architect through all areas of architecture development. This study concentrates on the comparative analysis of enterprise architecture frameworks. T...

  4. Comparative sonographic evaluation of the anteroposterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dimensions were also significantly smaller in the Type 1 diabetics compared to Type 2 (P < 0.001 in all cases). The mean duration of illness for the Types 1 and 2 diabetics were 3.09 ± 1.38 and 3.78 ± 3.12 years, respectively. Longer duration of illness was associated with smaller pancreas body and tail dimensions, ...

  5. Neutron activation analysis-comparative (NAAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    A software system for the reduction of comparative neutron activation analysis data is presented. Libraries are constructed to contain the elemental composition and isotopic nuclear data of an unlimited number of standards. Ratios to unknown sample data are performed by standard calibrations. Interfering peak corrections, second-order activation-product corrections, and deconvolution of multiplets are applied automatically. Passive gamma-energy analysis can be performed with the same software. 3 figures

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Computer Access Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    the commercial market (Parks, 1990). Fingerprint readers scan to a finer degree than handprint readers and record measurements of the loops, whorls and...the trait used for authentication is tested and compared with the stored data (Alexander, 1990). a. Handprint and Fingerprint Readers Both handprint...and fingerprint readers depend on the uniqueness of each individual’s hand geometry or fingerprint ridges to identify him/her. Handprint readers also

  7. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  8. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  9. Anticipating drug side effects by comparative pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Serna, Ricard; Mestres, Jordi

    2010-10-01

    Anticipating the likely side effect profile of drugs is an aspect of key importance in current drug discovery, development and marketing. It was recently shown that drug pairs having similar side effect profiles had also affinity for a common target. Acknowledging that most drugs have a rich polypharmacology, we provide proof that drugs related by side effect similarity have in fact affinities for multiple common targets beyond their primary targets and set the basis for the use of comparative pharmacology to anticipate drug side effects. Nomenclature issues to be able to identify and properly store drugs, targets and side effects from multiple public sources; the construction of drug networks from side effect similarity and the inference of common targets among them; polypharmacology and data completeness; methods for in silico target profiling; and comparative pharmacology and inference of common side effects. The reader is provided with a detailed step-by-step analysis of the entire process from predicting the target profile of a compound to anticipating its side effect profile, and a discussion on the particular needs and limitations found at each stage of the process through illustrative examples. Comparing preclinical pharmacology data obtained in vitro but also predicted in silico using modern virtual screening methods represents an attractive strategy to anticipate clinical drug side effects.

  10. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  11. Dissociable learning processes in comparative psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Church, Barbara A

    2017-08-10

    Comparative and cognitive psychologists interpret performance in different ways. Animal researchers invoke a dominant construct of associative learning. Human researchers acknowledge humans' capacity for explicit-declarative cognition. This article offers a way to bridge a divide that defeats productive cross-talk. We show that animals often challenge the associative-learning construct, and that it does not work to try to stretch the associative-learning construct to encompass these performances. This approach thins and impoverishes that important construct. We describe an alternative approach that restrains the construct of associative learning by giving it a clear operational definition. We apply this approach in several comparative domains to show that different task variants change-in concert-the level of awareness, the declarative nature of knowledge, the dimensional breadth of knowledge, and the brain systems that organize learning. These changes reveal dissociable learning processes that a unitary associative construct cannot explain but a neural-systems framework can explain. These changes define the limit of associative learning and the threshold of explicit cognition. The neural-systems framework can broaden empirical horizons in comparative psychology. It can offer animal models of explicit cognition to cognitive researchers and neuroscientists. It can offer simple behavioral paradigms for exploring explicit cognition to developmental researchers. It can enliven the synergy between human and animal research, promising a productive future for both.

