WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiretroviral treatment adherence

  1. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention. ... their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and ...

  2. Determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated factors of adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment (ART), factors or variables that can discriminate between adherent and non-adherent patients on ART were selected. Simple structured questionnaire was employed. The study sample consisted of 145 HIV patients who received ART in the Shashemene ...

  3. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  4. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and offer recommendations for HIV-prevention and treatment interventions in a mining workplace. Keywords: assessment methods, behaviour, HAART, HIV/AIDS, ...

  5. Antiretroviral treatment adherence among HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlagan Shandir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful antiretroviral treatment is dependent on sustaining high rates of adherence. In the southern African context, only a handful of studies (both quantitative and qualitative have looked at the determinants including a health behaviour theory of adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The aim of this study is to assess factors including the information, motivation and behavioural skills model (IMB contributing to antiretroviral (ARV adherence six months after commencing ARVs at three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 735 HIV-positive patients were selected prior to commencing on ART from outpatient departments from three hospitals and followed-up at six months and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results A good proportion of patients were found to be adherent using both adherence instruments (visual analog scale = VAS 82.9%; Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group = AATCG 70.8%. After adjusting for significant socio-economic variables, both the VAS and the dose, schedule and food adherence indicator found levels of adherence amongst urban residents to be almost 3 times greater than that of rural residents. After adjusting for health-related variables, for both indicators better adherence was associated with low depression and poorer adherence was associated with poor environmental factors. Adjusted odds ratios for adherence when taking into account different behavioural variables were for both adherence indicators, discrimination experiences were associated with lower adherence, and higher scores in adherence information and behavioural skills were associated with higher adherence. For the VAS adherence indicator, higher social support scores were associated with higher adherence. For the dose, schedule and food adherence indicator, using herbal medicines for HIV was associated with lower adherence. Conclusion For the patients in this study, particularly those not living in

  6. Preliminary investigation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of HIV with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in declining morbidity and mortality rates from HIV-associated diseases, but concerns regarding access and adherence are growing. To determine the adherence level and the reasons for non-adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ...

  7. Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy initiation on adherence to antituberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Knight

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare workers are often reluctant to start combination antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients receiving tuberculosis (TB treatment because of the fear of high pill burden, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and side-effects. Object: To quantify changes in adherence to tuberculosis treatment following ART initiation. Design: A prospective observational cohort study of ART-naïve individuals with baseline CD4 count between 50 cells/mm3 and 350 cells/mm3 at start of TB treatment at a primary care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Adherence to TB treatment was measured by pill count,self-report, and electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (eMEMS before and after initiation of ART. Results: ART tended to negatively affect adherence to TB treatment, with an 8% – 10% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to pill count and an 18% – 22% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to eMEMS in the first month following ART initiation, independent of the cut-off used to define adherence (90%, 95% or 100%. Reasons for non-adherence were multi factorial, and employment was the only predictor for optimal adherence (adjusted odds ratio 4.11, 95% confidence interval 1.06–16.0. Conclusion: Adherence support in the period immediately following ART initiation could optimise treatment outcomes for people living with TB and HIV.

  8. Exploring ‘generative mechanisms’ of the antiretroviral adherence club intervention using the realist approach: a scoping review of research-based antiretroviral treatment adherence theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C. Mukumbang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor retention in care and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART continue to undermine the success of HIV treatment and care programmes across the world. There is a growing recognition that multifaceted interventions – application of two or more adherence-enhancing strategies – may be useful to improve ART adherence and retention in care among people living with HIV/AIDS. Empirical evidence shows that multifaceted interventions produce better results than interventions based on a singular perspective. Nevertheless, the bundle of mechanisms by which multifaceted interventions promote ART adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we reviewed theories on ART adherence to identify candidate/potential mechanisms by which the adherence club intervention works. Methods We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES and Google Scholar using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms. A manual search of citations from the reference list of the studies identified from the electronic databases was also done. Twenty-six articles that adopted a theory-guided inquiry of antiretroviral adherence behaviour were included for the review. Eleven cognitive and behavioural theories underpinning these studies were explored. We examined each theory for possible ‘generative causality’ using the realist evaluation heuristic (Context-Mechanism-Outcome configuration, then, we selected candidate mechanisms thematically. Results We identified three major sets of theories: Information-Motivation-Behaviour, Social Action Theory and Health Behaviour Model, which explain ART adherence. Although they show potential in explaining adherence bebahiours, they fall short in explaining exactly why and how the various elements they outline combine to explain positive or negative outcomes. Candidate mechanisms indentified were motivation, self-efficacy, perceived social support, empowerment, perceived threat, perceived

  9. Exploring 'generative mechanisms' of the antiretroviral adherence club intervention using the realist approach: a scoping review of research-based antiretroviral treatment adherence theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2017-05-04

    Poor retention in care and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) continue to undermine the success of HIV treatment and care programmes across the world. There is a growing recognition that multifaceted interventions - application of two or more adherence-enhancing strategies - may be useful to improve ART adherence and retention in care among people living with HIV/AIDS. Empirical evidence shows that multifaceted interventions produce better results than interventions based on a singular perspective. Nevertheless, the bundle of mechanisms by which multifaceted interventions promote ART adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we reviewed theories on ART adherence to identify candidate/potential mechanisms by which the adherence club intervention works. We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES and Google Scholar) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. A manual search of citations from the reference list of the studies identified from the electronic databases was also done. Twenty-six articles that adopted a theory-guided inquiry of antiretroviral adherence behaviour were included for the review. Eleven cognitive and behavioural theories underpinning these studies were explored. We examined each theory for possible 'generative causality' using the realist evaluation heuristic (Context-Mechanism-Outcome) configuration, then, we selected candidate mechanisms thematically. We identified three major sets of theories: Information-Motivation-Behaviour, Social Action Theory and Health Behaviour Model, which explain ART adherence. Although they show potential in explaining adherence bebahiours, they fall short in explaining exactly why and how the various elements they outline combine to explain positive or negative outcomes. Candidate mechanisms indentified were motivation, self-efficacy, perceived social support, empowerment, perceived threat, perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Although these candidate

  10. the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is better than cure' may therefore be applicable to the problem of non-adherence among patients on ART even more than in the management of chronic non- infectious diseases in which drug resistance is not an issue of concern. We therefore undertook an analysis of results from the adherence monitoring in our HIV care ...

  11. [Adherence to antiretroviral treatments with a protease inhibitor in HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Céron, D; Deleuze, J; Coste, J; Guerin, C; Ginsburg, C; Blanche, P; Finkielsztejn, L; Pecqueux, L; Chaput, S; Gorin, I; Sicard, D

    2000-06-01

    Long-term therapeutic success of powerful antiretroviral treatments dependent on patient adherence. This study was conducted to assess the difficulties HIV-infected patients with advanced-stage disease encounter in adhering to antiretroviral treatments with a protease inhibitor. A prospective self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted at our outpatient clinic for 2 months. CD4 counts and HIV viral loads were also determined. Seventy-one percent of the study population which included 262 responded to the questionnaire. The survey was made a median 215 days after initiating the antiprotease treatment with indinavir (71% of the cases), ritonavir (13%), saquinavir (6%), or a combination of protease inhibitors (10%). At onset of antiprotease treatment, mean CD4 count was 171+/-150/mm(3) and mean HIV viral load was 75,000 copies/ml. The treatment was considered to be difficult to take by 43% of the patients; 66% stated they had forgotten to take their drugs at least once a month. It was most difficult to take the drugs prescribed for the afternoon. Shifts of 1 hour were observed in 58% of patients. Non-adherence was frequent (1 failure to take drugs per week), observed in 13% of patients. Most often, the patients stated they had forgotten to take their drugs because of occupational or relational difficulties (52%). Non-adherence increased with duration of treatment. The drug most often associated with non-adherence was indinavir (73%). Age and sex did not influence adherence. Mean RNA HIV serum level was lower than at onset of the antiprotease treatment in the most non-adherent patients. At the time of the questionnaire, there was no difference in serum RNA HIV level or in the percentage of patients with an undetectable level between non-adherent and adherent patients. This survey confirmed difficulties in adherence are frequent and worsen with time. No relationship was found between non-adherence and reduction in viral load, suggesting that a short-term effect

  12. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  13. Barriers to adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Stigma, disclosure, unemployment, lack of transport, insufficient feeding, disability grants and alternative forms of therapy were identified as major barriers to adherence, whereas inadequate follow-ups and lack of patient confidentiality came under major criticisms from the patients. Conclusion: Interventions to ...

  14. Information and communication technologies for adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ivana Cristina Vieira de; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz; Alexandre, Herta de Oliveira; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Araújo, Thelma Leite de

    2016-08-01

    Information and communication technologies support interventions directed at the prevention of HIV transmission and patient monitoring by promoting improved accessibility and quality of care. To evaluate the efficacy of information and communication technologies in the adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS. Systematic review conducted from March to May of 2015 in three databases-the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); the Latin-American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences (LILACS/BIREME) and SCOPUS; and the Cochrane library and the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online portal (MEDLINE/PubMed). The sample consisted of nine randomized clinical trials based on the use of information and communication technologies for adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS. Three studies analysed the use of a short message service - SMS - two phone calls, two alarm devices, one web-enabled Hand-held device and one web electronic intervention. Improvements in the levels of adherence in the group subjected to the intervention were identified in seven studies. The phone was the type of information and communication technology with proven efficacy with respect to adherence. It was used to make calls, as well as to send alert messages and reminders about taking medications. Pagers were not considered to be effective regarding adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The integrated use of information and communication technologies with standard care promotes increased access to care, strengthening the relationship between patients and health services, with the possibility of mitigating the difficulties experienced by people with HIV in achieving optimal levels of adherence to drug therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors affecting adherence to antiretroviral treatment in harari national regional state, eastern ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitiku, Habtamu; Abdosh, Tekabe; Teklemariam, Zelalem

    2013-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART) depends on strict adherence to the regimen, but many factors have been identified for nonadherence. Method. To identify the factors for non-adherence to ART, a cross-sectional study was conducted on people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and attending the ART service at Hiwot Fana and Jugal hospitals; it was done from October to December, 2010. Adherence was defined as taking 95% of the prescribed doses in the week before the survey. Data were collected using a standard interview questionnaire and were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Result. Among the 239 study participants, the magnitude of adherence to ART in the week before interview was 87%. The main reasons for nonadherence were forgetting (47.2%), traveling (18.9%), and being busy doing other things (15.1%). There was not any independent predicator identified for adherence to ART. Conclusion. Compared to other similar studies in Ethiopia, in this study a high adherence rate was found. Forgetfulness was the most common reason for the nonadherence. Therefore, the ART counseling needs to give emphasis to using memory aids. In addition, a further study on adherence rate and its determinants with multiple adherence measurements is recommended.

  16. Adherence to HIV treatment guidelines for comorbid disease assessment and initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Mark; Hoy, Jennifer; Cunningham, Nicola; Roth, Norman; Bailey, Michael; Pierce, Anna; Watson, Jo; Carr, Andrew

    2012-04-15

    There are limited data on adherence to HIV treatment guidelines. We assessed adherence to US Department of Health and Human Services guidelines with Australian Commentary for adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Data were recorded regarding "when to start", "what to start" and pre-ART comorbid disease assessment for consecutive adults initiating ART at primary care and hospital clinics in Sydney and Melbourne from 2004 through 2008. Independent predictors of adherence to guidelines were calculated by stepwise logistic regression. For the 500 subjects (95.9% male, mean 40.2 years, median CD4 count 270 cells/μL) "when to start" adherence was 87.6%, and was less likely with initiation in a clinical trial [0.25 (95% CI: 0.13 to 0.49); P ART initiated in 2008 versus pre-2008 [OR: 2.69 (1.64 to 4.61); P = 0.0001]. Median comorbid disease assessment adherence was 56.8%, ranging from 25.6% for urinalysis to 99.2% for white blood cell count, and was more likely in patients with AIDS, and initiating ART in hospital or in a clinical trial. Hospital clinics were more likely to perform antiretroviral resistance testing (71.2% vs. 46.4%, P ART regimens (76.8% vs. 62.2%, P = 0.0002) but less likely to promote healthy diet and lifestyle (63.4% vs. 36.4%, P ART comorbid disease assessment requires greater attention.

  17. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G; Lerner, Brenda D G; Hospital, Michelle M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL) whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny's (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence, and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hornschuh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU, Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n=26 were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment.

  19. Barriers to adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a regional hospital in Vredenburg, Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo N. Azia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa currently runs the largest public antiretroviral treatment (ART programme in the world, with over 80% of people living with HIV and/or AIDS on ART. However, in order to appreciate the benefits of using ART, patients are subject to uncompromising and long-term commitments of taking at least 95% of their treatment as prescribed. Evidence shows that this level of adherence is seldom achieved because of a multilevel and sometimes interwoven myriad of factors. Objective: We described the challenges faced by patients on ART in Vredenburg with regard to ART adherence. Methods: A descriptive qualitative research design was used. Eighteen non-adhering patients on ART in the Vredenburg regional hospital were purposefully selected. Using a semistructured interview guide, we conducted in-depth interviews with the study participants in their mother tongue (Afrikaans. The interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and translated into English. The data were analysed manually using the thematic content analysis method. Results: Stigma, disclosure, unemployment, lack of transport, insufficient feeding, disability grants and alternative forms of therapy were identified as major barriers to adherence, whereas inadequate follow-ups and lack of patient confidentiality came under major criticisms from the patients. Conclusion: Interventions to address poverty, stigma, discrimination and disclosure should be integrated with group-based ART adherence models in Vredenburg while further quantitative investigations should be carried out to quantify the extent to which these factors impede adherence in the community.

  20. Determinants of non-adherence to subsidized anti-retroviral treatment in southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzochukwu, B S C; Onwujekwe, O E; Onoka, A C; Okoli, C; Uguru, N P; Chukwuogo, O I

    2009-05-01

    The anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment programme in Nigeria is delivered through selected teaching and mission hospitals at a free/subsidized rate. The government aims to scale up ARV treatment in the country. However, non-adherence to ARV medication can lead to viral resistance, treatment failure, toxicities and waste of financial resources. This study examined the factors responsible for non-adherence to free/subsidized ARV treatment in south-east Nigeria. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive. Information was collected from 174 patients selected by simple random sampling from the register of all patients who had been on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for at least 12 months at the beginning of the study period. Patients were identified during their clinic visits. Information on their socio-demographic profile, ARV treatment and determinants of non-adherence to ARV treatment was obtained from those who gave consent, using pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaires. All patients clearly understood the need to take ARV drugs throughout their lives, and what the costs entailed. They understood the need for periodic testing, the probability that complications would develop, cost of transportation to treatment site and the daily treatment regimen. Seventy-five per cent of respondents were not adhering fully to their drug regimen; the mean number of days that respondents had been off drugs was 3.57 days the preceding month. Reasons for non-adherence included: physical discomfort (side effects); non-availability of drugs at treatment site; forgetting to carry drugs during the day; fear of social rejection; treatment being a reminder of HIV status; and selling of own drugs to those unable to enrol in the projects. Being female, under 35 years, single, and having higher educational status were significantly associated with non-adherence. It is important that policy makers and programme managers address the factors responsible for non-adherence when scaling up

  1. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesha Webb Mazinyo

    Full Text Available Adherence to tuberculosis (TB treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa.A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008-31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1 taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT as noted in the patient card; and (2 taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART. Risk ratios (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence.Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0% were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60 and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76.The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment.

  2. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  3. Prevention is better than cure – the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith Kwaan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The much-used phrase ‘prevention is better than cure’ is applicable to many circumstances, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In recent years suggestions have been made for a move towards treatment strategies that emphasise prevention of foreseeable adherence problems on a patient-by-patient basis, through focused patient preparation before commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART. This is well elucidated in a statement made in 2004 by Coetzee et al.:1 ‘As it is difficult to ascertain robust predictors of adherence, there has been a move to concentrate on patient preparation before the initiation of ART rather than the use of non-clinical predictors of adherence or selection criteria. A paradigm focused on preparation rather than selection is better suited to the aggressive targets for the scaling up of ART in countries with large epidemics (such as in South Africa, where the view of ART as a very expensive rationed intervention is rapidly changing.’

  4. Treatment Adherence and Outcomes of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N. B.; Uddin, Q. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the treatment outcomes in terms of adherence, outcomes and side effects of antiretroviral (ARV) agents. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Teaching Hospital of Khyber Medical University, Institute of Medical Sciences, Kohat, from February 2007 to December 2012. Methodology: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive patients, taking 1st line ARV agents for at least 6 months were included. Adherence was calculated by self report on asking the number of doses missed in last 30 days. ARVs were provided on monthly basis. Adherence data was noted over a period of 6 months. ARVs outcomes were recorded in the form of adherence, CD4 count, functional status of the patient, change in weight, further transmission of the disease, number of hospital admissions and deaths. Adverse Drug Reactions (ARDs) to ARVs were assessed clinically and by laboratory markers. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for numerical variables while frequencies and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. Results: Total number of patients included in this study were 107. Out of them, 66.4% were males and 33.6% were females. The mean age was 39.9 +- 13.80 years. Patients taking AZT/3TC/NVP, AZT/3TC/EFZ, D4T/3TC/NVP, D4T/3TC/EFZ, TNF/3TC/NVP or EFZ were 49.5%, 22.4%, 10.3%, 4.7% and 13% respectively. Most adverse affects were observed in 10 days to 90 days of initiation of therapy. Rash was observed in 71 (66.4%) patients, anaemia in 4 (3.7%) patients while only one patient (0.93%) had nausea / vomiting. Thirty (28%) patients reported no side effects. Out of 107 patients, 98 (91.5%) were alive whereas 9 (8.4%) died at the end of the study period. Twelve patients had one hospital admission (11.21%) whereas 9 (8.4%) patients had two admissions during the study period. The first mean CD4 was 325.27 cells /mcL whereas mean last CD4 count was 389.86 cells/mcL. Conclusion: ARVs have very satisfactory outcomes in HIV/AIDS patients

  5. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Arroyo MJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available María Jesús Hernández Arroyo,1 Salvador Enrique Cabrera Figueroa,2 Rosa Sepúlveda Correa,3 María de la Paz Valverde Merino,1 Alicia Iglesias Gómez,4 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil Hurlé5 On behalf of the Tormes Team 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 2Pharmacy Institute, University Austral of Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 3Department of Statistics, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 4Infectious Disease Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 5Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Background: Antiretroviral treatments (ART form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1 to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2 to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods: A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR. The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010. Results: A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01. Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001, and there was a

  6. Study of determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV Patients covered by Ahwaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Moradi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is essential for achieving durable clinical outcomes in patients with HIV. In addition, suboptimal adherence can accelerate development of drug-resistant HIV and mitigate HAART’s role in reducing HIV incidence and transmission. The present research has been conducted to study treatment adherence and determine its effective factors on HIV/AIDS patients with the support of Ahvaz JundiShapur University of Medical Sciences in 2015. This is a cross-sectional study in which 158 HIV/AIDS patients who had been registered in the counseling centers of behavioral diseases of Ahvaz and were receiving antiretroviral treatment. They had been selected by census method. Data were collected using the AACTG (Adult Aids Clinical Trials Group questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed and interpreted using descriptive statistical tests, χ2 and step by step regression by spss-16 software. The mean age of patients was 32.8±10.36. Among them 20.8% were female, 47.5% were single and 35.6% had a job. Also 33.7% of the respondents had CD4+ cell count less than 350 cells/μL. and average treatment duration was 9 months at study entry. According to the findings of this study, the degree of adherence was reported as % 63.9.The main reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness (26% and side effects (19%. There were no significant differences between highly adherent and less adherent patients with regard to age, gender, education Employment status, Treatment duration, time of diagnosis. Adherence to HAART is a key factor in disease course in persons with HIV/AIDS. Low-level adherence in subjects of the study indicated that educational and intervention is quite necessary for patients in order to improve their medication self-management.

  7. Representações sociais e adesão ao tratamento antirretroviral (Social Representations and Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigido Vizeu Camargo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Este trabalho teve como objetivo identificar as representações sociais e os fatores que influenciam a adesão ao tratamento antirretroviral. Participaram do estudo 154 pessoas que faziam tratamento antirretroviral, sendo 82 homens com média de idade de 40 anos e 3 meses. Os dados foram obtidos por meio de entrevistas diretivas e por uma escala de adesão ao tratamento antirretroviral. O material textual sobre o significado do tratamento foi analisado pelo software IRAMUTEQ. O tratamento é representado a partir de duas concepções: a primeira a uma vida normal mantida pela ideia de uso contínuo e regular dos medicamentos, compartilhada pelas pessoas com alta adesão ao tratamento. Já a segunda, como algo que gera sofrimento e isolamento social, mais característica de pessoas com baixa/inadequada e insuficiente/ regular adesão. Sobre o nível de adesão, os resultados indicaram que 22.7% dos participantes apresentaram adesão alta/ estrita, e que a relação com o médico, a equipe de saúde e a informação sobre o tratamento estão relacionados com a alta/estrita adesão ao tratamento antirretroviral dos participantes. Abstract This study aims to identify the social representations and the factors that influence in the adherence to antiretroviral treatment. The participants in the study were 154 people who were undergoing antiretroviral treatment, 82 men with an average age of 40 years and three months. The data was obtained through direct interviews and through a scale of adherence to antiretroviral treatment. The textual material in relation to the meaning of the treatment was analyzed by the IRAMUTEQ software. The treatment is represented in two concepts: First, from a normal life maintained by the idea of continuous and regular use of medications shared by people with high adherence to treatment. Second, as something which generates social suffering, and isolation, most characteristic of people with low/inadequate, and

  8. adherence to antiretroviral regimens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to macro- and microeconomic costs.' What soon became evident, however, was the vital importance of patient adherence with prescribed medication in order to garner the benefits that were so rapidly becoming available. As a result, much attention has recently been paid to this aspect of management. Both clinicians and ...

  9. When masculinity interferes with women's treatment of HIV infection: a qualitative study about adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Social constructions of masculinity have been shown to serve as an obstacle to men's access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ART). In the light of women's relative lack of power in many aspects of interpersonal relationships with men in many African settings, our objective is to explore how male denial of HIV/AIDS impacts on their female partners' ability to access and adhere to ART. Methods We conducted a qualitative case study involving thematic analysis of 37 individual interviews and five focus groups with a total of 53 male and female antiretroviral drug users and 25 healthcare providers in rural eastern Zimbabwe. Results Rooted in hegemonic notions of masculinity, men saw HIV/AIDS as a threat to their manhood and dignity and exhibited a profound fear of the disease. In the process of denying and avoiding their association with AIDS, many men undermine their wives' efforts to access and adhere to ART. Many women felt unable to disclose their HIV status to their husbands, forcing them to take their medication in secret, and act without a supportive treatment partner, which is widely accepted to be vitally important for adherence success. Some husbands, when discovering that their wives are on ART, deny them permission to take the drugs, or indeed steal the drugs for their own treatment. Men's avoidance of HIV also leave many HIV-positive women feeling vulnerable to re-infection as their husbands, in an attempt to demonstrate their manhood, are believed to continue engaging in HIV-risky behaviours. Conclusions Hegemonic notions of masculinity can interfere with women's adherence to ART. It is important that those concerned with promoting effective treatment services recognise the gender and household dynamics that may prevent some women from successfully adhering to ART, and explore ways to work with both women and men to identify couples-based strategies to increase adherence to ART PMID:21658260

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of Adherence to First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence of Treatment Sustainability from an Indian HIV Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Anita; Kumarasamy, N; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; Rewari, Bharath B; Arumugam, Karthika; Antony, Jimmy; De Costa, Ayesha; D'Souza, George

    2016-01-01

    Given the chronic nature of HIV infection and the need for life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART), maintaining long-term optimal adherence is an important strategy for maximizing treatment success. In order to understand better the dynamic nature of adherence behaviors in India where complex cultural and logistic features prevail, we assessed the patterns, trajectories and time-dependent predictors of adherence levels in relation to virological failure among individuals initiating first-line ART in India. Between July 2010 and August 2013, eligible ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals newly initiating first-line ART within the national program at three sites in southern India were enrolled and monitored for two years. ART included zidovudine/stavudine/tenofovir plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. Patients were assessed using clinical, laboratory and adherence parameters. Every three months, medication adherence was measured using pill count, and a structured questionnaire on adherence barriers was administered. Optimal adherence was defined as mean adherence ≥95%. Statistical analysis was performed using a bivariate and a multivariate model of all identified covariates. Adherence trends and determinants were modeled as rate ratios using generalized estimating equation analysis in a Poisson distribution. A total of 599 eligible ART-naïve patients participated in the study, and contributed a total of 921 person-years of observation time. Women constituted 43% and mean CD4 count prior to initiating ART was 192 cells/mm3. Overall mean adherence among all patients was 95.4%. The proportion of patients optimally adherent was 75.6%. Predictors of optimal adherence included older age (≥40 years), high school-level education and beyond, lower drug toxicity-related ART interruption, full disclosure, sense of satisfaction with one's own health and patient's perception of having good access to health-care services. Adherence was inversely proportional to virological

  11. Non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in children attending HIV treatment clinic at harare Children's Hospital, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimhuya, S; Nathoo, K J; Rusakaniko, S

    2013-01-01

    Non-adherence reduces the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. Knowledge of factors associated with non-adherence would assist clinicians and program planners to design and implement interventions to improve adherence and therefore treatment outcomes. To determine the prevalence and factors associated with non-adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in children less than 10 years of age. A cross-sectional study of 216 caregivers and children less than 10 years of age who had received HAART for at least 60 days prior to this study. Non-adherence was defined as taking less than 95% of prescribed doses. Caregiver self-reports of missed doses in the 30 days preceding a clinic visit, and clinic based pill counts were used to determine non-adherence. Of the 228 children selected, 216 (94.7%) study participants were assessed using the self-report method. Pill count assessment was done on only 96 (44%) participants who produced unused pills on their review dates. Caregiver self-reports (n=216) estimated the prevalence of non-adherence to be 7.4% (95%: CI 3.90 10.90) whereas clinic-based pill counts (n=96) yielded a higher estimate of 18.8% (95% CI 10.94 26.56). In a regression analysis based on pill count, two or fewer siblings (OR=6.26, 95% CI 1.64-23.95) or adults (OR=3.73, 95% CI: 1.01-13.78) in the household were independently associated with non-adherence to HAART. Of the 16 participants who were non adherent by pill count the reasons for missing doses were, attending gatherings (funeral, church), caregiver forgetting to give dose, medication running out, not understanding dosing instructions, concurrently taking other medicines such as anti tuberculosis drugs and cotrimoxazole, child visiting relatives during school vacation, and inconsistent supply of drugs in the hospital. The prevalence of non adherence using pill count method was high at this clinic. Caregiver reports of missed doses underestimated the prevalence of non-adherence to HAART

  12. Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents and Adults in Uganda: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Hamers, Raph L; Kityo, Cissy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Roura, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Long-term success of HIV antiretroviral therapy requires near-perfect adherence, maintained throughout one's lifetime. However, perceptions towards ART and patterns of adherence may change during the life course. We assessed challenges to long-term adherence in adolescents and adults in three regional HIV treatment centers in Uganda. We conducted 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus group discussions with a total of 33 health-care providers and expert clients (HIV patients on long-term ART who assist with adherence support of fellow patients). Interview topics included experiences with patients on long-term treatment with either declining adherence or persistent poor adherence. Transcribed texts were coded and analyzed based on the social-ecological framework highlighting differences and commonalities between adolescents and adults. The overarching themes in adolescents were unstructured treatment holidays, delays in disclosure of HIV status by caretakers, stigma, which was mainly experienced in boarding schools, and diminishing or lack of clinical support. In particular, there was minimal support for early and gradual disclosure for caretakers to the infected children, diminishing clinical support for young adults during transition to adult-based care and declining peer-to-peer support group activities. The predominating theme in adults was challenges with treatment access among temporary economic migrants. Common themes to adults and adolescents were challenges with disclosure in intimate relationships, treatment related factors including side effects, supply of single tablets in place of fixed-dose combined drugs, supply of drug brands with unfavorable taste and missed opportunities for counseling due to shortage of staff. Adherence counseling and support should be adapted differently for adolescents and adults and to the emerging life course challenges in long-term treated patients. Programs should also address constraints experienced by temporary economic

  13. Patients' adherence to antiretroviral therapy at Antiretroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence is the most important factor influencing successful antiretroviral therapy. Long term success with antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires taking 95% of medication. Less than 95% adherence can result in less than optimal therapeutic response and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  14. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our

  15. Relationship between alcohol consumption, whether linked to other substance use or not, and antiretroviral treatment adherence in HIV+ patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Álvarez, Sara; Madoz-Gúrpide, Agustín; Parro-Torres, Carlos; Hernández-Huerta, Daniel; Ochoa Mangado, Enriqueta

    2017-07-14

    Hazardous alcohol consumption is a common diagnosis among people living with HIV infection. The relationship between alcohol consumption and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy has been highlighted in different studies, yet few of them performed a parallel analysis of other substance use. In Spain, alcohol consumption is frequently associated with other substance use, mainly cannabis and cocaine. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of hazardous alcohol consumption both combined with other substances (cocaine, heroin, methadone and/or cannabis) or alone on antiretroviral therapy adherence in our social environment. We performed an observational case-control study including 119 HIV+ individuals. We recruited 40 non-adherent patients, defined by less than 90% compliance according to hospital pharmacy refill data, and corroborated by the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire (SMAQ) and referring professional's opinion. Control cases (n=79) were defined as those patients with similar characteristics but considered adherent according to the same parameters. Data collection took place between May 2013 and September 2015. Statistical analysis was performed using a binary logistic regression model. Our results indicate that alcohol consumption decreases adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The use of methadone represents a statistically significant increased risk of poor adherence. No significant differences were found between adherent and non-adherent groups regarding cocaine, heroin or cannabis use in this study. In summary, the detection of substance use and especially alcohol consumption in HIV+ patients can improve the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy by identifying and treating at-risk individuals for a poor therapeutic adherence.

  16. Adherence to antiretrovirals in refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwoguh, Francisca

    Adherence to antiretroviral regimes is essential in effective management of HIV. The cultural, social, religious and immigration status of refugees and asylum seekers can have an impact on their understanding of their care needs and maintenance of their treatment regimen.

  17. The magnitude of intentional non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The magnitude of intentional non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy among patients attending HIV care and treatment clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, ... Background: Suppression of viral replication is the goal of antiretroviral therapy. It is one ... Most patients (70.1%) experienced peripheral neuropathy.

  18. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India--the HIVIND study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Ayesha; Shet, Anita; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ashorn, Per; Eriksson, Bo; Bogg, Lennart; Diwan, Vinod K

    2010-03-26

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. 600 treatment naïve patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first-line antiretrovirals in an Indian context.

  19. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Nagalingeswaran

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. Methods/Design 600 treatment naïve patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Discussion Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first

  20. Roles of family dynamics on adherence to highly active antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been proven to be the only effective treatment for HIV/AIDS worldwide. Good adherence to HAART might require good family support. Objective: To determine the family dynamics and social support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and its ...

  1. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment and associated factors in people living with HIV/AIDS in Quindío, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deisy Viviana Cardona-Duque

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Depression and self-report on compliance were associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. A comprehensive study on the perception of social support and cognitive variables, such as self-efficacy and risk perception, is highly recommended for people living with HIV/AIDS.

  2. Longitudinal relationships between antiretroviral treatment adherence and discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race, and sexual orientation among African-American men with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Galvan, Frank H; Klein, David J

    2010-10-01

    African-Americans show worse HIV disease outcomes compared to Whites. Health disparities may be aggravated by discrimination, which is associated with worse health and maladaptive health behaviors. We examined longitudinal effects of discrimination on antiretroviral treatment adherence among 152 HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men. We measured adherence and discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation at baseline and monthly for 6 months. Hierarchical repeated-measures models tested longitudinal effects of each discrimination type on adherence. Over 6 months, participants took 60% of prescribed medications on average; substantial percentages experienced discrimination (HIV-serostatus, 38%; race/ethnicity, 40%; and sexual orientation, 33%). Greater discrimination due to all three characteristics was significantly bivariately associated with lower adherence (all p's discrimination was significant (p < 0.05). Efforts to improve HIV treatment adherence should consider the context of multiple stigmas, especially racism.

  3. Sticking to it: the effect of maximally assisted therapy on antiretroviral treatment adherence among individuals living with HIV who are unstably housed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Surita; Palmer, Alexis K; O'Brien, Nadia; Chan, Keith; Shen, Anya; Coulter, Suzy; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2011-11-01

    Housing is a known determinant of health behaviors, which includes adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Within the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) study, unstable housing is inversely associated with adherence. Several comprehensive adherence support services have emerged to improve adherence for unstably housed or otherwise vulnerable populations. The Maximally Assisted Therapy (MAT) program in Vancouver, British Columbia uses a multidisciplinary approach to support HIV-positive clients with a history of addictions or mental illness, many of whom also experience episodic homelessness. This study investigated the association between antiretroviral adherence and use of support services, including the MAT program, amongst people living with HIV and AIDS who are unstably housed in the LISA sample. Of the 212 unstably housed participants, those who attended the MAT program were 4.76 times more likely to be ≥95% adherent (95% CI 1.72-13.13; P = 0.003) than those who did not. The findings suggest that in the absence of sustainable housing solutions, programs such as MAT play an important role in supporting treatment adherence in this population.

  4. Sticking to It: The Effect of Maximally Assisted Therapy on Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Among Individuals Living with HIV Who are Unstably Housed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Alexis K.; O’Brien, Nadia; Chan, Keith; Shen, Anya; Coulter, Suzy; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Hogg, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Housing is a known determinant of health behaviors, which includes adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Within the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) study, unstable housing is inversely associated with adherence. Several comprehensive adherence support services have emerged to improve adherence for unstably housed or otherwise vulnerable populations. The Maximally Assisted Therapy (MAT) program in Vancouver, British Columbia uses a multidisciplinary approach to support HIV-positive clients with a history of addictions or mental illness, many of whom also experience episodic homelessness. This study investigated the association between antiretroviral adherence and use of support services, including the MAT program, amongst people living with HIV and AIDS who are unstably housed in the LISA sample. Of the 212 unstably housed participants, those who attended the MAT program were 4.76 times more likely to be ≥95% adherent (95% CI 1.72–13.13; P = 0.003) than those who did not. The findings suggest that in the absence of sustainable housing solutions, programs such as MAT play an important role in supporting treatment adherence in this population. PMID:21850442

  5. Impact of Socioeconomic Inequality on Access, Adherence, and Outcomes of Antiretroviral Treatment Services for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach Xuan Tran

    Full Text Available Ensuring an equal benefit across different patient groups is necessary while scaling up free-of-charge antiretroviral treatment (ART services. This study aimed to measure the disparity in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART in Vietnam and the effects of socioeconomic status (SES characteristics on the levels of inequality.A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1133 PLWH in Vietnam. ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes were self-reported using a structured questionnaire. Wealth-related inequality was calculated using a concentration index, and a decomposition analysis was used to determine the contribution of each SES variable to inequality in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART.Based on SES, minor inequality was found in ART access and adherence while there was considerable inequality in ART outcomes. Poor people were more likely to start treatment early, while rich people had better adherence and overall treatment outcomes. Decomposition revealed that occupation and education played important roles in inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes.The findings suggested that health services should be integrated into the ART regimen. Furthermore, occupational orientation and training courses should be provided to reduce inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes.

  6. Impact of Socioeconomic Inequality on Access, Adherence, and Outcomes of Antiretroviral Treatment Services for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Hwang, Jongnam; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Latkin, Noah Reed Knowlton; Tran, Ngoc Kim; Minh Thuc, Vu Thi; Nguyen, Huong Lan Thi; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Le, Huong Thi; Tran, Tho Dinh; Latkin, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring an equal benefit across different patient groups is necessary while scaling up free-of-charge antiretroviral treatment (ART) services. This study aimed to measure the disparity in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART in Vietnam and the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) characteristics on the levels of inequality. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1133 PLWH in Vietnam. ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes were self-reported using a structured questionnaire. Wealth-related inequality was calculated using a concentration index, and a decomposition analysis was used to determine the contribution of each SES variable to inequality in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART. Based on SES, minor inequality was found in ART access and adherence while there was considerable inequality in ART outcomes. Poor people were more likely to start treatment early, while rich people had better adherence and overall treatment outcomes. Decomposition revealed that occupation and education played important roles in inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes. The findings suggested that health services should be integrated into the ART regimen. Furthermore, occupational orientation and training courses should be provided to reduce inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes.

  7. Clinic Attendance for Medication Refills and Medication Adherence amongst an Antiretroviral Treatment Cohort in Uganda: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setor Kunutsor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regular clinic attendance for antiretroviral (ARV drug refills is important for successful clinical outcomes in HIV management. Methods. Clinic attendance for ARV drug refills and medication adherence using a clinic-based pill count in 392 adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in a district hospital in Uganda were prospectively monitored over a 28-week period. Results. Of the 2267 total scheduled clinic visits, 40 (1.8% were missed visits. Among the 392 clients, 361 (92% attended all appointments for their refills (regular attendance. Clinic attendance for refills was statistically significantly associated with medication adherence with regular attendant clients having about fourfold greater odds of achieving optimal (≥95% medication adherence [odds ratio (OR=3.89, 95% CI: 1.48 to 10.25, exact P=.013]. In multivariate analysis, clients in age category 35 years and below were less likely to achieve regular clinic attendance. Conclusion. Monitoring of clinic attendance may be an objective and effective measure and could be a useful adjunct to an adherence measure such as pill counting in resource-constrained settings. Where human resource constraints do not allow pill counts or other time-consuming measures, then monitoring clinic attendance and acting on missed appointments may be an effective proxy measure.

  8. Determinants of antiretroviral therapy adherence in northern Tanzania: a comprehensive picture from the patient perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyimo, R.A.; Bruin, de M.; Boogaard, van den J.; Hospers, H.J.; Ven, van der A.; Mushi, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background - To design effective, tailored interventions to support antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, a thorough understanding of the barriers and facilitators of ART adherence is required. Factors at the individual and interpersonal level, ART treatment characteristics and health care factors

  9. Barriers and facilitators to patients\\' adherence to antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients\\' adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for effective medical treatment of HIV/AIDS. We conducted a qualitative interview study in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia in 2006. The aim of the study was to explore patients\\' and health care professionals\\' perceived barriers and facilitators to patients\\' ...

  10. Spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor drug adherence is a major problem in the care of HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Spirituality is one of the several factors that affects ... The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Spirituality (FACIT-Sp) tool was used to determine their level of spirituality. Participants were classified as having high or ...

  11. The Presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders Is Associated With a Lower Adherence to Combined Antiretroviral Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Isabella; Wandeler, Gilles; Sehhat, Asemaneh; Bugnon, Olivier; Metral, Melanie; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Gutbrod, Klemens; Cavassini, Matthias; Schneider, Marie P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are defined according to their diagnostic degrees as follows: asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, mild neurocognitive disorder, and HIV-associated dementia. Because high adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is required to maintain viral suppression among HIV-infected patients, it is important to investigate the impact of HAND on medication adherence. Our study hypothesis was that patients with HAND had a lower medication adherence than patients who did not have HAND. Methods. This was an observational, exploratory, 2-center pilot study of patients who had a state-of-the-art neurocognitive assessment performed between January 2011 and June 2015 while also being followed at their respective adherence clinics. Adherence was measured with electronic monitors. Patients’ sociodemographic characteristics, HIV viral load, and CD4 counts were retrieved from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database. At each time t, adherence was computed as the proportion of patients taking medication as prescribed at that time. Results. We included 59 patients, with a median (Q1, Q3) age of 53 years (47–58) and 39 (66%) were male participants. Twenty-two patients (35%) had no neurocognitive deficits, 16 (27%) patients had HAND, and 21 (35%) patients had non-HAND (mostly depression). Implementation over 3 years showed a significant decline (50%) in medication adherence among patients diagnosed with HAND in comparison with patients who had a normal neuropsychological status or a non-HIV-related cognitive deficit (implementation stayed 90% during follow-up). Conclusions. Our findings support the hypothesis that HAND is associated with reduced cART adherence. PMID:28584853

  12. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Fixed-Dose Combination Antiretroviral Drugs Adherence among HIV-Positive Pregnant Women on Option B Treatment in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandir Ramlagan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility for all babies to be born and remain HIV-negative for the first year of life is achievable in South Africa. HIV-positive mothers’ adherence to their antiretroviral medication is one of the crucial factors to achieve this target. Cross-sectional data were collected at 12 community health centres, over 12 months (2014–2015, from 673 HIV-positive women, less than 6 months pregnant, attending antenatal care, and on Option B treatment. Adherence measures included the Adults AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG four-day measure, as well as the Visual Analog Scale (VAS seven-day measure. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions are presented. 78.8% of respondents were adherent on AACTG, while 68.8% reported VAS adherence. Bivariate analyses for increased adherence show significant associations with older age, less/no alcohol usage, disclosure of HIV status, higher HIV knowledge, no desire to avoid ARV side effects, low stigma, and low depression. AACTG showed a negative association with intimate partner violence. Multivariable logistic regression on AACTG and VAS adherence rates resulted in unique contributions to increased adherence of older age, less/no alcohol usage, higher HIV knowledge, lack of depression, and non-disclosure. Programs targeting closer side effect monitoring, HIV disclosure, pre-natal depression, alcohol intake, and HIV knowledge need consideration.

  13. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling to improve adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke eLangebeek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counselling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes.Methods: We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counselling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counselling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD in adherence and the odds ratio (OR of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71. Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.63. However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counselling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Electronic monitoring-informed counselling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counselling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not

  14. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counseling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes. We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counseling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counseling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in adherence and the odds ratio (OR) of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits (CI). A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.71). Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.63). However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counseling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant. Electronic monitoring-informed counseling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counseling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not in studies where it was the only intervention component.

  15. Perceived stigma and highly active antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived stigma and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. ... Data on socio-demographic characteristics, stigma and adherence to drug regimen were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire. Data were ...

  16. Long-term adherence to antiretroviral treatment and program drop-out in a high-risk urban setting in sub-Saharan Africa: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Unge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seventy percent of urban populations in sub-Saharan Africa live in slums. Sustaining HIV patients in these high-risk and highly mobile settings is a major future challenge. This study seeks to assess program retention and to find determinants for low adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART and drop-out from an established HIV/ART program in Kibera, Nairobi, one of Africa's largest informal urban settlements. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A prospective open cohort study of 800 patients was performed at the African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF clinic in the Kibera slum. Adherence to ART and drop-out from the ART program were independent outcomes. Two different adherence measures were used: (1 "dose adherence" (the proportion of a prescribed dose taken over the past 4 days and (2 "adherence index" (based on three adherence questions covering dosing, timing and special instructions. Drop-out from the program was calculated based on clinic appointment dates and number of prescribed doses, and a patient was defined as being lost to follow-up if over 90 days had expired since the last prescribed dose. More than one third of patients were non-adherent when all three aspects of adherence--dosing, timing and special instructions--were taken into account. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that not disclosing HIV status, having a low level of education, living below the poverty limit (US$ 2/day and not having a treatment buddy were significant predictors for non-adherence. Additionally, one quarter of patients dropped out for more than 90 days after the last prescribed ART dose. Not having a treatment buddy was associated with increased risk for drop-out (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0-1.9. CONCLUSION: These findings point to the dilemma of trying to sustain a growing number of people on life-long ART in conditions where prevailing stigma, poverty and food shortages threatens the long-term success of HIV treatment.

  17. ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara Panigrahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Million Death Study Collaborators in the British Medical Journal have estimated that the people living with HIV/AIDS population to be between 1.4-1.6 million. Development of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART has been one of the dramatic advances in the history of medicine. Among several factors that can affect the ART outcome, adherence to the ART has been cited as a major factor associated with poor outcomes. For ART to have maximum effect greater than 95%, adherence has been suggested. Additionally, non adherence to ART is a major cause of HIV drug resistance. Especially, in the Indian context, adherence to ART is very important due to the sheer number of HIV/AIDS cases, the socioeconomic status, diversity of the population and regions. That is, the socioeconomic challenges faced by patients contribute to nonadherence to ART in India. With this background, this study was done with the primary objective of assessing the level of adherence to the given regimen of ART as per the NACO guidelines and factors influencing adherence. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective patient record-based study conducted in the Antiretroviral Therapy Centre at MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, from January 2016 to June 2016. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 150 patients’ records from the ART Centre of the medical college. The data was collected in a predesigned case record form from the patient card available at antiretroviral therapy centre. The patients were followed up through the patient card for six months from their recruitment. The adherence to treatment was evaluated using the adherence score adopted by NACO where a score of 1, 2 and 3 implied that 95%, 80-95% and 95% medication taken. Persons with primary education, married individuals and persons without employment had better improvement in adherence score than other groups. Anaemia was the predominant adverse drug reaction encountered. CONCLUSION The findings of this

  18. Short-term garlic supplementation and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence, CD4+ cell counts, and human immunodeficiency virus viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic's association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the studies visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research teams selection criteria and contributed 99 pairs of visits for the study. Among the women who used garlic

  19. Determinantes da adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral em Brasília, DF: um estudo de caso-controle Determinants of antiretroviral treatment adherence in Brasília, Federal District: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Viveiros de Carvalho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se avaliar os fatores relacionados à adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral no Distrito Federal. De 150 pacientes entrevistados em sete centros de referência, 35 não aderentes foram definidos como casos, sendo selecionados 70 controles aderentes, pareados por idade. Avaliaram-se variáveis sócio-demográficas, hábitos, suporte social, qualidade de vida, questões relacionadas a doença, estado clínico, tratamento e serviço. Na análise bivariada, houve associação da adesão com raça/cor, escolaridade, centros de referência em que faz acompanhamento e renda familiar. Após ajuste, cor parda, centros de referência localizado no Plano Piloto, escolaridade alta e receber apoio dos amigos quanto às necessidades permaneceram associados com adesão. Retirando raça/cor do modelo, mantiveram-se centros de referência, escolaridade, profissão, renda, apoio (contar com alguém que demonstre gostar de você e satisfação com o atendimento na farmácia de dispensação. Além dos fatores já consolidados na literatura, questões relacionadas ao apoio no âmbito micro-social e aos serviços de assistência mostraram-se associados à observância terapêutica.We sought to evaluate factors relating to adherence to antiretroviral treatment in the Federal District. Out of 150 patients interviewed at seven reference centers; 35 non-adherent subjects were considered to be cases; we selected 70 age-matched adherent individuals as controls. Variables relating to sociodemographics, habits, social support, quality of life, disease-related issues, clinical conditions, treatment and healthcare services were evaluated. Bivariate analysis showed that adherence was associated with race/color, educational level, the reference center where the patient was followed up and familial income. After adjustments, mixed race (parda, reference center location in central Brasília, high educational level and friends’ support for needs remained associated with

  20. Utility of Mobile Communication Devices as a Tool to Improve Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in HIV-infected Children and Young Adults in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankievich, Erica; Malanca, Adriana; Foradori, Irene; Ivalo, Silvina; Losso, Marcelo

    2018-04-01

    Optimal adherence is critical to achieve the benefits of antiretroviral treatment (ART). The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of mobile devices as a strategy to improve adherence to ART, measured by viral load (VL) in HIV+ patients less than 25 years of age. A prospective study was conducted in a cohort of HIV+ patients less than 25 years of age. HIV+ patients, on ART, VL >1000 copies/mL, using mobile devices and suboptimal adherence were included. The intervention was based on a mobile generic contact twice a month using text message and Facebook during 32 weeks. Extended communications were generated by the patient. VL was performed before and after the intervention. Twenty-five patients were included. Three were excluded and 22 patients were enrolled. Mean age was 17.2 ± 6.1 years (range: 6-25); 15 (68%) were female; mean baseline VL was 25,100 copies/mL (range: 1020-500,000 copies/mL), mean log was 4.3 (range: 3-5.7 log). Each participant received a total of 16 contacts; 84% (296) were answered by the patient and 54% (189) of the contacts generated extended communications. After the strategy implementation, 20/22 VL results were available: 13/20 (65%) were undetectable, 14/20 (70%) had VL mobile devices and social networks is a valid tool to improve ART adherence in HIV+ pediatric and young adults, evaluated through VL. The strategy is feasible. The reminder messages trigger additional communications between patients and health provider and better engagement with HIV care. Longer follow-up time is needed.

  1. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs. Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 37 Number 1 (2010). *P. Mweemba, M.K. Makukula, P.K. Mukwato, M.M. Makoleka. Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ABSTRACT. Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy has led to ...

  2. Real-Time Adherence Monitoring for HIV Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Josh; Kigozi, Isaac; Emenyonu, Nneka; Hunt, Peter; Martin, Jeffrey; Bangsberg, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Current adherence assessments typically detect missed doses long after they occur. Real-time, wireless monitoring strategies for antiretroviral therapy may provide novel opportunities to proactively prevent virologic rebound and treatment failure. Wisepill, a wireless pill container that transmits a cellular signal when opened, was pilot tested in ten Ugandan individuals for 6 months. Adherence levels measured by Wisepill, unannounced pill counts, and self-report were compared with each other, prior standard electronic monitoring, and HIV RNA. Wisepill data was initially limited by battery life and signal transmission interruptions. Following device improvements, continuous data was achieved with median (interquartile range) adherence levels of 93% (87–97%) by Wisepill, 100% (99–100%) by unannounced pill count, 100% (100–100%) by self-report, and 92% (79–98%) by prior standard electronic monitoring. Four individuals developed transient, low-level viremia. After overcoming technical challenges, real-time adherence monitoring is feasible for resource-limited settings and may detect suboptimal adherence prior to viral rebound. PMID:20809380

  3. Use of an on-line pager system to increase adherence to antiretroviral medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, S A; Hendriksen, E S; Desousa, N; Boswell, S L; Mayer, K H

    2003-12-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is critical for treatment success. Antiretroviral therapy typically requires multiple pills at multiple dosing times. To address this, we tested the feasibility, utility, and efficacy of a customizable reminder system using pagers, which were programmed using web-based technology, to increase and maintain proper adherence in patients with pre-existing adherence problems. After a two-week monitoring period with an electronic pill-cap, participants with less than 90% adherence were randomized to continue monitoring or to receive a pager. The group who received the pagers had greater improvements in adherence from baseline to Week 2 and Week 12 than those who monitored their medications only. However, adherence in both groups at the outcome assessments points was still poor. While the provision of a reminder system helped improve adherence, it is likely that more intensive interventions are required for patients with pre-existing problems.

  4. Psychological distress and adherence to highly active anti-retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mental health related risk factors for non-adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) have not been investigated in Uganda and yet adherence is critical to the success of the current scale up in the provision of HAART to HIV positive individuals in rural areas of Uganda. Objective: To determine ...

  5. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies from a rural Uganda prospective clinical cohort. ... Journal Home > Vol 13, No 2 (2013) > ... should target specific personal barriers to ART adherence like: lack of family support, health and sexual life concerns, desire to have children and family instability.

  6. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  7. Adherence to Antiretrovirals Among US Women During and After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeguez, Arlene D.; Lindsey, Jane C.; Shannon, Maureen; Tuomala, Ruth E.; Cohn, Susan E.; Smith, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Buschur, Shelly; Cotter, Amanda; Bettica, Linda; Read, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Antiretrovirals (ARVs) are recommended for maternal health and to reduce HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission, but suboptimal adherence can counteract its benefits. Objectives To describe antepartum and postpartum adherence to ARV regimens and factors associated with adherence. Methods We assessed adherence rates among subjects enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 1025 from August 2002 to July 2005 on tablet formulations with at least one self-report adherence assessment. Perfectly adherent subjects reported no missed doses 4 days before their study visit. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare antepartum with postpartum adherence rates and to identify factors associated with perfect adherence. Results Of 519 eligible subjects, 334/445 (75%) reported perfect adherence during pregnancy. This rate significantly decreased 6, 24, and 48 weeks postpartum [185/284 (65%), 76/118 (64%), and 42/64 (66%), respectively (P pregnancy (P pregnancy are needed. PMID:18614923

  8. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication adherence is a complex behaviour with multiple determinants. Understanding the barriers and facilitators of adherence is invaluable for programme improvement, which assists the foundation of adherence intervention strategies. A qualitative study was conducted in six selected hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2008, ...

  9. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam AG; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of adherence-enhancing interventions. Our objective was to review evidence on predictors/correlates of adherence to ART, and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of their impact on adher...

  10. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  11. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C Mukumbang

    Full Text Available The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory-the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not.We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective.We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase.The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing an initial programme

  12. Motivational Groups Support Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian women comprise the fastest growing group of persons with AIDS in Africa. Antiretroviral therapy has transformed the course of HIV/AIDS to a treatable, chronic illness worldwide. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a group intervention using motivational interviewing (MI) to promote ...

  13. Association between daily antiretroviral pill burden and treatment adherence, hospitalisation risk, and other healthcare utilisation and costs in a US medicaid population with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Calvin J; Meyers, Juliana L; Davis, Keith L

    2013-08-01

    Lower pill burden leads to improved antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV patients. Simpler dosing regimens have not been widely explored in real-world populations. We retrospectively assessed ART adherence, all-cause hospitalisation risk and costs, and other healthcare utilisation and costs in Medicaid enrollees with HIV treated with ART as a once-daily single-tablet regimen (STR) or two or more pills per day (2+PPD). Patients with an HIV diagnosis from 2005 to 2009 receiving complete ART (ie, two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus a third agent) for ≥60 days as STR or 2+PPD were selected and followed until the first of (1) discontinuation of the complete ART, (2) loss of enrolment or (3) end of database. Adherence was measured using the medication possession ratio. Monthly all-cause healthcare utilisation and costs were observed from regimen initiation until follow-up end. Of the 7381 patients who met inclusion criteria, 1797 were treated with STR and 5584 with 2+PPD. STR patients were significantly more likely to reach 95% adherence and had fewer hospitalisations than 2+PPD patients (both p<0.01). STR patients had mean (SD) total monthly costs of $2959 ($4962); 2+PPD patients had $3544 ($5811; p<0.001). Hospital costs accounted for 53.8% and pharmacy costs accounted for 32.5% of this difference. Multivariate analyses found that STR led to a 23% reduction in hospitalisations and a 17% reduction in overall healthcare costs. ART adherence appears to be a key mechanism mediating hospitalisation risk, as patients with ≥95% adherence (regardless of regimen type) had a lower hospitalisation rate compared with <95% adherence. While it was expected that STR patients would have lower pharmacy costs, we also found that STR patients had fewer hospitalisations and lower hospital costs than 2+PPD patients, resulting in significantly lower total healthcare costs for STR patients.

  14. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study determined the effect of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on body mass index (BMI) and immunological and virological parameters of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending University College Hospital, Ibadan. Methodology: Prospective cohort of consenting PLWHA ...

  15. Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy Part II: which interventions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interventions to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be classified into four categories: cognitive, behavioural and affective interventions and (modified) directly observed therapy (DOT.) Cognitive interventions improve HIV- and ART-related knowledge, but this is not consistently associated with better ...

  16. Determinants of optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Successful Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was shown to rely on high levels of medication adherence to enable maximum and durable viral suppression for the prolongation of life among people living with HIV/AIDS. Objective: The study sought to determine individual and environmental factors that influence ...

  17. Implementing tools to promote adherence to anti-retroviral therapy at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lack of effective systems and tools to identify and track defaulters are some of the factors that pose challenges in adherence monitoring for patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). An intervention was performed to introduce a facilitybased appointment keeping system, and a revised clinic form to monitor ...

  18. Determinants of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heestermans, Tessa; Browne, Joyce L; Aitken, Susan C; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The rapid scale up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has resulted in an increased focus on patient adherence. Non-adherence can lead to drug-resistant HIV caused by failure to achieve maximal viral suppression. Optimal treatment requires the identification of

  19. Determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Patients in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalu A. Reda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are only a few comprehensive studies of adherence to ART and its challenges in Africa. This paper aims to assess the evidence on the challenges and prospects of ART adherence in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The authors reviewed original and review articles involving HIV-positive individuals that measured adherence to ART and its predictors in the past decade. Findings. Against expectations, sub-Saharan Africa patients have similar or higher adherence levels compared to those of developed countries. The challenges to ART adherence include factors related to patients and their families, socioeconomic factors, medication, and healthcare systems. Conclusion. Despite good adherence and program-related findings, antiretroviral treatment is challenged by a range of hierarchical and interrelated factors. There is substantial room for improvement of ART programs in sub-Sahara African countries.

  20. Pattern and Determinants of Antiretroviral Drug Adherence among Nigerian Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Ekama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for a high level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs has remained a major hurdle to achieving maximal benefit from its use in pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the level of adherence and identify factors that influence adherence during pregnancy. Method. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a semistructured questionnaire. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine factors independently associated with good drug adherence during pregnancy. Result. 137 (80.6% of the interviewed 170 women achieved adherence level of ≥95% using 3 day recall. The desire to protect the unborn child was the greatest motivation (51.8% for good adherence. Fear of being identified as HIV positive (63.6% was the most common reason for nonadherence. Marital status, disclosure of HIV status, good knowledge of ART, and having a treatment supporter were found to be significantly associated with good adherence at bivariate analysis. However, after controlling for confounders, only HIV status disclosure and having a treatment partner retained their association with good adherence. Conclusion. Disclosure of HIV status and having treatment support are associated with good adherence. Maternal desire to protect the child was the greatest motivator for adherence.

  1. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H.; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C.; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B.; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of

  2. Pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS: variáveis associadas à adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral Persons living with HIV/AIDS: factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Maria Fleury Seidl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou descrever o comportamento de adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral em pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS e investigar preditores da adesão entre as variáveis escolaridade, presença de efeitos colaterais, interrupção anterior da terapia anti-retroviral (TARV por conta própria, auto-estima, expectativa de auto-eficácia, estratégias de enfrentamento, suporte social e satisfação com a relação profissional de saúde-usuário. Adesão foi medida pelo auto-relato da perda do número de comprimidos/cápsulas dos medicamentos anti-retrovirais na última semana e mês, sendo considerada satisfatória na ocorrência de omissão inferior a 5% do total prescrito. Participaram 101 pessoas, 60,4% homens, idades entre 20 a 71 anos (M = 37,9 anos, 73,3% sintomáticos. A coleta de dados incluiu entrevista e instrumentos auto-aplicáveis. A maioria (n = 73; 72,3% relatou adesão igual ou superior a 95%. Nos resultados da regressão logística, interrupção anterior da TARV e expectativa de auto-eficácia foram preditores significativos da adesão. Faz-se necessária a qualificação da assistência pela constituição de equipes interdisciplinares, para o desenvolvimento de abordagens adequadas às dificuldades médicas e psicossociais de adesão das pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS.This study aimed to describe the adherence of persons living with HIV/AIDS to antiretroviral therapy (ART and to investigate adherence predictors among the following: level of schooling, presence of side effects, current or previous interruption of ART by the persons themselves, self-esteem, self-efficacy expectation, coping strategies, social support, and satisfaction with the health professional-patient relationship. Adherence was measured by self-reported number of ART pills/capsules missed during the previous week and previous month, evaluated as satisfactory when less than 5%. 101 HIV+ adults took part in this study, 60.4% males, ranging from 20 to 71 years

  3. Predictors of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV infected patients in northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seleman Khamis Semvua

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been shown to reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality amongst those living with HIV and reduce transmission of the virus to those who are yet to be infected. However, these outcomes depend on maximum ART adherence, and HIV programs around the world make efforts to ensure optimal adherence. Predictors of ART non-adherence vary considerably across populations and settings with respect to demographic, psychological, behavioral and economic factors. The objective of this study is to investigate risk factors that predict non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment among HIV-infected individuals in northern Tanzania.At Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC, a tertiary and referral hospital in northern Tanzania, we used an existing ART database to randomly select HIV-infected patients above 18 years of age who have been on triple ART for at least two years. We used interviewer administered structured questionnaires to cross-sectionally determine predictors of ART non-adherence. We determined non-adherence through retrospective review of pharmacy drug refill (PDR records of the interviewed participants using a pharmacy database.Non-adherence was defined as collecting less than 95% of expected monthly refills in the previous 2 years. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors of non-adherence. Of the 256 patients enrolled mean age was 44 years (SD ± 11 and median CD4 count was 499 cells per microliter (IQR 332-690. Median PDR adherence was 71% (IQR 58%-75%. Non-adherence was associated with younger age and unemployment.In this setting, adherence strategies could be adapted to address issues facing young adults, and those with household challenges such as unemployment. Further research is required to better understand the potential roles of these factors in suboptimal adherence.

  4. Predicting adherence to antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women in Guyana: Utility of the Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitalis, Deborah

    2017-07-01

    Barriers to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among pregnant women are varied and complex. This study explored the constructs of a theoretical model, the Health Belief Model (HBM) to understand and predict ART adherence among pregnant women in Guyana. A cross-sectional study surveyed 108 pregnant women attending 11 primary care clinics. ART adherence ranging from the past weekend to three months was assessed through self-reports, and health beliefs with the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire (ADQ). Constructs with sufficient variation in responses were tested for association with the level of adherence using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and test. Sixty-seven per cent (72) of the women reported being always adherent. Although there was positive endorsement of ART treatment and adherence, the HBM did not help in understanding or predicting ART adherence in this population. Only one item from the perceived susceptibility construct was significantly associated (p = 0.009) with adherence. Interventions are warranted to address ART adherence in this population, as 19% of the women were recently non-adherent. Although the ADQ did not contribute to a deeper understanding or provide insight into pathways that can be targeted for intervention, theoretical models can play a key role in identifying these pathways.

  5. Methamphetamine use and neuropsychiatric factors are associated with antiretroviral non-adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J; Atkinson, J Hampton; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the impact of methamphetamine (METH) on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV+ persons, as well as examines the contribution of neurocognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric factors [i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD), antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and attention deficit disorder (ADHD)] for ART non-adherence. We examined HIV+ persons with DSM-IV-diagnosed lifetime history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /METH+ ; n=67) as compared to HIV+ participants with no history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /METH - ; n=50). Ancillary analyses compared these groups with a small group of HIV+ /METH+ persons with current METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /CU METH+ ; n=8). Non-adherence was defined as self-report of any skipped ART dose in the last four days. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed with a comprehensive battery, covering seven neuropsychological domains. Lifetime METH diagnosis was associated with higher rates of detectable levels of plasma and CSF HIV RNA. When combing groups (i.e., METH+ and METH- participants), univariate analyses indicated co-occurring ADHD, ASPD, and MDD predicted ART non-adherence (p's ART non-adherence after controlling for the other variables (pdisorders are associated with worse HIV disease outcomes and ART medication non-adherence. Interventions often target substance use behaviors alone to enhance antiretroviral treatment outcomes; however, in addition to targeting substance use behaviors, interventions to improve ART adherence may also need to address coexisting neuropsychiatric factors and cognitive impairment to improve ART medication taking.

  6. Factors associated with high rates of antiretroviral medication adherence among youth living with perinatal HIV in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ezer; Delzell, Darcie A P; Chhabra, Manik; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

    2015-07-01

    Antiretroviral medication adherence behaviour among Thai youth with perinatal HIV in Thailand has received growing attention. However, few studies have examined individual predictors of antiretroviral adherence using multiple self-reports. A convenience sample of 89 Thai youth (interquartile range 14-16 years) with perinatal HIV at three paediatric programmes in Chiang Mai completed a structured questionnaire and reported their antiretroviral adherence in the past one, seven and 30 days using count-based recall and a visual analog scale. Mean self-reported adherence rates ranged from 83.5% (past 30 days) to 99.8% (yesterday) of the time. One-inflated beta regression models were used to examine the associations between antiretroviral adherence outcomes, treatment self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, social support and beliefs/attitudes about medications. Higher percentage of medications taken in the past 30 days was independently associated with higher treatment self-efficacy and fewer symptoms of depression. Adherence monitoring would benefit from focal assessment of youth depression and perceived capacity to follow their antiretroviral regimen. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. the moralities of antiretroviral treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the moralities of antiretroviral treatment. Klaus Fiedler. AIDS - a moral issue. When HIV I AIDS was discovered in 1984 and began to spread all over the world, it was a moral ... may have to perform) and it has increased the number of working days lost due to attendance .... the other side, moral issues are addressed in detail.

  8. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Spain. A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortego, Carmen; Huedo-Medina, Tania Bibiana; Vejo, Javier; Llorca, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the percentage of adherence to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Spanish observational studies and to identify the variables associated with adherence. Seven electronic databases were used to locate the studies. Six inclusion criteria were established. Two coders codified the variables independently. Intercoder reliability was calculated. Publication bias was analyzed through the Begg, Egger and Trim and Fill tests. Homogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and the l² index. A random effects model was assumed to estimate both the overall percentage of adherence and to explain heterogeneity. This meta-analysis included 23 observational studies, yielding a total of 34 adherence estimates. The sample was composed of 9,931 HIV-positive individuals (72% men) older than 18 years under treatment with HAART. The percentage of patients adhering to an intake of >90% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs was 55%. Wide heterogeneity was detected (I² =91.20; 95%CI: 88.75-93.13). Adherence was mainly measured using a single strategy (47.8%), the most widely used being self-report (48.7%). In the univariate analysis, the following factors were significant: infection stages A (β=0.68, p loads >200 copies/ml (β=-0.41, p load of <200 copies/ml. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  10. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral therapy adherence among patients with HIV in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dlama Nggida; da Silva Té, David; Rodkjaer, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Adherence is a decisive factor in achieving a successful response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection.No previous studies have been conducted regarding HIV treatment adherence in Guinea-Bissau. In this study we assessed barriers and facilitators to patient ART adherence. Semi...... were experienced treatment benefits and complementing social networks. The barriers were treatment-related costs and competing livelihood needs; poor clinic infrastructure; perceived stigma; and traditional practices. Our findings indicate that good ART adherence,especially in resource-limited settings...

  11. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities.

  12. Predictive validity of a brief antiretroviral adherence index: Retrospective cohort analysis under conditions of repetitive administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwell Bradford

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newer antiretroviral (ARV agents have improved pharmacokinetics, potency, and tolerability and have enabled the design of regimens with improved virologic outcomes. Successful antiretroviral therapy is dependent on patient adherence. In previous research, we validated a subset of items from the ACTG adherence battery as prognostic of virologic suppression at 6 months and correlated with adherence estimates from the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS. The objective of the current study was to validate the longitudinal use of the Owen Clinic adherence index in analyses of time to initial virologic suppression and maintenance of suppression. Results 278 patients (naïve n = 168, experienced n = 110 met inclusion criteria. Median [range] time on the first regimen during the study period was 286 (30 – 1221 days. 217 patients (78% achieved an undetectable plasma viral load (pVL at median 63 days. 8.3% (18/217 of patients experienced viral rebound (pVL > 400 after initial suppression. Adherence scores varied from 0 – 25 (mean 1.06, median 0. The lowest detectable adherence score cut point using this instrument was ≥ 5 for both initial suppression and maintenance of suppression. In the final Cox model of time to first undetectable pVL, controlling for prior treatment experience and baseline viral load, the adjusted hazard ratio for time updated adherence score was 0.36score ≥ 5 (95% CI: 0.19–0.69 [reference: score ≥ 5 (0.05–0.66 [reference: Conclusion A brief, longitudinally administered self report adherence instrument predicted both initial virologic suppression and maintenance of suppression in patients using contemporary ARV regimens. The survey can be used for identification of sub-optimal adherence with subsequent appropriate intervention.

  13. Supporting adherence to antiretroviral therapy with mobile phone reminders: results from a cohort in South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence is central to the success of antiretroviral therapy. Supporting adherence has gained importance in HIV care in many national treatment programs. The ubiquity of mobile phones, even in resource-constrained settings, has provided an opportunity to utilize an inexpensive, contextually feasible technology for adherence support in HIV in these settings. We aimed to assess the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in South India. Participant experiences with the intervention were also studied. This is the first report of such an intervention for antiretroviral adherence from India, a country with over 800 million mobile connections. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Quasi-experimental cohort study involving 150 HIV-infected individuals from Bangalore, India, who were on antiretroviral therapy between April and July 2010. The intervention: All participants received two types of adherence reminders on their mobile phones, (i an automated interactive voice response (IVR call and (ii A non-interactive neutral picture short messaging service (SMS, once a week for 6 months. Adherence measured by pill count, was assessed at study recruitment and at months one, three, six, nine and twelve. Participant experiences were assessed at the end of the intervention period. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 38 years, 27% were female and 90% urban. Overall, 3,895 IVRs and 3,073 SMSs were sent to the participants over 6 months. Complete case analysis revealed that the proportion of participants with optimal adherence increased from 85% to 91% patients during the intervention period, an effect that was maintained 6 months after the intervention was discontinued (p = 0.016. Both, IVR calls and SMS reminders were considered non-intrusive and not a threat to privacy. A significantly higher proportion agreed that the IVR was helpful compared to the SMS (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Mobile phone reminders may improve

  14. Insights into Adherence among a Cohort of Adolescents Aged 12–20 Years in South Africa: Reported Barriers to Antiretroviral Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhairi Maskew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents experience disproportionately high rates of poor ART outcomes compared to adults despite prolonged use of antiretroviral therapy in Southern African treatment programs, presenting a significant challenge to national attempts to meet the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets for 2020. This cohort study among adolescents aged 12–20 years accessing ART care at two urban public-sector clinics in Johannesburg between September and November 2013 aimed to identify factors potentially associated with poor attendance at clinic visits. Patients were followed up through routine medical records to identify missed visits (failing to attend clinic within 30 days of scheduled visit date up to 2 years after enrolment. We enrolled 126 adolescents on ART for a median of 6.3 years (IQR: 2.7–8.4. A total of 47 (38% adolescents missed a scheduled visit within 24 months of enrolment. Older adolescents (18–20 years were more likely to miss a visit compared to adolescents aged 12–14 years (risk ratio (RR = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.00–2.95. Those who were identified to have difficulty in taking medication (RR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.13–2.18 as a barrier to care were more likely to miss a visit compared to adolescents who did not. Awareness of treatment fatigue, challenges to taking ART, and caregiver difficulties is important when considering interventions to improve treatment outcomes among adolescents.

  15. Namibian prisoners describe barriers to HIV antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalihu, Nauyele; Pretorius, Louise; van Dyk, Agnes; Vander Stoep, Ann; Hagopian, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Little is available in scholarly literature about how HIV-positive prisoners, especially in low-income countries, access antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication. We interviewed 18 prisoners at a large prison in Namibia to identify barriers to medication adherence. The lead nurse researcher was a long-standing clinic employee at the prison, which afforded her access to the population. We identified six significant barriers to adherence, including (1) the desire for privacy and anonymity in a setting where HIV is strongly stigmatized; (2) the lack of simple supports for adherence, such as availability of clocks; (3) insufficient access to food to support the toll on the body of ingesting taxing ART medications; (4) commodification of ART medication; (5) the brutality and despair in the prison setting, generally leading to discouragement and a lack of motivation to strive for optimum health; and (6) the lack of understanding about HIV, how it is transmitted, and how it is best managed. Because most prisoners eventually transition back to communitysettings when their sentences are served, investments in prison health represent important investments in public health.

  16. Who takes the medicine? Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome W

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wondu Teshome,1 Mihretu Belayneh,1 Mathewos Moges,1 Misganu Endriyas,2 Emebet Mekonnen,2 Sinafiksh Ayele,2 Tebeje Misganaw,2 Mekonnen Shiferaw,2 Palanivel Chinnakali,3 Sven Gudmund Hinderaker,4 Ajay MV Kumar5 1School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia; 2Research Technology Transfer Process Unit, SNNP Regional Health Bureau, Hawassa, Ethiopia; 3Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Post-graduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India; 4Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 5The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, South-East Asia Regional Office, New Delhi, India Background: Treatment adherence is critical for the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART for people living with HIV. There is limited representative information on ART drug adherence and its associated factors from Southern Ethiopia. We aimed at estimating the level of adherence to ART among people living with HIV and factors associated with it in 20 randomly selected ART clinics of Southern Ethiopia.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we interviewed consecutive HIV patients on first-line antiretroviral regimen attending the clinics in June 2014 using a pretested and structured questionnaire. For measuring adherence, we used 4-day recall method based on “The AIDS Clinical Trial Group adherence assessment tool”. Patients were classified as “Incomplete adherence” if they missed any of the doses in the last 4 days. Data were singly entered using EpiData and descriptive analysis, and unadjusted odds ratios were calculated using EpiDataStat software. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed using Stata v12.0.Results: Of 974 patients interviewed, 539 (56% were females, and mean age was 35 years. The proportion of patients with incomplete adherence was 13% (95% confidence interval: 11%–15

  17. Highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and its determinants in selected regions in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix F. Widjaja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART can reduce morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients. However, it depends upon adherence to medication. The objective of this study was to examine the adherence to HAART and to evaluate individual patient characteristics i.e. self-efficacy, depression level, and social support and to finally determine HAART adherence in selected regions in Indonesia.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Jakarta, Malang, Bandung, Makasar and Banda Aceh. The subject of the study was HIV-infected patients who were older than 13 years old and had taken HAART for at least a month. They were recruited consecutively then asked how many pills they had missed during the previous month. Poor adherence can be stated if the percentage of adherence rate is below 95%. HIV treatment adherence self-efficacy scale  (HIVASES, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL was adapted to assess self-efficacy, depression level and social support, respectively.Results: We found that 96% (n=53 of the subjects adhered to HAART. There were no associations between adherence with self-efficacy, depression level, and social support. The main cause of non-adherence in this study was ‘simply  forget’.Conclusion: Adherence to HAART was found to be high and not associated with self-efficacy, depression level and social support in some central regions in Indonesia. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:50-5Keywords: adherence, depression, HAART, HIV, self-efficacy, social support

  18. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors.

  19. Use of peers to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a global network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Steve; Park, Jay Jh; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Forrest, Jamie; Thorlund, Kristian; Nachega, Jean B; Mills, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether using peers can improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To construct the World Health Organization's global guidance on adherence interventions, we conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of using peers for achieving adequate adherence and viral suppression. We searched for randomized clinical trials of peer-based interventions to promote adherence to ART in HIV populations. We searched six electronic databases from inception to July 2015 and major conference abstracts within the last three years. We examined the outcomes of adherence and viral suppression among trials done worldwide and those specific to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) using pairwise and network meta-analyses. Twenty-two trials met the inclusion criteria. We found similar results between pairwise and network meta-analyses, and between the global and LMIC settings. Peer supporter+Telephone was superior in improving adherence than standard-of-care in both the global network (odds-ratio [OR]=4.79, 95% credible intervals [CrI]: 1.02, 23.57) and the LMIC settings (OR=4.83, 95% CrI: 1.88, 13.55). Peer support alone, however, did not lead to improvement in ART adherence in both settings. For viral suppression, we found no difference of effects among interventions due to limited trials. Our analysis showed that peer support leads to modest improvement in adherence. These modest effects may be due to the fact that in many settings, particularly in LMICs, programmes already include peer supporters, adherence clubs and family disclosures for treatment support. Rather than introducing new interventions, a focus on improving the quality in the delivery of existing services may be a more practical and effective way to improve adherence to ART.

  20. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Methods: Quantitative data on patients' health status, ART adherence, CD4 cell counts and viral loads were collected, and qualitative data on life ... Patient 4, a 14 year old orphan had missed ART for 2 months when his treatment supporter was away. Patient 5 aged 66 ... understanding of treatment benefits and leaving.

  1. Associations among correlates of schedule adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART): a path analysis of a sample of crack cocaine using sexually active African-Americans with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J S; Schönnesson, L Nilsson; Williams, M L; Timpson, S C

    2008-02-01

    Adherence to HIV medication regimens is a function of multiple dimensions including psychological functioning, social support, adherence self-efficacy and optimism regarding treatment. Active substance use can also negatively affect adherence. An understanding of the nature of the associations among the correlates of adherence can better inform the design of interventions to improve adherence. This study developed an exploratory path model of schedule adherence using data from a sample 130 African-American HIV-positive crack cocaine users on highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). This model was based on the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman. Following the theory, the effects of psychological distress on schedule adherence were mediated by patients' relationship with their doctor and optimism towards antiretroviral treatment. Adherence was also associated with patients' self-efficacy regarding their medical regimen which, in turn, was associated with their social support.

  2. Associations among correlates of schedule adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART): A path analysis of a sample of crack cocaine using sexually active African–Americans with HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATKINSON, J. S.; SCHÖNNESSON, L. NILSSON; WILLIAMS, M. L.; TIMPSON, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to HIV medication regimens is a function of multiple dimensions including psychological functioning, social support, adherence self-efficacy and optimism regarding treatment. Active substance use can also negatively affect adherence. An understanding of the nature of the associations among the correlates of adherence can better inform the design of interventions to improve adherence. This study developed an exploratory path model of schedule adherence using data from a sample 130 African-American HIV-positive crack cocaine users on highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). This model was based on the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman. Following the theory, the effects of psychological distress on schedule adherence were mediated by patients’ relationship with their doctor and optimism towards antiretroviral treatment. Adherence was also associated with patients’ self-efficacy regarding their medical regimen which, in turn, was associated with their social support. PMID:18293137

  3. Treatment Adherence in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite developments in treatment options there is no significant increase in treatment adherence ratios. Inadherence in psychiatric disorders is higher than the other diseases. Loss of insight, drugs' side effects, sociodemographic features, personality traits are major factors affecting the treatment adherence. Determining and overcoming these factors for each disorder will help to improve adherence and reduce the treatment costs and hospitalization. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 85-93

  4. Barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural Eastern province, Zambia: the role of household economic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, Rainier; Chowa, Gina; Nyirenda, Victor

    2017-07-01

    In Zambia, more people living with HIV now have access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapy than ever before. However, progress in HIV treatment and care has not always resulted in lower mortality. Adherence remains a critical barrier to treatment success. The objective of this study was to examine the barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence, particularly the role of household economic status. The study included a cross-sectional sample of 101 people living with HIV (PLHIV) in two rural communities in eastern Zambia. Adherence was measured using patient self-assessment and pharmacy information. Household economic status included components such as occupation, income, assets, food security, and debt. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between household economic factors and adherence. Our findings suggest that the role of economic status on adherence appears to be a function of the economic component. Debt and non-farming-related occupation were consistently associated with non-adherence. The association between assets and adherence depends on the type of asset. Owning more transportation-related assets was consistently associated with non-adherence, whereas owning more livestock was associated with self-reported adherence. Additionally, living in a community with fewer economic opportunities was associated with non-adherence. The associations between place of residence and pharmacy refill adherence and between transportation assets and self-reported adherence were statistically significant. Improving adherence requires a multifaceted strategy that addresses the role of economic status as a potential barrier and facilitator. Programmes that provide economic opportunities and life-skills training may help PLHIV to overcome economic, social, and psychological barriers.

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy, virologic failure and workload at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-14

    Oct 14, 2009 ... The analysis compared self-reported adherence levels by factor and viral load test results. Results: Only 71% of ... it imperative that the health system now invests in patient retention in treatment and care ... Rustenburg is one of the fastest-growing cities in South Africa, home to large platinum mines with ...

  6. Correlates of highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... expenditure income of Birr 2 000 or more. There is a need to design and implement targeted adherence interventions that could lead to better treatment outcomes. Keywords: Africa, compliance, HAART, health knowledge, HIV/AIDS, quantitative research, self-efficacy, self-reporting. African Journal of AIDS Research 2011, ...

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Estimation of adult antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. 661. Estimation of adult antiretroviral treatment coverage in. South Africa. Muhammad Aarif Adam, Leigh F Johnson. Death notification statistics confirm that AIDS is dramatically affecting mortality in South Africa.1 Demographic and epidemiological models suggest that antiretroviral treatment is.

  8. FACTORS INTERFERING WITH THE ADHERENCE OF PEOPLE WITH AIDS TO ANTIRETROVIRALS, JEQUIÉ, BAHIA, BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Narriman Silva de Oliveira Boery

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper adherence to antiretroviral therapy is essential for improving the quality of life and decreased mortality due to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Our objective was to analyze adherence to antiretroviral therapy of patients with HIV/AIDS living in the area covered by the 13th Regional Health Board (DIRES, whose seat is the city of Jequié – Bahia. It is an exploratory study with quantitative approach and the study setting was the city of Jequié. 34 patients with HIV/AIDS, of both sexes, registered in the center of reference and attended it regularly were informants of the study. Data were collected through a form with the information obtained processed with Microsoft Excel. The age of the respondents ranged from 24 to 60 years old. Most had low education, low income and were adept to Catholic religion. The time of diagnosis was 1 to 4 years. Concern in ensuring the confidentiality of HIV status was identified. We conclude it to be relevant promoting health education activities for treatment adherence, building and maintaining membership groups to discuss issues related to pathology and the legal aspects involved in the daily lives of patients living with HIV/AIDS.

  9. Concomitant medication polypharmacy, interactions and imperfect adherence are common in Australian adults on suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siefried, Krista J; Mao, Limin; Cysique, Lucette A; Rule, John; Giles, Michelle L; Smith, Don E; McMahon, James E.; Read, Tim R; Ooi, Catriona; Tee, Ban K; Bloch, Mark; de Wit, John|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06883652X; Carr, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We quantified concomitant medication polypharmacy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions, adverse effects and adherence in Australian adults on effective antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. METHODS: Patients recruited into a nationwide cohort and assessed for

  10. HIV Stigma and Depressive Symptoms are Related to Adherence and Virological Response to Antiretroviral Treatment Among Immigrant and Indigenous HIV Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sumari-de Boer, I. Marion; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Prins, Jan M.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2011-01-01

    We compared adherence to cART and virological response between indigenous and immigrant HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands, and investigated if a possible difference was related to a difference in the psychosocial variables: HIV-stigma, quality-of-life, depression and beliefs about medications. Psychosocial variables were assessed using validated questionnaires administered during a face-to-face interview. Adherence was assessed trough pharmacy-refill monitoring. We assessed association...

  11. HIV stigma and depressive symptoms are related to adherence and virological response to antiretroviral treatment among immigrant and indigenous HIV infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumari-de Boer, I Marion; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2012-08-01

    We compared adherence to cART and virological response between indigenous and immigrant HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands, and investigated if a possible difference was related to a difference in the psychosocial variables: HIV-stigma, quality-of-life, depression and beliefs about medications. Psychosocial variables were assessed using validated questionnaires administered during a face-to-face interview. Adherence was assessed trough pharmacy-refill monitoring. We assessed associations between psychosocial variables and non-adherence and having detectable plasma viral load using logistic regression analyses. Two-hundred-two patients participated of whom 112 (55%) were immigrants. Viral load was detectable in 6% of indigenous patients and in 15% of the immigrants (P stigma and prior virological failure were associated with non-adherence, and depressive symptoms, prior virological failure and non-adherence with detectable viral load. Our findings suggest that HIV-stigma and depressive symptoms may be targets for interventions aimed at improving adherence and virological response among indigenous and immigrant HIV-infected patients.

  12. An interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program combining motivational interviewing and electronic antiretroviral drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummenacher, Isabelle; Cavassini, Matthias; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie P

    2011-05-01

    To ensure successful treatment, HIV patients must maintain a high degree of medication adherence over time. Since August 2004, patients who are (or are at risk of) experiencing problems with their HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) have been referred by their physicians to an interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program. The program consists of a multifactorial intervention along with electronic drug monitoring (MEMS(TM)). The pharmacists organize individualized semi-structured motivational interviews based on cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social issues. At the end of each session, the patient brings an adherence report to the physician. This enables the physician to use the adherence results to evaluate the treatment plan. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze this on-going interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program. All patients who were included between August 2004 and the end of April 2008 were analyzed. One hundred and four patients were included (59% women, median age 39 (31.0, 46.0) years, 42% black ethnicity). Eighty (77%) patients were ART-experienced patients and 59% had a protease inhibitor-based treatment. The retention rate was high (92%) in the program. Patient inclusion in this HIV-adherence program was determined by patient issues for naive patients and by nonadherence or suboptimal clinical outcomes for ART-experienced patients. The median time spent by a subject at the pharmacy was 35 (25.0, 48.0) minutes, half for the medication handling and half for the interview. The adherence results showed a persistence of 87% and an execution of 88%. Proportion of undetectable subjects increased during study. In conclusion, retention and persistence rates were high in this highly selected problematic population.

  13. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10-16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00-2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth's adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92-2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV.

  14. Food insecurity as a barrier to sustained antiretroviral therapy adherence in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Food insecurity is emerging as an important barrier to antiretroviral (ARV adherence in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere, but little is known about the mechanisms through which food insecurity leads to ARV non-adherence and treatment interruptions.We conducted in-depth, open-ended interviews with 47 individuals (30 women, 17 men living with HIV/AIDS recruited from AIDS treatment programs in Mbarara and Kampala, Uganda to understand how food insecurity interferes with ARV therapy regimens. Interviews were transcribed, coded for key themes, and analyzed using grounded theory.Food insecurity was common and an important barrier to accessing medical care and ARV adherence. Five mechanisms emerged for how food insecurity can contribute to ARV non-adherence and treatment interruptions or to postponing ARV initiation: 1 ARVs increased appetite and led to intolerable hunger in the absence of food; 2 Side effects of ARVs were exacerbated in the absence of food; 3 Participants believed they should skip doses or not start on ARVs at all if they could not afford the added nutritional burden; 4 Competing demands between costs of food and medical expenses led people either to default from treatment, or to give up food and wages to get medications; 5 While working for food for long days in the fields, participants sometimes forgot medication doses. Despite these obstacles, many participants still reported high ARV adherence and exceptional motivation to continue therapy.While reports from sub-Saharan Africa show excellent adherence to ARVs, concerns remain that these successes are not sustainable in the presence of widespread poverty and food insecurity. We provide further evidence on how food insecurity can compromise sustained ARV therapy in a resource-limited setting. Addressing food insecurity as part of emerging ARV treatment programs is critical for their long-term success.

  15. "[Drinking is] Like a Rule That You Can't Break": Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Reduce Alcohol Use and Improve Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Among People Living with HIV and Alcohol Use Disorder in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershow, Rebecca B; Zuskov, Diana S; Vu Tuyet Mai, Nguyen; Chander, Geetanjali; Hutton, Heidi E; Latkin, Carl; Vuong, Nguyen Duc; Sripaipan, Teerada; Lancaster, Kathryn E; Ha, Tran Viet; Go, Vivian F

    2018-03-14

    Alcohol use, a highly normative behavior in Vietnam that is associated with high rates of HIV infection and lower antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence, has been largely overlooked by HIV prevention efforts. Using the risk environment framework, this qualitative study aims to explore the perceived microenvironmental (community-level) and endogenous (individual-level) barriers and facilitators to alcohol reduction among people living with HIV (PLHIV) with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in Vietnam. From June-July 2014, semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirty PLHIV (18 men; 12 women) recruited from an outpatient ART clinic in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. All participants had scores of ≥8 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and ten of the 30 participants were currently using injection drugs. Interviews were transcribed, translated, and analyzed to identify perceived barriers and facilitators to alcohol reduction. Most participants reported a spike in alcohol consumption at the time of HIV diagnosis. Most perceived barriers existed at the microenvironmental level, including perceived inability to refuse alcohol in the context of community-level social norms and lack of alcohol treatment programs. Two commonly mentioned endogenous barriers were compensatory behaviors when reducing injection drug use and using alcohol as a coping strategy for HIV-related sadness. Those who were able to successfully reduce alcohol use and adhere to ART reported having social support to buffer community-level social pressure and cope with sadness. It may be effective to introduce targeted alcohol reduction interventions in health care centers to address individual risk practices and microenvironmental social norms.

  16. Perspectives on adherence and simplicity for HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy: self-report of the relative importance of multiple attributes of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens in predicting adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Valerie E; Jordan, Jamie; Tolson, Jerry; Miller, Robert; Pilon, Tom

    2004-07-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) of 95% or greater seems to be required for successful treatment of HIV/AIDS. Efforts to simplify regimens to improve adherence are ongoing, including the advent of once-daily (QD) dosing regimens, which are presumed to be beneficial, although data regarding their overall impact on adherence are not yet available. To assess patient perceptions of the impact on adherence of 10 attributes of HAART, including QD dosing, and to compare 7 actual regimens based on patients' perceptions of their likelihood to promote adherence. Two hundred ninety-nine highly treatment-experienced patients with HIV/AIDS completed a questionnaire that evaluated perceptions of the impact on adherence of 10 HAART regimen attributes using a modified adaptive conjoint analysis. Patients' perceptions of the likelihood that they would adhere to 7 actual HAART regimens were scored on Likert scales. : Pill count, dosing frequency, and adverse events had the greatest impact on patients' perceived ability to adhere to antiretroviral medication regimens. QD was the preferred dosing frequency, but QD dosing regimens did not score better than other regimens. Among actual regimens, predicted adherence was highest for a twice-daily (BID) regimen with 2 pills daily, no dietary restrictions, and 1 prescription and copayment and lowest for a BID regimen with 13 pills daily, food requirements, and 3 prescriptions and copayments. All HAART regimen attributes studied were perceived to have an impact on adherence, but pill count, dosing frequency, and adverse events had the greatest perceived impact. These data are of potential importance to clinicians as they seek to structure HAART regimens to which their patients are most likely to adhere.

  17. HIV Stigma and Depressive Symptoms are Related to Adherence and Virological Response to Antiretroviral Treatment Among Immigrant and Indigenous HIV Infected Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumari-de Boer, I. Marion; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Prins, Jan M.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2012-01-01

    We compared adherence to cART and viro-logical response between indigenous and immigrant HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands, and investigated if a possible difference was related to a difference in the psychosocial variables: HIV-stigma, quality-of-life, depression and beliefs about

  18. Retention in care, viral suppression, treatment adherence and quality of life in a public antiretroviral therapy program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    In his thesis, Legese A. Mekuria presents the results of a PhD study which was undertaken in 10 health-care facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The overall aim was to estimate retention in HIV care, viral suppression, medication adherence and patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL). An

  19. Adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in pregnant and lactating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-retroviral drugs reduce morbidity and mortality due to HIV and prevent transmission from mother to child. But compliance on anti-retroviral treatment is an essential element for the success of therapeutic goals. Objective: To assess the level of compliance of anti-retroviral treatment in pregnant and lactating ...

  20. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Turkey: Results from the ACTHIV-IST Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Sevgi, Dilek; Gunduz, Alper; Altuntas Aydin, Ozlem; Mete, Bilgul; Sargin, Fatma; Kumbasar Karaosmanoglu, Hayat; Uzun, Nuray; Yemisen, Mucahit; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Tabak, Fehmi

    2017-12-01

    Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for optimizing the management of HIV infection. The aim of this study is to explore ART adherence rates in Turkey. Included in this study were a total of 263 HIV-infected patients followed up by the ACTHIV-IST (ACTion against HIV in Istanbul) Study Group affiliated with four tertiary hospitals. The study population included patients 18 years of age or older who were on ART for over 12 months. Adherence was assessed by the medication possession ratio (MPR) calculated for each patient using data (a list of all drugs dispensed within the previous year for that patient) obtained from pharmacy medication records. In addition, patients completed a self-report questionnaire addressing missed doses and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) adherence questionnaire. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty. Patient ages ranged from 19 to 71 years. Two hundred and thirty-one patients were male (88%). Two hundred and twenty-four patients (85%) had optimal adherence (MPR ≥95%). During the course of ART, 236 patients (90%) reported no missed doses in the past 4 days of their treatment, whereas 206 patients (78%) reported no missed doses in the past month. Simply forgetting was the most common reason for nonadherence. MPR was associated with virologic rebound. Major factors affecting adherence were being female, taking antituberculosis drugs, having an opportunistic infection, being able to take all or most of the medication as directed, and being aware of the need to take medication exactly as instructed to prevent the development of drug resistance. Adherence to ART measured by MPR and self-report surveys is relatively high in Turkey when compared with other countries, which probably led to high ART success rates.

  1. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Y Fonsah

    Full Text Available Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (p40 years were less likely to be non-adherent (p<0.01 and had shorter non-adherent periods (p<0.0001. The presence of depression symptoms correlated with non-adherence to ART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04, and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.04 and longer non-adherent periods (p = 0.04. Change in ART regimen was significantly associated with increased likelihood of non-adherence and increased duration of the non-adherence period. Addressing these underlying risk factors could improve ART adherence, retention in care and treatment outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in Cameroon.

  2. Interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a rapid systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyachati, Krisda H; Ogbuoji, Osondu; Price, Matthew; Suthar, Amitabh B; Negussie, Eyerusalem K; Bärnighausen, Till

    2014-03-01

    Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has substantially improved over the past decade. In this new era of HIV as a chronic disease, the continued success of ART will depend critically on sustained high ART adherence. The objective of this review was to systematically review interventions that can improve adherence to ART, including individual-level interventions and changes to the structure of ART delivery, to inform the evidence base for the 2013 WHO consolidated antiretroviral guidelines. A rapid systematic review. We conducted a rapid systematic review of the global evidence on interventions to improve adherence to ART, utilizing pre-existing systematic reviews to identify relevant research evidence complemented by screening of databases for articles published over the past 2 years on evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched five databases for both systematic reviews and primary RCT studies (Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and WHO Global Health Library); we additionally searched ClinicalTrials.gov for RCT studies. We examined intervention effectiveness by different study characteristics, in particular, the specific populations who received the intervention. A total of 124 studies met our selection criteria. Eighty-six studies were RCTs. More than 20 studies have tested the effectiveness of each of the following interventions, either singly or in combination with other interventions: cognitive-behavioural interventions, education, treatment supporters, directly observed therapy, and active adherence reminder devices (such as mobile phone text messages). Although there is strong evidence that all five of these interventions can significantly increase ART adherence in some settings, each intervention has also been found not to produce significant effects in several studies. Almost half (55) of the 124 studies investigated the effectiveness of combination interventions. Combination interventions tended to have effects that

  3. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  4. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  5. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahov David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  6. Predicting adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV in Tanzania: A test of an extended theory of planned behaviour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Kasia; Lyimo, Ramsey A; Hospers, Harm J; van der Ven, Andre; de Bruin, Marijn

    2017-10-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV is widely available in sub-Saharan Africa. Adherence is crucial to successful treatment. This study aimed to apply an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model to predict objectively measured adherence to cART in Tanzania. Prospective observational study (n = 158) where patients completed questionnaires on demographics (Month 0), socio-cognitive variables including intentions (Month 1), and action planning and self-regulatory processes hypothesised to mediate the intention-behaviour relationship (Month 3), to predict adherence (Month 5). Taking adherence was measured objectively using the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS) caps. Model tests were conducted using regression and bootstrap mediation analyses. Perceived behavioural control (PBC) was positively (β = .767, p < .001, R 2  = 57.5%) associated with adherence intentions. Intentions only exercised an indirect effect on adherence (B = 1.29 [0.297-3.15]) through self-regulatory processes (B = 1.10 [0.131-2.87]). Self-regulatory processes (β = .234, p = .010, R 2  = 14.7%) predicted better adherence. This observational study using an objective behavioural measure, identified PBC as the main driver of adherence intentions. The effect of intentions on adherence was only indirect through self-regulatory processes, which were the main predictor of objectively assessed adherence.

  7. The factors that influence adherence of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS to anti-retroviral therapy - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p396

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Lima de Barros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the experiences of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS in relation to adherence to antiretroviral therapy in two public hospitals of reference for HIV/AIDS in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study conducted with 24 pregnant women who were in prenatal care and use of antiretroviral therapy. Sociodemographic and obstetric data and information regarding the experience with antiretroviral therapy adherence were collected from July to September 2009, through a semi-structured interview. Results: Women had a mean age of 29, low income, low education and a stable partner. It was found that some factors affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Among these, stand out not accepting the diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS. However, the fear of transmitting the virus to the baby acted as a stimulus for pregnant women adhere to treatment. Conclusion: The non-acceptance of diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS negatively affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral treatment. On the other hand, the fear that the child be born with the virus and the desire to continue to live are stimuli to adherence.

  8. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsah, Julius Y; Njamnshi, Alfred K; Kouanfack, Charles; Qiu, Fang; Njamnshi, Dora M; Tagny, Claude T; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Heaton, Robert; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2017-01-01

    Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (pART regimen, age, gender, and education showed that subjects with opportunistic infections had 3.1-times higher odds of having been non-adherent (p40 years) were less likely to be non-adherent (pART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04), and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.04) and longer non-adherent periods (p = 0.04). Change in ART regimen was significantly associated with increased likelihood of non-adherence and increased duration of the non-adherence period. Addressing these underlying risk factors could improve ART adherence, retention in care and treatment outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in Cameroon.

  9. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs | Mweemba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of life is a complex broad ranging multidimensional concept defined in terms of individual's subjective experiences. The definition by the ... Antiretroviral regimens are demanding and difficult, with numerous possible side effects and patients need to take the pills for indefinite periods of time. Efficacy of antiretroviral ...

  10. Factors associated with adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in homeless or unstably housed adults living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Scott W; Kidder, Daniel P; Patrabansh, Satyendra; Wolitski, Richard J; Holtgrave, David R; Aidala, Angela; Pals, Sherri; Stall, Ron

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are homeless or unstably housed. We evaluated homeless or unstably housed PLWHA (n=644) in three US cities were enrolled in the Housing and Health Study. Using baseline data and controlling for gender, race, age, and education, we examined associations between self-reported two- and Seven-day adherence and access to healthcare, mental health, substance use, and attitudes toward HIV medical therapy. Of the 644 participants, 358 (55%) were currently on HAART. For two-day adherence, 280 (78%) reported missing no prescribed doses (100% adherence), and for seven-day adherence, 291 (81%) reported > or =90% adherence. Logistic regression analyses indicated being younger, not having health insurance, and drug use were associated with missing > or =1 dose over the past two days. Scoring lower on SF-36 mental component summary scale and having greater risk of depression (CES-D) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were associated with poorer adherence for both two- and seven-day outcomes. Negative attitudes toward HIV treatment were also associated with lower adherence. Adherence to HIV medications in this population is similar to other groups. Coexisting problems of access to healthcare, higher risk of mental health problems, along with poorer attitudes toward treatment are associated with increased likelihood of missing doses. Comprehensive models of HIV care that include a continuum of medical and social services are essential for treating this population.

  11. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients: a cross-sectional study in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.T. Pinheiro

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted on HIV-infected adults being treated with antiretroviral drugs at a reference service in Southern Brazil. Participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire and were tested by scales assessing sociocognitive variables. Adherence to treatment was assessed by a self-report inventory developed for the study. Clinical information was obtained from the patients' records. Significance tests were conducted using univariate logistic regressions followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 195 patients participated in the study and 56.9% of them reported > or = 95% adherence on the previous two days. In univariate analysis, the odds of adherence increased with self-efficacy (a person's conviction that he/she can successfully execute the behavior required to produce a certain desired outcome in taking medications as prescribed (OR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.90-6.55, and decreased with perception of negative affect and physical concerns (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.53-0.95. The odds were lower for taking antiretroviral medications >4 times a day (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.94 and higher for patients with 8 years of schooling (OR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.12-4.66. In the multivariate analysis, self-efficacy (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.69-6.56 and taking medication >4 times a day (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.80 were independently associated with adherence. Self-efficacy was the most important predictor of adherence, followed by number of times antiretroviral medication was taken per day. Among sociodemographic and clinical variables, only the number of years of schooling was associated with adherence. Motivational interventions based on self-efficacy may be useful for increasing treatment adherence.