  12. Comparative study of some new EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzimami, K.S.; Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Bradley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations have been made of four new radiation dosimetry EPR candidates from the same family of materials: sulfamic acid, sulfanillic acid, homotaurine, and taurine. Mass energy attenuation coefficients, mass stopping power values and the time dependence of the radiation induced radicals are compared. Also investigated are the microwave saturation behavior and the effect of applied modulation amplitude on both peak-to-peak line width (W PP ) and peak-to-peak signal height (H PP ). The dosimeters are characterized by simple spectra and stable radiation-induced radicals over reasonable durations, especially in taurine dosimeters. Sulfamic acid dosimeters possessed the highest sensitivity followed by taurine and homotaurine and sulfanillic. - Highlights: ► Several EPR dosimeters were suggested based on SO 3 − radical. ► Taurine, homotaurine, sulfanilic, and sulfamic acid all possess simple EPR spectra. ► Dosimeters were compared to each other in terms of the dosimetric point of view. ► Energy dependence curves of the selected dosimeters were compared to eachother

  13. On divination: an exercise in comparative method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Podemann Sørensen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Some comparative methods aim at establishing universals, others seek human causes that will account for cross-cultural or transhistorical resemblance. The sole aim of the comparative method presented here is to improve our questionnaire. All theories, including those claiming universals, contribute to our professional questionnaire; and that is how, in spite of the theoretical monsters we have to kill every year, our discipline has been making some progress throughout its history. Time may have come, then, to concentrate our comparative endeavours on questions to ask. Divination is the production, observation and interpretation of signs in order to obtain a religious basis for decision and action. This working definition excludes ecstatic prophecy and straightforward clairvoyance and concentrates on what is sometimes called inductive divination. We shall consider a few divination systems from different parts of the world', but before doing so we should make clear what we are after. If we want to arrive at an idea of divination as a religious pattern, we should study the structure and content of each divination procedure, giving priority to the question of how it makes sense to its users as a true basis for making decisions.

  14. Validating and comparing stroke prognosis scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence J; Singh, Sarjit; Lees, Kennedy R; Bath, Philip M; Myint, Phyo K

    2017-09-05

    To compare the prognostic accuracy of various acute stroke prognostic scales using a large, independent, clinical trials dataset. We directly compared 8 stroke prognostic scales, chosen based on focused literature review (Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne [ASTRAL]; iSCORE; iSCORE-revised; preadmission comorbidities, level of consciousness, age, and neurologic deficit [PLAN]; stroke subtype, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project, age, and prestroke modified Rankin Scale [mRS] [SOAR]; modified SOAR; Stroke Prognosis Instrument 2 [SPI2]; and Totaled Health Risks in Vascular Events [THRIVE]) using individual patient-level data from a clinical trials archive (Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive [VISTA]). We calculated area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for each scale against 90-day outcomes of mRS (dichotomized at mRS >2), Barthel Index (>85), and mortality. We performed 2 complementary analyses: the first limited to patients with complete data for all components of all scales (simultaneous) and the second using as many patients as possible for each individual scale (separate). We compared AUROCs and performed sensitivity analyses substituting extreme outcome values for missing data. In total, 10,777 patients contributed to the analyses. Our simultaneous analyses suggested that ASTRAL had greatest prognostic accuracy for mRS, AUROC 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-0.82), and SPI2 had poorest AUROC, 0.61 (95% CI 0.57-0.66). Our separate analyses confirmed these results: ASTRAL AUROC 0.79 (95% CI 0.78-0.80 and SPI2 AUROC 0.60 (95% CI 0.59-0.61). On formal comparative testing, there was a significant difference in modified Rankin Scale AUROC between ASTRAL and all other scales. Sensitivity analysis identified no evidence of systematic bias from missing data. Our comparative analyses confirm differences in the prognostic accuracy of stroke scales. However, even the best performing scale had prognostic accuracy that may not

  15. Methods for the comparative evaluation of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busse, Reinhard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Political background: As a German novelty, the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen; IGWiG was established in 2004 to, among other tasks, evaluate the benefit of pharmaceuticals. In this context it is of importance that patented pharmaceuticals are only excluded from the reference pricing system if they offer a therapeutic improvement. The institute is commissioned by the Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss, G-BA or by the Ministry of Health and Social Security. The German policy objective expressed by the latest health care reform (Gesetz zur Modernisierung der Gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung, GMG is to base decisions on a scientific assessment of pharmaceuticals in comparison to already available treatments. However, procedures and methods are still to be established. Research questions and methods: This health technology assessment (HTA report was commissioned by the German Agency for HTA at the Institute for Medical Documentation and Information (DAHTA@DIMDI. It analysed criteria, procedures, and methods of comparative drug assessment in other EU-/OECD-countries. The research question was the following: How do national public institutions compare medicines in connection with pharmaceutical regulation, i.e. licensing, reimbursement and pricing of drugs? Institutions as well as documents concerning comparative drug evaluation (e.g. regulations, guidelines were identified through internet, systematic literature, and hand searches. Publications were selected according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Documents were analysed in a qualitative matter following an analytic framework that had been developed in advance. Results were summarised narratively and presented in evidence tables. Results and discussion: Currently licensing agencies do not systematically assess a new drug's added value for patients and society. This is why many