  12. Supporting children to adhere to anti-retroviral therapy in urban Malawi: multi method insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phiri Sam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring good adherence is critical to the success of anti-retroviral treatment (ART. However, in resource-poor contexts, where paediatric HIV burden is high there has been limited progress in developing or adapting tools to support adherence for HIV-infected children on ART and their caregivers. We conducted formative research to assess children's adherence and to explore the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of caregivers towards children's treatment. Methods All children starting ART between September 2002 and January 2004 (when ART was at cost in Malawi were observed for at least 6 months on ART. Their adherence was assessed quantitatively by asking caregivers of children about missed ART doses during the previous 3 days at monthly visits. Attendance to clinic appointments was also monitored. In June and July 2004, four focus group discussions, each with 6 to 8 caregivers, and 5 critical incident narratives were conducted to provide complementary contextual data on caregivers' experiences on the challenges to and opportunities of paediatric ART adherence. Results We followed prospectively 47 children who started ART between 8 months and 12 years of age over a median time on ART of 33 weeks (2–91 weeks. 72% (34/47 never missed a single dose according to caregivers' report and 82% (327/401 of clinic visits were either as scheduled, or before or within 1 week after the scheduled appointment. Caregivers were generally knowledgeable about ART and motivated to support children to adhere to treatment despite facing multiple challenges. Caregivers were particularly motivated by seeing children begin to get better; but faced challenges in meeting the costs of medicine and transport, waiting times in clinic, stock outs and remembering to support children to adhere in the face of multiple responsibilities. Conclusion In the era of rapid scale-up of treatment for children there is need for holistic support strategies that focus

  13. Caretakers' barriers to pediatric antiretroviral therapy adherence in Vietnam - A qualitative and quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, C T; Pham, T H; Tran, K T; Nguyen, T K C; Larsson, M

    2017-06-01

    Poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence leads to drug resistance and treatment failures. The options for second and third line ART regimens, particularly for pediatric patients, are very limited in low and middle-income countries. HIV-infected children are mostly passive drug-takers, thus caretakers play a very important role in assuring ART adherence. Pediatric ART adherence is still a challenging problem in Vietnam since non-adherence is the major risk factor for treatment failure. Our study explores and measures caretakers' barriers in order to improve pediatric ART adherence in future. Exploring caretakers' barriers was conducted through a qualitative study with Focus Group Discussion (FGD) on two topics: 1. Current society - family support and difficulties in taking care children under ART; 2. Stigma experience. Based on the finding from the qualitative study a quantitative study measuring caretakers' barriers was conducted through a designed questionnaire. Study methods strictly followed the consolidated criteria with 32-item checklist for interviews and focus groups. In total eight FGDs with 53 participants were conducted. Common caretakers' barriers to children's ART adherence, were financial burden, lack of ART KP (Knowledge-Practice), stigma, depression, shifting caretaker, drug taste and side effects, lack of family support, fixed health check-up schedule and HIV non-disclosure. In the questionnaire study a total of 209 caretakers participated. The most commonly reported caretakers' barriers were: financial burden (144; 69%), KP burden (143; 68%), depression (85; 41%) and stigma (30; 14.8%). Some caretakers' characteristics that significantly associated with reported barriers (plevel education reported significantly more financial burdens (OR=2.08) and stigma (OR=4.15) compared to caretakers with high school education or over. Financial burden, KP burden, depression and stigma were common reported caretakers' barriers to pediatric ART adherence

  14. Patient-Reported Barriers to Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Shubber

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining high levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is a challenge across settings and populations. Understanding the relative importance of different barriers to adherence will help inform the targeting of different interventions and future research priorities.We searched MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsychINFO from 01 January 1997 to 31 March 2016 for studies reporting barriers to adherence to ART. We calculated pooled proportions of reported barriers to adherence per age group (adults, adolescents, and children. We included data from 125 studies that provided information about adherence barriers for 17,061 adults, 1,099 children, and 856 adolescents. We assessed differences according to geographical location and level of economic development. The most frequently reported individual barriers included forgetting (adults 41.4%, 95% CI 37.3%-45.4%; adolescents 63.1%, 95% CI 46.3%-80.0%; children/caregivers 29.2%, 95% CI 20.1%-38.4%, being away from home (adults 30.4%, 95% CI 25.5%-35.2%; adolescents 40.7%, 95% CI 25.7%-55.6%; children/caregivers 18.5%, 95% CI 10.3%-26.8%, and a change to daily routine (adults 28.0%, 95% CI 20.9%-35.0%; adolescents 32.4%, 95% CI 0%-75.0%; children/caregivers 26.3%, 95% CI 15.3%-37.4%. Depression was reported as a barrier to adherence by more than 15% of patients across all age categories (adults 15.5%, 95% CI 12.8%-18.3%; adolescents 25.7%, 95% CI 17.7%-33.6%; children 15.1%, 95% CI 3.9%-26.3%, while alcohol/substance misuse was commonly reported by adults (12.9%, 95% CI 9.7%-16.1% and adolescents (28.8%, 95% CI 11.8%-45.8%. Secrecy/stigma was a commonly cited barrier to adherence, reported by more than 10% of adults and children across all regions (adults 13.6%, 95% CI 11.9%-15.3%; children/caregivers 22.3%, 95% CI 10.2%-34.5%. Among adults, feeling sick (15.9%, 95% CI 13.0%-18.8% was a more commonly cited barrier to adherence than feeling well (9.3%, 95% CI 7.2%-11.4%. Health

  15. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ population from Bata, Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanton-García, Jon; Herrador, Zaida; Ruiz-Seco, Pilar; Nzang-Esono, Jesús; Bendomo, Veronica; Bashmakovic, Emma; Nseng-Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a serious public health problem in Equatorial Guinea, with a prevalence of 6.2% among adults. the high-activity antiretroviral treatment (HAART) coverage data is 10 points below the overall estimate for Sub-Saharan Africa, and only 61% patients continue with HAART 12 months after it started. This study aims to assess HAART adherence and related factors in Litoral Province of Equatorial Guinea. In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and clinical data were collected at Regional Hospital of Bata, during June-July 2014. Adherence to treatment was assessed by using the Spanish version of CEAT-VIH. Bivariate and linear regression analyses were employed to assess HAART adherence-related factors. We interviewed 50 men (35.5%) and 91 women (64.5%), with a mean age of 47.7 ± 8.9 and 36.2 ± 11.2, respectively (p VIH score varied by ethnic group (p = .005). There was a positive correlation between CEAT-VIH score and current CD4 T-cells count (p = .013). The Cronbach's α value was 0.52. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess HAART adherence in Equatorial Guinea. Internal reliability for CEAT-VIH was low, nonetheless the positive correlation between the CEAT-VIH score and the immunological status of patients add value to our findings. Our results serve as baseline for future research and will also assist stakeholders in planning and undertaking contextual and evidence-based policy initiatives.

  16. Risk-factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy Fatores preditivos de não-adesão à terapia antiretroviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina Fraga Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study analyzed as case-control to identify risk factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy. We studied 412 out-clinics HIV infected subjects of three public hospitals of Recife, Pernambuco. The objective was to examine the association between non-adherence to the antiretroviral therapy and biological, social-behavior and demographics and economic factors, factors related to the disease and/or treatment, factors related to life habits and depression symptoms. Variables significantly associated with non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy were: time elapsed since HIV diagnosis (p = 0.002, daily dose (p = 0.046, use of alcohol (p = 0.030 and past drug use (p = 0.048, and borderline p-values were found for educational level (p = 0.093 and family monthly income (p = 0.08. In the multivariable analysis, the factors that remained in the final model were family monthly income, time period with HIV infection and use of alcohol. No association was observed between non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy and gender, age, sexual orientation, marital status, educational level and place of residence. Based on our results and the local situation we suggest: assessment of social needs; training of partners and/or families on supporting adherence, creation of "adherence groups" to motivate and to reassure patients on the benefits of treatment; counseling and/or psychotherapy for alcohol drinkers.Estudo transversal com análise tipo caso-controle, que avaliou 412 pacientes de hospitais públicos do Recife - PE, com o objetivo de identificar fatores preditivos de não adesão à terapia antiretroviral. Verificou-se associação entre não adesão à terapia antiretroviral e aspectos biológicos, sócio-comportamentais e demográficos, econômicos, relacionados à doença e ao tratamento, aos hábitos de vida e aos distúrbios do humor. Variáveis com associação estatisticamente significante com não adesão na análise univariada foram

  17. Impact of antiretroviral dosing frequency and pill burden on adherence among newly diagnosed, antiretroviral-naive HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscher, A; Hartman, C; Kallen, M A; Giordano, T P

    2012-05-01

    There are few data on the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen factors on adherence in ART-naïve HIV patients on contemporary once- or twice-daily regimens. Ninety-nine newly diagnosed patients in a prospective observational cohort study completed a visual analogue scale to assess their ART adherence. Adherence by type of ART and dosing frequency were compared by Brown-Mood median tests. Participants taking once-daily regimens had higher adherence (n = 70, 99.5%) compared with participants taking twice-daily regimens (n = 29, 94%; P = 0.01). Adherence of participants taking the fixed dose combination efavirenz-emtricitabine-tenofovir (n = 34, 100%) compared with those taking once-daily regimens of two or more pills was no different (n = 36, 99.3%; P = 0.34). Among a cohort of newly diagnosed ART-naïve patients, once-daily dosing of ART resulted in higher adherence than twice-daily dosing. Pill burden among once-daily regimens did not predict adherence, suggesting that factors other than pill burden should drive regimen selection.

  18. Facilitators and barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence among adolescents in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankrah DNA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Daniel NA Ankrah,1,2 Ellen S Koster,2 Aukje K Mantel-Teeuwisse,2 Daniel K Arhinful,3 Irene A Agyepong,4 Margaret Lartey5,6 1Pharmacy Department, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana; 2Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana (Legon, 4Health Policy, Planning and Management, University of Ghana School of Public Health, 5Department of Medicine, University of Ghana Medical School, 6Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is known to be challenging among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, notwithstanding the life-saving importance of this therapy. Of the global total number of adolescents living with HIV in 2013, 83% reside in sub-Saharan Africa. The study aimed to identify facilitators of and barriers to antiretroviral treatment adherence among adolescents in Ghana. Methods: A cross-sectional qualitative study using semi-structured interviews for data collection was carried out among adolescents (aged 12–19 years at the adolescents HIV clinic at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. Predominantly open-ended questions relating to ART were used. Interviews were done until saturation. In total, 19 interviews were conducted. Analysis was done manually to maintain proximity with the text. Findings: The main facilitators were support from health care providers, parental support, patient’s knowledge of disease and self-motivation, patient’s perceived positive outcomes, and dispensed formulation. The identified barriers were patient’s forgetfulness to take medicines, perceived stigmatization due to disclosure, financial barriers, and adverse effects of ART. Support from health care workers was the most frequently mentioned facilitator, and patient’s forgetfulness and perceived

  19. Methamphetamine use and neuropsychiatric factors are associated with antiretroviral non-adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, DJ; Blackstone, K; Woods, SP; Ellis, RJ; Atkinson, JH; Heaton, RK; Grant, I

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the impact of methamphetamine (METH) on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV+ persons, as well as examines the contribution of neurocognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric factors [i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD), antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and attention deficit disorder (ADHD)] for ART non-adherence. We examined HIV+ persons with DSM-IV-diagnosed lifetime history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+ /METH+; n=67) as compared to HIV+...

  20. The association between depression and adherence to antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-17

    Mar 17, 2011 ... Background: Depressive disorders are associated with poorer health outcomes in people living with human immunodeficiency virus infection and .... economical tool to assess adherence in resource-poor settings.25 ..... Willard S. Relationship of emotional intelligence and adherence to combination.

  1. Roles of family dynamics on adherence to highly active antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    with PLWHA experiencing rejection even by their families; however with ... function test, Chest X-ray and blood chemistry. The .... PLWHA at LAUTECH teaching hospital Osogbo, Nigeria. Socio demographic characteristics. Good adherence. Poor adherence X2; df; p-value. (>95%). (< 95%). Age group. 20-29. 46 (95.8%).

  2. Barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between household economic factors and adherence. Our findings suggest that the role of economic status on adherence appears to be a function of the economic component. Debt and non-farming-related occupation were consistently associated ...

  3. Determinants of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    education on the benefits and risks of non-adherence, and ..... relied on public transport as their usual mode of transport to get to ... Mode of transport was not significantly associated with ART adherence. (p=0.201). A large proportion of the study participants (73%) reported to never have received at least one support visit.

  4. Factors affecting first-month adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAART adherence was positively associated with higher age among patients who possessed cell phones and among patients who provided a source of income in the urban setting, but not in the rural setting. Though long-term data from this cohort is required to fully evaluate the impact of non-adherence in the first month of ...

  5. Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Barnett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The recent scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART coverage in resource-limited settings has greatly improved access to treatment. However, increasing numbers of patients are failing first- and second-line ART. Objective. To examine factors affecting adherence to second-line ART from the perspective of clinic staff and patients, assessing both individual and structural perceived barriers. Methods. Research was conducted at a large primary care tuberculosis (TB/HIV clinic in Khayelitsha, a peri-urban township in Cape Town, South Africa. Participants were drawn from a Médecins Sans Frontières-run programme to support patients failing second-line ART. A qualitative research approach was used, combining multiple methodologies including key informant interviews with staff (n=11, in-depth interviews with patients (n=10 and a Photovoice workshop (n=11. Responses and photographs were coded by content; data were transformed into variables and analysed accordingly. Results. Staff identified drinking, non-disclosure, not using condoms and pill fatigue as barriers to ART adherence, while patients identified side-effects, not using condoms and a lack of understanding concerning medication timing. With respect to service delivery, staff identified a need for continued counselling and educational support following ART initiation. Patients were concerned about missing medical records and poor staff attitudes in the clinic. Conclusion. These findings identify discrepancies between provider and patient perceptions of barriers to, and facilitators of adherence, as well as of service delivery solutions. This highlights the need for on-going counselling and education following ART initiation, improved quality of counselling, and improved methods to identify and address specific barriers concerning medication adherence.

  6. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Gare

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12 of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91, pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84 with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01 and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037 were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033. Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  7. Work-related barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral therapy adherence in persons living with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Madriz, Gilberto; Lerner, Debra; Ruthazer, Robin; Rogers, William H; Wilson, Ira B

    2011-10-01

    Little is known about how the structure of work affects adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy. We surveyed participants in an adherence intervention study to learn more about job characteristics, including measures of psychological demand and control, and job accommodations. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System. Of 156 trial subjects, 69 were employed, and these 69 made 229 study visits. Psychological demands and control were unrelated to adherence, but the presence of workplace accommodations was significantly associated with adherence (P side effects affecting work performance. Having the ability to institute job accommodations was more important to adherence than the psychosocial structure of the work. These potential benefits of requesting modifications need to be weighed against the possible risks of workplace disclosure.

  8. Antiretroviral therapy adherence and self-efficacy among people living with HIV and a history of drug use in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Lee, Sung-Jae; Tuan, Le Anh; Feng, Nan; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2017-10-01

    People living with HIV with a history of drug use face additional psychosocial challenges that could compromise their adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study examined ART treatment adherence and adherence self-efficacy among people living with HIV with a history of drug use in Vietnam. We used cross-sectional baseline data collected between October 2014 and February 2015 from a randomized controlled trial in Vietnam. Of the 900 persons with a history of drug use in the trial, a sample of 109 people living with HIV currently on ART were included in the study. The vast majority (92%) of the participants reported not missing any medications in the past 30 days. Multiple regression results indicated that social support was positively associated with adherence self-efficacy (β = 0.420, P social challenges facing people living with HIV with a history of drug use to promote ART treatment adherence. Clinical management of HIV should identify and address concurrent substance use behaviors to maximize adherence and treatment outcomes.

  9. Evaluating adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy with use of pill counts and viral load measurement in the drug resources enhancement against AIDS and malnutrition program in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Lio, Massimo Magnano; Carbini, Riccardo; Germano, Paola; Guidotti, Giovanni; Mancinelli, Sandro; Magid, Noorjehan Abdul; Narciso, Pasquale; Palombi, Leonardo; Renzi, Elsa; Zimba, Ines; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2008-05-15

    Maintaining treatment adherence among the growing number of patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in Africa is a dramatic challenge. The objective of our study was to explore the results of a computerized pill count method and to test the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of this method with respect to viral load measurement in an African setting. We performed a prospective, observational study involving patients who received first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy in Mozambique from 1 April 2005 through 31 March 2006. Enrolled patients had received treatment for at least 3 months before the study. For defining treatment adherence levels, pill counts were used, and the results were analyzed with viral load measurements at the end of the observation period. The study involved 531 participants. During the 12 months of observation, 137 patients left the program or discontinued first-line therapy. Of the remaining 394 patients, 284 (72.1%) had >95% treatment adherence; of those 284 patients, 274 (96.5%) had a final viral load 95% treatment adherence and the final viral load was closer than that between >90% treatment adherence and viral load. Treatment adherence >95% maximizes the results of the nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen. The pill count method appears to be a reliable and economic tool for monitoring treatment adherence in resource-limited settings.

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a home-based AIDS care programme in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Paul J; Wamai, Nafuna; Solberg, Peter; Liechty, Cheryl; Sendagala, Sam; Were, Willy; Mermin, Jonathan; Buchacz, Kate; Behumbiize, Prosper; Ransom, Ray L; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2006-11-04

    Poverty and limited health services in rural Africa present barriers to adherence to antiretroviral therapy that necessitate innovative options other than facility-based methods for delivery and monitoring of such therapy. We assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-infected people in a home-based AIDS care programme that provides the therapy and other AIDS care, prevention, and support services in rural Uganda. HIV-infected individuals with advanced HIV disease or a CD4-cell count of less than 250 cells per muL were eligible for antiretroviral therapy. Adherence interventions included group education, personal adherence plans developed with trained counsellors, a medicine companion, and weekly home delivery of antiretroviral therapy by trained lay field officers. We analysed factors associated with pill count adherence (PCA) of less than 95%, medication possession ratio (MPR) of less than 95%, and HIV viral load of 1000 copies per mL or more at 6 months (second quarter) and 12 months (fourth quarter) of follow-up. 987 adults who had received no previous antiretroviral therapy (median CD4-cell count 124 cells per muL, median viral load 217,000 copies per mL) were enrolled between July, 2003, and May, 2004. PCA of less than 95% was calculated for 0.7-2.6% of participants in any quarter and MPR of less than 95% for 3.3-11.1%. Viral load was below 1000 copies per mL for 894 (98%) of 913 participants in the second quarter and for 860 (96%) of 894 of participants in the fourth quarter. In separate multivariate models, viral load of at least 1000 copies per mL was associated with both PCA below 95% (second quarter odds ratio 10.6 [95% CI 2.45-45.7]; fourth quarter 14.5 [2.51-83.6]) and MPR less than 95% (second quarter 9.44 [3.40-26.2]; fourth quarter 10.5 [4.22-25.9]). Good adherence and response to antiretroviral therapy can be achieved in a home-based AIDS care programme in a resource-limited rural African setting. Health-care systems must

  11. Concurrent use of complementary and alternative medicine with antiretroviral therapy reduces adherence to HIV medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwunife, Obinna Ikechukwu; Oreh, Chinekwu; Ubaka, Chukwuemeka Micheal

    2012-10-01

    Antiretroviral therapy requires strict adherence to ensure therapeutic success. Concurrent use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) could alter the adherence to and thereby effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs. This study examined the association of CAM use with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and CD4 count. The study was conducted in two HIV clinics: one in a semi-urban, the other in a rural area. Adherence to ART was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Data on type of CAM used and MMAS adherence were collected by patient interview and demographic; clinical data were collected from hospital records. Altogether 212 HIV patients participated in the exit study conducted over 3 months. Almost half (47.9%) used CAM concurrently with antiretroviral drugs. Dietary supplements (40.3%), healing systems (36.5%) and exercise (23.2%) were mainly used. The use of CAM significantly lowered adherence to ART (89.4% in non-CAM users versus 82.5% in CAM users, P = 0.01). Improvement in CD4 count was less in patients using CAM compared to non-CAM users although the difference was not statistically significant (310.5 ± 294.0 cells/L in CAM users versus 224.5 ± 220.0 cells/L in non-CAM users, P = 0.13). Patients attending the rural HIV clinic were more likely to use CAM compared to patients attending semi-urban hospital (χ(2) test = 7.0; P therapy. There is need to develop protocol which could help in monitoring CAM use in HIV patients especially those from rural settings. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Association of Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence With Inflammation in Virologically Suppressed Individuals Enrolled in the SMART Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Phillips, Andrew N; Neaton, James D

    2018-01-01

    Suboptimal (ie, <100%) antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence has been associated with heightened inflammation in cohort studies, even among people with virologic suppression. We aimed to evaluate this association among participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMAR...... suboptimal vs 100% adherence, respectively. These findings confirm previous observations and support the hypothesis that suboptimal ART adherence, even in the context of virologic suppression, may have significant biological consequences. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00027352....

  13. It's Not Just the Pills: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis of HIV Antiretroviral Adherence Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Julie; Leblanc, Natalie M; Flores, Dalmacio

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health and longevity of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and also prevents transmission of the virus. Yet, lack of adherence to ART regimens has been a persistent problem, even with simpler regimens. Guidelines that deal with ART adherence are based almost solely on quantitative studies; this focus ignores the context and complexity of patients' lives. Guidelines are also focused on the individual. We argue that the solution is to include the broader communities in which patients live, and to deal with systemic disparities that persist worldwide; this can be done in part through demedicalizing HIV care for healthy PLWH. We present findings from a qualitative meta-synthesis of 127 studies conducted around the world on the last two pillars of the HIV treatment cascade: starting and remaining on ART until optimal viral suppression is achieved. We use Maslow's hierarchy of needs to frame our findings. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 'I told her this is your life': relationship dynamics, partner support and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among South African couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Amy; Leddy, Anna; Johnson, Mallory; Ngubane, Thulani; van Rooyen, Heidi; Darbes, Lynae

    2017-11-01

    Despite the important role of social relationships for health and wellbeing, little is known about how primary partners affect adherence to HIV care and treatment. We qualitatively explored how relationship dynamics and partner support influence adherence among couples from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Twenty-four heterosexual couples with at least one HIV-positive partner completed semi-structured interviews on topics including relationship dynamics (intimacy or emotional closeness, communication, violence), experiences with HIV care and treatment and HIV-related social support. The majority of couples were seroconcordant HIV-positive (92%) and both on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (63%). Participants described how primary partners both interfered with and supported adherence. Negative forms of influence included relationship conflict, which resulted in forgetfulness to take pills, and men's attempt to control use of ART. However, participants were more likely to highlight positive forms of influence on adherence, which included social support (instrumental, informational and emotional), intimacy and commitment. The findings also suggest a reciprocal relationship between ART and relationships such that couple ART use may enhance relationship quality. Primary partners are important pillars of support for ART adherence, especially in contexts of high unemployment and poverty. Future interventions that encourage and leverage these supportive relationships could improve ART adherence among heterosexual couples in similar settings.

  15. Perceived stigma among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived stigma among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment: A prospective randomised trial comparing an m-DOT strategy with standardof- care in Kenya. S Kaai, S Bullock, A Sarna, M Chersich, S Luchters, S Geibel, P Munyao, K Mandaliya, M Temmerman, N Rutenberg ...

  16. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  17. Effect of an Empowerment Intervention on Antiretroviral Drug Adherence in Thai Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihin, Ratchaneekorn; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Chitreechuer, Jittaporn; Grimes, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine effects of an empowerment intervention on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among Thai youth living with HIV/AIDS. It compared two groups of 23 young persons (15-24 years) who receive ART from AIDS clinics at two community hospitals. One hospital's patients served as the experimental group, and the other as a control group. The experimental groups attended five sessions that empowered them to take control of their own health. The control group received the standard of care. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square statistics. Before the empowerment, no one from the experimental group or the control group had ART adherence ≥ 95%. After the intervention, the 82.6% of the experimental group had ≥ 95% adherence compared to the control group, which had 21.7% adherence (p < .0001). The empowerment intervention resulted in a significant increase in ART adherence among Thai youth.

  18. Factors affecting adherence to antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Ter Goon, Daniel; Owolabi, Eyitayo Omolara; Eboh, Alfred; Lambert, John

    2018-04-13

    Context-specific factors influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among pregnant women living with HIV. Gaps exist in the understanding of the reasons for the variable outcomes of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme at the health facility level in South Africa. This study examined adherence levels and reasons for non-adherence during pregnancy in a cohort of parturient women enrolled in the PMTCT programme in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. This was a mixed-methods study involving 1709 parturient women in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. We conducted a multi-centre retrospective analysis of the mother-infant pair in the PMTCT electronic database in 2016. Semi-structured interviews of purposively selected parturient women with self-reported poor adherence (n = 177) were conducted to gain understanding of the main barriers to adherence. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors of ART non-adherence. A high proportion (69.0%) of women reported perfect adherence. In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding factors, marital status, cigarette smoking, alcohol use and non-disclosure to a family member were the independent predictors of non-adherence. Analysis of the qualitative data revealed that drug-related side-effects, being away from home, forgetfulness, non-disclosure, stigma and work-related demand were among the main reasons for non-adherence to ART. Non-adherence to the antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women in this setting is associated with lifestyle behaviours, HIV-related stigma and ART side-effects. In order to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, clinicians need to screen for these factors at every antenatal clinic visit.

  19. Factors associated with non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakibi Samwel N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART requires high-level (> 95% adherence. Kenya is rolling out ART access programmes and, issue of adherence to therapy is therefore imperative. However, published data on adherence to ART in Kenya is limited. This study assessed adherence to ART and identified factors responsible for non adherence in Nairobi. Methods This is a multiple facility-based cross-sectional study, where 416 patients aged over 18 years were systematically selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire about their experience taking ART. Additional data was extracted from hospital records. Patients were grouped into adherent and non-adherent based on a composite score derived from a three questions adherence tool developed by Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE. Multivariate regression model was used to determine predictors of non-adherence. Results Overall, 403 patients responded; 35% males and 65% females, 18% were non-adherent, and main (38% reason for missing therapy were being busy and forgetting. Accessing ART in a clinic within walking distance from home (OR = 2.387, CI.95 = 1.155-4.931; p = 0.019 and difficulty with dosing schedule (OR = 2.310, CI.95 = 1.211-4.408, p = 0.011 predicted non-adherence. Conclusions The study found better adherence to HAART in Nairobi compared to previous studies in Kenya. However, this can be improved further by employing fitting strategies to improve patients' ability to fit therapy in own lifestyle and cue-dose training to impact forgetfulness. Further work to determine why patients accessing therapy from ARV clinics within walking distance from their residence did not adhere is recommended.

  20. Non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caregiver self-reports of missed doses in the 30 days preceding a clinic visit, and clinic based pill counts were used to determine non-adherence. Results:Of the 228 children selected, 216 (94.7%) study participants were assessed using the self-report method. Pill count assessment was done on only 96 (44%) participants ...

  1. Substance abuse and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that 61.9% of the patients did not use any substance of abuse, 38.1% either abused one substance or a combination of substances. Substance abuse were (p = 0.0001), alcohol abuse (p = 0.003) and educational status (p = 0.0001) significantly associated with non-adherence to ART while, age (p ...

  2. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in depressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sociodemographic and drug adherence questionnaire was administered. The Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to screen for depressive symptoms while the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) was used to confirm the diagnosis of depressive disorder.

  3. The association between depression and adherence to antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depressive symptoms were significantly linked to lower levels of education and unemployment, while non-adherence was associated with unemployment and mid-range CD4 counts (200–499 cells/ìl). The study had some limitations. Further studies are needed to determine the prevalence and causes of depression and its ...

  4. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending University College Hospital, Ibadan. Methodology: Prospective cohort of consenting PLWHA was followed up for a minimum of. 3 months, had their drug adherence determined using pharmacy records and self-reporting. The sociodemographic data, weight ...

  5. Social Support and the Mediating Roles of Alcohol Use and Adherence Self-Efficacy on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence Among ART Recipients in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Jordaan, Esmé; Nkosi, Sebenzile; Morojele, Neo K

    2017-07-01

    We sought to (a) replicate and (b) extend (via the addition of alcohol use) Cha et al.'s cross-sectional multi-component model of ART adherence on the relationship between social support, depression, self-efficacy beliefs, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, among HIV patients in Tshwane, South Africa. Using purposive sampling, 304 male and female ART recipients were recruited. ART adherence was assessed using three manifest indicators: total adherence ratio, the CASE adherence index and 1-month adherence measure. Data were analysed using structural equation modeling. In our replicated model, social support had both direct and indirect relationships with ART adherence, and inclusion of alcohol use improved prediction of ART adherence. Direct and indirect effects of alcohol use on ART adherence emerged: adherence self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the latter path. Findings highlight the importance of integrating into ART promotion interventions, the reduction of alcohol use, provision of social support, and enhancement of adherence self-efficacy beliefs.

  6. Adherence to the antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Colombrini, Maria Rosa Ceccato; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes; Figueiredo, Rosely Moralez de

    2006-01-01

    A não-adesão à terapêutica antiretroviral altamente eficaz (HAART) é considerada, no plano individual, como um dos mais ameaçadores perigos para a efetividade do tratamento da pessoa com HIV/aids e para a disseminação de vírus-resistência, no plano coletivo. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi analisar, mediante revisão de literatura, os fatores de risco para não-adesão à HAART, além de agrupá-los e relacioná-los à pessoa em tratamento, à doença, ao tratamento e ao serviço de saúde e suporte s...

  7. Adherence to the Treatment in Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although medical treatments and drug industry develop day by day, there have been no changes in the treatment adherence ratios in the past years. To generate possible solutions, treatment adherence should be assessed in all clinical interviews and if patient is non-adherent this issue should be handled seriously. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 555-568

  8. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetten, Kathryn; Shirey, Kristen; Pence, Brian Wells; Yao, Jia; Thielman, Nathan; Whetten, Rachel; Adams, Julie; Agala, Bernard; Ostermann, Jan; O'Donnell, Karen; Hobbie, Amy; Maro, Venance; Itemba, Dafrosa; Reddy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs), understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care. The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT) study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+) participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468). Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART. Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence. This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of expanded

  9. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Whetten

    Full Text Available As antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs, understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care.The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+ participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468. Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART.Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence.This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of

  10. Excellent adherence to antiretrovirals in HIV+ Zambian children is compromised by disrupted routine, HIV nondisclosure, and paradoxical income effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to develop interventions to sustain high levels of adherence.Adherence among 96 HIV-infected Zambian children (median age 6, interquartile range [IQR] 2,9 initiating fixed-dose combination ART was measured prospectively (median 23 months; IQR 20,26 with caregiver report, clinic and unannounced home-based pill counts, and medication event monitoring systems (MEMS. HIV-1 RNA was determined at 48 weeks. Child and caregiver characteristics, socio-demographic status, and treatment-related factors were assessed as predictors of adherence. Median adherence was 97.4% (IQR 96.1,98.4% by visual analog scale, 94.8% (IQR 86,100% by caregiver-reported last missed dose, 96.9% (IQR 94.5,98.2% by clinic pill count, 93.4% (IQR 90.2,96.7% by unannounced home-based pill count, and 94.8% (IQR 87.8,97.7% by MEMS. At 48 weeks, 72.6% of children had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml. Agreement among adherence measures was poor; only MEMS was significantly associated with viral suppression (p = 0.013. Predictors of poor adherence included changing residence, school attendance, lack of HIV disclosure to children aged nine to 15 years, and increasing household income.Adherence among children taking fixed-dose combination ART in sub-Saharan Africa is high and sustained over two years. However, certain groups are at risk for treatment failure, including children with disrupted routines, no knowledge of their HIV diagnosis among older children, and relatively high household income, possibly reflecting greater social support in the setting of greater poverty.

  11. Improving the Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy, a Difficult but Essential Task for a Successful HIV Treatment—Clinical Points of View and Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona A. Iacob

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is responsible for one the most devastating human pandemics. The advent of antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of the pandemic and saved millions of lives. Complex therapeutic regimens have been introduced since 1996 and have contributed to the transformation of HIV infection into a treatable chronic diseases. New types of potent antiretrovirals and their combinations, including “once daily” treatment, have simplified the regimens and diminished side effects. Nevertheless the adherence to antiretroviral therapy remains unsatisfactory and varies between 27 and 80% across different population in various studies, compared with the required level of 95%. The lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a multi-factorial and dynamic process which raises considerable difficulties for long-term follow-up. Current solutions to this problem are complex. These should be applied by a multidisciplinary team and should take into account key features related to both the individual and social factors as well as to the population to whom it belongs (children, teenagers, elderly, marginalized population like drug users, incarcerated patients, sex workers, etc.. Importantly, adherence should continue to be monitored even in patients known to be compliant. In case of subsequent failure the team should identify the reasons for non-adherence and apply the appropriate methods. Where usual methods have no chance of success, a coordinated package of services also known as “harm reduction” can be offered in order to reduce the risks of transmission. The current article analyses the concept of adherence to antiretroviral therapy, the shortcomings of this medication and the methods that can be applied in practice to increase adherence. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of groups at high risk for HIV infection that currently represent the spearhead with which the HIV pandemic is spreading.

  12. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test. PMID:27695297

  13. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Desi...

  14. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Sim, Benedict Lh; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Sohn, Annette H.; Hamers, Raph L.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a

  15. Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutwa, Philippe R.; van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Pool, Robert; Ruhirimbura, John; Kanakuze, Chantal; Reiss, Peter; Geelen, Sibyl; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Boer, Kimberly R.

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD), and in-depth interviews (IDI)) to

  16. Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutwa, P.R.; Ilo van Nuil, J.; Asiimwe-Kateera, B.; Kestelyn, E.; Vyankandondera, J.; Pool, R.; Ruhirimbura, J.; Kanakuze, C.; Reiss, P.; Geleen, S.; van de Wijgert, J.; Boer, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD), and in-depth

  17. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ART services in Nigeria. Among child patients on HAART, there is a need to identify factors affecting clinic attendance and drug exhaustion at home. Keywords: caregivers; compliance; drug treatment; HAART; HIV/AIDS; paediatrics; questionnaires; sub-Saharan Africa African Journal of AIDS Research 2010, 9(1): 25–30 ...

  18. Assessing adherence to the 2010 antiretroviral guidelines in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    standardised test panel. Notably, similar blood tests were routinely done during followup visits, despite no indication for doing so. While the number of blood tests was found to decrease over time, the type of blood tests requested for specific treatment regimens was not in accordance with the ARV guidelines. Conclusion.

  19. Better physician-patient relationships are associated with higher reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Greenfield, Sheldon; Li, Wenjun; Wilson, Ira B

    2004-11-01

    There is little evidence to support the widely accepted assertion that better physician-patient relationships result in higher rates of adherence with recommended therapies. To determine whether and which aspects of a better physician-patient relationship are associated with higher rates of adherence with antiretroviral therapies for persons with HIV infection. Cross-sectional analysis. Twenty-two outpatient HIV practices in a metropolitan area. Five hundred fifty-four patients with HIV infection taking antiretroviral medications. We measured adherence using a 4-item self-report scale (alpha= 0.75). We measured core aspects of physician-patient relationships using 6 previously tested scales (general communication, HIV-specific information, participatory decision making, overall satisfaction, willingness to recommend physician, and physician trust; alpha > 0.70 for all) and 1 new scale, adherence dialogue (alpha= 0.92). For adherence dialogue, patients rated their physician at understanding and solving problems with antiretroviral therapy regimens. Mean patient age was 42 years, 15% were female, 73% were white, and 57% reported gay or bisexual sexual contact as their primary HIV risk factor. In multivariable models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians' practices, 6 of the 7 physician-patient relationship quality variables were significantly (P < .05) associated with adherence. In all 7 models worse adherence was independently associated (P < .05) with lower age, not believing in the importance of antiretroviral therapy, and worse mental health. This study showed that multiple, mutable dimensions of the physician-patient relationship were associated with medication adherence in persons with HIV infection, suggesting that physician-patient relationship quality is a potentially important point of intervention to improve patients' medication adherence. In addition, our data suggest that it is critical to investigate and incorporate patients

  20. Assessment of antiretroviral treatment outcome in public hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The outcome of antiretroviral treatment, survival patterns and associated determining factors in public hospitals are not well known. Thus a longitudinal study is vital to understand the pattern of survival and treatment outcome. Objective: To assess the outcome of antiretroviral treatment in rural public hospitals in ...

  1. Low-Cost Method to Monitor Patient Adherence to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Using Multiplex Cathepsin Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K; Roberts, LaDeidra M; Caulk, Alexander W; Gleason, Rudolph L; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low-resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART-naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire, 4-6 months after ART initiation. 86 % of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin-positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95 % CI 1.26-4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis-based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource-limited settings.

  2. Low cost method to monitor patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy using multiplex cathepsin zymography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O.; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M.; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K.; Roberts, LaDeidra M.; Caulk, Alexander W.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error-prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire (SMAQ), 4–6 months after ART initiation. 86% of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95% CI 1.26–4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource limited settings. PMID:26589706

  3. Tailored nutrition education and food assistance improve adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy: evidence from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Homero; Palar, Kartika; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity and malnutrition negatively affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with poor HIV clinical outcomes. We examined the effect of providing household food assistance and nutrition education on ART adherence. A 12-month prospective clinical trial compared the effect of a monthly household food basket (FB) plus nutrition education (NE) versus NE alone on ART adherence on 400 HIV patients at four clinics in Honduras. Participants had been receiving ART for an average of 3.7 years and were selected because they had suboptimal adherence. Primary outcome measures were missed clinic appointments, delayed prescription refills, and self-reported missed doses of ART. These three adherence measures improved for both groups over 12 months (p < 0.01), mostly within 6 months. On-time prescription refills improved for the FB plus NE group by 19.6 % more than the group receiving NE alone after 6 months (p < 0.01), with no further change at 12 months. Change in missed appointments and self-reported missed ART doses did not significantly differ by intervention group.

  4. Livelihood experiences and adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy among participants in a food assistance pilot in Bolivia: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika Palar

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Health and development organizations increasingly promote livelihood interventions to improve health and economic outcomes for people living with HIV (PLHIV receiving treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART. In-depth understanding about how PLHIV make labor decisions in the context of treatment for HIV - and treatment decisions in the context of their livelihoods - is essential to guiding intervention design and developing hypotheses for future research on livelihoods and ART. However, few studies have explored the perspectives of PLHIV regarding integration of livelihoods and ART in urban, resource-limited settings. METHODS: Qualitative interviews explored the livelihood experiences of food insecure ART patients in four Bolivian cities (n = 211. Topics included work-related barriers to ART adherence, HIV-related barriers to work, and economic coping mechanisms. Themes were identified using content coding procedures, with two coders to maximize reliability. RESULTS: Participants reported complex economic lives often characterized by multiple economic activities, including both formal and informal labor. They struggled to manage ART treatment and livelihoods simultaneously, and faced a range of interpersonal and structural barriers. In particular, lack of HIV status disclosure, stigma, and discrimination were highly salient issues for study participants and likely to be unique to people with HIV, leading to conflict around requesting time off for clinic visits, resentment from co-workers about time off, and difficulties adhering to medication schedules. In addition, health system issues such as limited clinic hours or drug shortages exacerbated the struggle to balance economic activities with HIV treatment adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Improved policy-level efforts to enforce existing anti-discrimination laws, reduce HIV-related stigma, and expand health services accessibility could mitigate many of the barriers discussed by our

  5. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roge, BT; Barfod, TS; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...

  6. Antiretroviral Treatment Failure and Its Types Among Patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and the types of antiretroviral treatment failure among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at ZMH. Using data abstraction format, demographic data, the type of treatment failure and the WHO staging of the disease were recorded for patients who were under ...

  7. Antiretroviral Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS Treatment Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Pin it Email Print Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection All FDA-approved medicines used in the ...

  8. Associations between the legal context of HIV, perceived social capital, and HIV antiretroviral adherence in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J Craig; Webel, Allison; Rose, Carol Dawson; Corless, Inge B; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Nokes, Kathleen; Brion, John; Chen, Wei-Ti; Iipinge, Scholastika; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Nicholas, Patrice K; Johnson, Mallory O; Maryland, Mary; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Portillo, Carmen J; Chaiphibalsarisdi, Puangtip; Kirksey, Kenn M; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Reid, Paula; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L

    2013-08-08

    Human rights approaches to manage HIV and efforts to decriminalize HIV exposure/transmission globally offer hope to persons living with HIV (PLWH). However, among vulnerable populations of PLWH, substantial human rights and structural challenges (disadvantage and injustice that results from everyday practices of a well-intentioned liberal society) must be addressed. These challenges span all ecosocial context levels and in North America (Canada and the United States) can include prosecution for HIV nondisclosure and HIV exposure/transmission. Our aims were to: 1) Determine if there were associations between the social structural factor of criminalization of HIV exposure/transmission, the individual factor of perceived social capital (resources to support one's life chances and overcome life's challenges), and HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among PLWH and 2) describe the nature of associations between the social structural factor of criminalization of HIV exposure/transmission, the individual factor of perceived social capital, and HIV ART adherence among PLWH. We used ecosocial theory and social epidemiology to guide our study. HIV related criminal law data were obtained from published literature. Perceived social capital and HIV ART adherence data were collected from adult PLWH. Correlation and logistic regression were used to identify and characterize observed associations. Among a sample of adult PLWH (n = 1873), significant positive associations were observed between perceived social capital, HIV disclosure required by law, and self-reported HIV ART adherence. We observed that PLWH who have higher levels of perceived social capital and who live in areas where HIV disclosure is required by law reported better average adherence. In contrast, PLWH who live in areas where HIV transmission/exposure is a crime reported lower 30-day medication adherence. Among our North American participants, being of older age, of White or Hispanic ancestry, and having

  9. A stress and coping model of medication adherence and viral load in HIV-positive men and women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kathryn E; Llabre, María M; Durán, Ron E; Antoni, Michael H; Ironson, Gail; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil

    2005-07-01

    The authors tested a structural model that incorporated age, time since diagnosis, social support, coping, and negative mood as predictors of medication adherence and HIV viral load on 188 men and 134 women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The authors used psychosocial latent factors formed from baseline measures to predict latent factors of adherence, as assessed by electronic monitoring and self-report, and viral load defined by indicators assessed over a 15-month period. Results from the model indicate that greater negative mood and lower social support are related to greater use of avoidance-oriented coping strategies. Use of these coping strategies by patients on HAART is related to poorer medication adherence and, subsequently, higher viral load. This model advances researchers' understanding of the contribution of psychosocial variables in predicting treatment adherence and disease progression in HIV-positive men and women.

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and clinical outcomes among young adults reporting high-risk sexual behavior, including men who have sex with men, in coastal Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan M; Mugo, Peter; Gichuru, Evanson; Thiong'o, Alexander; Macharia, Michael; Okuku, Haile S; van der Elst, Elise; Price, Matthew A; Muraguri, Nicholas; Sanders, Eduard J

    2013-05-01

    African men who have sex with men (MSM) face significant stigma and barriers to care. We investigated antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among high-risk adults, including MSM, participating in a clinic-based cohort. Survival analysis was used to compare attrition across patient groups. Differences in adherence, weight gain, and CD4 counts after ART initiation were assessed. Among 250 HIV-1-seropositive adults, including 108 MSM, 15 heterosexual men, and 127 women, patient group was not associated with attrition. Among 58 participants who were followed on ART, 40 % of MSM had less than 95 % adherence, versus 28.6 % of heterosexual men and 11.5 % of women. Although MSM gained less weight after ART initiation than women (adjusted difference -3.5 kg/year), CD4 counts did not differ. More data are needed on barriers to adherence and clinical outcomes among African MSM, to ensure that MSM can access care and derive treatment and prevention benefits from ART.

  11. Multiple measures reveal antiretroviral adherence successes and challenges in HIV-infected Ugandan children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART among children in developing settings is poorly understood.To understand the level, distribution, and correlates of ART adherence behavior, we prospectively determined monthly ART adherence through multiple measures and six-monthly HIV RNA levels among 121 Ugandan children aged 2-10 years for one year. Median adherence levels were 100% by three-day recall, 97.4% by 30-day visual analog scale, 97.3% by unannounced pill count/liquid formulation weights, and 96.3% by medication event monitors (MEMS. Interruptions in MEMS adherence of ≥ 48 hours were seen in 57.0% of children; 36.3% had detectable HIV RNA at one year. Only MEMS correlated significantly with HIV RNA levels (r = -0.25, p = 0.04. Multivariable regression found the following to be associated with <90% MEMS adherence: hospitalization of child (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-5.5; p = 0.001, liquid formulation use (AOR 1.4, 95%CI 1.0-2.0; p = 0.04, and caregiver's alcohol use (AOR 3.1, 95%CI 1.8-5.2; p<0.0001. Child's use of co-trimoxazole (AOR 0.5, 95%CI 0.4-0.9; p = 0.009, caregiver's use of ART (AOR 0.6, 95%CI 0.4-0.9; p = 0.03, possible caregiver depression (AOR 0.6, 95%CI 0.4-0.8; p = 0.001, and caregiver feeling ashamed of child's HIV status (AOR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.6; p<0.0001 were protective against <90% MEMS adherence. Change in drug manufacturer (AOR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5-11.5; p = 0.009 and caregiver's alcohol use (AOR 5.5, 95%CI 2.8-10.7; p<0.0001 were associated with ≥ 48-hour interruptions by MEMS, while second-line ART (AOR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1-0.99; p = 0.049 and increasing assets (AOR 0.7, 95%CI 0.6-0.9; p = 0.0007 were protective against these interruptions.Adherence success depends on a well-established medication taking routine, including caregiver support and adequate education on medication changes. Caregiver-reported depression and shame may reflect fear of poor outcomes, functioning as motivation for

  12. Masivukeni: Development of a Multimedia Based Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Intervention for Counselors and Patients in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remien, Robert H; Mellins, Claude A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Kelsey, Ryan; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Lalkhen, Nuruneesa; Hoppe, Lara; Abrams, Elaine J.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective medical treatment for HIV/AIDS requires patients’ optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In resource-constrained settings, lack of adequate standardized counseling for patients on ART remains a significant barrier to adherence. Masivukeni (“Lets Wake Up” in Xhosa) is an innovative multimedia-based intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve and maintain high levels of ART adherence. Adapted from a couples-based intervention tested in the United States (US), Masivukeni was developed through community-based participatory research with US and South African partners and informed by Ewart’s Social Action Theory. Innovative computer-based multimedia strategies were used to translate a labor- and training-intensive intervention into one that could be readily and widely used by lay counselors with relatively little training with low-literacy patients. In this paper, we describe the foundations of this new intervention, the process of its development, and the evidence of its high acceptability and feasibility. PMID:23468079

  13. Mobile phones to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the Indian National AIDS Control Programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rashmi; Bogg, Lennart; Shet, Anita; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical to maintaining health and good clinical outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. To address poor treatment adherence, low-cost interventions using mobile communication technology are being studied. While there are some studies that show an effect of mobile phone reminders on adherence to ART, none has reported on the costs of such reminders for national AIDS programmes. This paper aims to study the costs of mobile phone reminder strategies (mHealth interventions) to support adherence in the context of India's National AIDS Control Program (NACP). The study was undertaken at two tertiary level teaching hospitals that implement the NACP in Karnataka state, South India. Costs for a mobile phone reminder application to support adherence, implemented at these sites (i.e. weekly calls, messages or both) were studied. Costs were collected based on the concept of avoidable costs specific to the application. The costs that were assessed were one-time costs and recurrent costs that included fixed and variable costs. A sequential procedure for costing was used. Costs were calculated at national-programme level, individual ART-centre level and individual patient level from the NACP's perspective. The assessed costs were pooled to obtain an annual cost per patient. The type of application, number of ART centres and number of patients on ART were varied in a sensitivity analysis of costs. The Indian NACP would incur a cost of between 79 and 110 INR (USD 1.27-1.77) per patient per year, based on the type of reminder, the number of patients on ART and the number of functioning ART centres. The total programme costs for a scale-up of the mHealth intervention to reach the one million patients expected to be on treatment by 2017 is estimated to be 0.36% of the total five-year national-programme budget. The cost of the mHealth intervention for ART-adherence support in the context of the Indian NACP is low and is facilitated by

  14. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, B T; Barfod, T S; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...... adherent patients on randomized treatment failed in the RS-arm, none in the NN-arm, and six in the ASD-arm. CONCLUSIONS: Primary virological failure was caused mainly by treatment interruption. No primary protease inhibitor (PI) mutations were found in patients failing on boosted saquinavir, whereas...

  15. Contemporary issues on the epidemiology and antiretroviral adherence of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejumo, Olurotimi A; Malee, Kathleen M; Ryscavage, Patrick; Hunter, Scott J; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents are a unique and sometimes neglected group in the planning of healthcare services. This is the case in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, where more than eight out of ten of the world's HIV-infected adolescents live. Although the last decade has seen a reduction in AIDS-related mortality worldwide, largely due to improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), AIDS remains a significant contributor to adolescent mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although inadequate access to ART in parts of the subcontinent may be implicated, research among youth with HIV elsewhere in the world suggests that suboptimal adherence to ART may play a significant role. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology of HIV among sub-Saharan African adolescents and review their adherence to ART, emphasizing the unique challenges and factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of online databases for articles, relevant abstracts, and conference reports from meetings held between 2010 and 2014. Our search terms included “adherence,” “compliance,” “antiretroviral use” and “antiretroviral adherence,” in combination with “adolescents,” “youth,” “HIV,” “Africa,” “interventions” and the MeSH term “Africa South of the Sahara.” Of 19,537 articles and abstracts identified, 215 met inclusion criteria, and 148 were reviewed. Discussion Adolescents comprise a substantial portion of the population in many sub-Saharan African countries. They are at particular risk of HIV and may experience worse outcomes. Although demonstrated to have unique challenges, there is a dearth of comprehensive health services for adolescents, especially for those with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. ART adherence is poorer among older adolescents than other age groups, and psychosocial, socio-economic, individual, and treatment-related factors influence adherence behaviour among adolescents in this region. With

  16. Contemporary issues on the epidemiology and antiretroviral adherence of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejumo, Olurotimi A; Malee, Kathleen M; Ryscavage, Patrick; Hunter, Scott J; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are a unique and sometimes neglected group in the planning of healthcare services. This is the case in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, where more than eight out of ten of the world's HIV-infected adolescents live. Although the last decade has seen a reduction in AIDS-related mortality worldwide, largely due to improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), AIDS remains a significant contributor to adolescent mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although inadequate access to ART in parts of the subcontinent may be implicated, research among youth with HIV elsewhere in the world suggests that suboptimal adherence to ART may play a significant role. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology of HIV among sub-Saharan African adolescents and review their adherence to ART, emphasizing the unique challenges and factors associated with adherence behaviour. We conducted a comprehensive search of online databases for articles, relevant abstracts, and conference reports from meetings held between 2010 and 2014. Our search terms included "adherence," "compliance," "antiretroviral use" and "antiretroviral adherence," in combination with "adolescents," "youth," "HIV," "Africa," "interventions" and the MeSH term "Africa South of the Sahara." Of 19,537 articles and abstracts identified, 215 met inclusion criteria, and 148 were reviewed. Adolescents comprise a substantial portion of the population in many sub-Saharan African countries. They are at particular risk of HIV and may experience worse outcomes. Although demonstrated to have unique challenges, there is a dearth of comprehensive health services for adolescents, especially for those with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. ART adherence is poorer among older adolescents than other age groups, and psychosocial, socio-economic, individual, and treatment-related factors influence adherence behaviour among adolescents in this region. With the exception of a few examples based on affective, cognitive, and

  17. Platelet count kinetics following interruption of antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Baker, Jason V

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of platelet kinetics in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study that demonstrated excess mortality with CD4 guided episodic antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug conservation compared with continuous treatment viral suppression. Follow......-up analyses of stored plasma samples demonstrated increased activation of both inflammatory and coagulation pathways after stopping ART....

  18. Exploration of pain in children on antiretroviral treatment in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploration of pain in children on antiretroviral treatment in a regional hospital in South Africa. M Azam, L Campbell, A Ross. Abstract. Background: Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease on antiretroviral therapy (ART) may experience pain for a variety of reasons, including the effects of the virus itself, ...

  19. Highly specific reasons for nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy: results from the German adherence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boretzki J

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Johanna Boretzki,1,2 Eva Wolf,3 Carmen Wiese,4 Sebastian Noe,4 Annamaria Balogh,3 Anja Meurer,5 Ivanka Krznaric,6 Alexander Zink,7 Christian Lersch,1 Christoph D Spinner1,2 1Department of Medicine II, University Hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, 2German Center for Infection Research, Partner Site Munich, 3MUC Research, Munich, 4MVZ Karlsplatz, HIV Clinical Care Center, Munich, 5Center for Infectiology and Internal Medicine, Munich, 6Center for Infectiology Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin, 7Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany Background: Reasons for and frequency of nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART may have changed due to pharmacological improvements. In addition, the importance of known non-pharmacologic reasons for nonadherence is unclear.Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, noninterventional, multicenter study to identify current reasons for nonadherence. Patients were categorized by physicians into the following adherence groups: good, unstable, or poor adherence. Co-variables of interest included age, sex, time since HIV diagnosis, ART duration, current ART regimen, HIV transmission route, comorbidity, HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL, and CD4 cell count. Patients self-reported the number of missed doses and provided their specific reasons for nonadherent behavior. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher’s extended exact test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and logistic regression models.Results: Our study assessed 215 participants with good (n=162, unstable (n=36, and poor adherence (n=17. Compared to patients with good adherence, patients with unstable and poor adherence reported more often to have missed at least one dose during the last week (good 11% vs unstable 47% vs poor 63%, p<0.001. Physicians’ adherence assessment was concordant with patients’ self-reports of missed doses during the last week (no vs one or more in 81% cases. Similarly, we found a

  20. Adherence and virologic suppression during the first 24 weeks on antiretroviral therapy among women in Johannesburg, South Africa - a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenstein David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence is a necessary part of successful antiretroviral treatment (ART. We assessed risk factors for incomplete adherence among a cohort of HIV-infected women initiating ART and examined associations between adherence and virologic response to ART. Methods A secondary data analysis was conducted on a cohort of 154 women initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based ART at a single site in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ninety women had been enrolled in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (pMTCT program and were exposed to single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP >18 months earlier. Women were interviewed pre-treatment and clinical, virologic and adherence data were collected during follow-up to 24 weeks. Incomplete adherence to ART was defined as returning >5% of medications, estimated by pill counts at scheduled visits. Multivariable logistic regression analysis and unadjusted odds ratio (95%CI were performed, using STATA/SE (ver 10.1. Results About half of the women (53% were 400 copies/ml at 24 weeks and 37% had incomplete adherence at one or more visits. Incomplete adherence was associated with less education (p = 0.01 and lack of financial support from a partner (p = 0.02 after adjustment for confounders. Only when adherence levels dropped below 80% was there a significant association with viremia in the group overall (p = 0.02 although adherence Conclusion Virologic response to NNRTI-treatment in the cohort was excellent. However, women who received sdNVP were at greater risk of virologic failure when adherence was

  1. Neuropsychological functioning and antiretroviral treatment in HIV/AIDS: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysique, Lucette A; Brew, Bruce J

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a review of studies that have investigated the neuropsychological effects of antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV-1 infection. It provides a brief overview of the era of monotherapy, dual-therapy, and an extended overview of the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). This review highlights that while CART has had a dramatic effect on the incidence and the severity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), HAND, in its mild form, still remains prevalent. New causes of this sustained prevalence are poor CNS penetration of some antiretroviral agents, drug resistance, poor adherence, potential neurotoxicity, co-morbidities such as the long-term CART side effects in relation to cardio-vascular disease, and chronic HIV brain infection that may facilitate the expression of new forms of neurodegenerative processes. The review emphasizes the need to address methodological limitations of published studies and the need for large and representative cross-disciplinary longitudinal investigations across the HIV illness span.

  2. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-08-21

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of adherence-enhancing interventions. Our objective was to review evidence on predictors/correlates of adherence to ART, and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of their impact on adherence. We searched PubMed for original English-language papers, published between 1996 and June 2014, and the reference lists of all relevant articles found. Studies reporting on predictors/correlates of adherence of adults prescribed ART for chronic HIV infection were included without restriction to adherence assessment method, study design or geographical location. Two researchers independently extracted the data from the same papers. Random effects models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effects estimates with 95% confidence intervals. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was used as the common effect size. The impact of study design features (adherence assessment method, study design, and the United Nations Human Development Index (HDI) of the country in which the study was set) was investigated using categorical mixed effects meta-regression. In total, 207 studies were included. The following predictors/correlates were most strongly associated with adherence: adherence self-efficacy (SMD = 0.603, P = 0.001), current substance use (SMD = -0.395, P = 0.001), concerns about ART (SMD = -0.388, P = 0.001), beliefs about the necessity/utility of ART (SMD = 0.357, P = 0.001), trust/satisfaction with the HIV care provider (SMD = 0.377, P = 0.001), depressive symptoms (SMD = -0.305, P = 0.001), stigma about HIV (SMD = -0.282, P = 0.001), and social support (SMD = 0.237, P = 0.001). Smaller but significant associations were observed for the

  3. A Longitudinal Analysis of Daily Pill Burden and Likelihood of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among People Living With HIV Who Use Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Nur Afiqah; Richardson, Lindsey; Kerr, Thomas; Shoveller, Jean; Montaner, Julio; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Milloy, M-J

    2018-03-07

    Among people living with HIV (PLWH), high levels of adherence to prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. However, little is known about the effects of daily pill burden on adherence amongst PLWH who use drugs. We sought to investigate the association between daily pill burden and adherence to ART among members of this key population in Vancouver, Canada. We used data from the AIDS Care Cohort to Evaluate Exposure to Survival Services study, a long-running community-recruited cohort of PLWH who use illicit drugs linked to comprehensive HIV clinical records. The longitudinal relationship between daily pill burden and the odds of ≥95% adherence to ART among ART-exposed individuals was analyzed using multivariable generalized linear mixed-effects modeling, adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioural, and structural factors linked to adherence. Between December 2005 and May 2014, the study enrolled 770 ART-exposed participants, including 257 (34%) women, with a median age of 43 years. At baseline, 437 (56.7%) participants achieved ≥95% adherence in the previous 180 days. Among all interview periods, the median adherence was 100% (interquartile range 71%-100%). In a multivariable model, a greater number of pills per day was negatively associated with ≥95% adherence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.87 per pill, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.91). Further analysis showed that once-a-day ART regimens were positively associated with optimal adherence (AOR 1.39, 95% CI 1.07-1.80). In conclusion, simpler dosing demands (ie, fewer pills and once-a-day single tablet regimens) promoted optimal adherence among PLWH who use drugs. Our findings highlight the need for simpler dosing to be encouraged explicitly for PWUD with multiple adherence barriers.

  4. Claustrophobia and adherence to CPAP treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasens, Eileen R; Pack, Allan I; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F; Weaver, Terri E

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of claustrophobia, an abnormal dread or fear of closed spaces, on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. The design was a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of participants (N = 153) that completed 3 months of CPAP therapy from seven sleep disorders centers in the United States and Canada. A 15-item subscale adapted from the Fear and Avoidance Scale measured claustrophobic tendencies pre-CPAP treatment and again after 3 months. An overt monitor attached to the CPAP machines recorded mask-on CPAP adherence. There was a statistically significant difference in claustrophobia scores by adherence group ( or = 5 hours) and time period (pre-CPAP and after 3 months CPAP). Poor CPAP adherence (claustrophobia score > or = 25. Identification of persons with increased claustrophobia tendencies and targeted interventions may increase adherence.

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a substudy cohort within a clinical trial of serodiscordant couples in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available Randomized clinical trials of oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for HIV prevention have widely divergent efficacy estimates, ranging from 0% to 75%. These discrepancies are likely due to differences in adherence. To our knowledge, no studies to date have examined the impact of improving adherence through monitoring and/or intervention, which may increase PrEP efficacy, or reported on objective behavioral measures of adherence, which can inform PrEP effectiveness and implementation.Within the Partners PrEP Study (a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir among HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda, we collected objective measures of PrEP adherence using unannounced home-based pill counts and electronic pill bottle monitoring. Participants received individual and couples-based adherence counseling at PrEP initiation and throughout the study; counseling was intensified if unannounced pill count adherence fell to 80% adherence. Study limitations include potential shortcomings of the adherence measures and use of a convenience sample within the substudy cohort.The high PrEP adherence achieved in the setting of active adherence monitoring and counseling support was associated with a high degree of protection from HIV acquisition by the HIV-uninfected partner in heterosexual serodiscordant couples. Low PrEP adherence was associated with sexual behavior, alcohol use, younger age, and length of PrEP use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  6. The Effect of Antiretroviral Stock-Outs on Medication Adherence Among Patients Living With HIV in Ghana: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Kathleen; Genberg, Becky; Norman, Betty; Reece, Rebecca

    Stock-outs of medications for antiretroviral therapy have been reported as a significant barrier to HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, but patient responses to these shortages have not been fully described. The aim of our study was to employ qualitative methods to examine the role of medication stock-outs in contributing to treatment interruption among a sample of patients already engaged in care for HIV at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. We found that medication stock-outs presented a number of challenges to adherence for patients undergoing HIV treatment. Often, patients interrupted treatment until the stock-out ended. Those who did not interrupt treatment during stock-outs coped with shortages by stockpiling old medication or experienced clinic-initiated changes to their treatment regimens. Particularly in areas lacking the resources to monitor viral load or viral genotype, viral resistance could develop due to frequent unstructured treatment interruptions as a result of stock-outs. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Short-term treatment outcomes of children starting antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short-term treatment outcomes of children starting antiretroviral therapy in the intensive care unit, general medical wards and outpatient HIV clinics at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa: A retrospective cohort study.

  8. Why HIV Positive Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment and/or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why HIV Positive Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment and/or Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis Use Traditional Medicine: Perceptions of Health Workers, Traditional Healers and Patients: A Study in Two Provinces of South Africa.

  9. Patient-reported barriers and drivers of adherence to antiretrovirals in sub-Saharan Africa: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Sonja; Kenter, Elise; McKenzie, Oran; Musheke, Maurice; Ntalasha, Harriet; Martin-Hilber, Adriane

    2010-06-01

    This meta-ethnography aims at providing a synthesis and an interpretation of the findings of recent social science research on the questions of retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The literature reviewed comprises ethnographic studies of the barriers to adherence to ART in various cultural settings. The results show that the quality of services, treatment-related costs, as well as the need to maintain social support networks - which can be negatively affected by HIV-related stigma - are important barriers to adherence. In addition, they show how African concepts of personhood are incompatible with the way services are conceived and delivered, targeting the individual. In SSA, individuals must balance physical health with social integrity, which is sometimes achieved by referring to traditional medicine. The ability of local concepts of illness to address social relations in addition to health, together with a historically grounded distrust in Western medicine, explains why traditional medicine is still widely used as an alternative to ART.

  10. Adesão à terapia antiretroviral para HIV/AIDS Adhesión a la terapia anti-retroviral para el vih/sida Adherence to the antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa Ceccato Colombrini

    2006-12-01

    que contribuyen a la construcción y ejercicio de la ciudadanía.The non-adherence to the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is considered one of the most threatening risks for the effectiveness of the treatment of the person with HIV/AIDS on the individual plan and for the resistance-virus dissemination on the collective plan. The objective of this study was to analyze, through a literature review, the predicting factors of non-adherence to the HAART, as well as to assemble and relate them to the person in treatment, the disease, the treatment and the health and social support service. The literature points to the need for studies that evaluate social-cultural aspects, beliefs, quality of the service and the relationship of the patient with the multi-professional team, as well as others related to race and to the side effects of the antiretroviral agents. These studies aim at favoring the creation of strategies that im-prove the adherence of patients to the HAART, contributing at the same time for the development and the exercise of citizenship.

  11. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Tuchayi S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sara Moradi Tuchayi,1 Tiffany M Alexander,2 Anish Nadkarni,1 Steven R Feldman1,3,4 1Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, 3Department of Public Health Sciences, 4Department of Pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Background: Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods: PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results: Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations: Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion: There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. Keywords: acne vulgaris, adherence, pathogenesis, treatment, quality of life, prevalence, physician–patient relationship, lifestyle, clinic visit, disease severity

  12. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression Among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Tanyka Suzanne; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-11-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9 % (n = 118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed.

  13. Associations between alcohol use, other psychosocial factors, structural factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among South African ART recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morojele, Neo K; Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Nkosi, Sebenzile

    2014-03-01

    We examined whether alcohol use is associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence independently of structural and psychosocial factors among 304 male and female ART recipients in ART sites in Tshwane, South Africa. ART adherence was assessed by the CASE Adherence Index. Independent variables were demographic, structural, psycho-social, and alcohol use (AUDIT score) factors. In hierarchical multiple regression, demographic variables (Step 1) explained 4 % of variance in ART adherence (p ≤ 0.01). Variance explained increased to 16 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering structural variables (Step 2); 19 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering psychosocial variables (Step 3); and 24 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering AUDIT score (Step 4). Alcohol use is independently associated with ART adherence.

  14. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  15. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona

    2017-01-01

    Setting The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement. PMID:29230326

  16. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Treffry-Goatley

    Full Text Available Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to

  17. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  18. The Impact of Substance Use on Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Infected Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuehan; Wilson, Tracey E; Adedimeji, Adebola; Merenstein, Daniel; Milam, Joel; Cohen, Jennifer; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T

    2018-03-01

    Research is scant regarding differential effects of specific types of recreational drugs use on antiretroviral therapy adherence among women, particularly to single-tablet regimens (STR). This is increasingly important in the context of marijuana legalization. We examined the effects of self-reported substance use on suboptimal (<95%) adherence in the Women's Interagency HIV Study, 2003-2014. Among 1799 HIV-infected women, the most prevalent substance used was marijuana. In multivariable Poisson GEE regression, substance use overall was significantly associated with suboptimal adherence (adjusted prevalence ratio, aPR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.10-1.32), adjusting for STR use, socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors. Among STR users, compared to no drug use, substance use overall remained detrimental to ART adherence (aPR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.24-2.09); specifically, both marijuana (aPR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.11-1.97) and other drug use (aPR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.29-2.70) predicted suboptimal adherence. These findings highlight the need to intervene with drug-using women taking antiretroviral therapy to maintain effective adherence.

  19. Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe R Mutwa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD, and in-depth interviews (IDI to better understand adherence barriers for Rwandan adolescents. Forty-two HIV positive adolescents (ages 12-21 and a selection of their primary caregivers were interviewed. All were perinatally-infected and received (cART for ≥ 12 months. Topics discussed during FGDs and IDIs included learning HIV status, disclosure and stigma, care and treatment issues, cART adherence barriers. RESULTS: Median age was 17 years, 45% female, 45% orphaned, and 48% in boarding schools. We identified three overarching but inter-related themes that appeared to influence adherence. Stigma, perceived and experienced, and inadvertent disclosure of HIV status hampered adolescents from obtaining and taking their drugs, attending clinic visits, carrying their cARTs with them in public. The second major theme was the need for better support, in particular for adolescents with different living situations, (orphanages, foster-care, and boarding schools. Lack of privacy to keep and take medication came out as major barrier for adolescents living in congested households, as well the institutionalization of boarding schools where privacy is almost non-existent. The third important theme was the desire to be 'normal' and not be recognized as an HIV-infected individual, and to have a normal life not perturbed by taking a regimen of medications or being forced to disclose where others would treat them differently. CONCLUSIONS: We propose better management of HIV-infected adolescents integrated into boarding school, orphanages, and foster care; training of school-faculty on how to support students and allow them privacy for taking their medications. To provide better care and

  20. Predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons: a prospective study in Southwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girma Belaineh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The devastating impact of AIDS in the world especially in sub-Saharan Africa has led to an unprecedented global effort to ensure access to antiretroviral (ARV drugs. Given that medication-taking behavior can immensely affect an individual's response; ART adherence is now widely recognized as an 'Achilles heel' for the successful outcome. The present study was undertaken to investigate the rate and predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in southwest Ethiopia. Methods The study was conducted in the antiretroviral therapy unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. A prospective study was undertaken on a total of 400 HIV infected person. Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire at first month (M0 and third month (M3 follow up visits. Results A total of 400 and 383 patients at baseline (M0 and at follow up visit (M3 respectively were interviewed. Self-reported dose adherence in the study area was 94.3%. The rate considering the combined indicator (dose, time and food was 75.7%. Within a three month follow up period, dose adherence decreased by 2% and overall adherence rate decreased by more than 3%. Adherence was common in those patients who have a social support (OR, 1.82, 95%CI, 1.04, 3.21. Patients who were not depressed were two times more likely to be adherent than those who were depressed (OR, 2.13, 95%CI, 1.18, 3.81. However, at the follow up visit, social support (OR, 2.42, 95%CI, 1.29, 4.55 and the use of memory aids (OR, 3.29, 95%CI, 1.44, 7.51 were found to be independent predictors of adherence. The principal reasons reported for skipping doses in this study were simply forgetting, feeling sick or ill, being busy and running out of medication in more than 75% of the cases. Conclusion The self reported adherence rate was high in the study area. The study showed that adherence is a dynamic process which changes overtime and cannot

  1. Mechanisms for the Negative Effects of Internalized HIV-Related Stigma on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Women: The Mediating Roles of Social Isolation and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Smith, Whitney; Cohen, Mardge H; Wilson, Tracey E; Adimora, Adaora A; Merenstein, Daniel; Adedimeji, Adebola; Wentz, Eryka L; Foster, Antonina G; Metsch, Lisa; Tien, Phyllis C; Weiser, Sheri D; Turan, Janet M

    2016-06-01

    Internalization of HIV-related stigma may inhibit a person's ability to manage HIV disease through adherence to treatment regimens. Studies, mainly with white men, have suggested an association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there is a scarcity of research with women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and on mediating mechanisms in the association between internalized stigma and ART adherence. The Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) is a multicenter cohort study. Women living with HIV complete interviewer-administered questionnaires semiannually. Cross-sectional analyses for the current article included 1168 women on ART for whom data on medication adherence were available from their last study visit between April 2013 and March 2014, when the internalized stigma measure was initially introduced. The association between internalized stigma and self-reported suboptimal ART adherence was significant for those in racial/ethnic minority groups (AOR = 0.69, P = 0.009, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.91), but not for non-Hispanic whites (AOR = 2.15, P = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.69 to 6.73). Depressive symptoms, loneliness, and low perceived social support mediated the association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence in the whole sample, as well as in the subsample of minority participants. In serial mediation models, internalized stigma predicted less-perceived social support (or higher loneliness), which in turn predicted more depressive symptoms, which in turn predicted suboptimal medication adherence. Findings suggest that interconnected psychosocial mechanisms affect ART adherence, and that improvements in adherence may require multifaceted interventions addressing both mental health and interpersonal factors, especially for minority women.

  2. Diagnóstico educativo sobre adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral en médicos y enfermeras de la atención primaria de salud Educative diagnosis on adherence to antiretroviral treatment in doctors and nurses in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gloria Romero González

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la deficiente adherencia a los tratamientos antirretrovirales, se ha convertido en un problema de salud de gran importancia, por lo que es necesario promover una correcta relación terapéutica, entre el profesional de la salud, y la persona con VIH/sida. Objetivos: identificar el nivel de conocimientos relacionados con la adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral, las principales prácticas profesionales que se realizan, y la percepción de capacitación que tienen los médicos y enfermeras del municipio Camagüey, en el periodo de septiembre de 2006 a junio de 2007. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, la población estuvo constituida por 150 enfermeras y 90 médicos. La muestra quedó conformada por 100 enfermeras y 65 médicos de la atención primaria de salud, que atendían en los consultorios, a las personas con VIH/sida. Resultados: los médicos y las enfermeras muestran escasos conocimientos en algunos elementos esenciales, relacionados con la adherencia a los tratamientos de larga duración, y la repercusión que tienen en la calidad de vida de las personas con VIH/sida. Existen dificultades en algunas prácticas profesionales, llevadas a cabo con los pacientes. Hubo insuficiente percepción de capacitación relacionada con el tema, para promover la adherencia en los pacientes. Conclusiones: los conocimientos que poseen los médicos y enfermeras de la familia, son insuficientes para abordar con calidad, la atención a las personas con VIH/sida, que se acogen al sistema de atención ambulatorio.Introduction: poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has become an important health issue, so it is necessary to promote proper therapeutic relationship between health professional and the persons with HIV/AIDS. Objectives: to identify the level of knowledge related to the antiretroviral therapy adherence, the major professional practices performed and the training perception of doctors and nurses

  3. Food insecurity, sexual risk behavior, and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among women living with HIV: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chop, Elisabeth; Duggaraju, Avani; Malley, Angela; Burke, Virginia; Caldas, Stephanie; Yeh, Ping Teresa; Narasimhan, Manjulaa; Amin, Avni; Kennedy, Caitlin E

    2017-09-01

    Gender inequalities shape the experience of food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV). We systematically reviewed the impact of food insecurity on sexual risk behaviors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among WLHIV. We included qualitative or quantitative peer-reviewed articles, extracted data in duplicate, and assessed rigor. Seven studies, from sub-Saharan Africa, North America, and Europe, met inclusion criteria. Food insecurity was associated with increased sexual risk through transactional sex and inability to negotiate safer sex. Hunger and food insecurity were barriers to ART initiation/adherence. Multidimensional programming and policies should simultaneously address poverty, gender inequality, food insecurity, and HIV.

  4. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in Latin America and the Caribbean: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jessica de Mattos; Torres, Thiago Silva; Coelho, Lara Esteves; Luz, Paula Mendes

    2018-01-01

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy is closely related with suppression of the HIV viral load in plasma, slowing disease progression and decreasing HIV transmission rates. Despite its importance, the estimated proportion of people living with HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean with optimal adherence has not yet been reported in a meta-analysis. Moreover, little is known of the factors leading to poor adherence which may be setting-specific. We present a pooled estimate of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of people living with HIV in Latin America and Caribbean, report the methods used to measure adherence and describe the factors associated with poor adherence among the selected studies. We electronically searched published studies up to July 2016 on the PubMed, Web of Science and Virtual Health Library (Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Portal); considering the following databases: MEDLINE, LILACS, PAHO and IBECS. Two independent reviewers selected and extracted data on ART adherence and study characteristics. Pooled estimate of adherence was derived using a random-effects model. Risk of bias in individual studies was assessed independently by two investigators using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-randomized Studies (RoBANS). The meta-analysis included 53 studies published between 2005 and 2016, which analysed 22,603 people living with HIV in 25 Latin America and Caribbean countries. Overall adherence in Latin America and Caribbean was 70% (95% CI: 63-76; I 2  = 98%), similar to levels identified by studies conducted in high-income regions. Self-report was the most frequently used method to measure adherence. Subgroup analysis showed that adherence was higher for the shortest recall time frame used, as well as in countries with lower income level, Gross National Income (GNI) per capita and Human Development Index (HDI). Studies reported diverse adherence barriers, such as alcohol and substance misuse, depression

  5. [Stigma related to HIV/AIDS associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients of a public hospital in Lima, Peru 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra-Tanaka, Jessica Hanae; Ticona-Chavez, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    To determine the level of stigma related to HIV/AIDS and its association with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A cross-sectional study that included adult patients which were part of the HAART program during at least 6 months. Stigma was defined as the loss of value of the person infected with HIV according to Berger scale and treatment adherence as the correct consume of medications which were measured with the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire. Poisson regression test was used to calculate the prevalence ratios (PR) of associated factors. The results of 339 surveys were analyzed. 74% were male and the median age was 39 years (Interquartile Range [IQR]: 16). High stigma was found in 25,4% of respondents, moderate in 47,5%. A reduction of 10 points in the Berger scale was associated with an increase of 5% in adherence to HAART in men (adjusted PR[aPR]: 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-0.99), and 7% in women (aPR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98). There is a high level of stigma related to HIV/AIDS and is associated with the lack of adherence to HAART according to gender. We recommend interventions aimed at reducing stigma related to status disclosure in women and related to public attitudes in men.

  6. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite declines in morbidity and mortality with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, its effectiveness is limited by adverse events, problems with adherence, and resistance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: We randomly assigned persons infected with HIV wh...

  7. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite declines in morbidity and mortality with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, its effectiveness is limited by adverse events, problems with adherence, and resistance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: We randomly assigned persons infected with HIV who...

  8. Factors contributing to antiretroviral drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS in a Kenyan rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Kioko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral (ARV adherence of ≥ 95% is recommended for suppressing HIV. However, studies have shown that the ≥ 95% recommended level is rarely achieved.Objective: This cross-sectional community-based study sought to assess factors contributing to ARV drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS.Setting: The study was conducted in a rural community in Machakos County, Kenya.Methods: The questions used for the study were adapted from the Patient Medicine Adherence Questionnaire (PMAQ, a tool grounded in the Health Belief Model. Adherence to ARV was measured using self-reports and pill counts. The perception social support was measured with a 5-point Likert scale, whereas the type and the number of side effects experienced were recorded using ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions. We used the chi-square test to test associations and binary logistic regression to assess factors explaining dose adherence to ARV.Results: The levels of adherence of 86% using self-reports were significantly higher (p < 0.001 than the pill count of 58.6%. The immediate family was rated high in providing social support (3.7 ± 0.6 followed by social support groups (3.1 ± 0.8. A binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict ARV adherence (adherent, non-adherent using social support, side effects and marital status as explanatory variables. The Wald criterion demonstrated that marital status (p = 0.019 and burden of side effects (p ≤ 0.001 made a significant contribution to the prediction of ARV adherence.Conclusion: The burden of side effects and being a divorcee are primary predictors of ARV adherence.

  9. Harmful alcohol drinking among HIV-positive people in Nepal: an overlooked threat to anti-retroviral therapy adherence and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Khem Narayan; Gaulee Pokhrel, Kalpana; Neupane, Sanjeev Raj; Sharma, Vidya Dev

    2018-01-01

    People living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) often suffer from alcohol-use disorders resulting in their poor health and treatment outcomes. Little is known about the association of harmful alcohol drinking with their adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and health-related quality of life (QOL) in low-resource settings. This study aimed to investigate associations between harmful alcohol drinking, adherence to ART and health-related QOL in HIV-positive people, stratified by gender, in Nepal. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 682 HIV-positive people on ART to measure their self-reported harmful alcohol drinking and non-adherence to ART in the previous month of data collection. We also measured health-related QOL using a WHOQOL-HIV BREF scale. The association between harmful alcohol drinking and non-adherence to ART was examined using multiple logistic regressions. Additionally, multiple linear regressions examined association between harmful alcohol drinking and QOL. Harmful alcohol drinking was associated with non-adherence to ART among men (AOR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.50, 4.11, p drinking. Moreover, women were more likely to have lower scores for the physical (β = -1.01, p = 0.015), social relations (β = -0.82, p = 0.033), environmental (β = -0.88, p = 0.011), and spiritual (β = -1.30, p = 0.005) domains of QOL when they had harmful alcohol drinking. Harmful alcohol drinking had a negative association with ART adherence and QOL in both HIV-positive men and women in Nepal. Screening for alcohol-use disorders and community-based counseling services should be provided while delivering ART services to improve treatment adherence and QOL.

  10. Video observations of treatment administration to children on antiretroviral therapy in rural KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    For children younger than five years, caregivers are responsible for the measurement and administration of antiretroviral medication doses to children. Failure to adhere to the regimen as prescribed may lead to high viral loads (VLs), immune suppression and ultimately drug resistance. In the content of this study, adherence refers to adequate dosing of the medication by a caregiver. Acquired drug resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is prevalent amongst children in South Africa, and poor adherence to the dosing regimen by caregivers may be associated with this problem. In this qualitative study, we purposively recruited 33 caregiver-child dyads from the Hlabisa HIV Treatment and Care Programme database. Children were divided into three groups based on their VL at the time of recruitment. Children with a VL ≥ 400 cps/ml were grouped as unsuppressed (n = 11); children with a VL ≤ 400 cps/ml were grouped as suppressed (n = 12); and children with no VL data were grouped as newly initiated (n = 10). Caregiver-child dyads were visited at their households twice to document, by means of video recording, how treatment was administered to the child. Observational notes and video recordings were entered into ATLAS.ti v 7 and analysed thematically. Results were interpreted through the lens of Ecological Systems Theory and the information-motivation-behavioural skills model was used to understand and reflect on several of the factors influencing adherence within the child's immediate environment as identified in this study. Thematic video analysis indicated context- and medication-related factors influencing ART adherence. Although the majority of children in this sample took their medicine successfully, caregivers experienced several challenges with the preparation and administration of the medications. In the context of emerging drug resistance, efforts are needed to carefully monitor caregiver knowledge of treatment administration by

  11. Estimation of adult antiretroviral treatment coverage in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unmet need for treatment in adults is estimated using a Markov model of HIV progression in adults, combined with estimates of annual new HIV infections from a national AIDS and demographic model. Results. By the middle of 2008, 568 000 adults and children were receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa, ...

  12. Defining a Cutoff for Atazanavir in Hair Samples Associated With Virological Failure Among Adolescents Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawana, Tariro D; Gandhi, Monica; Nathoo, Kusum; Ngara, Bernard; Louie, Alexander; Horng, Howard; Katzenstein, David; Metcalfe, John; Nhachi, Charles F B

    2017-09-01

    Adequate antiretroviral exposure is crucial to virological suppression. We assessed the relationship between atazanavir hair levels with self-reported adherence, virological outcomes, and the effect of a home-based adherence intervention in HIV-infected adolescents failing second-line antiretroviral treatment in Zimbabwe. HIV-infected adolescents on atazanavir/ritonavir-based second-line treatment for ≥6 months with viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL were randomized to either standard care (control) or standard care plus modified directly administered antiretroviral therapy (intervention). Questionnaires were administered; VL and hair samples were collected at baseline and after 90 days in each group. Viral suppression was defined as hair concentration 2.35 ng/mg) hair concentrations. Participants with virological failure were more likely to have suboptimal atazanavir hair concentrations (RR = 7.2, 95% CI: 1 to 51, P = 0.049). There were no differences in atazanavir hair concentration between the arms after follow-up. A threshold of atazanavir concentrations in hair (2.35 ng/mg), above which virological suppression was likely, was defined for adolescents failing second-line atazanavir/ritonavir-based ART in Zimbabwe. Male sex and better self-reported adherence were associated with adequate atazanavir hair concentrations. Antiretroviral hair concentrations may serve as a useful clinical tool among adolescents.

  13. Effect of a clinic-wide social marketing campaign to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Thomas P; Rodriguez, Sonia; Zhang, Hong; Kallen, Michael A; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Buscher, April L; Arya, Monisha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Ross, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This demonstration study tested the impact of a 5-month clinic-wide social marketing campaign at improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The intervention included a video, posters, pens, mugs, and lapel buttons with the campaign slogan "Live the Solution: Take Your Pills Every Day." Participants self-reported adherence over a 4-week interval, the primary outcome, with a visual analogue scale. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by 141 participants. Adherence did not change over time (absolute mean change -2.02 %, paired t test P = 0.39). Among the 39.7 % of participants who correctly identified the campaign slogan on the post-intervention survey, adherence increased by 3.3 %, while it decreased in the other participants by 5.5 % (paired t test P = 0.07). The well-received campaign did not increase short-term adherence to ART, but adherence tended to increase in participants who were more engaged with the intervention. Future interventions should engage patients more completely and have a more potent effect on adherence.

  14. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf.

  15. The (political) economics of antiretroviral treatment in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattrass, Nicoli J

    2008-12-01

    Despite unprecedented international mobilisation to support universal provision of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), national governments continue to play the key role in determining access to treatment. Whereas some AIDS-affected countries have performed as well as or better than expected given their level of development, institutional characteristics and demographic challenges (e.g. Thailand and Brazil), others (notably South Africa) have not. This article argues that the 'economics' of antiretroviral drug delivery is at heart a political-economy of access to treatment. It depends on commitment on the part of national governments to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies over patented antiretroviral drug prices, on their policy towards compulsory licensing, and on the approach they adopt to delivering HAART. Civil society has an important role to play in encouraging governments to become, and remain, committed to taking action to ensure sustainable and widespread access to HAART.

  16. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence among patients with HIV in Chennai, India: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, N; Safren, Steven A; Raminani, Sudha R; Pickard, Robert; James, Romola; Krishnan, A K Sri; Solomon, Suniti; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2005-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is increasingly being introduced and utilized in diverse areas of the world. However, little research exists on adherence to ART in different cultural settings, particularly in developing countries such as India. This formative qualitative study examined barriers and facilitators of ART adherence among 60 (49 men, 11 women; 33 taking ART, 27 not currently taking ART) patients receiving HIV primary care at YRG CARE, a nongovernmental organization, in Chennai, India. The average participant reported becoming HIV infected through heterosexual transmission, was between 31 and 40 years old, had over ninth class standard education, was married, and generally had access to medical care; however, we obtained some qualitative data from various other risk categories. Trained ethnographers at the study site conducted in-depth interviews in the local language. These interviews were analyzed for content and ethnographic data. Almost all of the participants discussed the cost of ART as a barrier, with many reporting extended drug holidays, turning to family and/or friends, or taking drastic measures (i.e., selling family jewels, property) for financial assistance. Other barriers centered on privacy and stigma issues, such as disclosure of HIV inhibiting pill-taking and social support. Frequently discussed facilitators of adherence included perceived benefits of ART and proper adherence, perceptions about the consequences of nonadherence, and social support, if available. These data highlight the importance of reducing the cost of antiretroviral medications, involving family members in HIV care, and addressing privacy issues and stigma in counseling interventions in this setting.

  17. The Clinical Interpretation of Viral Blips in HIV Patients Receiving Antiviral Treatment: Are We Ready to Infer Poor Adherence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chun-Hai Fung, Isaac; Gambhir, Manoj; van Sighem, Ard; de Wolf, Frank; Garnett, Geoffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Viral blips may be an indication of poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment. This article studies how the variations of the definitions of viral blips and that of the choice of sampling frame in studies investigating viral blips may contribute to the uncertainty of the associations

  18. Self-reported adherence to treatment: A study of socioeconomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Adherence to treatment is important and relevant in HIV treatment. Previous studies in sub Sahara Africa and south western Nigeria reported that psychiatric morbidity influence treatment adherence. The present study was to examine treatment adherence among the male and the female patients with HIV infection ...

  19. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV (PLHIV): a cross-sectional survey to measure in Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansana, Visanou; Sanchaisuriya, Pattara; Durham, Jo; Sychareun, Vanphanom; Chaleunvong, Kongmany; Boonyaleepun, Suwanna; Schelp, Frank Peter

    2013-06-28

    Since 2001, antiretroviral therapy (ART) for people living with HIV (PLHIV) has been available in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). A key factor in the effectiveness of ART is good adherence to the prescribed regimen for both individual well-being and public health. Poor adherence can contribute to the emergence of drug resistant strains of the virus and transmission during risky behaviors. Increased access to ART in low-income country settings has contributed to an interest in treatment adherence in resource-poor contexts. This study aims to investigate the proportion of adherence to ART and identify possible factors related to non-adherence to ART among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Lao PDR. A cross-sectional study was conducted with adults living with HIV receiving free ART at Setthathirath hospital in the capital Vientiane and Savannakhet provincial hospitals from June to November 2011. Three hundred and forty six PLHIV were interviewed using an anonymous questionnaire. The estimation of the adherence rate was based on the information provided by the PLHIV about the intake of medicine during the previous three days. The statistical software Epidata 3.1 and Stata 10.1 were used for data analysis. Frequencies and distribution of each variable were calculated by conventional statistical methods. The chi square test, Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression were used for bivariate analyses. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the predictors of non-adherence to ART. A p-value ART. Reasons for not taking medicine as required were being busy (97.0%), and being forgetful (62.2%). In the multivariate analysis, educational level at secondary school (OR=3.7, 95% CI:1.3-10.1, p=0.012); illicit drug use (OR=16.1, 95% CI:1.9-128.3, p=0.011); dislike exercise (OR=0.6, 95% CI:0.4-0.9, p=0.028), and forgetting to take ARV medicine during the last month (OR=2.3, 95% CI:1.4-3.7, p=0.001) were independently associated with non-adherence

  20. Treatment adherence in patients living with HIV/AIDS assisted at a specialized facility in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyada, Simone; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Gatto, Renata Colturato Joaquim; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2017-01-01

    In the 1990s, Brazil adopted a public policy that allowed for universal, free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since then, treatment adherence has become a new challenge for administrators of sexually transmitted disease/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (STD/AIDS) policies. This study quantified adherence to ART and verified whether there is an association between sociodemographic variables and clinical/laboratory data in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study with a quantitative approach that was conducted over 8 months. The target population contained patients who were assisted at the ambulatory care facility specialized in STD/AIDS of a medium-size city located in Northwest São Paulo. In order to verify the level of adherence to ART, a validated CEAT-VIH (Assessment of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Questionnaire) questionnaire was used. Sociodemographic aspects and clinical/laboratory data were obtained from the medical records. The results were analyzed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's coefficient. Herein, 109 patients were interviewed, 56% of whom were male. The age of the population ranged 18-74 years (mean 45.67 years). Adherence to ART was classified as insufficient in 80.7% of cases. There was an association between ART adherence and presence of symptoms and/or opportunistic infection (p=0.008) and economic status (p<0.001). Adherence to ART among HIV carriers cared for by the public health system is low. Patients who reported a favorable economic status and those without symptoms and/or opportunistic infection demonstrated greater treatment adherence than those who needed to take more than 3 pills a day.

  1. Treatment adherence in patients living with HIV/AIDS assisted at a specialized facility in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Miyada

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: In the 1990s, Brazil adopted a public policy that allowed for universal, free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Since then, treatment adherence has become a new challenge for administrators of sexually transmitted disease/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (STD/AIDS policies. This study quantified adherence to ART and verified whether there is an association between sociodemographic variables and clinical/laboratory data in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study with a quantitative approach that was conducted over 8 months. The target population contained patients who were assisted at the ambulatory care facility specialized in STD/AIDS of a medium-size city located in Northwest São Paulo. In order to verify the level of adherence to ART, a validated CEAT-VIH (Assessment of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Questionnaire questionnaire was used. Sociodemographic aspects and clinical/laboratory data were obtained from the medical records. The results were analyzed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's coefficient. RESULTS Herein, 109 patients were interviewed, 56% of whom were male. The age of the population ranged 18-74 years (mean 45.67 years. Adherence to ART was classified as insufficient in 80.7% of cases. There was an association between ART adherence and presence of symptoms and/or opportunistic infection (p=0.008 and economic status (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to ART among HIV carriers cared for by the public health system is low. Patients who reported a favorable economic status and those without symptoms and/or opportunistic infection demonstrated greater treatment adherence than those who needed to take more than 3 pills a day.

  2. Strategies to improve HIV treatment adherence in developed countries: clinical management at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Maithe; McKinsey, David S

    2011-01-01

    REMARKABLE ADVANCES IN THE TREATMENT OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) DISEASE HAVE BEEN BLUNTED BY WIDESPREAD SUBOPTIMAL ADHERENCE (IE, NONADHERENCE), WHICH HAS EMERGED AS A MAJOR BARRIER TO ACHIEVING THE PRIMARY GOAL OF ANTIRETROVIRAL (ARV) THERAPY: suppression of HIV viral load. Nonsuppressed HIV viral load is associated with drug resistance, increased morbidity and mortality, and a higher risk of person-to-person HIV transmission. For HIV-infected individuals who are failing HIV treatment due to nonadherence, becoming adherent is a life-saving behavior change. However, overcoming nonadherence is one of the most daunting challenges in the successful management of HIV disease. The purpose of this paper is to provide clinicians with a better understanding of nonadherence to ARV treatment and to review the various factors that have been associated with either adherence or nonadherence. Strategies are presented that may help the nonadherent individual become ready to take HIV medications as prescribed.

  3. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sim, Benedict Lh; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke De Wit, Tobias F; Sohn, Annette H; Hamers, Raph L

    2017-03-03

    Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a bi-regional cohort in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This multicentre prospective study of adults starting first-line ART assessed patient-reported adherence at follow-up clinic visits using a 30-day visual analogue scale. Determinants of suboptimal adherence (Africa vs. Asia) was assessed as a potential effect modifier. Of 13,001 adherence assessments in 3934 participants during the first 24 months of ART, 6.4% (837) were suboptimal, with 7.3% (619/8484) in the African cohort versus 4.8% (218/4517) in the Asian cohort ( p  Africa (OR 5.8, 95% CI 4.3-7.7; p  health system resources may explain regional differences. Adherence-enhancing interventions should address patient-reported barriers tailored to local settings, prioritizing the first years of ART.

  4. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sim, Benedict LH; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke De Wit, Tobias F; Sohn, Annette H; Hamers, Raph L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a bi-regional cohort in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Methods: This multicentre prospective study of adults starting first-line ART assessed patient-reported adherence at follow-up clinic visits using a 30-day visual analogue scale. Determinants of suboptimal adherence (Asia) was assessed as a potential effect modifier. Results: Of 13,001 adherence assessments in 3934 participants during the first 24 months of ART, 6.4% (837) were suboptimal, with 7.3% (619/8484) in the African cohort versus 4.8% (218/4517) in the Asian cohort (p ART duration in both regions. Participants in low- and lower-middle-income countries had a higher risk of suboptimal adherence (OR 1.6, 1.3–2.0; p Asia (OR 9.0, 95% CI 5.0–16.2; p ART. PMID:28362063

  5. Usefulness of pharmacy dispensing records in the evaluation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesto, Aline Santarem; Lemos, Renata Muller Banzato Pinto de; Huehara, Maria Ivone; Morcillo, André Moreno; Dos Santos Vilela, Maria Marluce; Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco da

    2012-01-01

    Adherence, which is crucial to the success of antiretroviral therapy (HAART), is currently a major challenge in the care of children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. To evaluate the prevalence of nonadherence to HAART using complementary instruments in a cohort of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS followed in a reference service in Campinas, Brazil. The level of adherence of 108 patients and caregivers was evaluated by an adapted standardized questionnaire and pharmacy dispensing records (PDR). Non-adherence was defined as a drug intake lower than 95% (on 24-hour or seven-day questionnaires), or as an interval of 38 days or more for pharmacy refills. The association between adherence and clinical, immunological, virological, and psychosocial characteristics was assessed by multivariate analysis. Non-adherence prevalence varied from 11.1% (non-adherent in three instruments), 15.8% (24-hour self-report), 27.8% (seven-day self-report), 45.4% (PDR), and 56.3% (at least one of the outcomes). 24-hour and seven-day self-reports, when compared to PDR, showed low sensitivity (29% and 43%, respectively) but high specificity (95% and 85%, respectively). In multivariate analysis, medication intolerance, difficulty of administration by caregiver, HAART intake by the patient, lower socioeconomical class, lack of virological control, missed appointments in the past six months, and lack of religious practice by caregiver were significantly associated with non-adherence. A high prevalence of HAART non-adherence was observed in the study population, and PDR was the most sensitive of the tested instruments. The instruments employed were complementary in the identification of non-adherence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Usefulness of pharmacy dispensing records in the evaluation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazilian children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Santarem Ernesto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adherence, which is crucial to the success of antiretroviral therapy (HAART, is currently a major challenge in the care of children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of nonadherence to HAART using complementary instruments in a cohort of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS followed in a reference service in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS: The level of adherence of 108 patients and caregivers was evaluated by an adapted standardized questionnaire and pharmacy dispensing records (PDR. Non-adherence was defined as a drug intake lower than 95% (on 24-hour or seven-day questionnaires, or as an interval of 38 days or more for pharmacy refills. The association between adherence and clinical, immunological, virological, and psychosocial characteristics was assessed by multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Non-adherence prevalence varied from 11.1% (non-adherent in three instruments, 15.8% (24-hour self-report, 27.8% (seven-day self-report, 45.4% (PDR, and 56.3% (at least one of the outcomes. 24-hour and seven-day self-reports, when compared to PDR, showed low sensitivity (29% and 43%, respectively but high specificity (95% and 85%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, medication intolerance, difficulty of administration by caregiver, HAART intake by the patient, lower socioeconomical class, lack of virological control, missed appointments in the past six months, and lack of religious practice by caregiver were significantly associated with non-adherence. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of HAART non-adherence was observed in the study population, and PDR was the most sensitive of the tested instruments. The instruments employed were complementary in the identification of non-adherence.

  7. Estimates of eligibility for antiretroviral treatment (ART) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ART impact scenarios illustrate that a relatively high ART coverage would be needed to ensure a substantial impact of ART on HIV/AIDS-associated mortality. Keywords: antiretroviral treatment, CD4 cell counts,AIDS mortality, impact modeling. Résumé Cette étude a évalué la proportion des enseignants séropositifs qui ...

  8. the effects of antiretroviral treatment on liver function enzymes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    aspartate aminotransferase (AST). It is one of the greatest causes of treatment discontinuation in HIV-infected patients [1]. Its prevention and management is therefore very important among HIV-infected patients who are to be placed on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [2]. Till date, there has been broad variability ...

  9. Assessment of antiretroviral treatment outcome in public hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    2009-01-31

    Jan 31, 2009 ... Background: The outcome of antiretroviral treatment, survival patterns and associated determining factors in public hospitals are ... Method: A historical retrospective cohort study design was used for patients visiting hospitals from January 1, 2005 to. January .... SPSS version 15 was used for data analysis.

  10. Antiretroviral treatment in the private sector in Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, F.; Mugala-Mukungu, F.; Kangudi, M.; Feris, A.; Katjitae, I.; Colebunders, R.

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been available in the private sector in Namibia since 1998. National guidelines were developed by the Ministry of Health and clinicians of the public and private sector in 2003 and launched at the start of the public sector ART programme by the Ministry of Health.

  11. Exploring the costs of a limited public sector antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The role of antiretroviral treatment for adults in the pubic sector in South Africa is debated with little consideration of programme choices that could impact on the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. This study seeks to explore the impact of these programme choices at an individual level, as well as explore the ...

  12. Delays in switching patients onto second-line antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: South Africa has one of the largest antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes globally. In addition to increasing access to ART, it is important that the health system also focuses on the appropriate management of patients who fail first-line ART. Delays in switching patients onto second-line ART can adversely ...

  13. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Delivery of integrated care for patients with HIV-associated TB is challenging. We assessed the uptake and timing of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among eligible patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics. Methods. In a retrospective cohort study, all HIV-associated TB patients ...

  14. Treatment Adherence Intervention Studies in Dermatology and Guidance on How to Support Adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, S.R.; Vrijens, B.; Gieler, U.; Piaserico, S.; Puig, L.; Kerkhof, P. van de

    2017-01-01

    Adequate adherence to prescribed treatment regimens can help to break the cycle of treatment failure, disease progression and subsequent treatment escalation. Unfortunately, adherence in the treatment of skin disorders such as acne, atopic dermatitis/eczema and psoriasis is often inadequate. A

  15. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  16. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Peterson, Gregory M; Bimirew, Mekides A; Kassie, Desalew M

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes.