  16. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W Florian

    2017-04-27

    The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. CloVR-Comparative runs reference-free multiple whole-genome alignments to determine unique, shared and core coding sequences (CDSs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Output includes short summary reports and detailed text-based results files, graphical visualizations (phylogenetic trees, circular figures), and a database file linked to the Sybil comparative genome browser. Data up- and download, pipeline configuration and monitoring, and access to Sybil are managed through CloVR-Comparative web interface. CloVR-Comparative and Sybil are distributed as part of the CloVR virtual appliance, which runs on local computers or the Amazon EC2 cloud. Representative datasets (e.g. 40 draft and complete Escherichia coli genomes) are processed in <36 h on a local desktop or at a cost of <$20 on EC2. CloVR-Comparative allows anybody with Internet access to run comparative genomics projects, while eliminating the need for on-site computational resources and expertise.

  17. Using tree diversity to compare phylogenetic heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Seung-Jin; Matthews, Suzanne; Williams, Tiffani L

    2009-04-29

    Evolutionary trees are family trees that represent the relationships between a group of organisms. Phylogenetic heuristics are used to search stochastically for the best-scoring trees in tree space. Given that better tree scores are believed to be better approximations of the true phylogeny, traditional evaluation techniques have used tree scores to determine the heuristics that find the best scores in the fastest time. We develop new techniques to evaluate phylogenetic heuristics based on both tree scores and topologies to compare Pauprat and Rec-I-DCM3, two popular Maximum Parsimony search algorithms. Our results show that although Pauprat and Rec-I-DCM3 find the trees with the same best scores, topologically these trees are quite different. Furthermore, the Rec-I-DCM3 trees cluster distinctly from the Pauprat trees. In addition to our heatmap visualizations of using parsimony scores and the Robinson-Foulds distance to compare best-scoring trees found by the two heuristics, we also develop entropy-based methods to show the diversity of the trees found. Overall, Pauprat identifies more diverse trees than Rec-I-DCM3. Overall, our work shows that there is value to comparing heuristics beyond the parsimony scores that they find. Pauprat is a slower heuristic than Rec-I-DCM3. However, our work shows that there is tremendous value in using Pauprat to reconstruct trees-especially since it finds identical scoring but topologically distinct trees. Hence, instead of discounting Pauprat, effort should go in improving its implementation. Ultimately, improved performance measures lead to better phylogenetic heuristics and will result in better approximations of the true evolutionary history of the organisms of interest.

  18. Optical safety of comparative theater projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H; Stack, Casey; Schnuelle, David; Parkinson, Jay

    2014-03-01

    Traditional movie projectors employing carbon arcs were introduced to movie theaters more than a century ago, and they were replaced during the 1950s by xenon-arc projectors. Today, these arc-lamp film projectors are expected to be replaced by digital laser projectors. Questions have arisen with regard to safety of the new laser-based projectors and about the comparable safety to the xenon-arc projectors that they replace. Smaller projectors employing tungsten-halogen lamps have been used for decades in home and office environments, and small arc-discharge lamps more recently have enjoyed widespread use in digital projectors. The trend in digital projectors has led to increased luminance projection products. Results of a comparative evaluation of ocular hazards from various projection systems, with an emphasis on professional laser illuminated projection systems, are presented. Irradiance and source size measurements were made to determine the radiance of each of the projection systems for both thermal and blue light hazards to the retina. Ultraviolet and infrared measurements were also made for completeness of the hazard evaluation. Projectors are classified by risk groups according to national and international standards, and recommendations for projector safety are provided. It is shown that laser illuminated projectors have hazard distances comparable to traditional 35 mm movie-theater projectors of the order of 1 m. Since there is no resemblance to the optical hazards of distant, collimated laser beams in light shows and only minimal hazards are posed by theater projectors to the audience, the standards and regulations applicable to "laser light shows" should not be applicable for these types of products.

  19. Comparative Analysis of GOCI Ocean Color Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS, developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI. Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET. The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed  correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r2 is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm2srμm] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm2srμm]  at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm2srμm] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm2srμm]  at 490 nm.

  20. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that