  17. Knowledge of HIV-AIDS a dominant factor of antiretroviral therapeutic adherence in women with HIV-AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surilena

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Antiretroviral therapy adherence (ART adherence is a factor significantly extending life expectancy of people living with HIV/AIDS. The objective of this study was determine several factors on ART adherence in women infected with HIV/AIDS. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 99 women with HIV/AIDS who were infected through their sexual partner or spouse was conducted in Dharmais Hospital between March and August 2014. The instruments used were demographic and self-esteem questionnaires, Hamilton rating scale for depression, Hamilton rating scale for anxiety, knowledge, perception of ART benefits and limitations, family support, peer support as well as assessment of ART adherence. The knowledge questionnaire has been validated with Cronbach’s alpha = 0.823. Data were analyzed using Chi-Square test and multivariate logistic regression. Results A total of 99 women with HIV/AIDS participated in the study, with an age range of 30- 60 years and mean age of 36 ± 3.72 years. A total of 57.58% of participants showed poor ART adherence. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that knowledge, ART side effects, depression, peer support and ARV availability significantly affected ART adherence (p<0.05. The most dominant factor affecting ART adherence was knowledge, with OR = 64.02 (95% CI 4.99-670.12. Conclusion With good knowledge about HIV/AIDS infection, ART benefits, and possible ARV side effects, women living with HIV/AIDS are expected to carry out ART adherence according to the recommended rules.

  18. Treatment adherence in patients with headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Rachelle R; Ryan, Jamie L; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W; Aylward, Brandon S; Hommel, Kevin A

    2014-05-01

    To review and critically evaluate the extant research literature pertaining to adherence in youth and adults with headache and to provide recommendations for future research. This article provides the first systematic review of pediatric headache adherence and updates a previous review of treatment adherence in adults with headache. Systematic review of empirical literature. A literature search with no date restriction was conducted using PubMed and PsycINFO electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant articles. Adherence rates in adults with headache range considerably from 25% to 94% across treatment, assessment method, and definition of adherence utilized. Methods to assess adherence included retrospective prescription claims data, paper or electronic diaries, follow-up appointment attendance, written and verbal self-report of general adherence, verbal self-report of adherence over a specific amount of time via in person interview or telephone, validated adherence measures, adherence questionnaires without validation, and counselor ratings of homework. Each methodology and assessment tool demonstrated strengths and weaknesses. No studies have systematically examined medication adherence in children with headache, and the few available studies examining adherence to behavioral treatment have documented adherence rates ranging from 52% to 86%. Adherence research in adults with headache is growing, but studies demonstrate a number of methodological shortcomings. Adherence research in children with headache, and adherence intervention research in both adults and children, is scant. Future research should use objective measures of adherence, consider over-the-counter medications and medication overuse, examine demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates of adherence, assess adherence to botulinum toxin type A, and examine the efficacy of adherence interventions in individuals with headache. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  19. Non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected adults in Mon State of Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Lei Aye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART was started in Myanmar in 2005 in collaboration with the National AIDS Program and the private sector. Successful clinical management of HIV-infected patients is subject to optimal adherence. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of adherence to ART and identify factors associated with non-adherence to ART among HIV infected adults registered in a private sector setting in Mon State, Myanmar. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with adults living with HIV receiving ART at an HIV outpatient clinic between April and May 2016. A total of three hundred People Living with HIV(PLHIV were interviewed using a pretested and structured questionnaire. The 30 days Visual Analog Scale (VAS adherence instrument was used to assess the level of adherence. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence to ART. Results Among 300 patients (male 37.7% and female 62.3%, with a mean age of 41.3 years, standard deviation 8.7, 84% reported ≥95% adherence to ART in the past month. Among 16% of those reporting non-adherence, major reasons for skipping the medication were being busy (23%, being away from home (17.7% and being forgetful (12.3%. In multivariable logistic rgeression, low behavioural skills on ART adherence (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.94, tobacco use (OR = 3.22, 95% CI:1.28-8.12, having disclosed their HIV status (OR = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01-0.69, having a partner who was not on ART (OR = 4.25, 95% CI: 1.70-10.64 and among men, having erectile dysfunction (OR = 15.14, 95% CI: 1.41-162.66 were significant associated with ART non-adherence. Conclusion Non-adherence to ART was associated with individual moderating factors and behavioral skills. Priority measures such as addressing risk behaviour and behavioural change communication tailored to individual patients’ lifestyles requires comprehensive

  20. A pilot study of food supplementation to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among food-insecure adults in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Ronald A; Sinkala, Moses; Megazinni, Karen; Lawson-Marriott, Sibi; Washington, Sierra; Chi, Benjamin H; Tambatamba-Chapula, Bushimbwa; Levy, Jens; Stringer, Elizabeth M; Mulenga, Lloyd; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2008-10-01

    The provision of food supplementation to food-insecure patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) may improve adherence to medications. A home-based adherence support program at 8 government clinics assessed patients for food insecurity. Four clinics provided food supplementation, and 4 acted as controls. The analysis compared adherence (assessed by medication possession ratio), CD4, and weight gain outcomes among food-insecure patients enrolled at the food clinics with those enrolled at the control clinics. Between May 1, 2004, and March 31, 2005, 636 food- insecure adults were enrolled. Food supplementation was associated with better adherence to therapy. Two hundred fifty-eight of 366 (70%) patients in the food group achieved a medication possession ratio of 95% or greater versus 79 of 166 (48%) among controls (relative risk = 1.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 1.8). This finding was unchanged after adjustment for sex, age, baseline CD4 count, baseline World Health Organization stage, and baseline hemoglobin. We did not observe a significant effect of food supplementation on weight gain or CD4 cell response. This analysis suggests that providing food to food-insecure patients initiating ART is feasible and may improve adherence to medication. A large randomized study of the clinical benefits of food supplementation to ART patients is urgently needed to inform international policy.

  1. A qualitative approach to understand antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence for refugees living in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laughlin, Kelli N; Rouhani, Shada A; Kasozi, Julius; Greenwald, Kelsy E; Perkons, Nicholas R; Faustin, Zikama M; Bassett, Ingrid V; Ware, Norma C

    2018-01-01

    Refugees living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa suffer unique hardships that may increase their vulnerability to interruptions in antiretroviral therapy (ART). To investigate refugees' experiences adhering to ART, we conducted inperson interviews with refugees on ART ( n  = 73) and HIV clinic staff ( n  = 4) in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in southwest Uganda from March to July 2011. Three analysts used a conventional content analysis approach to evaluate these data. Refugees described profound motivation to adhere to ART and employed adherence strategies to facilitate success despite the austere setting. However, refugees spoke of specific hardships living in Nakivale that served as barriers to ART adherence, including difficulty accessing clinic when ill, food insecurity, drug stockouts, and violence and unrest in the settlement. For some refugees, need for ART inextricably linked them to the HIV clinic and prevented them from transitioning permanently away from the settlement. By learning about refugees' experiences we can design informed interventions to enhance ART adherence, thus minimizing morbidity and mortality, preventing transmission of HIV, and supporting refugees' abilities to move freely toward repatriation, resettlement or integration in their host country.

  2. A measurement model of medication adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and its relation to viral load in HIV-positive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabre, Maria M; Weaver, Kathryn E; Durán, Ron E; Antoni, Michael H; McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Schneiderman, Neil

    2006-10-01

    This study compared a multiple method measurement model of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence with single-method models to determine optimal validity in predicting HIV viral load. Repeated measures of antiretroviral adherence were collected over a 15-month period using three different measurement methods: a self-report questionnaire, an adherence interview item, and electronic medication monitoring. The participants included HIV-positive men and women (n = 323) who were currently prescribed HAART. Single-factor models composed of multiple measurements over time were developed for each adherence method and HIV viral load. The three adherence methods were then combined in a second order factor measurement model. Structural equation modeling was used to test the models. Mean adherence, defined as percent of doses taken, was 92%, 90%, and 57% by self-report, interview, and electronic monitoring, respectively. Reliability of individual measurements of adherence was low. Four or seven assessments were needed to attain acceptable stability, depending on the method. The second-order factor model of adherence fit the data and explained 45% of the variability in HIV viral load. Models including only one method of assessing adherence explained between 20% and 24% of the variability. Models that included both self-report and electronic monitoring optimized predictive validity. Using at least two different methods of adherence measurement, each assessed at multiple times is recommended to derive reliable and valid measurement of medication adherence, which is predictive of biological outcomes such as HIV viral load.

  3. Use of and adherence to antiretroviral therapy is associated with decreased sexual risk behavior in HIV clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Catherine; Richardson, Jean L; Milam, Joel; Stoyanoff, Susan; McCutchan, J Allen; Kemper, Carol; Larsen, Robert A; Hollander, Harry; Weismuller, Penny; Bolan, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Previous research suggested that the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) was associated with increased risky sexual behavior. This study examined the relationship between unprotected anal or vaginal sex (UAV) and ART use and adherence in a cross-sectional survey conducted in 874 randomly selected, sexually active patients at 6 public HIV clinics in California. Patients completed a standardized interview in 1998-1999 regarding HIV history, sexual behavior, illicit drug use, and ART use and adherence. Thirty-four percent reported UAV, defined as anal or vaginal sex without a condom within the past 3 months. Of 79% on ART, 26% reported UAV were found for both ART use, odds ratio (OR) 0.5 (95% CI 0.4-0.7, P or = 95%, OR 0.6 (95% CI 0.4-0.8, P UAV, OR 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8, P behavior.

  4. Financing equitable access to antiretroviral treatment in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Di

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While South Africa spends approximately 7.4% of GDP on healthcare, only 43% of these funds are spent in the public system, which is tasked with the provision of care to the majority of the population including a large proportion of those in need of antiretroviral treatment (ART). South Africa is currently debating the introduction of a National Health Insurance (NHI) system. Because such a universal health system could mean increased public healthcare funding and improved ...

  5. Computer-based intervention in HIV clinical care setting improves antiretroviral adherence: the LifeWindows Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeffrey D; Amico, K Rivet; Fisher, William A; Cornman, Deborah H; Shuper, Paul A; Trayling, Cynthia; Redding, Caroline; Barta, William; Lemieux, Anthony F; Altice, Frederick L; Dieckhaus, Kevin; Friedland, Gerald

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of LifeWindows, a theory-based, computer-administered antiretroviral (ARV) therapy adherence support intervention, delivered to HIV + patients at routine clinical care visits. 594 HIV + adults receiving HIV care at five clinics were randomized to intervention or control arms. Intervention vs. control impact in the intent-to-treat sample (including participants whose ARVs had been entirely discontinued, who infrequently attended care, or infrequently used LifeWindows) did not reach significance. Intervention impact in the On Protocol sample (328 intervention and control arm participants whose ARVs were not discontinued, who attended care and were exposed to LifeWindows regularly) was significant. On Protocol intervention vs. control participants achieved significantly higher levels of perfect 3-day ACTG-assessed adherence over time, with sensitivity analyses maintaining this effect down to 70% adherence. This study supports the utility of LifeWindows and illustrates that patients on ARVs who persist in care at clinical care sites can benefit from adherence promotion software.

  6. Health care provider communication training in rural Tanzania empowers HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy to discuss adherence problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, S; Letang, E; Glass, T R; Natamatungiro, A; Mnzava, D; Mapesi, H; Haschke, M; Duthaler, U; Berger, B; Muri, L; Bader, J; Marzolini, C; Elzi, L; Klimkait, T; Langewitz, W; Battegay, M

    2017-10-01

    Self-reported adherence assessment in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is challenging and may overestimate adherence. The aim of this study was to improve the ability of health care providers to elicit patients' reports of nonadherence using a "patient-centred" approach in a rural sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective interventional cohort study of HIV-infected patients on ART for ≥ 6 months attending an HIV clinic in rural Tanzania was carried out. The intervention consisted of a 2-day workshop for health care providers on patient-centred communication and the provision of an adherence assessment checklist for use in the consultations. Patients' self-reports of nonadherence (≥ 1 missed ART dose/4 weeks), subtherapeutic plasma ART concentrations (communication can successfully be implemented with a simple intervention in rural Africa. It increases the likelihood of HIV-infected patients reporting problems with adherence to ART; however, sustainability remains a challenge. © 2017 The Authors HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  7. Group Motivational Interviewing to Promote Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications and Risk Reduction Behaviors in HIV Infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; DiIorio, Colleen; Kelley, Mary E.; Resnicow, Kenneth; Sharma, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a clinical trial that tested the efficacy of using motivational interviewing (MI) in a group format to promote adherence to antiretroviral medications and risk reduction behaviors (RRB) in 203 predominately African American HIV infected women. It was compared to a group health promotion program. Participants were followed for 9 months. Adherence was measured by MEMS®; and RRB by self-report. Controlling for recruitment site and years on ART, no significant group by time effects were observed. Attendance (≥7/8 sessions) modified the effects. Higher MI attendees had better adherence at all follow-ups, a borderline significant group by time effect (p = 0.1) for % Doses Taken on Schedule, a significantly larger proportion who reported abstinence at 2 weeks, 6, and 9 months, and always used protection during sex at 6 and 9 months. Though not conclusive, the findings offer some support for using MI in a group format to promote adherence and some risk reduction behaviors when adequate attendance is maintained. PMID:21165692

  8. Antiretroviral treatment of adult HIV infection - 2008 recommendations of the International AIDS Society USA panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Scott M.; Eron, Joseph J.; Reiss, Peter; Schooley, Robert T.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Walmsley, Sharon; Cahn, Pedro; Fischl, Margaret A.; Gatell, Jose M.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Richman, Douglas D.; Yeni, Patrick G.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Context The availability of new antiretroviral drugs and formulations, including drugs in new classes, and recent data on treatment choices for antiretroviral- naive and - experienced patients warrant an update of the International AIDS Society - USA guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy

  9. Stigma, social support, and treatment adherence among HIV-positive patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-10-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients.

  10. Evaluation of Adherence to Diabetic Treatment in Northern Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine medication adherence and predictors of suboptimal adherence in patients with diabetes type 2, and to address the factors that are associated with treatment non-adherence in Northern Region of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 200 type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

  11. Gynaecomastia in two men on stable antiretroviral therapy who commenced treatment for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jeremy D; El-Shazly, Ahmad Y; Mambuque, Santos G; Demetria, Elpidio; Veldkamp, Peter; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-12-01

    Gynaecomastia is a common clinical presentation that varies from benign presentations in stages of human development to hormonal pathology, mainly due to hepatic dysfunction, malignancy, and adverse pharmacologic effects. We describe the development of significant bilateral gynaecomastia after starting treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in two males with WHO stage III Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on stable antiretroviral regimens. Emerging reports suggest that distinct hepatic impairment in efavirenz metabolism modulates oestrogenic activity, which may be potentiated by anti-tuberculosis therapy. Clinical application includes early recognition of efavirenz-induced gynaecomastia, especially after commencing tuberculosis treatment. To avoid decreased adherence resulting from the distressing side effect of gynecomastia, transition to an alternative ART regimen over the course of tuberculosis treatment should be considered.

  12. Influence of treatment complexity on adherence and incidence of blips in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Cidoncha, Elena; González-Bueno, Javier; Almeida-González, Carmen Victoria; Morillo-Verdugo, Ramón

    2015-02-01

    The addition of antihepatitis C therapy to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients leads to an increase in the treatment complexity that may result in decreased adherence. Blips, defined as intermittent episodes of detectable low-level HIV viremia, may be an indication of poor adherence to HAART. To (a) determine the influence of adding anti-HCV therapy to HAART on complexity index, adherence, and incidence of blips and (b) determine complexity index and adherence in patient subgroups based on anti-HCV therapy. We conducted a prospective 2-center observational study. HIV/HCV coinfected patients under antiretroviral treatment who started anti-HCV bi-therapy or triple therapy between January 2011 and December 2013 were included. Patients were excluded if they were virologically uncontrolled (HIV viral load greater than 50 copies RNA/mL) or if they had changed antiretroviral treatment in the 6 months prior to the introduction of anti-HCV therapy. Data were collected before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART. The main variables were complexity index, incidence of blips, and adherence. The complexity index was based on a score that utilized the number of pills per day, dosing schedule, dosage form, and any specific instructions linked to use of the drug. Blips were defined as a detectable HIV-RNA level ( greater than 50 copies/mL but no more than 1,000 copies/mL) occurring between 2 negative assays. Medication adherence was assessed using electronic pharmacy refill records. The threshold for optimal adherence was defined at 95% and above. Differences in the variables collected were assessed before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART.R ESULTS: A total of 66 patients were included in the study. Based on the complexity index, the median value before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART was 4.2 (interquartile range [IQR] = 3

  13. Risk factors for suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana: a pilot cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndiaye M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maimouna Ndiaye,1,2 Peter Nyasulu,1 Hoang Nguyen,6,7 Elizabeth D Lowenthal,8,9 Robert Gross,10 Edward J Mills,3 Jean B Nachega4–6 1School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Central Medical Stores, Ministry of Health, Gaborone, Botswana; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; 4Department of Medicine and Centre for Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; 5Department of Epidemiology, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research Program, Pittsburgh University Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Departments of Epidemiology and International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 7Tay Ho Clinics, Department of Medicine, Hanoi Health Services, Hanoi, Vietnam; 8Departments of Pediatrics and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 9Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 10Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Objective: Little is known about factors associated with suboptimal antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence among adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our objective was to determine the level of ART adherence and predictors of non-adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected adolescents at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 82 HIV-infected adolescents receiving ART and their caregivers were administered a structured questionnaire. The patient's clinical information was retrieved from medical records. Outcome measures included excellent pill count ART adherence (>95% and virologic suppression

  14. Psychosocial influencers and mediators of treatment adherence in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Park, Ji Suk; Seo, Wha Sook

    2013-09-01

    This article is a report of the development and testing of the hypothetical model that illustrates relationships between treatment adherence and its psychosocial influencing factors and to elucidate the direct and indirect (mediating) effects of factors on treatment adherence. Poor adherence has been consistently reported in haemodialysis patients. Much research has showed various influencing factors of adherence, but these studies have failed to identify consistent influencing factors. This study was performed using a non-experimental, cross-sectional design. The study subjects were 150 end-stage renal failure patients on haemodialysis at a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Data were collected over 10 months (June 2010-April 2011). The hypothetical model provided a good fit with data. Haemodialysis-related knowledge, perceived barrier to adherence, self-efficacy on adherence, and healthcare provider support had significant effects on adherence. Self-efficacy was found to mediate barrier-adherence and family support-adherence relationships. Self-efficacy in combination with barrier, family support, and healthcare provider support was found to mediate the depression-adherence relationship. Strategies aimed at the development of successful adherence interventions should focus on reducing perceived barriers and enhancing self-efficacy and knowledge. It can be suggested that efforts to improve the healthcare provider-patient relationship would enhance adherence. In depressive patients, strategies that promote self-efficacy and the support of family or healthcare providers could diminish the negative impact of depression on adherence. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Harmful alcohol drinking among HIV-positive people in Nepal: an overlooked threat to anti-retroviral therapy adherence and health-related quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Khem Narayan; Gaulee Pokhrel, Kalpana; Neupane, Sanjeev Raj; Sharma, Vidya Dev

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: People living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) often suffer from alcohol-use disorders resulting in their poor health and treatment outcomes. Little is known about the association of harmful alcohol drinking with their adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and health-related quality of life (QOL) in low-resource settings. Objective: This study aimed to investigate associations between harmful alcohol drinking, adherence to ART and health-related QOL in HIV-positive people, stratified by gender, in Nepal. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 682 HIV-positive people on ART to measure their self-reported harmful alcohol drinking and non-adherence to ART in the previous month of data collection. We also measured health-related QOL using a WHOQOL-HIV BREF scale. The association between harmful alcohol drinking and non-adherence to ART was examined using multiple logistic regressions. Additionally, multiple linear regressions examined association between harmful alcohol drinking and QOL. Results: Harmful alcohol drinking was associated with non-adherence to ART among men (AOR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.50, 4.11, p < 0.001) and women (AOR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.32, 4.80, p = 0.005). Men were more likely to have lower score for the psychological (β = −0.55, p = 0.021) and level of independence (β = −0.68, p = 0.018) domains when they had harmful alcohol drinking. Moreover, women were more likely to have lower scores for the physical (β = −1.01, p = 0.015), social relations (β = −0.82, p = 0.033), environmental (β = −0.88, p = 0.011), and spiritual (β = −1.30, p = 0.005) domains of QOL when they had harmful alcohol drinking. Conclusions: Harmful alcohol drinking had a negative association with ART adherence and QOL in both HIV-positive men and women in Nepal. Screening for alcohol-use disorders and community-based counseling services should be provided while delivering ART services to improve

  16. Determinants of antiretroviral adherence among HIV positive children and teenagers in rural Tanzania: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyogea, Daniel; Mtenga, Sally; Henning, Lars; Franzeck, Fabian C; Glass, Tracy R; Letang, Emilio; Tanner, Marcel; Geubbels, Eveline

    2015-01-31

    Around 3.3 million children worldwide are infected with HIV and 90% of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. Our study aimed to estimate adherence levels and find the determinants, facilitators and barriers of ART adherence among children and teenagers in rural Tanzania. We applied a sequential explanatory mixed method design targeting children and teenagers aged 2-19 years residing in Ifakara. We conducted a quantitative cross sectional study followed by a qualitative study combining focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs). We used pill count to measure adherence and defined optimal adherence as > =80% of pills being taken. We analysed determinants of poor adherence using logistic regression. We held eight FGDs with adolescent boys and girls on ART and with caretakers. We further explored issues emerging in the FGDs in four in-depth interviews with patients and health workers. Qualitative data was analysed using thematic content analysis. Out of 116 participants available for quantitative analysis, 70% had optimal adherence levels and the average adherence level was 84%. Living with a non-parent caretaker predicted poor adherence status. From the qualitative component, unfavorable school environment, timing of the morning ART dose, treatment longevity, being unaware of HIV status, non-parental (biological) care, preference for traditional medicine (herbs) and forgetfulness were seen to be barriers for optimal adherence. The study has highlighted specific challenges in ART adherence faced by children and teenagers. Having a biological parent as a caretaker remains a key determinant of adherence among children and teenagers. To achieve optimal adherence, strategies targeting the caretakers, the school environment, and the health system need to be designed.

  17. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  18. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letícia Santos Cruz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers’ role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV. Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors.

  19. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D; Fabbro, Marcia D'All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-06-21

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers' role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors.

  20. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    OpenAIRE

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for im...

  1. The effect of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) on antiretroviral therapeutic adherence and mental health in women infected with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surilena; Ismail, R Irawati; Irwanto; Djoerban, Zubairi; Utomo, Budi; Sabarinah; Iwan; Akip, Arwin A P

    2014-10-01

    To identify the effectiveness of rational-emotive-behavior-based therapy (REBT-based therapy) on improved mental health and antiretroviral (ART) therapeutic adherence in women infected with HIV/AIDS (female subjects with HIV/AIDS). A randomized and single-blinded clinical trial in women infected with HIV/AIDS who had their treatment at the outpatient clinic of Pokdiksus AIDS RSCM and at the AIDS Comprehensive Diagnostic Unit of Dharmais Hospital was conducted between October 2011 and March 2012. A block randomization of 160 female subjects with AIDS was performed that resulted in a REBT-based treatment group (n=80) and a control group (n=80). The treatment group received REBT-based intervention of 8 sessions weekly including 6 individual-therapeutic sessions/week and 2 group-therapeutic sessions/week. Instruments used in the study were questionnaires on demography, ART adherence (measured by self report and pill count), and mental health (SRQ-20). Data were analyzed using Chi-Square test, Generalized Linear Model, and Generalized Estimating Equations. There were 148 respondents analyzed including in the REBT-based group (n=72) and in the control group (n=76) with mean age of 33-34 years. After 8 weeks of REBT-based intervention, there was improved (increased) mean value of the self-reported adherence score (self-report) compared to control group (100%; CI 95%,83.3-96.7 vs. 84%; CI 95%,77.5-87.8) and improved (decreased) SRQ-20 mean score in REBT-based treatment group compared to control group (2.9; CI 95%, 2.7-13.0 vs. 5.4; CI 95%: 5.0-13.6). ART adherence based on viral load titer was not analyzed in both group since most of VL titer were undetected (REBT-based treatment group, which were more significant (pREBT-based intervention to female subjects with HIV/AIDS, there is a decrease of SRQ-20 mean score which may result in increased ART adherence mean score in the treatment group compared to the control.

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral drugs in North-Central zone of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study of 110 patients attending State House Clinic, Abuja were assessed for compliance in time and dose of anti-retroviral drugs for one month. One hundred and five of the patients complied to taking the drugs (taking complience >95%) and compliance to the dosage was also good (98.1%). However, the ...

  3. Alcoholism treatment adherence: older age predicts better adherence and drinking outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslin, David W; Pettinati, Helen; Volpicelli, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    Adherence to treatment has been demonstrated to be an important factor for remission from alcohol dependence. The authors compared therapy and medication adherence for treatment of alcohol dependence in older adults with adherence in younger adults. All subjects were participants in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy trial of naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence. All subjects received a medically-based psychosocial intervention focused on motivating patients to change and on adherence to treatment. The therapy is nonconfrontational and is delivered by a nurse-practitioner. Compared with younger adults, older adults had greater attendance at therapy sessions and greater adherence to the medication. Age-group was the only pretreatment factor associated with adherence. The greater adherence in older adults translated to less relapse than in younger adults. Treatment for alcohol dependence can be effective for older adults. Older adults appear to respond well to a medically-oriented program that is supportive and individualized. In fact, findings from this study suggest that older adults can be treated in mixed-age treatment settings when psychotherapeutic strategies are used that are age-appropriate and delivered on an individual basis.

  4. Better adherence to pre-antiretroviral therapy guidelines after implementing an electronic medical record system in rural Kenyan HIV clinics: a multicenter pre-post study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oluoch, Tom; Kwaro, Daniel; Ssempijja, Victor; Katana, Abraham; Langat, Patrick; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of pre-antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) is a key indicator of HIV quality of care. This study investigated the association of an electronic medical record system (EMR) with adherence to pre-ART guidelines in rural HIV clinics in Kenya. A retrospective study was carried out to assess

  5. Adherence to treatment in men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Tiemensma, Jitske; Quinton, Richard; Pitteloud, Nelly; Morin, Diane

    2017-03-01

    Men with congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH) typically require lifelong hormonal therapy, and discontinuing treatment can have negative health consequences. Little is known about adherence to treatment or the psychosocial impact of CHH. A sequential, multiple methods approach was used. A quantitative online survey assessed adherence to treatment, depressive symptoms and illness perceptions. Subsequently, qualitative focus groups explored patient-reported factors for adherence. Adult men with CHH on at least 1 year of treatment were recruited internationally. Adherence (Morisky medication adherence scale), depressive symptoms (Zung self-rating depression scale) and patient perception of CHH (revised illness perception questionnaire) were assessed in an online survey, and comparisons were made to reference groups. Patient focus group discussions were conducted and thematic analysis was employed to identify patient-reported factors for adherence. In total, 101 men on long-term treatment were included (mean age 37 ± 11 years). Forty three percent (43/101) exhibited low medication adherence and a significantly elevated prevalence of mild, moderate or severe depressive symptoms (27%, 17%, 20%, respectively, all P hypogonadism men are challenged to adhere to long-term treatment. Poor adherence may contribute to adverse effects on bone, sexual and psychological health. The psychosocial morbidity of CHH is significant and appears to be underappreciated by healthcare providers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Number of daily pills, dosing schedule, self-reported adherence and health status in 2010: a large cross-sectional study of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, N; Galli, L; Bocchiola, B; Cahua, T; Panzini, P; Zandonà, D; Salpietro, S; Maillard, M; Danise, A; Pazzi, A; Lazzarin, A; Castagna, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether pill burden is associated with self-reported adherence to current combination antiretroviral regimens and health status in a large sample of unselected and chronically treated HIV-infected patients. An adherence and health status questionnaire was offered to all patients collecting their drugs between March and May 2010 at our clinic; both parameters were primarily evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Linear correlations were evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Wilcoxon's rank-sum test and the χ(2) test were used to compare quantitative and qualitative variables. The generalized linear model was used in multivariable analyses. Among 2763 subjects on treatment during the study period, 2114 (78.8% male; mean age 46.9 ± 8.84 years) were tested for adherence; 1803 (85.3%) had viral loads pill burden and dosing interval, adherence was higher in patients with undetectable HIV RNA (P pill burden (P = 0.019). In this highly adherent population, the number of daily pills was related to self-reported health status but not to self-reported adherence, whereas the dosing interval did not influence self-reported adherence or health status. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  7. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults. PMID:27404187

  8. Paediatric antiretroviral treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One-year survival probability was between 84% and 91%, and considerable improvement in the clinical, immunologic and viral status of the paediatric patients was generally recorded. Loss to follow-up was less than 10% in all but two studies. Adherence to treatment was good and few adverse events were reported. This is ...

  9. Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiros, Y. K.; Teklu, T.; Desalegn, F.; Tesfay, M.; Klinkenberg, E.; Mulugeta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) patients in Mekelle Zone, Tigray Region, in Ethiopia. To investigate adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. A cross-sectional study in health facilities providing anti-tuberculosis treatment was conducted. Adherence was measured in three ways: through self-reported missed doses,

  10. Social-cognitive correlates of antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected individuals receiving infectious disease care in a medium-sized northeastern US city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer L; Littlewood, Rae A; Vanable, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    High levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence are required to achieve optimal viral suppression. To better understand mechanisms associated with ART adherence, this study characterized demographic and social-cognitive correlates of ART adherence among HIV-infected individuals from a medium-sized northeastern US city (n=116; 42% female; 43% African-American). Participants completed an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing survey assessing demographics, social-cognitive constructs, and ART adherence, and the participants' most recent viral load was obtained from their medical charts. Suboptimal ART adherence (taking less than 95% of prescribed medications during the past month) was reported by 39% of participants and was associated with being female, being a minority, and having a detectable viral load. In a hierarchical logistic regression analysis, greater than 95% ART adherence was associated with higher levels of adherence self-efficacy (AOR =1.1; p=0.015), higher perceived normative beliefs about the importance of ART adherence (AOR=1.3; p=0.03), and lower concern about missing ART doses (AOR=0.63; p=0.002). Adherence did not differ based on ART outcome expectancies, ART attitudes, or the perceived necessity of ART. In fact, most participants endorsed positive attitudes and expectancies regarding the need for and effectiveness of ART. Taken together, results indicate that suboptimal adherence remains high among HIV-infected minority women, a subpopulation that experiences particularly high rates of chronic stress due to both illness-specific stressors and broader environmental stressors. Consistent with social-cognitive theory, adherence problems in our sample were linked with deficits in self-efficacy as well as perceived norms and behavioral intentions that do not support a goal of 100% adherence. We suggest that interventions to improve adherence informed by social-cognitive theory (1) target patients who are at risk for adherence problems, (2

  11. The Islamification of antiretroviral therapy: Reconciling HIV treatment and religion in northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Jack Ume

    2017-10-01

    Access and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are essential to HIV treatment success and epidemic control. This article is about how HIV-positive Muslims and providers balance ART with religious tenets and obligations. I conducted 17 months of multi-site ethnographic research between 2007 and 2010, including participant-observation in an urban HIV clinic in Kano, Nigeria and a support group for people living with HIV, as well as in-depth interviews with 30 HIV-positive men and 30 key informants with caregiving, clinical, or policy roles related to HIV/AIDS. Patients migrated from Islamic prophetic medicine to ART when it became more widely available in the mid-2000s through the U.S. PEPFAR program. At the same time, a conceptual shift occurred away from considering HIV immediately curable through spiritual and herbal-based Islamic prophetic medicine toward considering HIV as a chronic infection that requires adherence to daily pill regimens. Hope for a complete cure and encouragement from some Islamic prophetic healers resulted in some patients forgoing ART. Patients and providers adapted biomedical treatment guidelines to minimize disruption to religious practices also considered essential to Muslims' wellbeing, irrespective of HIV status. Providers discouraged patients on second-line ART from fasting because such patients had fewer treatment options and, often, poorer health. However, patients' medication adherence was affected by the desire to fulfill fasting obligations and to avoid questions from family and friends unaware of their HIV-positive status. This study is one of few ethnographic accounts of HIV treatment in a Muslim-majority society and contributes to understanding the significance of religion for HIV treatment in northern Nigeria. It has implications for public health programming and clinical approaches to HIV treatment in medically pluralistic Muslim societies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral medications among participants in HIV clinical trials: the AACTG adherence instruments. Patient Care Committee & Adherence Working Group of the Outcomes Committee of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, M A; Ickovics, J R; Chambers, D B; Gifford, A L; Neidig, J; Zwickl, B; Wu, A W

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the AACTG Adherence Instruments, which are comprised of two self-report questionnaires for use in clinical trials conducted by the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG). The questionnaires were administered to 75 patients at ten AACTG sites in the USA. All patients were taking combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), including at least one protease inhibitor. Eleven per cent of patients reported missing at least one dose the day before the interview, and 17% reported missing at least one dose during the two days prior. The most common reasons for missing medications included 'simply forgot' (66%) and a number of factors often associated with improved health, including being busy (53%), away from home (57%) and changes in routine (51%). Less adherent patients reported lower adherence self-efficacy (p = 0.006) and were less sure of the link between non-adherence and the development of drug resistance (p = 0.009). They were also more likely to consume alcohol, to be employed outside the home for pay and to have enrolled in clinical trials to gain access to drugs (all p USA and abroad.

  13. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and the first year postpartum among HIV-positive women in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Heather; Thorne, Claire; Malyuta, Ruslan; Townsend, Claire L; Semenenko, Igor; Cortina-Borja, Mario

    2014-09-24

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with HIV disease progression and, during pregnancy, increased mother-to-child transmission risk. In Ukraine, access to combination ART is expanding but data on adherence are scarce. Cross-sectional surveys of HIV-positive women were conducted i) at delivery (on antenatal ART adherence) and ii) during the first year postpartum (on ART adherence in the preceding four weeks). Factors associated with a score ≤ 11 on the self-report Case Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) index or ≥ 1 self-reported missed dose were assessed using Fisher's exact test. Of 185 antenatal participants and 102 postnatal participants, median ages were 27.5 and 29.5 years respectively: 28% (50/180) and 27% (26/98) reported an unplanned pregnancy, and 13% (24/179) and 17% (17/98) an illicit drug-use history (excluding marijuana). One quarter (49/180 antenatally, 27/101 postnatally) screened positive for depression. The proportion reporting 'low' ART-related self-efficacy (i.e. unable to do ≥ 1/5 ART-taking activities) was 20% (28/141) antenatally and 17% (11/66) postnatally. Antenatally, 14% (95% CI 10-21%) had a CASE score ≤ 11 and 35% (95% CI 28-42%) reported missing ≥ 1 dose. Factors associated with a CASE score ≤ 11 were unplanned pregnancy (25% (12/48) vs. 11% (13/120) where planned, p = 0.03) and living with extended family (23% (13/57) vs. 10% (12/125) living with partner/alone, p = 0.04). Self-report of ≥ 1 missed dose antenatally was additionally associated with younger age (p = 0.03) and lower self-efficacy (50% (14/28) reported ≥ 1 missed dose vs. 28% (30/108) of those with high self-efficacy, p = 0.04). Of 102 postnatal participants, 8% (95% CI 4-15%) had a CASE score ≤ 11 and 31% (95% CI 22-41%) reported ≥ 1 missed dose. Of 11 women with low self-efficacy, 3 (27%) had a CASE score ≤ 11 compared with 3/55 (5%) of those with high self-efficacy (p = 0.05). Current smokers more commonly reported ≥ 1

  14. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Increased Risk of Non-Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumari, Patou Masika; Wouters, Edwin; Kayembe, Patrick Kalambayi; Kiumbu Nzita, Modeste; Mbikayi, Samclide Mutindu; Suguimoto, S. Pilar; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; El-saaidi, Christina; Piot, Peter; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Food insecurity is increasingly reported as an important barrier of patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in both resource-poor and rich settings. However, unlike in resource rich-settings, very few quantitative studies to date have investigated the association of food insecurity with patient adherence to ART in Sub-Saharan Africa. The current study examines the association between food insecurity and adherence to ART among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods and Findings This is a cross-sectional quantitative study of patients receiving ART at three private and one public health facilities in Kinshasa, DRC. Participants were consecutively recruited into the study between April and November 2012. Adherence was measured using a combined method coupling pharmacy refill and self-reported adherence. Food insecurity was the primary predictor, and was assessed using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Of the 898 participants recruited into the study, 512 (57%) were food insecure, and 188 (20.9%) were not adherent to ART. Food insecurity was significantly associated with non-adherence to ART (AOR, 2.06; CI, 1.38–3.09). We also found that perceived harmfulness of ART and psychological distress were associated respectively with increased (AOR, 1.95; CI, 1.15–3.32) and decreased (AOR, 0.31; CI, 0.11–0.83) odds of non-adherence to ART. Conclusion Food insecurity is prevalent and a significant risk factor for non-adherence to ART among HIV-infected individuals in the DRC. Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to improve food access among HIV-infected on ART in order to ensure patient adherence to ART and ultimately the long-term success of HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24454841

  15. Food insecurity is associated with increased risk of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patou Masika Musumari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food insecurity is increasingly reported as an important barrier of patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in both resource-poor and rich settings. However, unlike in resource rich-settings, very few quantitative studies to date have investigated the association of food insecurity with patient adherence to ART in Sub-Saharan Africa. The current study examines the association between food insecurity and adherence to ART among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This is a cross-sectional quantitative study of patients receiving ART at three private and one public health facilities in Kinshasa, DRC. Participants were consecutively recruited into the study between April and November 2012. Adherence was measured using a combined method coupling pharmacy refill and self-reported adherence. Food insecurity was the primary predictor, and was assessed using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS. Of the 898 participants recruited into the study, 512 (57% were food insecure, and 188 (20.9% were not adherent to ART. Food insecurity was significantly associated with non-adherence to ART (AOR, 2.06; CI, 1.38-3.09. We also found that perceived harmfulness of ART and psychological distress were associated respectively with increased (AOR, 1.95; CI, 1.15-3.32 and decreased (AOR, 0.31; CI, 0.11-0.83 odds of non-adherence to ART. CONCLUSION: Food insecurity is prevalent and a significant risk factor for non-adherence to ART among HIV-infected individuals in the DRC. Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to improve food access among HIV-infected on ART in order to ensure patient adherence to ART and ultimately the long-term success of HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Factors related to adherence to treatment for systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to seek the evidence available in the literature regarding the factors related to adherence to treatment for systemic hypertension. It used the method of integrative review in the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, and LILACS, using the keywords: hypertension, compliance, non-compliance, adherence, non-adherence, patient compliance, in the period 2004 – 2008, and articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, with the use of a validated instrument and content analysis. 28 studies were selected, 64.3% of which had level of evidence VI. The following were identified as factors related to adherence to treatment: treatment costs, educational activities, sex, physician-patient relationship, physiological and behavioral aspects, drug therapy, attending checkups and lifestyle. The use of combined strategies is suggested in order to increase the individuals’ adherence to the treatment. Gaps point to the valorization of dialogic relationships for integrated and more efficacious health practices.

  17. Behavioral Economics Matters for HIV Research: The Impact of Behavioral Biases on Adherence to Antiretrovirals (ARVs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Stecher, Chad

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral economics (BE) has been used to study a number of health behaviors such as smoking and drug use, but there is little knowledge of how these insights relate to HIV prevention and care. We present novel evidence on the prevalence of the common behavioral decision-making errors of present-bias, overoptimism, and information salience among 155 Ugandan HIV patients, and analyze their association with subsequent medication adherence. 36 % of study participants are classified as present-biased, 21 % as overoptimistic, and 34 % as having salient HIV information. Patients displaying present-bias were 13 % points (p = 0.006) less likely to have adherence rates above 90 %, overoptimistic clients were 9 % points (p = 0.04) less likely, and those not having salient HIV information were 17 % points (p behavioral biases and the associated suboptimal adherence.

  18. Barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence and plasma HIV RNA suppression among AIDS clinical trials group study participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Neilands, Torsten B; Vittinghoff, Eric; Johnson, Mallory O; Chesney, Margaret; Cohn, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a secondary data analysis of 11 AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) studies to examine longitudinal associations between 14 self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence barriers (at 12 weeks) and plasma HIV RNA (at 24 weeks) and to discern the relative importance of these barriers in explaining virologic detectability. Studies enrolled from 1997 to 2003 and concluded between 2002 and 2012. We included 1496 (54.2% of the original sample) with complete data. The most commonly selected barriers were "away from home" (21.9%), "simply forgot" (19.6%), "change in daily routine" (19.5%), and "fell asleep/slept through dosing time" (18.9%). In bivariate analyses, "too many pills to take" (OR=0.43, ppills at specified time" (OR=0.71, p=0.04) were associated with a lower odds of an undetectable HIV RNA. "Too many pills to take," "wanted to avoid side effects," "felt drug was toxic/harmful," "felt sick/ill,", and "felt depressed/overwhelmed" had the highest relative importance in explaining virologic detectability. "Simply forgot" was not associated with HIV RNA (OR=0.99, p=0.95) and was ninth in its relative importance. Adherence interventions should prioritize barriers with highest importance in explaining virologic outcomes rather than focusing on more commonly reported barriers.

  19. Financial stress is associated with reduced treatment adherence in HIV-infected adults in a resource-rich setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, J; Beardsworth, G; Lavie, E; MacRae, K; Carr, A

    2013-02-01

    Financial stress has been identified as a barrier to antiretroviral adherence, but only in resource- limited settings. Almost half of HIV-infected Australian adults earn no regular income and, despite highly subsidised antiretroviral therapy and universal health care, 3% of HIV-infected Australians cease antiretroviral therapy each year. We studied the relationship between financial stress and treatment adherence in a resource-rich setting. Out-patients attending the HIV clinic at St Vincent's Hospital between November 2010 and May 2011 were invited to complete an anonymous survey including questions relating to costs and adherence. Of 335 HIV-infected patients (95.8% male; mean age 52 years; hepatitis coinfection 9.2%), 65 patients (19.6%) stated that it was difficult or very difficult to meet pharmacy dispensing costs, 49 (14.6%) reported that they had delayed purchasing medication because of pharmacy costs, and 30 (9.0%) reported that they had ceased medication because of pharmacy costs. Of the 65 patients with difficulties meeting pharmacy costs, 19 (29.2%) had ceased medication vs. 11 (4.1%) of the remaining 270 patients (P travel costs to the clinic. Treatment cessation and interruption were both independently associated with difficulty meeting both pharmacy and clinic travel costs. Only 4.9% had been asked if they were having difficulty paying for medication. These are the first data to show that pharmacy dispensing and clinic travel costs may affect treatment adherence in a resource-rich setting. Patients should be asked if financial stress is limiting their treatment adherence. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  20. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  1. The effect of reminder systems on patients' adherence to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenerty SD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah D Fenerty1, Cameron West1, Scott A Davis1, Sebastian G Kaplan3, Steven R Feldman1,2,41Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USABackground: Patient adherence is an important component of the treatment of chronic disease. An understanding of patient adherence and its modulating factors is necessary to correctly interpret treatment efficacy and barriers to therapeutic success.Purpose: This meta-analysis aims to systematically review published randomized controlled trials of reminder interventions to assist patient adherence to prescribed medications.Methods: A Medline search was performed for randomized controlled trials published between 1968 and June 2011, which studied the effect of reminder-based interventions on adherence to self-administered daily medications.Results: Eleven published randomized controlled trials were found between 1999 and 2009 which measured adherence to a daily medication in a group receiving reminder interventions compared to controls receiving no reminders. Medication adherence was measured as the number of doses taken compared to the number prescribed within a set period of time. Meta-analysis showed a statistically significant increase in adherence in groups receiving a reminder intervention compared to controls (66.61% versus 54.71%, 95% CI for mean: 0.8% to 22.4%. Self-reported and electronically monitored adherence rates did not significantly differ (68.04% versus 63.67%, P = 1.0. Eight of eleven studies showed a statistically significant increase in adherence for at least one of the reminder group arms compared to the control groups receiving no reminder intervention.Limitations: The data are limited by imperfect measures of adherence due to variability in data collection methods. It is also likely

  2. Behavioral Economics Matters for HIV Research: The Impact of Behavioral Biases on Adherence to Antiretrovirals (ARVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral economics (BE) has been used to study a number of health behaviors such as smoking and drug use, but there is little knowledge of how these insights relate to HIV prevention and care. We present novel evidence on the prevalence of the common behavioral decision-making errors of present-bias, overoptimism, and information salience among 155 Ugandan HIV patients, and analyze their association with subsequent medication adherence. 36 % of study participants are classified as present-biased, 21 % as overoptimistic, and 34 % as having salient HIV information. Patients displaying present-bias were 13 % points (p = 0.006) less likely to have adherence rates above 90 %, overoptimistic clients were 9 % points (p = 0.04) less likely, and those not having salient HIV information were 17 % points (p < 0.001) less likely. These findings indicate that BE may be used to screen for future adherence problems and to better design and target interventions addressing these behavioral biases and the associated suboptimal adherence. PMID:25987190

  3. 'I was thinking too much': experiences of HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Bere, Tarisai; Macpherson, Kirsty; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Potter, Lucy; Makadzange, Tariro; Munjoma, Ronald; Marufu, Marshall; Araya, Ricardo; Safren, Steven; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Chibanda, Dixon; Abas, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    To document the lived experiences of people with both poor mental health and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in high HIV prevalence settings. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 (female = 31) HIV-positive adults who scored above the cut-point on a locally validated scale for common mental disorders (CMDs). Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants with evidence of poor adherence. Six additional key informant interviews (female = 6) were conducted with healthcare workers. Data were collected and analysed inductively by an interdisciplinary coding team. The major challenges faced by participants were stressors (poverty, stigma, marital problems) and symptoms of CMDs ('thinking too much', changes to appetite and sleep, 'burdened heart' and low energy levels). Thinking too much, which appears closely related to rumination, was the symptom with the greatest negative impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults with CMDs. In turn, thinking too much was commonly triggered by the stressors faced by people living with HIV/AIDS, especially poverty. Finally, participants desired private counselling, access to income-generating activities and family engagement in mental health care. Better understanding of the local expression of mental disorders and of underlying stressors can inform the development of culturally sensitive interventions to reduce CMDs and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergill B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bav Shergill,1 Simon Zokaie,2 Alison J Carr3 1Department of Dermatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Elm Grove, Brighton, UK; 2Leo Pharma, Princes Risborough, 3Hamell, London, UK Background: There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK. Objectives: To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results: This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305 of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01: 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a qualitative study with physicians from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Aderência à terapia anti-retroviral: um estudo qualitativo com médicos no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Malta

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Brazil provides free antiretroviral (ARV therapy to some 150,000 individuals living with HIV/ AIDS. ARV regimens require optimal adherence to achieve undetectable viral loads and to avoid viral resistance. Physicians play a key role to foster ARV adherence, but until now little is known about the communication between physicians/ people living with HIV/AIDS in this setting. In-depth interviews were conducted with 40 physicians treating people living with HIV/AIDS at six public reference centers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Interview topics included: experiences in the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS, relationship and dialogue with patients, barriers/facilitators to adherence, and effectiveness of available services. Barriers to ARV adherence were mainly related to the low quality of patient-provider relationship. Other barriers were related to "chaotic" patients' lifestyles, and inadequate knowledge and/or negative beliefs about HIV/AIDS and ARV effectiveness. It is necessary to improve networking between services, establish agile referral systems, and improve health professionals' integration. These structural changes could contribute to improved adherence, resulting in improved quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS.O Brasil fornece gratuitamente terapia anti-retroviral (ARV para cerca de 150 mil pessoas vivendo com HIV/ AIDS. A terapia ARV requer aderência ótima, visando alcançar carga viral indetectável e evitar resistência viral. Os médicos desempenham papel central quanto à aderência à ARV, mas há escassa informação sobre a comunicação entre médicos/pessoas vivendo com HIV/ AIDS. Entrevistas em profundidade foram realizadas com 40 médicos assistentes de seis hospitais de referência do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Tópicos da entrevista incluíram: experiências relativas ao tratamento de pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS, relacionamento/diálogo com pacientes, barreiras/facilitadores para aderência aos servi

  6. [Improving treatment adherence in kidney transplantation: a major challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michèle

    2014-06-01

    The kidney transplant recipient is faced not only with the perspective of taking immunosuppressive drugs lifelong, but also the possibility of other long-term treatments prescribed for preexisting conditions, complications, or side effects. Proper management, and most importantly patient adherence, can become a complex challenge. Here we recall current definitions and describe methods for measuring treatment adherence, followed by a discussion on the prevalence of non-adherence in kidney transplant recipients, its effect on graft survival, and factors predictive of non-adherence. Ways of improving adherence are examined, leading to the conviction that helping patients take their medications regularly would probably have a greater impact on graft survival than marketing a new immunosuppressive agent. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... SUMMARY. Objectives: To evaluate available and desired sources and types of social-support among hypertensive and type-2- diabetes (T2D) patients. Associations of medication adherence and clinical outcome with access to most available social-support and medicine affordability were subsequently ...

  8. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Carly; Cluver, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents living in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are disproportionately burdened by the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Maintaining medication adherence is vital to ensuring that adolescents living with HIV/AIDS receive the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), although this group faces unique challenges to adherence. Knowledge of the factors influencing adherence among people during this unique developmental period is needed to develop more targeted and effective adherence-promoting strategies. This systematic review summarizes the literature on quantitative observational studies examining correlates, including risk and resilience-promoting factors, of ART adherence among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in LMICs. A systematic search of major electronic databases, conference-specific databases, gray literature, and reference lists of relevant reviews and documents was conducted in May 2014. Included studies examined relationships between at least one factor and ART adherence as an outcome and were conducted in primarily an adolescent population (age 10-19) in LMICs. The search identified 7948 unique citations from which 15 studies fit the inclusion criteria. These 15 studies identified 35 factors significantly associated with ART adherence representing a total of 4363 participants across nine different LMICs. Relevant studies revealed few consistent relationships between measured factors and adherence while highlighting potentially important themes for ART adherence including the impact of (1) adolescent factors such as gender and knowledge of serostatus, (2) family structure, (3) the burdensome ART regimens, route of administration, and attitudes about medication, and (4) health care and environmental factors, such as rural versus urban location and missed clinic appointments. Rates of adherence across studies ranged from 16% to 99%. This review identifies unique factors significantly related to ART adherence among adolescents living in LMICs. More

  9. Strategies to improve HIV treatment adherence in developed countries: clinical management at the individual level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enriquez M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maithe Enriquez¹, David S McKinsey²¹School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Division of Infectious Diseases, Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill, ²School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Kansas and Division of Infectious Diseases, Research Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, USAAbstract: Remarkable advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease have been blunted by widespread suboptimal adherence (ie, nonadherence, which has emerged as a major barrier to achieving the primary goal of antiretroviral (ARV therapy: suppression of HIV viral load. Nonsuppressed HIV viral load is associated with drug resistance, increased morbidity and mortality, and a higher risk of person-to-person HIV transmission. For HIV-infected individuals who are failing HIV treatment due to nonadherence, becoming adherent is a life-saving behavior change. However, overcoming nonadherence is one of the most daunting challenges in the successful management of HIV disease. The purpose of this paper is to provide clinicians with a better understanding of nonadherence to ARV treatment and to review the various factors that have been associated with either adherence or nonadherence. Strategies are presented that may help the nonadherent individual become ready to take HIV medications as prescribed.Keywords: noncompliance, treatment failure, AIDS

  10. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L.S. Cruz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL < 50 copies/mL. Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VL < 50 copies/mL. In the univariate analyses, HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection, lower caregiver scores for anxiety, and higher scores in physical and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL < 50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01. Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89 and median interval between pharmacy visits < 33 days (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98 were independently associated with VL < 50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19 and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50 were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence.

  11. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria L S; Cardoso, Claudete A A; Darmont, Mariana Q; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D; D'Al Fabbro, Marcia M; Fonseca, Rosana; Bellido, Jaime G; Monteiro, Simone S; Bastos, Francisco I

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL)Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VLpsychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL<50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01). Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR=0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89) and median interval between pharmacy visits<33 days (OR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98) were independently associated with VL<50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR=2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19) and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR=2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50) were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Adherence to treatment in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucks, Romola S.; Hawkins, Katharine; Skinner, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    ObjectivesThis study was conducted to explore the relationships between illness perceptions, emotional representations, treatment beliefs and reported adherence in adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). MethodsThirty-eight adolescents completed questionnaires assessing their perceptions of CF...

  13. Soaring antiretroviral prices, TRIPS and TRIPS flexibilities: a burning issue for antiretroviral treatment scale-up in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Fabienne; d'almeida, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    The achievement of significant reductions in the price of antiretroviral drugs constitutes one of the main economic pillars of antiretroviral treatment scale-up in developing countries. Today this economic pillar is threatened. The prohibitive prices of newer first-line and second-line regimens have created a watershed in relation to the prices of earlier first-line treatments. These price increases are closely related to the World Trade Organization's Agreement on the trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS) that imposes an important barrier to generic competition. Intellectual property flexibilities foreseen by the TRIPS agreement allow the manufacture and supply of affordable generic versions of new generations of antiretroviral under certain conditions. However, the capacity to supply a specified list of generics under such conditions is tight and the utilization of such flexibilities in their current form remains complex and unattractive. The TRIPS agreement currently constitutes a significant barrier to providing access to new antiretroviral at affordable prices in developing countries. If the debate on initiatives for increased flexibility of intellectual property rights does not become more extensive or obtain the overwhelming support of the international community, serious consequences are to be expected in terms of the fight against AIDS in most of the developing countries.

  14. Effects of nutritional supplementation for HIV patients starting antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Abdissa, Alemseged; Kæstel, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of lipid based nutritional supplements with either whey or soy protein in patients with HIV during the first three months of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to explore effects of timing by comparing supplementation at the start of ART and after three months...... delay. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Three public ART facilities in Jimma, Oromia region, Ethiopia. Participants: Adults with HIV eligible for ART with body mass index (BMI) >16. Intervention: Daily supplementation with 200 g (4600 kJ) of supplement containing whey or soy during either...... with undetectable viral load at three months. Patients receiving delayed supplementation had higher weight gain but lower gains in functional outcomes. Conclusions: Lipid based nutritional supplements improved gain of weight, lean body mass, and grip strength in patients with HIV starting ART. Supplements...

  15. Assessing treatment motivation among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy: a multidimensional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Eric; McKirnan, David J; Cervone, Daniel; Johnson, Matthew S; Sandfort, Theo G M

    2012-01-01

    Using multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis, this study examined how patient conceptualisations of treatment motivation compare with theoretically based assumptions used in current assessment approaches. Patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS (n=39) rated for similarity between all possible pairings of 23 treatment descriptions, including descriptors of intrinsic, extrinsic, approach and avoidance motivation. MDS analyses revealed that patient perceptions of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations often differ from those based on definitions derived from common interpretations of self-determination theory. Findings also showed that patients reported motivation for avoiding treatment when they associated their medication regimens with side effects and other negatively valenced outcomes. The study describes new applications of MDS in assessing how patients perceive the relationship between treatment behaviours and specific forms of motivation, such as intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. In addition, the study suggests how MDS may be used to develop behavioural strategies aimed at helping patients follow their regimens consistently by identifying treatment conceptualisations and contexts that facilitate or impede adherence.

  16. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2010 Recommendations of the International AIDS Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Aberg, Judith A.; Cahn, Pedro; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Telenti, Amalio; Gatell, José M.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hammer, Scott M.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Reiss, Peter; Richman, Douglas D.; Volberding, Paul A.; Yeni, Patrick; Schooley, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Context Recent data regarding the consequences of untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the expansion of treatment choices for antiretroviral-naive and antiretroviral-experienced patients warrant an update of the International AIDS Society-USA guidelines for the use of

  17. Adherence to On-Time ART Drug Pick-Up and Its Association with CD4 Changes and Clinical Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Adults on First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Nigerian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oladele, Edward A; Badru, Titilope; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Oqua, Dorothy; Khamofu, Hadiza; Adebayo, Olufunso; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto Nzapfurundi

    2017-02-01

    Medication adherence is a major determinant of antiretroviral treatment (ART) success. Promptness in medication refill pick-ups may give an indication of medication adherence. This study determined medication refill adherence among HIV positive patients on ART and its association with treatment outcomes in HIV treatment centers in Nigeria. This retrospective multi-center cohort study involved a review of ART refill records for 3534 HIV-positive patients aged 18-60 years who initiated first-line ART between January 2008 and December 2009 and were on therapy for ≥18 months after ART initiation. Drug refill records of these patients for 10 consecutive refill visits after ART initiation were analyzed. The first ten consecutive refill appointment-keeping rates after ART initiation ranged from 64.3 % to 76.1 % which decreased with successive visits. Altogether, 743 (21.1 %) patients were deemed adherent, meaning they picked up their drugs within 7 days of the drug refill appointment date on at least nine out of ten refill visits. The adherent group of patients had a mean CD4 cells increase of 206 ± 6.1 cells/dl after 12 months of ART compared to 186 ± 7.1 cells/dl reported among the nonadherent group (p = 0.0145). The proportion of patients in the adherent category who showed no OIs after 12 months on ART (81 %) was significantly higher when compared to the proportion in the non-adherent category (23.5 %), (p = 0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that the odds of being adherent was 2-3 times more in patients who had a baseline CD4 count of less than 200 cells/dl compared to those with a baseline CD4 of >350 cells/dl. (AOR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.62-3.66). In addition, for patients with baseline CD4 cell count of 201-350 cells/dl, the odds of being adherent was found to be 1.9 compared to those with baseline CD4 of greater than 350 cells/dl (AOR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.27-2.94). Pharmacy refill data can serve as an adherence measure. Adherence to on-time drug

  18. Trends in antiretroviral treatment use and treatment response in three Australian states in the first decade of combination antiretroviral treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falster, Kathleen; Gelgor, Linda; Shaik, Ansari; Zablotska, Iryna; Prestage, Garrett; Grierson, Jeffrey; Thorpe, Rachel; Pitts, Marian; Anderson, Jonathon; Chuah, John; Mulhall, Brian; Petoumenos, Kathy; Kelleher, Anthony; Law, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine if there were any differences in antiretroviral treatment (ART) use across the three eastern states of Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland, during the period 1997 to 2006. Methods We used data from a clinic-based cohort, the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD), to determine the proportion of HIV-infected patients on ART in selected clinics in each state and the proportion of treated patients with an undetectable viral load. Data from the national Highly Specialised Drugs program and AHOD was used to estimate total numbers of individuals on ART and the proportion of individuals living with HIV on ART nationally and by state. Data from the HIV Futures Survey and the Gay Community Periodic Survey (GCPS) were used to determine the proportion of community-based men who have sex with men (MSM) on ART. The proportion of patients with primary HIV infection (PHI) who commenced ART within one year of diagnosis was obtained from the Acute Infection and Early Disease Research Program (AIEDRP) CORE01 protocol and Primary HIV and Early Disease Research: Australian cohort (PHAEDRA) cohorts. Results We estimated that the numbers of individuals on ART increased from 3,181 to 4,553 in NSW, 1,309 to 1,926 in Victoria and 809 to 1615 in Queensland between 2000 and 2006. However, these numbers may reflect a lower proportion of individuals living with HIV on ART in NSW compared to the other states (37% compared to 49 and 55% in 2000). We found similar proportions of HIV-positive MSM participants were on ART in all three states over the study period in the clinic-based AHOD cohort (81-92%) and two large, community based surveys in Australia (69-85% and 49-83%) . Similar proportions of treated patients had an undetectable viral load across the three states, with a consistently increasing trend over time observed in all states. We found that more PHI patients commenced treatment in the first year following HIV diagnosis in NSW compared to

  19. Adherence to anti-retroviral therapy & factors associated with it: A community based cross-sectional study from West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobha Pahari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Failure to adhere to anti-retroviral therapy (ART can lead to a range of unfavourable consequences impacting upon people living with HIV (PLH and society. It is, therefore, paramount that ART adherence is measured in a reliable manner and factors associated with adherence are identified. Lack of such data from West Bengal necessitated undertaking the current study. Methods: Participants were included during August-October, 2011 from three Drop-In-Centres (DICs from the three districts of West Bengal, India. ART-adherence was calculated by using formula based on pill-count and records collected from ART-card in possession of each of the 128 consenting adult PLH. Information on self-reported adherence, socio-demography, and adherence influencing issues was also collected through interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: Of the 128 PLH, 99 (77% and 93 (73% PLH had ≥90 per cent and ≥95 per cent adherence, respectively to ART. Conversely, subjective reporting captured much higher proportion of PLH as ′well adherent′; a finding having implications for ongoing ART programme. Factors, independently associated with poor adherence (<90%, were ′7 th to 12 th month period of ART intake′ (adjusted OR=9.5; 90% CI 1.9 - 47.3; p0 =0.02 and ′non-disclosure of HIV status to family members′ (adjusted OR=4; 90% CI 1.3 - 13; P=0.05. Results at 95 per cent adherence cut-off were similar. Interpretation & conclusions: Enabling environment, which would encourage people to disclose their HIV status and in turn seek adherence partners from families and beyond and ongoing adherence-counselling appear to be important issues in the programme. Relevance of these study findings in wider context is conceivable.

  20. Influence of Spirituality and Religion on Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Adult HIV/AIDS Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agam Ebaji Ayuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a chronic medical illness such as Human Immune Deficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS may be the time when people turn to the Sacred through spirituality and religion. HIV is a chronic illness that requires strict adherence to medication regimens that may be influenced by spirituality/religion. This study was aimed at finding the association between spirituality/religion and adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in adult HIV/AIDS patients. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 370 patients. Adherence was measured using an adapted adult AIDS clinical trial group (AACTG and visual analogue scale (VAS tools. Spirituality was assessed using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality Expanded (FACIT-Sp-Ex scale, religiosity with Duke University Religion index (DUREL, and religious coping with Brief Religious Coping (RCOPE scale. Adherence rates were 86.2 and 43.8% using AACTG and VAS tools, respectively. Statistical significant correlation was found between spirituality and adherence to HAART (r = 0.265; p = 0.00. Also, significant correlation was found between positive religious coping and adherence (r = 0.15, p = 0.003. Odds ratio indicated that female respondents were 1.6 times more likely to be adherent, compared with males. Similarly, every unit rise in spirituality score yielded a 1.3 times increased likelihood of adherence to HAART on multiple logistic regression of adherence to HAART with relevant predictors. Both spirituality and positive religious coping have positive influence on optimal adherence. Therefore, the training of health care personnel to assess and provide spiritual care and involvement of chaplains/religious leaders is advocated for improved adherence.

  1. Antiretroviral Therapy Uptake, Attrition, Adherence and Outcomes among HIV-Infected Female Sex Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Elisa; Mishra, Sharmistha; Vickerman, Peter; Pickles, Michael; Gilks, Charles; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to characterize the antiretroviral therapy (ART) cascade among female sex workers (FSWs) globally. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE in March 2014 to identify studies reporting on ART uptake, attrition, adherence, and outcomes (viral suppression or CD4 count improvements) among HIV-infected FSWs globally. When possible, available estimates were pooled using random effects meta-analyses (with heterogeneity assessed using Cochran's Q test and I2 statistic). Results 39 studies, reporting on 21 different FSW study populations in Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Central America and the Caribbean, were included. Current ART use among HIV-infected FSWs was 38% (95% CI: 29%–48%, I2 = 96%, 15 studies), and estimates were similar between high-, and low- and middle-income countries. Ever ART use among HIV-infected FSWs was greater in high-income countries (80%; 95% CI: 48%–94%, I2 = 70%, 2 studies) compared to low- and middle-income countries (36%; 95% CI: 7%–81%, I2 = 99%, 3 studies). Loss to follow-up after ART initiation was 6% (95% CI: 3%–11%, I2 = 0%, 3 studies) and death after ART initiation was 6% (95% CI: 3%–11%, I2 = 0%, 3 studies). The fraction adherent to ≥95% of prescribed pills was 76% (95% CI: 68%–83%, I2 = 36%, 4 studies), and 57% (95% CI: 46%–68%, I2 = 82%, 4 studies) of FSWs on ART were virally suppressed. Median gains in CD4 count after 6 to 36 months on ART, ranged between 103 and 241 cells/mm3 (4 studies). Conclusions Despite global increases in ART coverage, there is a concerning lack of published data on HIV treatment for FSWs. Available data suggest that FSWs can achieve levels of ART uptake, retention, adherence, and treatment response comparable to that seen among women in the general population, but these data are from only a few research settings. More routine programme data on HIV treatment among FSWs across settings should be collected and

  2. Can a digital medicine system improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Ostuzzi, G

    2018-06-01

    A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice.

  3. A simple self-reported adherence tool as a predictor of viral rebound in people with viral suppression on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J L; Gardner, E M; Esser, S; Mannheimer, S B; Lifson, A R; Telzak, E E; Phillips, A N

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological outcomes in the multinational Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study. Eligible participants were from the continuous ART arm and had at least one viral load (VL) ≤ 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL and a subsequent VL value (VL pair). Self-reported adherence was measured at each visit using a five-point Likert scale which employed a 7-day recall. High adherence was defined as taking 'all pills every day' (level 1) for every regimen component; all others had suboptimal adherence (levels 2 - 5). In individuals with VL suppression (≤ 50 copies/mL), the association between adherence (at the time of VL suppression) and VL rebound (> 200 copies/mL at next visit) was assessed using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. A total of 10 761 sets of VL pairs from 1986 participants were included in the study. For 1220 (11%) VL pairs, adherence was suboptimal. For 507 VL pairs (5%), VL rebound occurred. The risk of rebound generally increased as adherence decreased: 4.2% for level 1, 7.7% for level 2, 16.3% for level 3, 9.4% for level 4 and 12.9% for level 5. In multivariable analysis, suboptimal adherence at the time of suppression was associated with a 50% increased odds of experiencing subsequent VL rebound [odds ratio (OR) 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.92; P = 0.0023], compared with high adherence. Self-reported suboptimal adherence in people with VL suppression is associated with an increased risk of VL rebound. Our findings highlight the importance of continued adherence counselling, even in people with VL suppression, and to ensure that people with HIV infection maintain excellent adherence in order to minimize the risk of VL rebound. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  4. Creating Effective Mobile Phone Apps to Optimize Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: Perspectives From Stimulant-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Keith J; Alemu, Dawit; Danh, Thu; Baker, Jason V; Carrico, Adam W

    2016-04-15

    The use of stimulant drugs among men who have sex with men (MSM) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with decreased odds of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and elevated risk of forward HIV transmission. Advancing tailored and innovative mobile phone-based ART adherence app interventions for stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM requires greater understanding of their needs and preferences in this emerging area. The purpose of this study is to (1) assess reasons that stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM download and sustain their use of mobile phone apps in general, and (2) obtain feedback on features and functions that these men prefer in a mobile phone app to optimize their ART adherence. Focus groups were conducted with stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM (24-57 years of age; mostly non-Hispanic white; 42% once a week or more frequent stimulant drug use) in San Francisco and Minneapolis. Our aim was to explore the mobile phone app features and functions that they considered when deciding to download and sustain their use of general apps over time, as well as specific features and functions that they would like to see incorporated into an ART adherence mobile app. Focus groups were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied to transcripts using line-by-line open coding and organizing codes into meaningful themes. Men reported that they currently had a variety of health and wellness, social media and networking, gaming and entertainment, and utility apps on their mobile phones. Downloading apps to their mobile phones was influenced by the cost of the app, recommendations by a trusted source, and the time it takes to download. In addition, downloading and sustained use of apps was more likely to occur when men had control over most features of the app and apps were perceived to be useful, engaging, secure, and credible. Participants suggested that ART adherence mobile phone apps include social networking features, connections

  5. Adherence to treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arturi, Pablo; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Sommerfleck, Fernando; Buschiazzo, Emilio; Ledesma, César; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to determine the level of adherence to treatment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and to identify possible factors associated to lack of adherence. We included consecutive AS patients (NY modified criteria). Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected. Patients answered auto-reported questionnaires: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life, and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (ACR'87 criteria) were assessed as the control group. The adherence of the studied groups to medical treatment and exercises was measured by means of two questionnaires: Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology (CQR) and Exercise Attitude Questionnaire-18 (EAQ-18). The study included 59 patients with AS and 53 patients with RA. Of the AS patients, 43 (72.9%) were male, median age 47 years (interquartile range (IQR) 33-57) and median disease duration of 120 months (IQR 33-57). Of the RA patients, 37 (69.8%) were female, had a median age of 56 years (IQR 43.5-60) and a median disease duration of 156 months (IQR 96-288). There were no significant differences in the results of the adherence questionnaires between both groups, with a total median of 68.42 for the CQR in both groups and of 40.7 in AS vs. 42.6 in RA for the EAQ. When dichotomizing patients as adherent and non-adherent, taking as good adherence a cut value in the CQR and EAQ higher than 60, adherence to pharmacological treatment was significantly higher in RA vs. AS (92.5 vs. 74.6%, p = 0.01) and there were no differences in the EAQ. On the uni- and multivariate analysis, lack of adherence to treatment was not associated to sex, age, disease duration, education, health insurance, depressive status, and disease activity parameters in neither group of patients. AS have an acceptable adherence to pharmacological treatment, although it is lower than RA

  6. HIV-Positive Women Taking Lifelong Antiretroviral Therapy Report Better Adherence Than Women Taking Short-Course Prophylaxis During and After Pregnancy Under PMTCT Program Option A in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampanda, Karen M; Abuogi, Lisa L; Ahmed, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    HIV-positive women's adherence to antiretrovirals is critical for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We aimed to establish if mothers taking triple lifelong antiretroviral therapy report higher adherence compared to mothers taking short-course prophylaxis under Option A in Lusaka, Zambia. In this clinic-based cross-sectional study, we interviewed 320 HIV-positive mothers at a large public health facility in Lusaka in 2014. Participants reported adherence using a visual analog scale. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine the adjusted odds of adherence by mother's prescribed regimen. Women taking lifelong triple antiretroviral therapy report higher adjusted odds of adherence during pregnancy, postpartum, and to giving the infant prophylaxis compared to women to women taking short-course prophylaxis. Women on lifelong therapy may have better adherence compared to women on short course prophylaxis because they knew their positive status for longer or were symptomatic with HIV-related disease. The lifelong therapy regimen may be easier for women to follow, particularly because they are required to give the infant prophylaxis for a shorter duration of time. Our results indicate that lifelong triple antiretroviral therapy has the potential to promote better drug adherence during and after pregnancy among women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, compared to short-course antiretroviral regimens.

  7. Efficacy of interventions in improving highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and HIV-1 RNA viral load. A meta-analytic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jane M; Pearson, Cynthia R; Pantalone, David W; Marks, Gary; Crepaz, Nicole

    2006-12-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is generally suboptimal, limiting the effectiveness of HAART. This meta-analytic review examined whether behavioral interventions addressing HAART adherence are successful in increasing the likelihood of a patient attaining 95% adherence or an undetectable HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL). We searched electronic databases from January 1996 to September 2005, consulted with experts in the field, and hand searched reference sections from relevant articles. Nineteen studies (with a total of 1839 participants) met the selection criteria of describing a randomized controlled trial among adults evaluating a behavioral intervention with HAART adherence or VL as an outcome. Random-effects models indicated that across studies, participants in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to achieve 95% adherence (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16 to 1.94); the effect was nearly significant for undetectable VL (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 0.99 to 1.59). The intervention effect for 95% adherence was significantly stronger in studies that used recall periods of 2 weeks or 1 month (vs. adherence intervention strategies were shown to be successful, but more research is needed to identify the most efficacious intervention components and the best methods for implementing them in real-world settings with limited resources.

  8. Trends and determining factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon: a systematic review and analysis of the CAMPS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Yondo, David; Noorduyn, Stephen; Smieja, Marek; Dolovich, Lisa

    2012-12-19

    The benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) cannot be experienced if they are not taken as prescribed. Yet, not all causes of non-adherence are dependent on the patient. Having to pay for medication reduces adherence rates. Non- adherence has severe public health implications which must be addressed locally and globally. This paper seeks to describe the trends in adherence rates reported in Cameroon and to investigate the determinants of adherence to ART in the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS (CAMPS) trial. We conducted a systematic review of electronic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE and PSYCINFO) for publications on adherence to ART in Cameroon (from January 1999 to May 2012) and described the trend in reported adherence rates and the factors associated with adherence. Data were extracted in duplicate. We used multivariable analyses on the baseline data for 200 participants in the CAMPS trial to determine the factors associated with adherence in four models using different measures of adherence (more than 90% or 95% on the visual analogue scale, no missed doses and a composite measure: 100% on the visual analogue scale, no missed doses and all pills taken on time). We identified nine studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Adherence to ART in Cameroon has risen steadily between 2000 and 2010, corresponding to reductions in the cost of medication. The factors associated with adherence to ART in Cameroon are grouped into patient, medication and disease related factors. We also identified factors related to the health system and the patient-provider relationship. In the CAMPS trial, education, side effects experienced and number of reminder methods were found to improve adherence, but only using multiple reminder methods was associated with better adherence in all the regression models (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 4.11, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.89, 8.93; pART is an important aspect of ensuring adequate adherence rates. Using multiple

  9. [THE IMPORTANCE OF PROPER ADHERENCE TO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix Comellas, Eva Maria; Force Sanmartín, Enriqueta; Rozas Quesada, Librada; Noguera Julian, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. This involves a serious public health problem. Adherence to TB treatment is a cornerstone for the control of this disease. Globally, there are major differences between countries as to the prevalence, incidence and mortality tuberculosis. Spain has a incidence rate higher than that of other countries in their socio-economic background. Treatment is prolonged, with significant side effects. Adherence to treatment is essential to be effective, prevent drug resistance and disease control. Children are more vulnerable to developing the disease than the rest of the population. Several direct and indirect methods measure the adherence to treatment, but none is ideal. Some socio-demographic risk factors that influence on adherence are described (immigration...). In addition, there are another more specific child factors to have been add. The literature reviewed highlights the importance of proper monitoring of patients to increase adherence to TB treatment. The role of the nurse and their interventions are very important.

  10. Socio-economic status and adherence to tuberculosis treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, P; Hansen, E H; Sabroe, S

    2005-01-01

    --living conditions, literacy and difficulty in financing treatment--were not found to be significantly associated with non-adherence when adjusted for other risk factors in the multivariate regression model. CONCLUSION: Low socio-economic status and particularly lack of money are important risk factors for non...... analysis showed that the risk of non-adherence to TB treatment was significantly associated with unemployment (odds ratio [OR] 9.2), low status occupation (OR 4.4), low annual income (OR 5.4), and cost of travel to the TB treatment facility (OR 3.0). Factors significant in the bivariate analyses...

  11. "It is not that I forget, it's just that I don't want other people to know": barriers to and strategies for adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV patients in Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tam, Vu; Pharris, Anastasia; Thorson, Anna; Alfven, Tobias; Larsson, Mattias

    2011-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) started to become more widely available in Vietnam in 2005. However, up to now, very little is known about factors influencing ART adherence among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Vietnam. This qualitative study aimed to describe factors influencing ART adherence among PLHIV in a northern province in Vietnam, and to explore possibilities of home delivery of ART. Forty-eight participants (36 men and 12 women), including patients on ART and their relatives, were divided in seven focus group discussions. The topics discussed included: adherence obstacles encountered during ART, methods patients used to enhance adherence, treatment support structures, and attitudes toward home delivery of ART. All interviews were audio-recorded, then transcribed in Vietnamese. Manual manifest and latent content analysis was applied for data analysis in order to elucidate the presence of, meaning of, and relationships between concepts in the text. Stigma was identified as a strong barrier to ART adherence, as patients feared that taking medications in the presence of other persons would lead to suspicion or inadvertent disclosure of their HIV status. In addition to desires for non-disclosure influencing PLHIV's adherence, it also shaped their attitudes toward opting for more confidential ways of receiving ART support and care. Home delivery of ART medications was seen as undesirable by participants, who feared that it might increase social stigmatization. Participants wished for more community-based support, preferably from PLHIV who had received sufficient training. Based on the results of this study, an intervention strategy using PLHIV as community-based adherence supporters is currently being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial intervention, including 640 patients in Quang Ninh, Vietnam.

  12. Gaps in the Implementation of Anti-Retroviral Treatment: A Case for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gaps in the Implementation of Anti-Retroviral Treatment: A Case for Addressing Gender and Mental Health Consequences of HIV Positive Individuals. JA Menon, MPS Ngoma, T Nkumbula, R Paul, S Sichimba ...

  13. Neurocognition and quality of life after reinitiating antiretroviral therapy in children randomized to planned treatment interruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Melvin, Diane; Amador, Jose T. R.; Childs, Tristan; Medin, Gabriela; Boscolo, Valentina; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Montero, Samuel; Gibb, Diana M.; Aboulker, J. -P.; Babiker, A.; Belfrage, E.; Bernardi, S.; Bologna, R.; Burger, D.; Butler, K.; Castelli-Gattinara, G.; Castro, H.; Clayden, P.; Compagnucci, A.; Cressey, T.; Darbyshire, J. H.; Debré, M.; de Groot, R.; della Negra, M.; Di Biagio, A.; de Rossi, A.; Duicelescu, D.; Faye, A.; Giaquinto, C.; Giacomet, V.; Gibb, D. M.; Grosch-Wörner, I.; Hainault, M.; Klein, N.; Lallemant, M.; Levy, J.; Lyall, H.; Marczynska, M.; Marques, L.; Mardarescu, M.; Mellado Peña, M. J.; Nadal, D.; Nastouli, E.; Naver, L.; Niehues, T.; Peckham, C.; Pillay, D.; Popieska, J.; Ramos Amador, J. T.; Rojo Conejo, P.; Rosado, L.; Rosso, R.; Rudin, C.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Sharland, M.; Stevanovic, M.; Thorne, C.; Tovo, P. A.; Tudor-Williams, G.; Turkova, A.; Valerius, N.; Volokha, A.; Walker, A. S.; Welch, S.; Wintergerst, U.; Aboulker, J. P.; Burger, D. M.; Green, H.; Harper, L.; Mofenson, L.; Moye, J.; Saïdi, Y.; Cressey, T. R.; Jacqz-Aigrain, E.; Khoo, S.; Regazzi, M.; Tréluyer, J. M.; Ngo-Giang-Huong, N.; Muñoz Fernandez, M. A.; Hill, C.; Lepage, P.; Pozniak, A.; Vella, S.; Chêne, G.; Vesikari, T.; Hadjou, G.; Léonardo, S.; Riault, Y.; Bleier, J.; Buck, L.; Duong, T.; Farrelly, L.; Forcat, S.; Harrison, L.; Horton, J.; Johnson, D.; Montero, S.; Taylor, C.; Chalermpantmetagul, S.; Peongjakta, R.; Khamjakkaew, W.; Than-in-at, K.; Chailert, S.; Jourdain, G.; Le Coeur, S.; Floret, D.; Costanzo, P.; Le Thi, T. T.; Monpoux, F.; Mellul, S.; Caranta, I.; Boudjoudi, N.; Firtion, G.; Denon, M.; Charlemaine, E.; Picard, F.; Hellier, E.; Heuninck, C.; Damond, F.; Alexandre, G.; Tricoire, J.; Antras, M.; Lachendowier, C.; Nicot, F.; Krivine, A.; Rivaux, D.; Notheis, G.; Strotmann, G.; Schlieben, S.; Rampon, O.; Boscolo, V.; Zanchetta, M.; Ginocchio, F.; Viscoli, C.; Martino, A.; Pontrelli, G.; Baldassar, S.; Concato, C.; Mazza, A.; Rossetti, G.; Dobosz, S.; Oldakowska, A.; Popielska, J.; Kaflik, M.; Stanczak, J.; Stanczack, G.; Dyda, T.; Kruk, M.; González Tomé, M. I.; Delgado García, R.; Fernandez Gonzalez, M. T.; Medin, G.; Mellado Peña, M. José; Martín Fontelos, P.; Garcia Mellado, M. I.; Medina, A. F.; Ascencion, B.; Garcia Bermejo, I.; Navarro Gomez, D. M. L.; Saavedra, J.; Prieto, C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Muñoz-Fernandez, M. A.; Garcia Torre, A.; de José Gómez, M. I.; García Rodriguez, M. C.; Moreno Pérez, D.; Núñez Cuadros, E.; Asensi-Botet, F.; Otero Reigada, C.; Pérez Tamarit, M. D.; Vilalta, R.; Molina Moreno, J. M.; Rainer, Truninger; Schupbach, J.; Rutishauser, M.; Bunupuradah, T.; Butterworth, O.; Phasomsap, C.; Prasitsuebsai, W.; Chuanjaroen, T.; Jupimai, T.; Ubolyam, S.; Phanuphak, P.; Puthanakit, T.; Pancharoen, C.; Mai, Chaing; Kanjanavanit, S.; Namwong, T.; Punsakoon, W.; Payakachat, S.; Chutima, D.; Raksasang, M.; Foster, C.; Hamadache, D.; Campbell, S.; Newbould, C.; Monrose, C.; Abdulla, A.; Walley, A.; Melvin, D.; Patel, D.; Kaye, S.; Seery, P.; Rankin, A.; Wildfire, A.; Novelli, V.; Shingadia, D.; Moshal, K.; Flynn, J.; Clapson, M.; Allen, A.; Spencer, L.; Rackstraw, C.; Ward, B.; Parkes, K.; Depala, M.; Jacobsen, M.; Poulsom, H.; Barkley, L.; Miah, J.; Lurie, P.; Keane, C.; McMaster, P.; Phipps, M.; Orendi, J.; Farmer, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Sodeinde, O.; Wong, S.; Bostock, V.; Heath, Y.; Scott, S.; Gandhi, K.; Lewis, P.; Daglish, J.; Miles, K.; Summerhill, L.; Subramaniam, B.; Weiner, L.; Famiglietti, M.; Rana, S.; Yu, P.; Roa, J.; Puga, A.; Haerry, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the effects of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption on neurocognition and quality of life (QoL) are important for managing unplanned interruptions and planned interruptions in HIV cure research. Design: Children previously randomized to continuous (continuous ART, n =

  14. Assessing self-reported adherence to HIV therapy by questionnaire: the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence) Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Moreno, J.A.; Fumaz, C.R.; Ferrer, M.J.; Tuldra, A.; Rovira, T.; Viladrich, C.; Bayes, R.; Burger, D.M.; Negredo, E.; Clotet, B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and RNA-HIV viral load outcomes has been extensively shown. Although there are different procedures for assessing treatment adherence, there is no ideal method. We present the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence)

  15. Treatment adherence in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Denson, Lee A; Baldassano, Robert N; Hommel, Kevin A

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents' ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers-adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment.

  16. Model of socio-cultural dimensions involved in adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in public health care centers in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuardo Ávila, Valeria; Manriquez Urbina, Jose Manuel; Fajreldin Chuaqui, Valentina; Belmar Prieto, Julieta; Valenzuela Santibáñez, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    In Chile, over 14,000 adults are living with HIV receive antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adequate adherence to HAART has a major impact on survival. There is little consensus on the causes of poor adherence, due to the unique and diverse sociocultural parameters involved in the issue. The objective of this study was to identify sociocultural dimensions that serve as barriers or facilitators to HAART adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Chile. A qualitative study design, with an exploratory followed by a descriptive phase was conducted. The study population consisted of adults living with HIV/AIDS, with and without HAART. A theoretical sample was designed and three gender profiles defined: women, men, and transwomen. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews by anthropologists in seven public health care centers for PLHIV. The model of sociocultural dimensions indicated that factors associated with family, expectations, gender/sexuality, affect, relationship with HIV, HAART, work, social support and networks, and stigma and discrimination influenced adherence, with different patterns among profiles. This study found that adherence is a dynamic category. It is crucial to consider sociocultural factors in developing strategies to improve HAART adherence.

  17. Association of Adolescent- and Caregiver-Reported Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence with HIV Viral Load Among Perinatally-infected South African Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Kirsty; Asafu-Agyei, Nana Akua; Hoare, Jacqueline; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Rabie, Helena; Nuttall, James; Roux, Paul; Stein, Dan J; Zar, Heather J; Myer, Landon

    2018-03-01

    Accurate measurement of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence remains challenging and there are few data assessing the validity of self-reported adherence among perinatally HIV-infected adolescents. We examined adolescent and caregiver reports of adolescent adherence among perinatally-infected adolescents aged 9-14 years in Cape Town, South Africa, and explored factors that may modify associations between reported adherence and elevated viral load (VL). Among 474 adolescents (median age 12.0 years; median duration of ART use 7.5 years), elevated VL and caregiver- and adolescent-report of missed ART doses were common. Elevated VL was particularly prevalent among older, male adolescents. Low-moderate concordance was observed between caregiver and adolescent report. Among adolescents aged ≥ 12 years, caregiver- and adolescent-reported adherence was associated with elevated VL across most items assessed, but few significant associations were observed among adolescents adolescents who require adherence interventions are needed in this context.

  18. Development and assessment of an innovative culturally sensitive educational videotape to improve adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ilene Y; Lawrence, Nicholas V; Struthers, Helen; McIntyre, James; Friedland, Gerald H

    2006-12-01

    The increasing availability of antiretroviral medication (ARV) therapy in the face of limited chronic medication-taking experience among resource-poor South Africans has raised concerns about adequate adherence to these medications. We hypothesized that a culturally sensitive audiovisual patient education program would be of substantial and measurable benefit in increasing patient understanding of the concepts of ARV resistance risk and medication-taking skills. To identify potential barriers to adherence and successful strategies to promote adherence, 6 focus groups with health care providers and HIV-positive adherence counselors were held, resulting in the production of a 17-minute culturally sensitive educational videotape. Basic drug-taking concepts and practical advice on how to improve adherence were presented in the videotape. Thirty-four HIV-positive patients (including 11 ARV-naive patients and 23 ARV-experienced patients) were shown the educational videotape, and their knowledge about medication taking was evaluated by a 24-point pre- and postvideotape questionnaire. On average, the 34 patients gained 2.2 knowledge points (P = 0.021). ARV-naive patients had an average improvement of 3.0 points (P = 0.0028), with most significant gains in the areas of understanding medication-taking strategies and side effects. These preliminary findings indicate that a culturally sensitive educational videotape can improve medication-taking knowledge in South Africa and that further study of the potential efficacy of using media technology to improve individuals' adherence to ARV therapy is warranted.

  19. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-05-13

    In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for improving ART adherence among YMSM. This study used a multiphase, iterative development process to create an ART adherence app for YMSM. The three-phase development process included: (1) theory-based concept development jointly by public health researchers and the technology team, (2) assessment of the target population's ART adherence needs and app preferences and development and testing of a clickable app prototype, and (3) development and usability testing of the final app prototype. The initial theory-based app concept developed in Phase One included medication reminders, daily ART adherence tracking and visualization, ART educational modules, limited virtual interactions with other app users, and gamification elements. In Phase Two, adherence needs, including those related to information, motivation, and behavioral skills, were identified. Participants expressed preferences for an ART adherence app that was informational, interactive, social, and customizable. Based on the findings from Phase Two, additional gaming features were added in Phase Three, including an interactive battle, superhero app theme, and app storyline. Other features were modified to increase interactivity and customization options and integrate the game theme. During usability testing of the final prototype, participants were able to understand and navigate the app successfully and rated the app favorably. An iterative development process was critical for the development of an ART adherence game app that was viewed

  20. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy during and after pregnancy in low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachega, Jean B; Uthman, Olalekan A; Anderson, Jean; Peltzer, Karl; Wampold, Sarah; Cotton, Mark F; Mills, Edward J; Ho, Yuh-Shan; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; McIntyre, James A; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2012-10-23

    To estimate antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence rates during pregnancy and postpartum in high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCI Web of Science, NLM Gateway, and Google scholar databases were searched. We included all studies reporting adherence rates as a primary or secondary outcome among HIV-infected pregnant women. Two independent reviewers extracted data on adherence and study characteristics. A random-effects model was used to pool adherence rates; sensitivity, heterogeneity, and publication bias were assessed. Of 72 eligible articles, 51 studies involving 20 153 HIV-infected pregnant women were included. Most studies were from United States (n =  14, 27%) followed by Kenya (n = 6, 12%), South Africa (n = 5, 10%), and Zambia (n = 5, 10%). The threshold defining good adherence to ART varied across studies (>80, >90, >95, 100%). A pooled analysis of all studies indicated a pooled estimate of 73.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 69.3-77.5%] of pregnant women who had adequate (>80%) ART adherence. The pooled proportion of women with adequate adherence levels was higher during the antepartum (75.7%, 95% CI 71.5-79.7%) than during postpartum (53.0%, 95% CI 32.8-72.7%; P = 0.005). Selected reported barriers for nonadherence included physical, economic and emotional stresses, depression (especially postdelivery), alcohol or drug use, and ART dosing frequency or pill burden. Our findings indicate that only 73.5% of pregnant women achieved optimal ART adherence. Reaching adequate ART adherence levels was a challenge in pregnancy, but especially during the postpartum period. Further research to investigate specific barriers and interventions to address them is urgently needed globally.

  1. Adherence to GOLD guideline treatment recommendations among pulmonologists in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Elif; Guclu, Salih Zeki; Kibar, Isil; Ocal, Ulku; Yilmaz, Veysel; Celik, Onur; Cimen, Filiz; Topcu, Fusun; Orhun, Meltem; Tereci, Hikmet; Konya, Aylin; Ar, Idilhan; Saryal, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    Low adherence to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guideline recommendations has been reported worldwide. There has been no study on the adherence to GOLD guidelines for COPD treatment in Turkey. To investigate the rates of adherence to GOLD 2010 guidelines for COPD treatment among pulmonologists. A multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out in eleven pulmonary outpatient clinics across Turkey. Adherence to GOLD was evaluated through hospital records. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Study included 719 patients (mean age: 62.9±9.7 years; males 85.4%) of whom 16 was classified as GOLD Stage I, 238 as II, 346 as III, and 119 as IV, and only 59.5% received appropriate treatment. Rates of guideline adherence varied across GOLD stages (I, 6.3%; II, 14.7%; III, 84.4%; and IV, 84%). Causes of inappropriate therapies were overtreatment (Stage I, 100% and Stage II, 91.1%), undertreatment (Stage III, 3.3% and Stage IV, 10.9%) and lack of treatment (Stage II, 3.8%; Stage III, 2.3%; and Stage IV, 5.9%). The most preferred regimen (43.4%) was long-acting β2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid-long-acting muscarinic antagonist. Overall, 614 patients (89%) received treatment containing inhaled corticosteroid. Pulmonologists in Turkey have low rates of adherence to GOLD guidelines in COPD treatment. Inappropriateness of therapies was due to overtreatment in early stages and excessive use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in all disease stages.

  2. Correlation of Adherence by Pill Count, Self-report, MEMS and Plasma Drug Levels to Treatment Response Among Women Receiving ARV Therapy for PMTCT in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudhune, Victor; Gvetadze, Roman; Girde, Sonali; Ndivo, Richard; Angira, Frank; Zeh, Clement; Thomas, Timothy; Lecher, Shirley Lee

    2018-03-01

    Success of antiretroviral therapy depends on adherence to effective treatment. We evaluated four adherence methods and their correlation with immunological and virologic response among women receiving PMTCT. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to assess how adherence by pill count (n = 463), self-report (n = 463), MEMS (n = 129) and plasma drug level (n = 89) was associated with viral load suppression within a 6 months period. Longitudinal analysis was performed to determine the correlation of CD4 cell count with each measure of adherence. For all measures of adherence, sustained viral suppression was less likely for participants in the lowest category of adherence. Although CD4 cell count increased substantially over time, there was no significant association with adherence by the methods. Multiple strategies can be used successfully to monitor treatment adherence. Persons with ≥95% adherence by any method used in this study were more likely to have a favorable treatment outcome.

  3. Hidden costs of HIV treatment in Spain: inefficiency of the antiretroviral drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre-Codina, Josep M; Andreu-Crespo, Angels; Cardona-Peitx, Gloria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet-Sala, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs in Spain are delivered by law only in hospital pharmacies. Commercial packages meet variable quality standards when dispensed drugs are returned due to treatment changes or adherence problems Nearly 20-25% of the initial regimens will be changed at 48 weeks for different reasons. We evaluated the economic impact on public health system of the inability of using returned drugs due to inefficient packaging. We defined socially efficient packaging as the best adapted one to being delivered in unit dose to outpatients and classified: Class A - Drug packed in unit doses with complete info (name of drug, dosage in mg, lot, and expiring date) in each unit, maintaining complete information of the drug if returned when the external package is opened. Class B - packed in blisters with complete info in the blister, but not in unit doses, without special conservation conditions (should be re-packed in unit doses in the pharmacy before its dispensation to assure a class A excellence). Class C - packed in plastic containers with complete info written only on a label over the container, would allow repackaging only before its initial delivery, but not when returned. Class D - drug packed in plastic containers with manufacturer's warning that the product cannot be placed outside of the original package due to special conditions of conservation (fridge, humidity) that doesn't allow a unit dose repackaging or reusing an opened container. We analysed a 12-month period (July 2011-June 2012) in a hospital-based HIV outpatient pharmacy that serves 2413 treated individuals. Patients generated 23,574 visits to pharmacy, and received 48,325 drug packages, with 2.529.137 pills delivered. The patients suffered 1051 treatment changes for any reason. A total amount of 122.945€ in treatment were returned to pharmacy in opened packages during the study period. 47.139.91€ would be totally lost, mainly due to being packaged in class C and D boxes, the equivalent of

  4. Adherence to national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral regimens in HIV patients: a Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tonny S; Andersen, Stig E; Gerstoft, January

    2011-01-01

    who in the period 1997-2006 started HAART according to the guidelines from The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases. We used Kaplan-Meier tables to estimate time from fulfilling the criteria for start of HAART to initiation of the treatment. Cox regression and logistic regression was used to identify...... risk factors for delayed initiation of treatment and chance of being included in clinical trials. RESULTS The study included 3223 patients, 74% of whom initiated HAART in the study period. Ninety-four% fulfilled the criteria for start of HAART, with minor differences over calendar periods. Ninety...

  5. Association between pharmacy medication refill-based adherence rates and cd4 count and viral-load responses: A retrospective analysis in treatment-experienced adults with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Mary L; Jackson, George L; Smith, Rose; Wilson, Kenneth H

    2007-04-01

    Current guidelines and most contemporary statements in the literature indicate that, like other medical conditions, HIV infection requires exceptionally high adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for successful treatment. This study was conducted to determine the association between pharmacy medication refill rates-a surrogate marker for adherence to HAART- and CD4-count/viral-load responses in patients with HIV METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at the HIV Clinic, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Male and female patients aged >/=18 years with a history of HIV who attended clinic appointments on 3 consecutive clinic days were enrolled. Pharmacy medication refill-based adherence rates over the 6 months before the study were determined by examining electronic pharmacy records. The most recent viral load and the change (Delta) in CD4 count over the past year-surrogate measures of outcome-were also collected from each patient's electronic medical record and compared with refill adherence rates. The incidence of AIDS-related events and past antiretroviral experience were also compared with the DeltaCD4 count and adherence rates. Data from 58 patients were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients were black men; the mean age was 51.5 years. There was a nonsignificant correlation between 6-month pharmacy medication refillbased adherence rates and viral loads (r = 0.10). The relationship between DeltaCD4 count and adherence was complex. With adherence rates >70%, the DeltaCD4 count ranged from +414 to -238, with no indication that increasing adherence led to a greater CD4 count increase. The DeltaCD4 count progressively declined with adherence rates 70%, there was no significant correlation between adherence rates and DeltaCD4 counts or viral-load responses.

  6. Brief Report: Prolonged Viral Suppression Over a 12-Year Follow-up of HIV-Infected Patients: The Persistent Impact of Adherence at 4 Months After Initiation of Combined Antiretroviral Therapy in the ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Maria P; Raffi, François; Picard, Odile; Hardel, Lucile; Piroth, Lionel; Jadand, Corinne; Pierret, Janine; Spire, Bruno; Leport, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    The effect of early adherence on long-term viral suppression was assessed among 1281 patients with HIV starting a protease inhibitor-containing regimen in 1997-1999, followed up to 12 years. Association between 4-month adherence (3-level score) and prolonged viral suppression was evaluated using a multivariate mixed logistic model in 891 eligible patients. High 4-months adherence [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 3.72 (1.98 to 6.98)] was associated with long-term prolonged viral suppression, irrespective of maintenance adherence. This unexpected long-term virological impact of early adherence reinforces the message that, when starting antiretrovirals, all means should be mobilized to ensure optimum early adherence to achieve prolonged antiretroviral success.

  7. Exploring the Factors and Effects of Non-Adherence to Antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deprivation of Sick Leave. Participants reported that their employers refuse to grant them leave to collect their treatment despite knowing their health status and that that impaired their immune systems. Moreover, participants expressed that their employers had threatened to fire them and employ other people should they be ...

  8. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children: a study of prevalence and associated factors Adesão aos anti-retrovirais em crianças: um estudo da prevalência e fatores associados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Isabel Raffo Wachholz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with AIDS has increased considerably with the use of more effective antiretrovirals, but the benefits of this therapy are limited by the difficulty of adherence to the treatment. This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of non-adherence to antiretrovirals among children residents in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and identifying associated factors. There were 194 child caregivers interviewed. The technique utilized to evaluate adherence allowed the detection of lack of understanding of the prescribed antiretroviral regimens, as well as conscious loss of doses. Non-adherence was defined when the child had taken less than 80% of the prescribed medication during the 24h period prior to the interview. A general prevalence of non-adherence was 49.5%, which was higher than that estimated. The non-institutional caregivers had a prevalence rate of 55.7%, while the institutional caregivers had 22.2%. In multivariate analysis, the education of the caregiver was found to have a borderline association with the outcome. Institutionalized children and those taken care of by people with a higher educational level appeared to have more protection against non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy.A sobrevida de crianças com AIDS teve um aumento considerável com o emprego de anti-retrovirais mais efetivos, porém os benefícios dessa terapêutica são limitados pela dificuldade na adesão ao tratamento. Este estudo transversal teve como objetivo estimar a prevalência da não-adesão aos anti-retrovirais entre crianças residentes em Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, e identificar os fatores associados. Foram entrevistados 194 cuidadores de crianças. A técnica utilizada para aferir a adesão permitiu detectar tanto as perdas por falhas no entendimento do esquema anti-retroviral prescrito quanto das perdas conscientes de doses. Foi definida como não-aderente a criança que ingeriu menos de 80

  9. The role of integrated home-based care in patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy O papel da assistência domiciliar integrada na adesão do paciente à terapia anti-retroviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Gupta

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-adherence is one of the primary obstacles to successful antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ patients worldwide. In Brazil, the Domiciliary Therapeutic Assistance is a multidisciplinary and integrated home-based assistance program provided for HIV+ patients confined in their homes due to physical deficiency. This study investigated ADT's ability to monitor and promote appropriate adherence to ARV therapy. Fifty-six individuals were recruited from three study groups: Group 1 - patients currently in the ADT program, Group 2 - 21 patients previously treated by the ADT program, and Group 3 - 20 patients who have always been treated using conventional ambulatory care. Using multivariable self-reporting to evaluate adherence, patients in the ADT program had significantly better adherence than patients in ambulatory care (F = 6.66, p = 0.003. This effect was independent of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as medical history. Patients in the ADT program also showed a trend towards greater therapeutic success than ambulatory patients. These results suggest the incorporation of characteristics of ADT in conventional ambulatory care as a strategy to increase adherence to ARV therapy.O sucesso da terapia antiretroviral depende da adesão ao tratamento. A Assistência Domiciliar Terapêutica é um programa de atendimento multidisciplinar a pacientes com HIV/AIDS e com dificuldades de se deslocar para atendimento ambulatorial. Este estudo compara a adesão de pacientes ao esquema ARV em um programa ADT com aqueles em tratamento ambulatorial convencional. Foram estudados: Grupo 1 - 15 pacientes no programa de ADT, Grupo 2 - 21 pacientes em tratamento ambulatorial convencional, Grupo 3 - 20 pacientes em tratamento ambulatorial convencional que nunca freqüentaram o programa ADT. Os pacientes inscritos no programa ADT apresentaram significativamente maior adesão ao tratamento do que pacientes ambulatoriais (F = 6.66, p= 0,003. Os resultados

  10. Do weight loss and adherence cluster within behavioral treatment groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Weight loss programs are often conducted in a group format, but it is unclear whether weight losses or adherence cluster within treatment group and whether characteristics of the group (e.g., size or homogeneity) affect outcomes. We examined these questions within Look AHEAD, a multicente...

  11. Noninfectious uveitis: strategies to optimize treatment compliance and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolz-Marco R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Dolz-Marco,1 Roberto Gallego-Pinazo,1 Manuel Díaz-Llopis,2 Emmett T Cunningham Jr,3–6 J Fernando Arévalo7,8 1Unit of Macula, Department of Ophthalmology, University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 5The Francis I Proctor Foundation, University of California San Francisco Medical Center, 6West Coast Retina Medical Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 7Vitreoretina Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 8Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Noninfectious uveitis includes a heterogenous group of sight-threatening ocular and systemic disorders. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis in recent years, particularly with regard to the effective use of corticosteroids and non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs, including biologic agents. All of these therapeutic approaches are limited, however, by any given patient’s ability to comply with and adhere to their prescribed treatment. In fact, compliance and adherence are among the most important patient-related determinants of treatment success. We discuss strategies to optimize compliance and adherence. Keywords: noninfectious uveitis, intraocular inflammation, immunosuppressive treatment, adherence, compliance, therapeutic failure

  12. Adherence and safety study in patients on treatment with capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Fernández-Ribeiro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The introduction of oral antineoplastic agents in therapeutics has caused a change in the treatment strategy against cancer. The objective of this study was to analyze the adherence in patients to treatment with capecitabine, their adverse events, and the overall health status of patients, as well as the relationship of these factors with adherence. Method: An observational, prospective study at 7 months, in a cohort of patients on capecitabine treatment, including treatment initiations and continuations, regardless of diagnosis or indication. The data collected were: demographic variables (age, gender, diagnostic (breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, off-label, adherence (tablet count, Morisky test,Sackett test, safety (assessment of adverse events, clinical evaluation by the oncologist and quality of life (performance status, SF-12 test. Data sources: electronic clinical records (IANUS®, dispensing program for outpatients (SILICON® and interviews with patients. Results: There were 111 evaluable patients, with a mean age of 66.7 years (range 32-86, ECOG PS 1 in 76.6%. Adherence level: 78.4% (81.7% in the initiation sub-group vs. 72.5% in the continuation sub-group. Adverse events: skin toxicity (33.33%, asthenia (25.22%, gastrointestinal toxicity (24.32% and neurological toxicity (24.32%, mostly G1.Health status, SF-12 test: subjective evaluation as “good” in 33.30% of cases. Conclusions: The low level of adherence in the continuation sub-group can be associated with the duration of treatment, toxicities, clinical evolution, and perception of their health status. It is necessary to conduct individualized monitoring in this group of patients in order to obtain a favorable clinical response.

  13. Adherence as a predictor of sexual behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS during the first year of antiretroviral therapy in rural Cameroon: data from Stratall ANRS 12110/ESTHER trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Ndziessi

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the time pattern of inconsistence condom use (ICU during the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART and its relationship with treatment adherence in naïve HIV-infected adult patients.Data collection was nested within a longitudinal trial on HIV treatment. ICU was defined as reporting to have "never", "sometimes" or "nearly always" used condoms with one's main or casual partner(s--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status in the three previous months. Adherence was defined as taking 100% of their ART prescribed doses in the 4 days before the visit and "not having interrupted treatment", even once, for more than two consecutive days during the 4 previous weeks. Mixed logistic regression was used to study the relationship between adherence and ICU.Among the 459 patients enrolled, 212 (46% during 334 visits reported to have had sexual intercourse at least once with their partner(s--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status--during the first 12 months of ART. The proportion of ICU was 76%, 50% and 59% at month 0 (M0, month 6 (M6 and month 12 (M12, while 60% and 66% of patients were ART-adherent at M6 and M12, respectively. After adjustment for the frequency of sexual activity, type of sexual partner(s, perceived social class and desire for a child, patients adherent to ART were less likely to report ICU when compared with baseline (AOR [95% CI]: 0.38 [0.19-0.76]; P = 0.006.Adherence to ART is associated with a lower risk of ICU but this result needs to be interpreted carefully. As adherence behaviors are not only determined by problems with the healthcare systems but also by social barriers encountered by patients in their daily life, counseling should not only be ART adherence-centered but also patient-centered, including sexual risk minimization and psychosocial support.

  14. Psoriasis in childhood: effective strategies to improve treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah KN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kara N Shah,1 Sandra Cortina,2,3 Michelle M Ernst,2 Jessica C Kichler2 1Division of Pediatric Dermatology, 2Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, 3Center for Adherence and Self-Management, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a relatively common chronic inflammatory skin disease in children for which there is no cure. Most children have mild disease that can be managed with topical therapy as opposed to phototherapy or systemic therapy. Despite the mild presentation of psoriasis in most children, the disease can have a significant impact on quality of life due to the need for ongoing treatment, the frequently visible nature of the cutaneous manifestations, and the social stigma that is associated with psoriasis. Adherence to treatment, in particular topical therapy, is often poor in adults and compromises response to therapy and medical provider management strategies. Multiple factors that may contribute to nonadherence in adults with psoriasis have been identified, including lack of education on the disease and expectations for management, issues related to ease of use and acceptability of topical medications, and anxiety regarding possible medication side effects. There is currently no published data on adherence in the pediatric psoriasis population; however, poor adherence is often suspected when patients fail to respond to appropriate therapy. General strategies used to assess adherence in other pediatric disease populations can be applied to children with psoriasis, and interventions that reflect experience in other chronic dermatologic disorders such as atopic dermatitis may also be helpful for medical providers caring for children with psoriasis. Keywords: adherence, psoriasis, children

  15. Antiretroviral treatment for children | Eley | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe the response of children during their first year on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design. Retrospective, descriptive. Setting. Tertiary, referral hospital. Subjects. All HIV-infected children commenced on HAART from 1 August 2002 until31 December 2004. Outcome measures. Children ...

  16. Patients' knowledge and beliefs about antiretroviral treatment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A cross-sectional survey of 184 randomly selected patients on ART between ages of 15 and 65 years was conducted. Results: The respondents completed a questionnaire on self-reported adherence, knowledge and beliefs about ART and other factors associated with adherence. The majority of the respondents ...

  17. Brief Report: Higher ART Adherence Is Associated With Lower Systemic Inflammation in Treatment-Naive Ugandans Who Achieve Virologic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Morrow, Mary; Boum, Yap; Byakwaga, Helen; Haberer, Jessica E; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David; Mawhinney, Samantha; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Huang, Yong; Tracy, Russell P; Burdo, Tricia H; Williams, Kenneth; Muzzora, Conrad; Hunt, Peter W; Siedner, Mark J

    2018-04-15

    Residual systemic inflammation persists despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is associated with non-AIDS clinical outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the association between ART adherence and inflammation in Ugandans living with HIV who were predominantly receiving nevirapine-based ART with a thymidine analog backbone and were virologically suppressed by conventional assays. Plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer, soluble (s)CD14, sCD163, and the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, in addition to CD8 T-cell activation, were measured at baseline and 6 months after ART initiation in treatment-naive adults who achieved an undetectable plasma HIV RNA (<400 copies/mL) at their 6-month visit. Adherence was measured through medication event monitoring system and calculated as the ratio of observed/prescribed device openings per participant. We fit adjusted linear regression models to estimate the association between ART adherence and the log-transformed plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers. We evaluated 282 participants (median age, 35 years; 70% women). The median (interquartile range) adherence was 93% (84-98). In the adjusted analyses, for every 10% increase in average ART adherence, we found a 15% [P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval (CI), -21.0 to -7.9], 11% (P = 0.017; 95% CI, -18.3 to -2.0), and 3% (P = 0.028; 95% CI, -5.0 to -0.3) decrease in IL-6, D-dimer, and sCD14, respectively. Higher ART adherence was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, and coagulopathy among Ugandans living with HIV who achieved viral suppression shortly after ART initiation. This suggests that ART adherence could have biological consequences beyond viral suppression. Whether ART adherence optimization in virologically suppressed individuals could reduce residual inflammation remains unknown.

  18. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  19. The perspectives of users of antiretroviral therapy on structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the importance of adherence to treatment regimens are widely known. Yet, suboptimal adherence to ART and retention in care of patients still persists and, by many accounts, is fairly widespread. The aim of this study was to identify the structural barriers that ...

  20. Population uptake of antiretroviral treatment through primary care in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärnighausen Till W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KwaZulu-Natal is the South African province worst affected by HIV and the focus of early modeling studies investigating strategies of antiretroviral treatment (ART delivery. The reality of antiretroviral roll-out through primary care has differed from that anticipated and real world data are needed to inform the planning of further scaling up of services. We investigated the factors associated with uptake of antiretroviral treatment through a primary healthcare system in rural South Africa. Methods Detailed demographic, HIV surveillance and geographic information system (GIS data were used to estimate the proportion of HIV positive adults accessing antiretroviral treatment within northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in the period from initiation of antiretroviral roll-out until the end of 2008. Demographic, spatial and socioeconomic factors influencing the likelihood of individuals accessing antiretroviral treatment were explored using multivariable analysis. Results Mean uptake of ART among HIV positive resident adults was 21.0% (95%CI 20.1-21.9. Uptake among HIV positive men (19.2% was slightly lower than women (21.8%, P = 0.011. An individual's likelihood of accessing ART was not associated with level of education, household assets or urban/rural locale. ART uptake was strongly negatively associated with distance from the nearest primary healthcare facility (aOR = 0.728 per square-root transformed km, 95%CI 0.658-0.963, P = 0.002. Conclusions Despite concerns about the equitable nature of antiretroviral treatment rollout, we find very few differences in ART uptake across a range of socio-demographic variables in a rural South African population. However, even when socio-demographic factors were taken into account, individuals living further away from primary healthcare clinics were still significantly less likely to be accessing ART

  1. Psoriasis in childhood: effective strategies to improve treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kara N; Cortina, Sandra; Ernst, Michelle M; Kichler, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a relatively common chronic inflammatory skin disease in children for which there is no cure. Most children have mild disease that can be managed with topical therapy as opposed to phototherapy or systemic therapy. Despite the mild presentation of psoriasis in most children, the disease can have a significant impact on quality of life due to the need for ongoing treatment, the frequently visible nature of the cutaneous manifestations, and the social stigma that is associated with psoriasis. Adherence to treatment, in particular topical therapy, is often poor in adults and compromises response to therapy and medical provider management strategies. Multiple factors that may contribute to nonadherence in adults with psoriasis have been identified, including lack of education on the disease and expectations for management, issues related to ease of use and acceptability of topical medications, and anxiety regarding possible medication side effects. There is currently no published data on adherence in the pediatric psoriasis population; however, poor adherence is often suspected when patients fail to respond to appropriate therapy. General strategies used to assess adherence in other pediatric disease populations can be applied to children with psoriasis, and interventions that reflect experience in other chronic dermatologic disorders such as atopic dermatitis may also be helpful for medical providers caring for children with psoriasis.

  2. Financing equitable access to antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Di

    2010-07-02

    While South Africa spends approximately 7.4% of GDP on healthcare, only 43% of these funds are spent in the public system, which is tasked with the provision of care to the majority of the population including a large proportion of those in need of antiretroviral treatment (ART). South Africa is currently debating the introduction of a National Health Insurance (NHI) system. Because such a universal health system could mean increased public healthcare funding and improved access to human resources, it could improve the sustainability of ART provision. This paper considers the minimum resources that would be required to achieve the proposed universal health system and contrasts these with the costs of scaled up access to ART between 2010 and 2020. The costs of ART and universal coverage (UC) are assessed through multiplying unit costs, utilization and estimates of the population in need during each year of the planning cycle. Costs are from the provider's perspective reflected in real 2007 prices. The annual costs of providing ART increase from US$1 billion in 2010 to US$3.6 billion in 2020. If increases in funding to public healthcare only keep pace with projected real GDP growth, then close to 30% of these resources would be required for ART by 2020. However, an increase in the public healthcare resource envelope from 3.2% to 5%-6% of GDP would be sufficient to finance both ART and other services under a universal system (if based on a largely public sector model) and the annual costs of ART would not exceed 15% of the universal health system budget. Responding to the HIV-epidemic is one of the many challenges currently facing South Africa. Whether this response becomes a "resource for democracy" or whether it undermines social cohesiveness within poor communities and between rich and poor communities will be partially determined by the steps that are taken during the next ten years. While the introduction of a universal system will be complex, it could generate a

  3. Financing equitable access to antiretroviral treatment in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Di

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While South Africa spends approximately 7.4% of GDP on healthcare, only 43% of these funds are spent in the public system, which is tasked with the provision of care to the majority of the population including a large proportion of those in need of antiretroviral treatment (ART. South Africa is currently debating the introduction of a National Health Insurance (NHI system. Because such a universal health system could mean increased public healthcare funding and improved access to human resources, it could improve the sustainability of ART provision. This paper considers the minimum resources that would be required to achieve the proposed universal health system and contrasts these with the costs of scaled up access to ART between 2010 and 2020. Methods The costs of ART and universal coverage (UC are assessed through multiplying unit costs, utilization and estimates of the population in need during each year of the planning cycle. Costs are from the provider’s perspective reflected in real 2007 prices. Results The annual costs of providing ART increase from US$1 billion in 2010 to US$3.6 billion in 2020. If increases in funding to public healthcare only keep pace with projected real GDP growth, then close to 30% of these resources would be required for ART by 2020. However, an increase in the public healthcare resource envelope from 3.2% to 5%-6% of GDP would be sufficient to finance both ART and other services under a universal system (if based on a largely public sector model and the annual costs of ART would not exceed 15% of the universal health system budget. Conclusions Responding to the HIV-epidemic is one of the many challenges currently facing South Africa. Whether this response becomes a “resource for democracy” or whether it undermines social cohesiveness within poor communities and between rich and poor communities will be partially determined by the steps that are taken during the next ten years. While the

  4. How can we simplify antiretroviral therapy in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Annette H; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this article is to present approaches towards simplifying pediatric antiretroviral therapy in order to improve access to care, coverage of HIV-positive children, and support adherence to treatment. Barriers to rapid and effective global scale-up of pediatric antiretroviral therapy include the narrow range of available pediatric antiretrovirals, complicated dosing schedules, and social and economic instability of the family caused by poverty, stigma, and death. Healthcare providers can simplify antiretroviral therapy delivery by promoting the development and use of pediatric fixed dose combinations and scored adult antiretrovirals, using weight-band dosing tables to prescribe antiretrovirals, and identifying less complex regimens. Caretakers would benefit from active counseling to facilitate more open communication with their children about adherence and disclosure. Children can develop long-term coping strategies through learning life skills that build confidence and improve decision-making. Whenever possible, antiretroviral therapy programs should provide access to free antiretrovirals, identify funds to cover transportation costs, and refer families to available community support programs. Interventions to simplify the administration of antiretroviral therapy need to address not only how antiretrovirals are prescribed and formulated, but the relationships of HIV-positive children with their families and communities as well.

  5. Treatment adherence during childhood in individuals with phenylketonuria: Early signs of treatment discontinuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ignacia García

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Treatment adherence in PKU diminishes with age. Early signs of treatment discontinuation can be identified during the second year of life, allowing preventive interventions in high risk groups.

  6. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Modality of Primary HIV Disclosure and Association with Mental Health, Stigma, and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Tanzanian Youth Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Julia V; Mmbaga, Blandina T; Turner, Elizabeth L; Rugalabamu, Leonia L; Luhanga, Severa; Cunningham, Coleen K; Dow, Dorothy E

    2018-01-01

    Disclosing HIV status to children before adolescence is a major challenge facing families and healthcare providers. This study used a mixed methods approach to explore the youth perspective of how youth living with HIV (YLHIV) found out their status and to quantify the association of disclosure modality with mental health, stigma, adherence, and HIV outcomes in adolescence. Youth 11-24 years of age attending adolescent HIV clinic in Moshi, Tanzania were included. Adolescents answered questions, including when and how they found out they had HIV, mental health surveys (nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and modified University of California Los Angeles trauma screen), modified Berger's stigma scale, and self-reported adherence. HIV-1 RNA and latest CD4 were obtained. In-depth interviews were conducted using a convenience sample. The majority of youth reported that they found out their HIV status on their own (80%). Youth attending the government site were less likely to be purposefully told their HIV status compared with those attending the referral site (p mental health symptoms and worse adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). It is imperative to implement disclosure protocols in early childhood to reduce mental health difficulties, internal stigma, and promote ART adherence in YLHIV.

  8. High levels of adherence and viral suppression in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy for 6, 12 and 18 months in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Elul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalizable data are needed on the magnitude and determinants of adherence and virological suppression among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Africa. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with chart abstraction, patient interviews and site assessments in a nationally representative sample of adults on ART for 6, 12 and 18 months at 20 sites in Rwanda. Adherence was assessed using 3- and 30-day patient recall. A systematically selected sub-sample had viral load (VL measurements. Multivariable logistic regression examined predictors of non-perfect (40 copies/ml. RESULTS: Overall, 1,417 adults were interviewed and 837 had VL measures. Ninety-four percent and 78% reported perfect adherence for the last 3 and 30 days, respectively. Eighty-three percent had undetectable VL. In adjusted models, characteristics independently associated with higher odds of non-perfect 30-day adherence were: being on ART for 18 months (vs. 6 months; younger age; reporting severe (vs. no or few side effects in the prior 30 days; having no documentation of CD4 cell count at ART initiation (vs. having a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/µL; alcohol use; and attending sites which initiated ART services in 2003-2004 and 2005 (vs. 2006-2007; sites with ≥600 (vs. <600 patients on ART; or sites with peer educators. Participation in an association for people living with HIV/AIDS; and receiving care at sites which regularly conduct home-visits were independently associated with lower odds of non-adherence. Higher odds of having a detectable VL were observed among patients at sites with peer educators. Being female; participating in an association for PLWHA; and using a reminder tool were independently associated with lower odds of having detectable VL. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of adherence and viral suppression were observed in the Rwandan national ART program, and associated with potentially modifiable factors.

  9. Duloxetine treatment adherence across mental health and chronic pain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Able SL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen L Able,1 Zhanglin Cui,2, Wei Shen2 1Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Global Statistical Sciences, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: This study applied a uniform methodology for measuring and comparing duloxetine adherence in the treatment of multiple chronic medical conditions. Materials and methods: Study patients 18–64 years of age initiating duloxetine therapy during 2008 were identified from a large managed care database. The study was restricted to patients with continuous health plan eligibility for 12 months pre- and post-duloxetine initiation. Study patients had ≥1 medical claim with an inpatient or outpatient diagnosis of one (and only one of the following conditions: major depressive disorder (MDD; generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; fibromyalgia, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain; or chronic musculoskeletal pain, as established in studies in patients with osteoarthritis and chronic lower back pain (CLBP. Patients initiating duloxetine who had two or more of the six studied conditions were not included in this study, thereby avoiding the need to differentiate between primary and secondary diagnoses from the claims records. Adherence rate was defined as the percentage of patients with a 365-day medication possession ratio ≥0.8. Results: A total of 20,490 patients initiated duloxetine treatment during 2008 with a diagnosis of one of the studied conditions during the study period. The adherence rate in our sample was 34.6% and was highest among patients with MDD (37.3% and lowest for patients with CLBP (29.9%. In general, adherence among patients with MDD and GAD was greater than among those with a chronic pain condition. Conclusion: Adherence among newly initiated duloxetine patients varied modestly across the medical conditions for which it was used. After adjusting for potential confounders, differences between the mental conditions (MDD and GAD and the chronic

  10. Nurse led, primary care based antiretroviral treatment versus hospital care: a controlled prospective study in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Kerry A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral treatment services delivered in hospital settings in Africa increasingly lack capacity to meet demand and are difficult to access by patients. We evaluate the effectiveness of nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment by comparison with usual hospital care in a typical rural sub Saharan African setting. Methods We undertook a prospective, controlled evaluation of planned service change in Lubombo, Swaziland. Clinically stable adults with a CD4 count > 100 and on antiretroviral treatment for at least four weeks at the district hospital were assigned to either nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment care or usual hospital care. Assignment depended on the location of the nearest primary care clinic. The main outcome measures were clinic attendance and patient experience. Results Those receiving primary care based treatment were less likely to miss an appointment compared with those continuing to receive hospital care (RR 0·37, p p = 0·001. Those receiving primary care based, nurse led care were more likely to be satisfied in the ability of staff to manage their condition (RR 1·23, p = 0·003. There was no significant difference in loss to follow-up or other health related outcomes in modified intention to treat analysis. Multilevel, multivariable regression identified little inter-cluster variation. Conclusions Clinic attendance and patient experience are better with nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment care than with hospital care; health related outcomes appear equally good. This evidence supports efforts of the WHO to scale-up universal access to antiretroviral treatment in sub Saharan Africa.

  11. Health-related quality of life of antiretroviral treatment defaulters in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi O. Ndubuka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART improves patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Defaulting from ART has detrimental consequences, including the development of viral resistance, treatment failure and increased risks of disease progression. Little is known about the quality of life of ART defaulters and reasons for discontinuing their ART. Objectives: This study sought to measure the HRQoL of ART patients in Botswana who were on ART for up to 5 years but had discontinued treatment for at least 3 months, and to identify factors associated with ART defaulting. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 104 eligible respondents in four ART clinics in south eastern Botswana. We assessed respondents’ HRQoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire for HIV short form. Clinical information was obtained from respondents’ medical records. Data were analysed using SAS version 9.2. Results: Reasons for discontinuing ART were inaccessible clinics (22.4%, feeling better (21.4%, running out of pills (11.2%, depression (8.2%, lack of care and/or support (8.2%, failure to understand instructions (7.7%, medications’ side effects (6.1% and alcohol abuse (3.1%. In multivariate analyses, respondents aged 36–45 years had a 0.03 lower independence HRQoL score compared to those aged 35 and younger (β = -0.03; 95% confidence interval: -1.72, -1.66. Despite defaulting from their ART, respondents’ calculated HRQoL scores were Conclusion: This study highlights the need to enhance ART adherence in order to improve the HRQoL of people living with HIV and/or AIDS.

  12. Symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence among patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Waberg, J.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Treatment non-adherence is a common problem in patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression. This study investigated the possible relationships between symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence. Methods: Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia and 58 outpatients with

  13. Cryptococcal meningitis screening and community-based early adherence support in people with advanced HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania and Zambia: an open-label, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfinanga, Sayoki; Chanda, Duncan; Kivuyo, Sokoine L; Guinness, Lorna; Bottomley, Christian; Simms, Victoria; Chijoka, Carol; Masasi, Ayubu; Kimaro, Godfather; Ngowi, Bernard; Kahwa, Amos; Mwaba, Peter; Harrison, Thomas S; Egwaga, Saidi; Jaffar, Shabbar

    2015-05-30

    Mortality in people in Africa with HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is high, particularly in those with advanced disease. We assessed the effect of a short period of community support to supplement clinic-based services combined with serum cryptococcal antigen screening. We did an open-label, randomised controlled trial in six urban clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Lusaka, Zambia. From February, 2012, we enrolled eligible individuals with HIV infection (age ≥18 years, CD4 count of treatment for cryptococcal infection combined with a short initial period of adherence support after initiation of ART could substantially reduce mortality in HIV programmes in Africa. European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2014 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Aberg, Judith A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Telenti, Amalio; Benson, Constance A.; Burger, David M.; Cahn, Pedro; Gallant, Joel E.; Glesby, Marshall J.; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael S.; Thomas, David L.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and antiretroviral regimens expand treatment choices in resource-rich settings and warrant an update of recommendations to treat adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). OBJECTIVE To provide updated treatment recommendations for adults with HIV, emphasizing when

  15. An information system to manage the rollout of the antiretroviral treatment programme in the Free State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, J E; McDonald, T

    2010-06-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome epidemic, caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a global crisis which threatens development gains, economies, and societies. Within sub-Saharan Africa, where the epidemic began the earliest and the HIV prevalence is the highest, African countries have death rates not seen before. In South Africa the epidemic has a devastating impact which creates profound suffering on individuals and their families, and the impact on the socio-economic level is of great concern. The eradication of HIV/AIDS represents one of humanity's greatest challenges, which requires co-operation and comprehensive collaboration between many different role players. In this endeavour clinical information plays a major role. To combat the effect of the disease, the Free State Department of Health started with the provisioning of antiretroviral therapy in the public health sector. The objective of this paper was to address the challenges they faced in order to develop and implement an information system to manage the rollout of antiretroviral treatment effectively. They started with a paper-based system to collect vital information. It was followed by a palm computer project that was initiated to electronically capture the data collected by the paper-based system. This system was then replaced by a comprehensive Hospital and Clinic Information System which was acquired and customised for the antiretroviral data collection process. Research partners developed a standalone antiretroviral data warehouse for collecting information associated with the monitoring and evaluation of the Free State antiretroviral and HIV/ AIDS treatment programme. The data warehouse successfully produced several management information reports to the antiretroviral management team. A need was identified to design a comprehensive antiretroviral data warehouse that will integrate data from several operational sources which are all associated with HIV/AIDS.

  16. An information system to manage the rollout of the antiretroviral treatment programme in the Free State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Kotzé

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome epidemic, caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a global crisis which threatens development gains, economies, and societies. Within sub-Saharan Africa, where the epidemic began the earliest and the HIV prevalence is the highest, African countries have death rates not seen before. In South Africa the epidemic has a devastating impact which creates profound suffering on individuals and their families, and the impact on the socio-economic level is of great concern. The eradication of HIV/AIDS represents one of humanity’s greatest challenges, which requires co-operation and comprehensive collaboration between many different role players. In this endeavour clinical information plays a major role. To combat the effect of the disease, the Free State Department of Health started with the provisioning of antiretroviral therapy in the public health sector. The objective of this paper was to address the challenges they faced in order to develop and implement an information system to manage the rollout of antiretroviral treatment effectively. They started with a paper-based system to collect vital information. It was followed by a palm computer project that was initiated to electronically capture the data collected by the paper-based system. This system was then replaced by a comprehensive Hospital and Clinic Information System which was acquired and customised for the antiretroviral data collection process. Research partners developed a standalone antiretroviral data warehouse for collecting information associated with the monitoring and evaluation of the Free State antiretroviral and HIV/ AIDS treatment programme. The data warehouse successfully produced several management information reports to the antiretroviral management team. A need was identified to design a comprehensive antiretroviral data warehouse that will integrate data from several operational sources which are all associated with HIV/AIDS.

  17. Treatment adherence therapy in people with psychotic disorders : Randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, A.B.P.; Van Der Gaag, M.; Koopmans, G.T.; Selten, J.P.; Van Beveren, J.M.; Hengeveld, M.W.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Mulder, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interventions to improve adherence to treatment in people with psychotic disorders have produced inconclusive results. We developed a new treatment, treatment adherence therapy (TAT), whose intervention modules are tailored to the reasons for an individual's non-adherence. Aims: To

  18. Etravirine combined with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir for HIV-1-infected, treatment-experienced adults: Week 48 results of a phase IV trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Arathoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: VIOLIN (TMC125IFD3002; NCT01422330 evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of etravirine with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: In a 48-week, phase IV, single-arm, multicenter study, patients on prior antiretroviral therapy (⩾8 weeks who needed to change regimen for virologic failure (viral load ⩾ 500 copies/mL or simplification/adverse events (viral load < 50 copies/mL received etravirine 200 mg bid with ⩾1 other active antiretroviral, excluding darunavir/ritonavir or only nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results: Of 211 treated patients, 73% (n = 155 had baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL and 27% (n = 56 had baseline viral load < 50 copies/mL. Protease inhibitors were the most common background antiretrovirals (83%. Diarrhea was the most frequent adverse event (17%. Serious adverse events (no rash occurred in 5% of patients; none were etravirine related. Overall, median etravirine AUC12h was 5390 ng h/mL and C0h was 353 ng/mL (N = 199. Week 48 virologic response rates (viral load < 50 copies/mL; Food and Drug Administration Snapshot algorithm were 48% (74/155 (baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL and 75% (42/56 (baseline viral load < 50 copies/mL. Virologic failure rates were 42% and 13%, respectively. The most frequently emerging etravirine resistance-associated mutations in virologic failures were Y181C, E138A, and M230L. Virologic response rates for patients with baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL were 38% (30/79 (non-adherent versus 64% (44/69 (adherent subset. Conclusion: Etravirine 200 mg bid in combination with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir was well tolerated in the studied treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected population. The overall etravirine safety and tolerability profile and pharmacokinetics (specifically in those patients who were adherent

  19. Comparisons of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a High-Risk Population in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Huan

    Full Text Available Reports on antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence are scare in China; we performed this meta-analysis to estimate ART adherence rates in different populations at high risk for HIV transmission in China.We searched PubMed, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (Chinese, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (Chinese, and Wanfang (Chinese to identify studies published from January 1985 to May 2015. We used random-effects meta-analysis to calculate weighted mean estimates across studies and 95% CIs. Data were pooled with proportions transformed prior to pooling using the Freeman-Tukey double arcsine transformation and then back transformed to the original scale. We calculated the I2 (and its 95% confidence intervals and tau2 to assess between-study heterogeneity.We identified 36 eligible articles, including 6885 HIV-positive individuals, reporting ART adherence. Pooled analysis produced an estimate of 77.61% (95% CI = 71.63-83.08 of patients with HIV with adequate adherence; however, high heterogeneity was observed between studies (I2 = 96.60%, 95%CI = 96.00%-97.20%; tau2 = 0.16. Three studies, which included 149 old HIV-infected patients, reported the highest ART adequate adherence rate (89.39%, 95% CI = 72.01-99.26 with high heterogeneity between the studies (I2 = 86.20%, 95%CI = 60.00-95.20%; tau2 = 0.13. While, only two studies, which included 143 heterosexual transmission group (HTG patients, reported the lowest ART adequate adherence rate (51.55%, 95% CI = 41.33-61.71 with low heterogeneity between the studies (I2 = 31.3%, tau2 = 0.007. In the multivariable meta-regression model, high-risk populations was the main factor explaining heterogeneity (variance explained 28.14%.ART adherence in some high-risk populations (e.g., heterosexual transmission group is below the recommended levels for maintaining virologic suppression. It is crucial to develop comprehensive intervention strategies to promote ART adherence in high-risk populations and

  20. Optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence as evaluated by CASE index score tool is associated with virological suppression in HIV-infected adults in Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabene, A K; Fortes-Déguénonvo, L; Niang, K; Manga, M N; Bulabula, A N H; Nachega, J B; Seydi, M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological failure (VLF) among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the national ART programme at the teaching hospital of Fann, Dakar, Senegal. Cross-sectional study from 1 September 2013 to 30 January 2014. (1) optimal ART adherence by the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) Index Score (>10) and (2) VLF (HIV RNA > 1000 copies/ml). Diagnostic accuracy of CASE Index Score assessed using sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with optimal adherence and VLF. Of 98 HIV-infected patients on ART, 68% were female. The median (IQR) age was 42 (20-50) years. A total of 57 of 98 (60%) were on ART more than 3 years, and majority (88%) were on NNRTI-based first-line ART regimen. A total of 79 of 98 (80%) patients reported optimal ART adherence, and only five of 84 (5.9%) had documented VLF. Patients with VLF were significantly more likely to have suboptimal ART adherence (17.7% vs. 2.9%; P = 0.02). CASE Index Score showed the best trade-off in Se (78.9%, 95% CI: 54.4-93.9%), Sp (20.0%, 95% CI: 11.1-31.7), PPV (22.4, 95% CI: 13.1-34.2%) and NPV (76.5%, 95% CI: 50.1-93.2), when used VLF threshold of HIV RNA >50 copies/ml. Factors independently associated with VLF were CASE Index Score <10 ([aOR] = 13.0, 95% CI: 1.1-147.9; P = 0.04) and being a boosted PI-based ART regimen ([aOR] = 27.0, 95% CI: 2.4-309.4; P = 0.008). Optimal ART adherence is achievable in a high proportion of HIV-infected adults in this study population. CASE Index Score was independently associated with virological outcomes, supporting usefulness of this low-cost ART adherence monitoring tool in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Self-efficacy and adherence to treatment in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    González-Cantero, Joel Omar; González Á., Ma. De Los Ángeles; Vázquez C., José; Galán C., Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus 2 (DM2) is exacerbated when people do not adhere to their treatment. It requires evaluating the factors that influence favorably the achievement of adherence to treatment. Objective. Evaluate the relationship between self-efficacy and adherence to treatment in patients with DM2 served in Family Medicine Unit No. 48 (UMF 48) of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Method. Descriptive-correlational with 314 participants. Were applied the Scale of Adherence to the T...

  2. Providing insecticide treated bed nets in antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pilot period, 1,282 ITNs were distributed to patients. A large proportion (70%) of ART patients at these sites received pilot study ITNs. Site adherence to the monitoring system was variable. Seventeen patients were interviewed, 14 of whom were ART patients who had received ITNs; 11 of these (79%) had slept under the ...

  3. Patients' knowledge and beliefs about antiretroviral treatment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... Gagné & Naccache 2003). The questionnaire comprised three sections, namely, sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and beliefs about ART and adherence to ART. It took the respondents approximately 30 to 45 minutes to complete the questionnaire. In the cases where respondents were unable ...

  4. Beyond "Option B+": Understanding Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence, Retention in Care and Engagement in ART Services Among Pregnant and Postpartum Women Initiating Therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Phillips, Tamsin K

    2017-06-01

    Several studies from sub-Saharan Africa have highlighted significant challenges in providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to pregnant and postpartum women, with specific concerns around maintaining optimal levels of adherence to ART and/or retaining women in long-term services. However, there are few conceptual frameworks to help understand nonadherence and nonretention, as well as the drivers of these, among HIV-infected women, particularly in the postpartum period. This review provides an overview of the key issues involved in thinking about ART adherence, retention in care and engagement in ART services among pregnant and postpartum women. The related behaviors of adherence and retention may be understood as components of effective engagement of patients in ART services, which share the goal of achieving and maintaining suppressed maternal viral load on ART. Under this framework, the existing literature indicates that disengagement from care is widespread among postpartum women, with strikingly similar data emerging from ART services around the globe and indications that similar challenges may be encountered by postpartum care services outside the context of HIV. However, the drivers of disengagement require further research, and evidence-based intervention strategies are limited. The challenges of engaging women in ART services during pregnancy and the postpartum period seem pervasive, although the determinants of these are poorly understood. Looking forward, a host of innovative intervention approaches are needed to help improve women's engagement, and in turn, promote maternal and child health in the context of HIV.

  5. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) – with a cost of 47,139.91€ – would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets. PMID:26273190

  6. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) - with a cost of 47,139.91 € - would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets.

  7. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu-Crespo À

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Àngels Andreu-Crespo,1,* Josep M Llibre,2,3,* Glòria Cardona-Peitx,1 Ferran Sala-Piñol,1 Bonaventura Clotet,2,4 Xavier Bonafont-Pujol1 1Pharmacy Department, 2HIV Unit and “Lluita contra la SIDA” Foundation, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, 3Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 4Universitat de Vic-Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC, Vic, Barcelona, Spain *These authors contributed equally to the work Abstract: While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals – with a cost of 47,139.91€ – would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar, should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets. Keywords: antiretroviral treatment, cost efficacy, drug packaging, treatment change

  8. Dyslipidemia, Diet and Physical Exercise in Children on Treatment With Antiretroviral Medication in El Salvador: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Michela; Sagrado, Maria José; Escobar, Gustavo; Lazzerini, Marzia; Rivas, Estefanie; Martín-Cañavate, Rocio; Pérez de López, Elsy; Ayala, Sandra; Castaneda, Luis; Aparicio, Pilar; Custodio, Estefanía

    2016-10-01

    Dyslipidemias are common in HIV-infected children, especially if treated with protease inhibitors, but there are few data on how to treat dyslipidemias in this population. We estimated the dyslipidemia prevalence and its association with treatment, diet and physical exercise in children on antiretroviral treatment at the El Salvador reference center for pediatric HIV care (CENID). Information was gathered regarding socio-demographic characteristics, treatment, diet and physical activity of 173 children aged 5-18 years and receiving antiretroviral therapy. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), viral load and CD4 T-lymphocytes were measured. Abnormal concentrations were defined as triglycerides ≥130 mg/dL in 10- to 18-year olds and ≥100 mg/dL in dyslipidemia with protease inhibitors, diet and physical exercise. Of the 173 children, 83 (48%) had hypertriglyceridemia and 25 (14.5%) hypercholesterolemia. High LDL-C concentrations were observed in 17 children (9.8%) and low HDL-C in 38 (22%). Treatment with protease inhibitors was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia [prevalence ratio (PR) 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0-3.8] and hypercholesterolemia (PR 9.0; 95% CI: 3.6-22.2). Higher adherence to a "high fat/sugar diet" was associated with hypercholesterolemia (PR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.3) and high LDL-C (PR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0-2.9). Compared with those exercising <3 times/week, children exercising ≥7 times were less likely to have low HDL-C (PR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.7). These results suggest that a healthy diet and exercise habits can contribute to controlling some aspects of the lipid profile in this population.

  9. Vietnamese Women's Struggle to Access Antiretroviral Drugs in a Context of Free Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Nam Thi Thu; Rasch, Vibeke; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore how HIV positive women living in a northern province of Vietnam experience seeking antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in the public health system, and how they address obstacles encountered along the way. Despite the fact that antiretroviral drugs were freely...... provided, they were not always accessible for women in need. A variety of factors at the population and health system level interacted in ways that often made access to ARV drugs a complicated and time-consuming process. We have suggested changes that could be made at the health system level that may help...

  10. Antiretroviral pill count and clinical outcomes in treatment-naive patients with HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, J.; Smith, C.; Teira, R.; Reiss, P.; Jarrín Vera, I.; Crane, H.; Miro, J. M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Saag, M.; Zangerle, R.; Bucher, H. C.; Boulle, Andrew; Stephan, Christoph; Cavassini, Matthias; del Amo, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gill, John; Guest, Jodie; Hans-Ulrich Haerry, David; Hogg, Robert; Justice, Amy; Shepherd, Leah; Obel, Neils; Sterling, Tim; Williams, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    ObjectivesTreatment guidelines recommend single-tablet regimens for patients with HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy. These regimens might be as effective and cost less if taken as separate drugs. We assessed whether the one pill once a day combination of efavirenz, emtricitabine and

  11. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2012 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Aberg, Judith A.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Telenti, Amalio; Benson, Constance; Cahn, Pedro; Eron, Joseph J.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hammer, Scott M.; Reiss, Peter; Richman, Douglas D.; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Thomas, David L.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    New trial data and drug regimens that have become available in the last 2 years warrant an update to guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in resource-rich settings. To provide current recommendations for the treatment of adult HIV

  12. Antiretroviral treatment among co-infected tuberculosis patients in integrated and non-integrated facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ledibane, T. D.; Motlhanke, S. C.; Rose, A.; Kruger, W. H.; Ledibane, N. R. T.; Claassens, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: South Africa has the second worst tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (TB-HIV) syndemic in the world: in 2011, the TB-HIV co-infection rate was estimated at 65%. Integration of TB and HIV health-care services was implemented to increase antiretroviral treatment (ART) uptake among eligible patients.

  13. Adherence to cancer treatment guidelines: influence of general and cancer-specific guideline characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Jong, J.D. de; Spronk, I.; Ho, V.K.; Brink, M.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guideline adherence remains a challenge in clinical practice, despite guidelines’ ascribed potential to improve patient outcomes. We studied the level of adherence to recommendations from Dutch national cancer treatment guidelines, and the influence of general and

  14. Adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment: a meta-analysis, interviews, and focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated

  15. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: A review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B.P. Staring (Anton); C.L. Mulder (Niels); M. van der Gaag (Mark); J.-P. Selten (Jean-Paul); A.J.M. Loonen (Anton); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNon-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a

  16. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: Review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, A.B.P.; Mulder, C.L.; van der Gaag, M.; Selten, J.P.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Hengeveld, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Non-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a

  17. Examining treatment adherence among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Robert; Kinsman, Anne; Ortaglia, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) participate in a variety of treatments, including medication, behavioral, alternative and developmental treatments. Parent adherence to these treatments is crucial for positive child outcomes. The current study: 1) Explored patterns of parent adherence across the full range of treatments that are prescribed to children with ASD and, 2) Examined whether parent demographics, parent treatment attitudes, and child ASD severity contribute to parents' adherence across ASD treatments. Questionnaires were distributed to parents of children with ASD in a southeastern state. Parents (N = 274) were included if they were parenting a child with ASD who was receiving treatment for ASD symptoms. Paired t-tests and multiple linear regression were used to assess the study aims. Adherence to medication treatment was significantly greater than adherence to behavioral, developmental, or alternative treatments (adjusted p-values 0.0006, 0.0030, 0.0006 respectively). Perceived family burden of a treatment was associated with lower adherence to medication, developmental, and alternative treatments. Finally, greater ASD severity was associated with lower adherence to alternative treatments. Overall, the independent variables accounted for more variance in adherence to medication and alternative treatments than in behavioral and developmental treatments. Parents' adherence to ASD treatment differs significantly by treatment type and is influenced by parental perceptions of the burden of treatment on the family. These findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing the impact of ASD treatment regimens on family life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Factors associated with treatment adherence for tuberculosis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Gea Velázquez de Castro, María Teresa; Requena Puche, Juana; Miralles Bueno, Juan José; Rigo Medrano, María Vicenta; Aranaz Andrés, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze adherence to treatment of tuberculosis infection and to identify risk factors for its compliance. An observational historical cohort study. Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant (Alicante). All patients with a tuberculin skin test (TST) done during tuberculosis contact tracing during 6 years. We included 764 tuberculosis contacts in the analysis. 59.7% of the 566 patients who completed the contact tracing, had tuberculosis infection (TI). Of the patients with TI, 45.6% had not started treatment for tuberculosis infection (TTBI). Factors associated with not starting TTBI were: age (36-65 years, RR: 5.8; 95% CI: 1.2-27.5, and > 65 years, RR: 11.3; 95% CI: 2.0-64.0), the social relationship with TB case (RR: 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-3.8), and the TST reaction (≥ 15mm; RR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). The completion rate for TTBI was 80.4% among people who started therapy. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance to TTBT (7-9H, RR: 12.7; 95% CI: 1.5-107.3). The treatment compliance rate of Tuberculosis infection was high among people who started therapy. Almost a half of the contacts with TI did not start treatment, and associated factors were: age, social relationship, and the TST reaction. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance. It is important to know the factors associated with adherence to treatment of TI in each health area, and focus efforts on risk groups; thereby approaching the global control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients infected with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis: two cases at the Lambaréné Hospital Center in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kombila, U D; Iba Ba, J; Tsoumbou-Bakana, G; Moussavou Kombila, J-B

    2016-11-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a serious infection occurring mainly in immunodepressed patients, especially those with AIDS. Its incidence is growing among people living with HIV/AIDS who interrupt their antiretroviral treatment. We report two cases that occurred in this situation and had lethal outcomes in the short term. Testing for cryptococcal antigen in serum (serum CRAG test) enables a reliable and early diagnosis, and its use should be promoted in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV‐infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L.S. Cruz

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers’ quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less‐than‐optimal adherence.

  1. “I told her this is your life”: Relationship Dynamics, Partner Support, and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among South African Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Conroy, Amy; Leddy, Anna; Johnson, Mallory; Ngubane, Thulani; van Rooyen, Heidi; Darbes, Lynae

    2017-01-01

    Despite the important role of social relationships on health and well-being, little is known about how primary partners affect adherence to HIV care and treatment. We qualitatively explored how relationship dynamics and partner support influence adherence among couples from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Twenty-four heterosexual couples with at least one HIV-positive partner completed semi-structured interviews on topics including relationship dynamics (intimacy or emotional closeness, communic...

  2. Access to antiretroviral treatment in developing countries: Which financing strategies are possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulière, A; Le Maux, A; Trehin, C; Perez, F

    2010-06-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, access to combination antiretroviral therapy for all people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in need of treatment is a major public health challenge. The objective of this paper was to provide an overview of the different financing modalities of HIV/AIDS care at the microeconomic level and an analysis of their advantages and limitations. A review of the published literature using mainly the Medline and Science Direct databases for the 1990-2008 period in English and French made it possible to explore different financing strategies for the access to combination antiretroviral therapy using as case studies specific countries from different regions: Ivory Coast, Uganda, Senegal, and Rwanda for sub-Saharan Africa, Brazil and Haiti in the Latin America/Caribbean region, and Thailand for Asia. In these settings, direct payment through user fees is the most frequent financing mechanism in place for HIV/AIDS care and treatment, including combination antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, other mechanisms are being implemented to improve access to treatment such as community-based health insurance schemes with free care for the poor and vulnerable households and public-private partnerships. The type of financing strategy for HIV/AIDS care and treatment depends on the context. As direct payment through user fees limits access to care and does not enable program sustainability, national and donor agencies are introducing alternative strategies such as community financing systems (mutual health organizations, micro insurance, community health funds) and public-private partnerships. Finally, access to combination antiretroviral therapy has improved in resource-limited settings; however, there is a need to introduce alternative financial mechanisms to ensure long-term universal and equitable access to treatment and care, including combination antiretroviral therapy. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS

  3. The Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS (CAMPS trial: a randomized trial of text messaging versus usual care for adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Mbuagbaw

    Full Text Available Mobile phone technology is a novel way of delivering health care and improving health outcomes. This trial investigates the use of motivational mobile phone text messages (SMS to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART over six months.CAMPS was a single-site randomized two-arm parallel design trial in Yaoundé, Cameroon. We enrolled and randomized HIV-positive adults on ART, aged 21 years and above to receive a weekly standardized motivational text message versus usual care alone. The primary outcome was adherence measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS, number of doses missed (in the week preceding the interview and pharmacy refill data. Outcomes were measured at 3 and 6 months. Service providers and outcome assessors were blinded to allocation. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Between November and December 2010, 200 participants were randomized, with 101 in the intervention group and 99 in the control group. At 6 months, overall retention was 81.5%. We found no significant effect on adherence by VAS>95% (risk ratio [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89, 1.29; p = 0.542; reported missed doses (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.87, 1.16; p>0.999 or number of pharmacy refills (mean difference [MD] 0.1, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.43; p = 0.617. One participant in the intervention arm reported a possible disclosure of status.Standardized motivational mobile phone text messages did not significantly improve adherence to ART in this study. Other types of messaging or longer term studies are recommended.1. Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry; PACTR201011000261458 2. Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01247181.

  4. Who is adherent with preoperative psychological treatment recommendations among weight loss surgery candidates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kelli E; Applegate, Katherine L; Grant, John

    2007-01-01

    Adherence to treatment regimens is critical for success with weight loss surgery. Weight loss surgery patients commonly undergo a psychological evaluation before surgery. When indicated, patients are provided with preoperative behavioral recommendations; yet, little is known about the adherence to these recommendations. In this study, we evaluated the following: (1) level of adherence to behavioral treatment plans; (2) characteristics that differentiate adherent patients from nonadherent patients; and (3) the weight loss of delayed-adherent patients compared with those whose surgery was not delayed. We performed a case review of psychological evaluations, preoperative behavioral treatment plans, and subsequent adherence rates. Of the 837 patients evaluated, 68 (8%) had significant psychosocial issues and were given behavioral treatment recommendations before surgery. Of these 68 patients, 38 (56%) were adherent and subsequently underwent surgery, and 30 (46%) were nonadherent and were not offered surgery in our program. Adherence did not differ relative to body mass index, age, education, race, marital status, depression, anxiety, or rate of eating disorders. Adherence did differ by gender: 31% percent of the men were adherent to recommendations while 62% of the women were adherent. Individuals with complex treatment plans were less likely to be adherent than those with less complex recommendations. Additionally, increased hostility reduced the adherence rates. Patients adherent to the psychological recommendations had weight loss within 2 years, which was similar to that of patients who did not require behavioral treatment recommendations. The results of this study have provided information regarding adherence to preoperative psychological treatment recommendations. Although most patients are psychologically suitable for weight loss surgery at the initial evaluation, a better understanding of the factors influencing the adherence with preoperative behavioral

  5. Mode of administration of dulaglutide: implications for treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amblee A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ambika Amblee1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, John Stroger Hospital of Cook County, 2Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Background: Medication complexity/burden can be associated with nonadherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients’ satisfaction with their treatment is an important consideration for physicians. Strategies like using longer acting efficacious agents with less frequent dosing may help adherence. Objective: To explore the mode of administration of dulaglutide and its implications for treatment adherence in T2DM. Methods: PubMed search using the term “Dulaglutide” through October 31, 2015 was conducted. Published articles, press releases, and abstracts presented at national/international meetings were considered. Results/conclusion: Dulaglutide is a once-weekly glucagon like peptide-1 analog with a low intraindividual variability. Phase III trials demonstrated significant improvements in glycemia and weight, with a low hypoglycemia risk similar to liraglutide/exenatide, but with substantially fewer injections. A significant improvement was observed in the total Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire score, Impact of Weight on Self-Perception, and perceived frequency of hyperglycemia with dulaglutide when compared with placebo, exenatide, liraglutide, or metformin. Treatment satisfaction scores showed an improvement with dulaglutide (34%–39% when compared with exenatide (31%. A positive experience with a high initial (97.2% and final (99.1% injection success rate along with a significant reduction in patients’ fear of self-injecting, as measured by the modified self-injecting subscale of the Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-Testing Questionnaire and Medication Delivery Device Assessment Battery, was found. Its acceptance was high (>96% among a variety of patients including patients who fear injections and injection-naïve users. Dulaglutide is

  6. Relationship of race-, sexual orientation-, and HIV-related discrimination with adherence to HIV treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarts, Jessica M; Bogart, Laura M; Tabak, Melanie A; Armelie, Aaron P; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2008-10-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) must be close to perfect in order to maintain suppression of HIV viral load, and to prevent the development of drug resistant strains of HIV. People living with HIV (PLWH) often report low levels of adherence. One variable that has been linked to poor adherence is perceived discrimination; however, research has generally not considered the possible unique effects of different types of discrimination on adherence. The present pilot study aimed to examine the association of three types of discrimination (due to HIV+ status, race, or sexual orientation) with adherence among 57 PLWH. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to demonstrate the relationships between each type of discrimination and self-reported adherence. Racial discrimination significantly predicted lower adherence levels, whereas sexual orientation- and HIV-related discrimination did not. Results underscore the importance of addressing discrimination issues, specifically racial, when designing interventions to improve adherence to HAART.

  7. Terapia anti-retroviral: fatores que interferem na adesão de crianças com HIV/AIDS Terapia anti-retroviral: factores que interfieren en la adherencia de niños con VIH/SIDA Antiretroviral therapy: factors interfering in the adherence of children with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claúdia Feitosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi conhecer os fatores que interferem na adesão à terapêutica medicamentosa em crianças infectadas pelo HIV/AIDS, relatados por 12 cuidadores em um serviço de referência em AIDS, em Fortaleza-CE. Os dados foram obtidos mediante entrevista, e, com eles, foram apurados fatores que dificultaram a adesão terapêutica, evidenciando relatos referentes à apresentação da droga, horário da tomada do medicamento, efeitos colaterais, falta na distribuição de medicamento gratuito, dificuldade de acesso regular ao serviço de saúde e problemas financeiros. Constatou-se a importância de conhecer o contexto social no qual a criança está inserida e as dificuldades no uso dos anti-retrovirais para intervir de forma eficiente e possibilitar uma melhor qualidade de vida às crianças.La finalidad de este estudio fue conocer los factores que interfieren en la adherencia a la terapéutica medicamentosa en niños infectados por el VIH/sida relatados por 12 cuidadores en un servicio de referencia en sida, en Fortaleza-CE, Brasil. Los datos fueron obtenidos mediante entrevista, y, con ellos fueran apurados factores que dificultaron la adherencia terapéutica, evidenciando relatos referentes a la presentación de la droga, horario de la toma del medicamento, efectos colaterales, falta en la distribución de medicamento gratuito, dificultad de acceso regular al servicio de salud y problemas financieros. Se constató la importancia de conocer el contexto social en que el niño está insertado y las dificultades en el uso de los anti-retrovirales para intervenir de forma eficiente y posibilitar una mejor calidad de vida a los niños.This study aimed to get to know the factors that interfere in medication treatment adherence among children infected by HIV/aids, as reported by 12 caregivers in a service reference to aids in Fortaleza/CE, Brazil. Data were collected through interviews, verifying factors that made treatment adherence

  8. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  9. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay P Bodell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials in AN, and provides a synthesis of existing data regarding the efficacy, safety, and adherence associated with pharmacologic and psychological interventions. Randomized controlled trials for the treatment of AN published in peer-reviewed journals were identified by electronic and manual searches. Overall, pharmacotherapy has limited benefits in the treatment of AN, with some promising preliminary findings associated with olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent. No single psychological intervention has demonstrated clear superiority in treating adults with AN. In adolescents with AN, the evidence base is strongest for the use of family therapy over alternative individual psychotherapies. Results highlight challenges in both treating individuals with AN and in studying the effects of those treatments, and further emphasize the importance of continued efforts to develop novel interventions. Treatment trials currently underway and areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, randomized controlled trials

  10. [Factors related to treatment adherence in patients with tuberculosis in Pereira, Colombia, 2012-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñes, Magally; Cardona, Dora

    2016-09-01

    According to the World Health Organization, the adherence to the tuberculosis treatment is the extent to which a patient's medication taking coincides with the prescribed treatment. The sum of cured patients and those who have completed treatment (directly observed therapy strategy, DOTS) are pragmatic indicators of the adherence. The patients who do not complete treatment correspond to non-adherents. Objective: To determine the relationship between anti-tuberculosis treatment adherence and socio-demographic, economic, clinical, and drug-related objective and subjective factors in patients over 18 years of age. Materials and methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 174 patient records of the tuberculosis control program and 15 semi-structured interviews to non-adherent patients during the period between June, 2012, and June, 2013. Results: The adherence in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was 94.8%. It was higher in patients in the social security contributory regime (p=0.035). Non-adherence was 5.2%. Drug intolerance was higher in the group of non-adherent patients. The lack of family support, absenteeism in the workplace, economic impact and dissatisfaction with the timeliness and the care of the health institution, were important in the decision of non-adherence. Affiliation to the health system regime and drug tolerance were objective factors related to adherence to treatment. The social and economic burden of disease is a subjective factor associated with the decision of not adhering to treatment.

  11. Treatment interruption after 2-year antiretroviral treatment initiated during acute/early HIV in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamalwa, Dalton; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Langat, Agnes; Tapia, Kenneth; Ngugi, Evelyn; Moraa, Helen; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Otieno, Vincent; Inwani, Irene; Richardson, Barbra A; Chohan, Bhavna; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace C

    2016-09-24

    Treatment interruption has been well tolerated and durable in some pediatric studies but none have compared treatment interruption with continued antiretroviral treatment (ART) following ART initiation in early HIV. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in treatment interruption versus continued ART among early-treated infants. Randomized trial (OPH-03; NCT00428116). The trial included HIV-infected infants who initiated ART at less than 13 months of age, received ART for 24 months, and, if eligible (CD4% >25%, normal growth), were randomized to treatment interruption versus continued ART. Children in the treatment interruption group restarted ART if they met WHO ART-eligibility criteria. During 18-months postrandomization, primary outcomes were incidence of serious adverse events and growth. CD4%, viral load, morbidity, and growth were compared. Of 140 infants enrolled, 121 started ART, of whom 75 completed at least 24 months ART and 42 were randomized (21 per arm). ART was initiated at median age 5 months and randomization at 30 months. Among 21 treatment interruption children, 14 met ART restart criteria within 3 months. Randomization was discontinued by Data and Safety Monitoring Board due to low treatment interruption durability. At 18 months postrandomization, growth and serious adverse events were comparable between arms; hypercholesteremia incidence was higher in the continued arm (P = 0.03). CD4% and viral load did not differ between arms [CD4% 35% and median viral load undetectable (<150 copies/ml) in both arms, P = 0.9 for each comparison]. No infants had post-treatment viral control. Short treatment interruption did not compromise 18-month CD4%, viral control, growth, or morbidity compared with continued ART among infants who started ART in early HIV infection.

  12. Medication adherence and direct treatment cost among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    53% non-adherence among diabetics in Malaysia; similar studies in ..... Associations between study participant drug adherence and other variables at LAUTECH. Teaching Hospital diabetes clinic. Adherence level. X2 df p-value. Monthly Income. 5.25. 2. 0..51. Sex .... sible use of their information for tax-related or other of-.

  13. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions.

  14. Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laws MB

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available M Barton Laws,1 Gary S Rose,2 Tanya Bezreh,1 Mary Catherine Beach,3 Tatiana Taubin,1 Laura Kogelman,4 Marcia Gethers,3 Ira B Wilson11Department of Health Services Policy and Practice, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, Boston, MA, USA; 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Studies have found that physician–patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician–patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed.Keywords: HIV, physician–patient communication, treatment adherence

  15. Adherence to topical treatment of glaucoma, risk and protective factors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Gómez, M C; Vásquez-Trespalacios, E M

    2018-02-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic asymptomatic disease, progressing to loss of vision. Elevated intraocular pressure is the only modifiable factor. Adherence to glaucoma treatment varies from 2-80%. To evaluate factors associated with adherence to topical glaucoma treatment reported in the literature, and to identify protective factors and risk factors, as well as modifiable and non-modifiable factors, in order to take them into account to perform interventions in adherence. A bibliographic search of articles published in the last 8 years in databases such as Clinical Key, Cochrane (OVID), EBSCO, Lilacs, PubMed and Science Direct, of different observational studies that performed a measurement of the treatment of glaucoma and to identify associated factors. A total of 7 studies were selected that directly and indirectly measured adherence to glaucoma treatment. Different risk and protective factors for adherence to treatment were found. These showed that African-American race, poor education, low personal income, and high treatment costs, are strongly related to poor adherence to treatment. It was also found that educational interventions and a good patient- physician relationship impacted positively on adherence. The results found are a guide for risk and protective factors for adherence to treatment of glaucoma. It is cost effective to educate patients to positively impact adherence. By identifying such factors, attention can be focused on poor adherence patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoror, Titilayo A; Falade, Catherine O; Olorunlana, Adetayo; Walker, Ebunlomo M; Okareh, Oladapo T

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in southwest Nigeria. Using purposive sampling, participants were recruited through a community-based organization. Consenting PLWHA participated in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions that were audio-taped. Using Deacon's conceptual framework of stigma, four opinion guides facilitated the interviews and discussions. Interviews and discussions were conducted in three languages, and lasted from 45 min to 2 h. A total of 35 women and men participated in the study. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 58 years, with an average of 4 years since clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. All participants were receiving ART, and self-reported high adherence level. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: life before ART, life after ART, and strategies used in ART adherence. In describing their lives before ART, participants reported experiencing self, anticipated and enacted stigmas due to their sickly appearance from HIV-related complications. After initiating ART, participants talked about friends and families "returning to them" and "apologizing for abandoning" them once they started "looking well." In response to anticipated stigma, many reported sticking to their medications. Drawing from the cultural milieu as part of their strategies, participants discussed the use of plastic bags for medications and àkònpó, as ways of diverting attention from their use of many medications. Implications for ART program policies and stigma interventions were discussed, along with limitation of a short-term ART study on stigma since long-term use of ART can contribute to stigma by way of lipoatrophy as PLWHA age.

  17. Strategies to Promote Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Applied by Dutch HIV Nurse Consultants : A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; Dijkstra, Boukje M.; Hazelzet, Esther E. B.; Fledderus, Bert; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes strategies used by Dutch HIV nurse consultants to promote adherence to anti retroviral therapy (ART) and the assumptions on which these strategies were based. The study used a descriptive qualitative design with individual and focus group interviews. Individual semi-structured

  18. A Bayesian method for the synthesis of evidence from qualitative and quantitative reports: the example of antiretroviral medication adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voils, Corrine I; Hassselblad, Vic; Crandell, Jamie L; Chang, YunKyung; Lee, EunJeong; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Bayesian meta-analysis is a frequently cited but very little-used method for synthesizing qualitative and quantitative research findings. The only example published to date used qualitative data to generate an informative prior probability and quantitative data to generate the likelihood. We developed a method to incorporate both qualitative and quantitative evidence in the likelihood in a Bayesian synthesis of evidence about the relationship between regimen complexity and medication adherence. Methods Data were from 11 qualitative and six quantitative studies. We updated two different non-informative prior distributions with qualitative and quantitative findings to find the posterior distribution for the probabilities that a more complex regimen was associated with lower adherence and that a less complex regimen was associated with greater adherence. Results The posterior mode for the qualitative findings regarding more complex regimen and lesser adherence (using the uniform prior with Jeffreys' prior yielding highly similar estimates) was 0.588 (95% credible set limits 0.519, 0.663) and for the quantitative findings was 0.224 (0.203, 0.245); due to non-overlapping credible sets, we did not combine them. The posterior mode for the qualitative findings regarding less complex regimen and greater adherence was 0.288 (0.214, 0.441) and for the quantitative findings was 0.272 (0.118, 0.437); the combined estimate was 0.299 (0.267, 0.334). Conclusions The utility of Bayesian methods for synthesizing qualitative and quantitative research findings at the participant level may depend on the nature of the relationship being synthesized and on how well the findings are represented in the individual reports. PMID:19770121

  19. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Spain: A meta-analysis Adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral de gran actividad (TARGA en España: Un metaanálisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ortego

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the percentage of adherence to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Spanish observational studies and to identify the variables associated with adherence. Methods: Seven electronic databases were used to locate the studies. Six inclusion criteria were established. Two coders codified the variables independently. Intercoder reliability was calculated. Publication bias was analyzed through the Begg, Egger and Trim and Fill tests. Homogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and the l² index. A random effects model was assumed to estimate both the overall percentage of adherence and to explain heterogeneity. Results: This meta-analysis included 23 observational studies, yielding a total of 34 adherence estimates. The sample was composed of 9,931 HIV-positive individuals (72% men older than 18 years under treatment with HAART. The percentage of patients adhering to an intake of >90% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs was 55%. Wide heterogeneity was detected (I²=91.20; 95%CI: 88.75-93.13. Adherence was mainly measured using a single strategy (47.8%, the most widely used being self-report (48.7%. In the univariate analysis, the following factors were significant: infection stages A (β=0.68, p 200 copies/ml (β=-0.41, p Objetivo: Calcular el porcentaje de adherencia al TARGA en estudios observacionales españoles, así como identificar las variables asociadas a ella. Métodos: Para localizar los estudios se emplearon siete bases bibliográficas. Se establecieron seis criterios de inclusión. Dos codificadores realizaron la codificación de forma independiente. Se calculó la fiabilidad intercodificadores. El sesgo de publicación se evaluó mediante los tests de Begg y de Egger, y Trim & Fill. La homogeneidad se estimó mediante la prueba Q y el índice I². Se asumió un modelo de efectos aleatorios tanto para la estimación del porcentaje global de adherencia como para explicar la heterogeneidad. Resultados: El

  20. Assessment of provider adherence to obesity treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Nicole; Ellis, Peggy; Lee Barron, Mary

    2013-03-01

    Despite the presence of obesity treatment guidelines, healthcare providers often provide suboptimal weight management. The purpose of the quality improvement project was to systematically assess adherence with adult overweight/obesity guidelines in primary care to reduce patient risk. Retrospective analysis of 420 encounter notes from overweight and obese adult patients in three primary care clinics. Data were collected before and after a continuing education session for providers on guidelines for optimal management of obesity. Measures of completeness of quality indicators were abstracted from records. Significant improvement in the completeness score and documentation of body mass index, height, diagnosis of overweight/obesity, and counseling for diet and physical activity were achieved. The proposed measures for systematically assessing the integration of obesity guidelines in primary care are feasible quality indicators and useful for evidence-based decision making. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. How children access antiretroviral treatment at Kgapane District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-04

    Jun 4, 2011 ... (PMTCT), HIV treatment for pregnant women and treatment of children with HIV.6 Although HIV testing is being accessed ... Poor communication about the diagnosis and treatment, negative attitudes, ..... a few cases this was exacerbated by parents who did not offer support because they felt that the fathers ...

  2. Comparing antiretroviral treatment outcomes between a prospective community-based and hospital-based cohort of HIV patients in rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alibhai Arif

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved availability of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa is intended to benefit all eligible HIV-infected patients; however in reality antiretroviral services are mainly offered in urban hospitals. Poor rural patients have difficulty accessing the drugs, making the provision of antiretroviral therapy inequitable. Initial tests of community-based treatment programs in Uganda suggest that home-based treatment of HIV/AIDS may equal hospital-based treatment; however the literature reveals limited experiences with such programs. The research This intervention study aimed to; 1 assess the effectiveness of a rural community-based ART program in a subcounty (Rwimi of Uganda; and 2 compare treatment outcomes and mortality in a rural community-based antiretroviral therapy program with a well-established hospital-based program. Ethics approvals were obtained in Canada and Uganda. Results and outcomes Successful treatment outcomes after two years in both the community and hospital cohorts were high. All-cause mortality was similar in both cohorts. However, community-based patients were more likely to achieve viral suppression and had good adherence to treatment. The community-based program was slightly more cost-effective. Per capita costs in both settings were unsustainable, representing more than Uganda’s Primary Health Care Services current expenditures per person per year for all health services. The unpaid community volunteers showed high participation and low attrition rates for the two years that this program was evaluated. Challenges and successes Key successes of this study include the demonstration that antiretroviral therapy can be provided in a rural setting, the creation of a research infrastructure and culture within Kabarole’s health system, and the establishment of a research collaboration capable of enriching the global health graduate program at the University of Alberta. Challenging questions about the

  3. Providing anti-retroviral therapy in the context of self-perceived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) has been a significant step towards improving quality of life among people living with HIV. However, stigma has been described to influence adherence to ART. A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted to explore factors related to stigma and perceived influence of ...

  4. Treatment adherence in heart failure patients followed up by nurses in two specialized clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Andressa Freitas; Cavalcanti, Ana Carla Dantas; Malta, Mauricio; Arruda, Cristina Silva; Gandin, Thamires; da Fé, Adriana; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze treatment adherence in heart failure (HF) patients followed up by the nursing staff at specialized clinics and its association with patients' characteristics such as number of previous appointments, family structure, and comorbidities. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at two reference clinics for the treatment of HF patients (center 1 and center 2). Data were obtained using a 10-item questionnaire with scores ranging from 0 to 26 points; adherence was considered adequate if the score was ≥ 18 points, or 70% of adherence. Results: a total of 340 patients were included. Mean adherence score was 16 (±4) points. Additionally, 124 (36.5%) patients showed an adherence rate ≥ 70%. It was demonstrated that patients who lived with their family had higher adherence scores, that three or more previous nursing appointments was significantly associated with higher adherence (p<0.001), and that hypertension was associated with low adherence (p=0.023). Conclusions: treatment adherence was considered satisfactory in less than a half of the patients followed up at the two clinics specialized in HF. Living with the family and attending to a great number of nursing appointments improved adherence, while the presence of hypertension led to worse adherence. PMID:26487139

  5. Suboptimal treatment adherence in bipolar disorder: impact on clinical outcomes and functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Jose Manuel; Maurino, Jorge; de Dios, Consuelo; Medina, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to assess drug treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder and to identify factors associated with adherence. The secondary aim was to analyze the impact of suboptimal adherence on clinical and functional outcomes. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of outpatients receiving an oral antipsychotic drug. Medication adherence was assessed combining the 10-item Drug Attitude Inventory, the Morisky Green Adherence Questionnaire, and the Compliance Rating Scale. Logistic regression was used to determine significant variables associated with suboptimal adherence to medication. Results Three hundred and three patients were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 45.9 ± 12.8 years, and 59.7% were females. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed suboptimal adherence. Disease severity and functioning were significantly worse in the suboptimal group than in the adherent group. Multivariate analysis showed depressive polarity of the last acute episode, presence of subsyndromal symptoms, and substance abuse/dependence to be significantly associated with suboptimal treatment adherence (odds ratios 3.41, 2.13, and 1.95, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of nonadherence was found in an outpatient sample with bipolar disorder. Identification of factors related to treatment adherence would give clinicians the opportunity to select more adequately patients who are eligible for potential adherence-focused interventions. PMID:23378745

  6. Default from Anti-Retroviral Treatment Programme in Sagamu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For those who were not met at home proxy interviewees such as a neighbour or a family member were asked if they were available. Of the 100 patients who had enrolled in the ART treatment programme during the study period, 36% of the study population defaulted treatment, 18% had died while 46% were alive and well.

  7. The influence of antiretroviral treatment on willingness to test: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A few negative factors that could potentially weaken the effects of this positive relationship between ART and HCT uptake were the disclosure difficulties experienced by those enrolled in treatment, beliefs that ART does not cure HIV disease, and the travel distance to testing and treatment facilities from where people live ...

  8. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV- associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ART results in a 64 - 95% reduction in mortality risk 5 and is an essential component of care. How soon to start. ART after TB treatment initiation has become clearer from randomised controlled trials. These show that integration of ART and TB treatment in all HIV-associated TB patients regardless of CD4 count significantly.

  9. Adherence to Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment Regimen: First Report From a Referral Center in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Saeedeh; Nasiri Toosi, Mohsen; Karimzadeh, Iman; Ahadi-Barzoki, Mehdi; Khalili, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Various aspects of adherence to HCV treatment such as frequency, risk factors as well as causes of non-adherence, and its real role in clinical and virological outcome of the infected patients have remained largely unknown. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate patients’ adherence to anti-HCV medications in Iran. Materials and Methods From October 2010 to March 2011, socio-demographic characteristics, features of HCV infection, clinical properties, and habitual history of 190 patients were collected. Adherence of each patient to anti-HCV medications was determined at months 1, 3, and 6 of treatment by self-reporting and pill or empty ampoule counting. Adherence to anti-HCV treatment regimen was determined based on the 80/80/80 rule. Results Adherence rate to interferon, ribavirin, or a combination of them over the first 6 months of therapy in Iranian HCV patients measured by both methods of self-reporting and pill counting were 35.4-65.8%, 46.3-56.8%, and 28.4-51.1%, respectively. Delay in receiving new prescription, financial issues, and adverse drug reactions were the most common causes of non-adherence in the patients. Adherence to ribavirin was identified as an independent predictor of achieving the end of treatment response, or sustained virological response. Conclusions The rate of adherence to interferon and ribavirin varied significantly according to the method of calculation. Over the treatment course, adherence to interferon alpha and ribavirin, each or their combination, diminished significantly. PMID:24032043

  10. Factors influencing non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Jepara, central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondags, Angelique; Himawan, Ari Budi; Metsemakers, Job Fm; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2014-07-01

    One of the most serious problems for tuberculosis (TB) control is non-adherence to TB treatment. We studied the factors influencing non-adherence to TB treatment in Indonesia to inform TB treatment adherence strategies. We con- ducted semi-structured interviews with non-adherent patients and key informants in Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Three major themes were found in reasons for non-adherence to TB treatment: 1) knowledge about TB, 2) knowledge about TB treatment and 3) choosing and changing a health care treatment facility. Respondents had an inadequate knowledge about TB and its treatment. Feeling healthy and having financial problems were the most common reasons for TB treatment non-adherence. Respondents sought treatment from many different health care providers, and often changed the treatment facility location. TB treatment adherence might improve by providing better education about the disease and its treatment to those undergoing treatment. Providing information about where to receive treatment and that treatment is free could also improve compliance.

  11. Effectiveness of patient adherence groups as a model of care for stable patients on antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Luque-Fernandez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Innovative models of care are required to cope with the ever-increasing number of patients on antiretroviral therapy in the most affected countries. This study, in Khayelitsha, South Africa, evaluates the effectiveness of a group-based model of care run predominantly by non-clinical staff in retaining patients in care and maintaining adherence. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participation in "adherence clubs" was offered to adults who had been on ART for at least 18 months, had a current CD4 count >200 cells/ml and were virologically suppressed. Embedded in an ongoing cohort study, we compared loss to care and virologic rebound in patients receiving the intervention with patients attending routine nurse-led care from November 2007 to February 2011. We used inverse probability weighting to estimate the intention-to-treat effect of adherence club participation, adjusted for measured baseline and time-varying confounders. The principal outcome was the combination of death or loss to follow-up. The secondary outcome was virologic rebound in patients who were virologically suppressed at study entry. Of 2829 patients on ART for >18 months with a CD4 count above 200 cells/µl, 502 accepted club participation. At the end of the study, 97% of club patients remained in care compared with 85% of other patients. In adjusted analyses club participation reduced loss-to-care by 57% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.43, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91 and virologic rebound in patients who were initially suppressed by 67% (HR 0.33, 95% CI = 0.16-0.67. DISCUSSION: Patient adherence groups were found to be an effective model for improving retention and documented virologic suppression for stable patients in long term ART care. Out-of-clinic group-based models facilitated by non-clinical staff are a promising approach to assist in the long-term management of people on ART in high burden low or middle-income settings.

  12. First-line antiretroviral treatment failure and associated factors in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Kumilachew, Dawit; Belay, Assefa; Getu, Samson; Teju, Derso; Endale, Desalegn; Tsegaye, Yemisirach; Wale, Zebiba

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores immune function and reduces HIV-related adverse outcomes. But treatment failure erodes this advantage and leads to an increased morbidity and compromised quality of life in HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with first-line ART failure in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. A retrospective study was conducted on 340 adults who had started ART during the period of September 2011 to May 2015. Data regarding patients' sociodemographics, baseline characteristics, and treatment-related information were collected through review of their medical charts. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary and multiple logistic regressions were utilized. Pfailure. The median duration of treatment failure from initiation of treatment was 17.5 months (8-36 months). Poor adherence to treatment and low baseline CD4 cell count were found to be significant predictors of treatment failure. The prevalence of first-line ART failure was 4.1%. Treatment failure was most likely to occur for the patients who had poor drug adherence and those who were delayed to start ART till their CD4 cell count became very low (<100 cells/mm(3)).

  13. Physician communication and patient adherence to treatment: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnierek, Kelly B Haskard; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2009-08-01

    Numerous empirical studies from various populations and settings link patient treatment adherence to physician-patient communication. Meta-analysis allows estimates of the overall effects both in correlational research and in experimental interventions involving the training of physicians' communication skills. Calculation and analysis of "r effect sizes" and moderators of the relationship between physician's communication and patient adherence, and the effects of communication training on adherence to treatment regimens for varying medical conditions. Thorough search of published literature (1949-August 2008) producing separate effects from 106 correlational studies and 21 experimental interventions. Determination of random effects model statistics and the detailed examination of study variability using moderator analyses. Physician communication is significantly positively correlated with patient adherence; there is a 19% higher risk of non-adherence among patients whose physician communicates poorly than among patients whose physician communicates well. Training physicians in communication skills results in substantial and significant improvements in patient adherence such that with physician communication training, the odds of patient adherence are 1.62 times higher than when a physician receives no training. Communication in medical care is highly correlated with better patient adherence, and training physicians to communicate better enhances their patients' adherence. Findings can contribute to medical education and to interventions to improve adherence, supporting arguments that communication is important and resources devoted to improving it are worth investing in. Communication is thus an important factor over which physicians have some control in helping their patients to adhere.

  14. Using a treatment partner and text messaging to improve adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Poor adherence to medications, including psychotropic medications contributes to the burden of disease. Mental health service users (MHSU) may also not attend follow-up appointments at their health care facilities where they could discuss adherence with their health care provider. This paper reports on ...

  15. Reliability of assessment of adherence to an antimicrobial treatment guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, PGM; Gans, ROB; Panday, PVN; Degener, JE; Laseur, M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    Assessment procedures for adherence to a guideline must be reliable and credible. The aim of this study was to explore the reliability of assessment of adherence, taking account of the professional backgrounds of the observers. A secondary analysis explored the impact of case characteristics on

  16. Comparison of adherence to generic multi-tablet regimens vs. brand multi-tablet and brand single-tablet regimens likely to incorporate generic antiretroviral drugs by breaking or not fixed-dose combinations in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwagitinywa, Joseph; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Bourrel, Robert; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Sommet, Agnès

    2018-03-05

    Adherence to antiretroviral (ARV) is crucial to achieve viral load suppression in HIV-infected patients. This study aimed to compare adherence to generic multi-tablet regimens (MTR) vs. brand MTR likely to incorporate ARV drugs without breaking fixed-dose combinations (FDC) and brand single-tablet regimens (STR) likely to incorporate generics by breaking the FDC. Patients aged of 18 years or over exposed to one of the generic or the brand of lamivudine (3TC), zidovudine/lamivudine (AZT/TC), nevirapine (NVP), or efavirenz (EFV), or the brand STR of efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir (EFV/FTC/TDF). Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) using both defined daily dose (DDD) and daily number of tablet recommended for adults (DNT). Adherence to generic MTR vs. brand MTR and brand STR was compared using Kruskal-Wallis. The overall median adherence was 0.97 (IQR 0.13) by DNT method and 0.97 (0.14) by DDD method. Adherence in patients exposed to generic MTR (n = 165) vs. brand MTR (n = 481) and brand STR (n = 470) was comparable by DNT and DDD methods. In conclusion, adherence to generic MTR was high and comparable with adherence to brand MTR and to STR. Utilization of DDD instead DNT to measure the MPR led to small but nonsignificant difference that has no clinical impact. © 2018 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  17. Illness and treatment perceptions are associated with adherence to medications, diet, and exercise in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Donkin, Liesje; Stroh, Julia C

    2011-02-01

    To investigate diabetic patients' perceptions of illness and treatments, and explore relationships to adherence and blood glucose control. Forty-nine type 1 and one hundred and eight type 2 diabetic patients completed questionnaires assessing illness perceptions, treatment beliefs, and adherence to medications, diet, and exercise. Blood glucose control was assessed from blood tests. Patients rated medication more important than diet and exercise, and reported higher adherence to medications. Insulin was perceived as more helpful for diabetes, while antihypertensives and cholesterol medication were perceived more helpful for preventing heart problems. Perceptions were associated with adherence to insulin, cholesterol and antihypertensive medications, exercise, and diet. Blood glucose control in type 1 diabetic patients was associated with insulin adherence and perceived personal control, and in type 2 diabetic patients to being prescribed insulin or antihypertensives, and perceived personal control. Patients hold specific mental models about diabetes treatments, which are associated with adherence.

  18. Association between diabetes treatment adherence and parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Blake Mark; Gadaire, Dana M; Holman, Kathryn; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2015-06-01

    When primary responsibility for Type 1 diabetes (DM1) treatment adherence transfers from parents to adolescents, glycemic control often suffers. Low rates of treatment adherence during this transition are possibly attributable to decreased parental involvement, disagreements between parents and children regarding treatment responsibilities, and increased family conflict. The current investigation assessed the relationships between each of these variables and glycemic control among youth diagnosed with DM1. Parent and child report questionnaires were completed by 64 parent-child dyads (ages 8-18) with a child diagnosed with DM1. HbA1c readings served as measures of glycemic control. Parental involvement in their children's treatment was reported to decline with age, however absolute levels of parent involvement were not significantly correlated with youth HbA1c levels. Parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibility and reports of diabetes-related conflict were significant predictors of glycemic control. Results support previous findings implicating parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities and family conflict as predictors of treatment adherence among youth with DM1. The current study found this relationship to be significant for a larger population of children for which past research has failed to find such an effect. Taken together, these findings suggest further research is warranted to identify effective methods for transferring treatment responsibilities from parents to children. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. he role of the affective temperament in the treatment adherence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: adherence to psychotropic medications is affected by factors related to the treatment, to the physician, to the environment and to the patient himself. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of affective temperaments on treatment adherence. Methods: thirty six stabilized outpatients were ...

  20. Impact of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence: systematic review and meta-synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ingrid T; Ryu, Annemarie E; Onuegbu, Afiachukwu G; Psaros, Christina; Weiser, Sheri D; Bangsberg, David R; Tsai, Alexander C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a critical determinant of HIV-1 RNA viral suppression and health outcomes. It is generally accepted that HIV-related stigma is correlated with factors that may undermine ART adherence, but its relationship with ART adherence itself is not well established. We therefore undertook this review to systematically assess the relationship between HIV-related stigma and ART adherence. Methods We searched nine electronic databases for published and unpublished literature, with no language restrictions. First we screened the titles and abstracts for studies that potentially contained data on ART adherence. Then we reviewed the full text of these studies to identify articles that reported data on the relationship between ART adherence and either HIV-related stigma or serostatus disclosure. We used the method of meta-synthesis to summarize the findings from the qualitative studies. Results Our search protocol yielded 14,854 initial records. After eliminating duplicates and screening the titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 960 journal articles, dissertations and unpublished conference abstracts for review. We included 75 studies conducted among 26,715 HIV-positive persons living in 32 countries worldwide, with less representation of work from Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Among the 34 qualitative studies, our meta-synthesis identified five distinct third-order labels through an inductive process that we categorized as themes and organized in a conceptual model spanning intrapersonal, interpersonal and structural levels. HIV-related stigma undermined ART adherence by compromising general psychological processes, such as adaptive coping and social support. We also identified psychological processes specific to HIV-positive persons driven by predominant stigmatizing attitudes and which undermined adherence, such as internalized stigma and concealment. Adaptive coping and social support were critical

  1. Beyond clinical trials: Cross-sectional associations of combination antiretroviral therapy with reports of multiple symptoms and non-adherence among adolescents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natukunda, H P M; Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Musiime, V; Yakubovich, A R

    2017-10-31

    Studies investigating symptoms associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use among adolescents in resource-limited settings are rare beyond clinical trials. Identifying adolescents at risk of non-adherence is imperative for HIV/AIDS programming and controlling the epidemic in this key population. To examine which cART regimens were associated with reports of multiple symptoms and past-week non-adherence in a large community-traced sample of HIV-positive adolescents in South Africa (SA). A total of 1 175 HIV-positive ART-experienced adolescents aged 10 - 19 years attending 53 health facilities in the Eastern Cape Province, SA, were interviewed in 2014 - 2015. Ninety percent (n=1 059) were included in the study. Adolescents who reported no medication use and those with unclear or missing data were excluded from further analysis, resulting in a sample for analysis of n=501. Outcomes were reports of multiple symptoms (three or more symptoms in the past 6 months) and past-week ART non-adherence (<95% correct doses in the past week). Multivariable logistic regression analyses controlled for sociodemographic and HIV-related covariates in Stata 13/IC. Of the adolescents included, 54.3% were female. The median age was 14 (interquartile range 12 - 16) years, and 66.5% were vertically infected. The prevalence of multiple symptoms was 59.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 55.3 - 63.9). Independent of covariates, stavudine (d4T)-containing cART regimens and the fixed-dose combination of tenofovir (TDF) + emtricitabine (FTC) + efavirenz (EFV) were associated with more reports of multiple symptoms (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.38; 95% CI 1.19 - 9.60 and aOR 2.67; 95% CI 1.21 - 5.88, respectively). Lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r)-containing regimens were associated with fewer reports of multiple symptoms (aOR 0.47; 95% CI 0.21 - 1.04). For EFV-based regimens, adolescents on d4T + lamivudine (3TC) + EFV were more likely to report multiple symptoms than those on TDF + FTC

  2. Antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children who require a rifamycin-containing regimen for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Helena; Decloedt, Eric H; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Cotton, Mark F; Frigati, Lisa; Lallemant, Marc; Hesseling, Anneke; Schaaf, H Simon

    2017-04-01

    In high prevalence settings, tuberculosis and HIV dual infection and co-treatment is frequent. Rifamycins, especially rifampicin, in combination with isoniazid, ethambutol and pyrazinamide are key components of short-course antituberculosis therapy. Areas covered: We reviewed available data, for which articles were identified by a Pubmed search, on rifamycin-antiretroviral interactions in HIV-infected children. Rifamycins have potent inducing effects on phase I and II drug metabolising enzymes and transporters. Antiretroviral medications are often metabolised by the enzymes induced by rifamycins or may suppress specific enzyme activity leading to drug-drug interactions with rifamycins. These may cause significant alterations in their phamacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and sometimes that of the rifamycin. Recommended strategies to adapt to these interactions include avoidance and dose adjustment. Expert opinion: Despite the importance and frequency of tuberculosis as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected children, current data on the management of co-treated children is based on few studies. We need new strategies to rapidly assess the use of rifamycins, new anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretroviral drugs together as information on safety and dosing of individual drugs becomes available.

  3. Applying an expanded social determinant approach to the concept of adherence to treatment: the case of Colombian women living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Ross, Michael; Useche, Bernardo; Springer, Andrew; Correa, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and analyze social determinants that influence adherence among Colombian women living with HIV/AIDS in poverty conditions. A qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study was developed. Forty-seven women participated in five focus group discussions. Also, in-depth interviews with six women were conducted. Results showed that women with lower adherence sell their antiretroviral medication to satisfy economic needs, and prioritize the care of their HIV-positive children over their own adherence needs. In contrast, women with higher adherence were found to participate in social support groups offered by nongovernmental organizations. These findings underscore the need to understand the social determinants that facilitate and/or hinder adherence among women in poverty-associated conditions. Results indicate the need to facilitate access to treatment on a timely and continual basis; provide economic resources, including support to meet basic needs as well as subsidies for transportation to health care centers; and explore mechanism for supporting the care of their offspring. Copyright © 2011 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in Malawian adults and effect on adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy: a cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Kelly

    Full Text Available Little is known about the prevalence and burden of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND among patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated the prevalence of HAND in adult Malawians on cART and investigated the relationship between HAND and adherence to cART.HIV positive adults in Blantyre, Malawi underwent a full medical history, neurocognitive test battery, depression score, Karnofsky Performance Score and adherence assessment. The Frascati criteria were used to diagnose HAND and the Global Deficit Score (GDS was also assessed. Blood was drawn for CD4 count and plasma nevirapine and efavirenz concentrations. HIV negative adults were recruited from the HIV testing clinic to provide normative scores for the neurocognitive battery.One hundred and six HIV positive patients, with median (range age 39 (18-71 years, 73% female and median (range CD4 count 323.5 (68-1039 cells/µl were studied. Symptomatic neurocognitive impairment was present in 15% (12% mild neurocognitive disorder [MND], 3% HIV associated dementia [HAD]. A further 55% fulfilled Frascati criteria for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI; however factors other than neurocognitive impairment could have confounded this estimate. Neither the symptomatic (MND and HAD nor asymptomatic (ANI forms of HAND were associated with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz concentrations, adjusted odds ratio 1.44 (CI. 0.234, 8.798; p = 0.696 and aOR 0.577 (CI. 0.09, 3.605; p = 0.556 respectively. All patients with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz levels had a GDS of less than 0.6, consistent with normal neurocognition.Fifteen percent of adult Malawians on cART had a diagnosis of MND or HAD. Subtherapeutic drug concentrations were found exclusively in patients with normal neurocognitive function suggesting HAND did not affect cART adherence. Further study of HAND requires more robust locally derived normative neurocognitive values and

  5. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) in Malawian Adults and Effect on Adherence to Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy: A Cross Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christine M.; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Ngwalo, Chisomo; Stewart, Robert C.; Benjamin, Laura; Robertson, Kevin R.; Khoo, Saye; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the prevalence and burden of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) among patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated the prevalence of HAND in adult Malawians on cART and investigated the relationship between HAND and adherence to cART. Methods HIV positive adults in Blantyre, Malawi underwent a full medical history, neurocognitive test battery, depression score, Karnofsky Performance Score and adherence assessment. The Frascati criteria were used to diagnose HAND and the Global Deficit Score (GDS) was also assessed. Blood was drawn for CD4 count and plasma nevirapine and efavirenz concentrations. HIV negative adults were recruited from the HIV testing clinic to provide normative scores for the neurocognitive battery. Results One hundred and six HIV positive patients, with median (range) age 39 (18–71) years, 73% female and median (range) CD4 count 323.5 (68–1039) cells/µl were studied. Symptomatic neurocognitive impairment was present in 15% (12% mild neurocognitive disorder [MND], 3% HIV associated dementia [HAD]). A further 55% fulfilled Frascati criteria for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI); however factors other than neurocognitive impairment could have confounded this estimate. Neither the symptomatic (MND and HAD) nor asymptomatic (ANI) forms of HAND were associated with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz concentrations, adjusted odds ratio 1.44 (CI. 0.234, 8.798; p = 0.696) and aOR 0.577 (CI. 0.09, 3.605; p = 0.556) respectively. All patients with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz levels had a GDS of less than 0.6, consistent with normal neurocognition. Discussion/Conclusion Fifteen percent of adult Malawians on cART had a diagnosis of MND or HAD. Subtherapeutic drug concentrations were found exclusively in patients with normal neurocognitive function suggesting HAND did not affect cART adherence. Further study of HAND requires more robust

  6. Physician Communication and Patient Adherence to Treatment: A Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskard Zolnierek, Kelly B.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

    2009-01-01

    Background Numerous empirical studies from various populations and settings link patient treatment adherence to physician-patient communication. Meta-analysis allows estimates of the overall effects both in correlational research and in experimental interventions involving the training of physicians’ communication skills. Objectives Calculation and analysis of “r effect sizes” and moderators of the relationship between physician’s communication and patient adherence, and the effects of communication training on adherence to treatment regimens for varying medical conditions. Methods Thorough search of published literature (1949 - August 2008) producing separate effects from 106 correlational studies and 21 experimental interventions. Determination of random effects model statistics and the detailed examination of study variability using moderator analyses. Results Physician communication is significantly positively correlated with patient adherence; there is a 19% higher risk of nonadherence among patients whose physician communicates poorly than among patients whose physician communicates well. Training physicians in communication skills results in substantial and significant improvements in patient adherence such that with physician communication training, the odds of patient adherence are 1.62 times higher than when a physician receives no training. Conclusion Communication in medical care is highly correlated with better patient adherence, and training physicians to communicate better enhances their patients’ adherence. Findings can contribute to medical education and to interventions to improve adherence, supporting arguments that communication is important and resources devoted to improving it are worth investing in. Communication is thus an important factor over which physicians have some control in helping their patients to adhere. PMID:19584762

  7. Medication Adherence and Direct Treatment Cost among Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa, with associated health and socioeconomic consequences. Adherence to antidiabetic medications has been shown to improve glycaemic control, which subsequently improves both the short- and longterm prognosis of the ...

  8. Treatment Failure in HIV-Infected Children on Second-line Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaysod, Rapeepan; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Salvadori, Nicolas; Cressey, Tim R; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Techakunakorn, Pornchai; Krikajornkitti, Sawitree; Srirojana, Sakulrat; Laomanit, Laddawan; Chalermpantmetagul, Suwalai; Lallemant, Marc; Le Cœur, Sophie; McIntosh, Kenneth; Traisathit, Patrinee; Jourdain, Gonzague

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children failing second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) have no access to third-line antiretroviral drugs in many resource-limited settings. It is important to identify risk factors for second-line regimen failure. HIV-infected children initiating protease inhibitor (PI)-containing second-line ART within the Program for HIV Prevention and Treatment observational cohort study in Thailand between 2002 and 2010 were included. Treatment failure was defined as confirmed HIV type 1 RNA load >400 copies/mL after at least 6 months on second-line regimen or death. Adherence was assessed by drug plasma levels and patient self-report. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for failure. A total of 111 children started a PI-based second-line regimen, including 59 girls (53%). Median first-line ART duration was 1.9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.4-3.3 years), and median age at second-line initiation was 10.7 years (IQR, 6.3-13.4 years). Fifty-four children (49%) experienced virologic failure, and 2 (2%) died. The risk of treatment failure 24 months after second-line initiation was 41%. In multivariate analyses, failure was independently associated with exposure to first-line ART for >2 years (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.8; P = .03), age >13 years (aHR, 2.9; P < .001), body mass index-for-age z score < -2 standard deviations at second-line initiation (aHR, 2.8; P = .03), and undetectable drug levels within 6 months following second-line initiation (aHR, 4.5; P < .001). Children with longer exposure to first-line ART, entry to adolescence, underweight, and/or undetectable drug levels were at higher risk of failing second-line ART and thus should be closely monitored. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Medication Adherence Affects Treatment Modifications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, Jaco; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Denig, Petra

    Background: Low rates of treatment modification in patients with insufficiently controlled risk factors are common in type 2 diabetes. Although adherence problems are often mentioned in surveys as a reason for not intensifying treatment, observational studies have shown inconclusive results.

  10. Explanatory models of depression and treatment adherence to antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Johannessen, Helle; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    and medicine were not central. However, taking antidepressant medication was a meaningful part of being admitted to hospital, and the adoption of the rhetoric and practices of biomedicine strengthened patients' sense of control and hope for recovery. If medicine was ineffective, the explanatory models...... legitimised alternative strategies towards recovery, including non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' reasons for adhering to antidepressants included a range of diverse psychosocial issues, and could be regarded as a central part of their common sense illness management....

  11. Treatment of HIV in the CNS: effects of antiretroviral therapy and the promise of non-antiretroviral therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Spudich, Serena

    2014-09-01

    The growing recognition of the burden of neurologic disease associated with HIV infection in the last decade has led to renewed efforts to characterize the pathophysiology of the virus within the central nervous system (CNS). The concept of the AIDS-dementia complex is now better understood as a spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from asymptomatic disease to severe impairment. Recent work has shown that even optimally treated patients can experience not only persistent HAND, but also the development of new neurologic abnormalities despite viral suppression. This has thrown into question what the impact of antiretroviral therapy has been on the incidence and prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction. In this context, the last few years have seen a concentrated effort to identify the effects that antiretroviral therapy has on the neurologic manifestations of HIV and to develop therapeutic modalities that might specifically alter the trajectory of HIV within the CNS.

  12. The perspectives of users of antiretroviral therapy on structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... Abstract. Background: The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the importance of adherence to treatment regimens are widely known. ... Kagee A, PhD, MPH, Professor of Psychology. Nothling J, MA, Master's ..... don't benefit from sick benefits, including time off work to attend appointments.

  13. Social support a key factor for adherence to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, R D; Dhande, D J; Sachdeva, K S; Sreenivas, A N; Kumar, A M V; Parmar, M

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a major public health problem globally. Treatment success rates in MDR-TB across the globe are not encouraging as completing MDR-TB treatment successfully is challenging due to high proportion of lost to follow up. Using qualitative methods and grounded theory approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with MDR-TB patients and treatment providers. The social cognitive framework was explored as a way to guide understanding of the factors affecting treatment adherence among MDR-TB patients. Multiple factors influenced patient's decision to adhere to MDR-TB treatment. Self-motivation, awareness about disease and treatment, counselling support, family support, nutritional support and social support were important drivers for successful treatment. Providers related that motivational counselling, nutritional support, family support and social support encouraged treatment adherence. To improve MDR-TB treatment adherence, a patient-centric approach should be considered at the programmatic level. There is a need to formulate strategy that includes motivational counselling, nutritional supplementation and social support mobilisation for treatment adherence. Participants suggested a Patient Support Group led treatment care model for better adherence and treatment success rates in MDR-TB treatment. Copyright © 2017 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Social and structural barriers for adherence to methadone maintenance treatment among Vietnamese opioid dependence patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Tran, Tung Thanh; Latkin, Carl A

    2018-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) services may reduce the risk of HIV transmission if patients completely adhere to the treatment. Identifying adherence patterns and potential related factors is vital for the sustainability of MMT program in Vietnam. This study examined social and structural factors associated with adherence to MMT among patients in different service delivery models. A total of 510 patients at three MMT clinics in Hanoi were interviewed. Measures of self-reported adherence included the number of missed doses in the past 7 days and the level of adherence in the past 30 days using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring from 0 (non-adherence) to 100 (perfect adherence). Multivariate regressions were employed to identify factors associated with non-adherence to MMT. A total of 17.7% of participants reported incomplete MMT adherence in the last 30 days and 8.3% reported missing a dose in the last seven days, respectively. Living with HIV/AIDS, poor self-care and usual activities, and disclosure of health issues to spouses or intimate partners were associated with non-adherence. Those patients with pain or depression were more likely to report better adherence. Disclosing health status to spouse/partner increased the risk of incomplete adherence, while disclosing to friends reduced the number of missed dose in the last seven days. Patients attending clinics with comprehensive services had a lower VAS score of adherence compared to those enrolling in clinics with only MMT and general health care. Sustaining the compliance of patients to MMT is principal in the rapid expansion of this service in Vietnam. It is necessary to address the complexity of health care demands of drug users, their difficulties to be rehabilitated into workforce and society, and the stigmatization to maximize the outcomes of MMT program.

  15. Pilot study of a multi-pronged intervention using social norms and priming to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and retention in care among adults living with HIV in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra I McCoy

    Full Text Available Interventions incorporating constructs from behavioral economics and psychology have the potential to enhance HIV 'treatment as prevention' (TasP strategies. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated an intervention to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence based on the concepts of social norms and priming.We used tools from marketing research and patient-centered design to develop a combination intervention that included visual feedback about clinic-level retention in care, a self-relevant prime, and useful take-home items with the priming image. The intervention was implemented at two HIV primary clinics in Shinyanga, Tanzania in 2-week intervals for six months. We conducted a quasi-experimental pilot study with a random sample of exposed and unexposed adult patients living with HIV infection (PLHIV to compare retention and the proportion of patients with medication possession ratio (MPR ≥95% after six months. Intervention acceptability was determined with a convenience sample of 405 PLHIV at baseline (n = 189 and endline (n = 216.Medical records were reviewed for 438 PLHIV (320 intervention, 118 standard of care. In adjusted analyses, PLHIV exposed to the intervention were significantly more likely to be in care after 6 months (87% vs. 79%, adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.78, p<0.05 and were more likely to achieve MPR≥95% (70% vs. 59%, OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.96, 2.37, p = 0.07. The intervention was associated with increases in staff support of treatment goals (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.01 and life goals (66% vs. 50%, p<0.01, the perceived likelihood of other patients' adherence (54% vs. 32%, p<0.01, support from other patients (71% vs. 60%, p = 0.03, and being very satisfied with care (53% vs. 35%, p<0.01.This novel intervention has the potential to improve the clinic experience, short-term retention in care, and ART adherence. Future studies are needed to expand the generalizability of the approach and evaluate effectiveness

  16. Pilot study of a multi-pronged intervention using social norms and priming to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and retention in care among adults living with HIV in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I; Fahey, Carolyn; Rao, Aarthi; Kapologwe, Ntuli; Njau, Prosper F; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Interventions incorporating constructs from behavioral economics and psychology have the potential to enhance HIV 'treatment as prevention' (TasP) strategies. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated an intervention to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence based on the concepts of social norms and priming. We used tools from marketing research and patient-centered design to develop a combination intervention that included visual feedback about clinic-level retention in care, a self-relevant prime, and useful take-home items with the priming image. The intervention was implemented at two HIV primary clinics in Shinyanga, Tanzania in 2-week intervals for six months. We conducted a quasi-experimental pilot study with a random sample of exposed and unexposed adult patients living with HIV infection (PLHIV) to compare retention and the proportion of patients with medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥95% after six months. Intervention acceptability was determined with a convenience sample of 405 PLHIV at baseline (n = 189) and endline (n = 216). Medical records were reviewed for 438 PLHIV (320 intervention, 118 standard of care). In adjusted analyses, PLHIV exposed to the intervention were significantly more likely to be in care after 6 months (87% vs. 79%, adjusted odds ratio (ORa) = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.78, p<0.05) and were more likely to achieve MPR≥95% (70% vs. 59%, OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.96, 2.37, p = 0.07). The intervention was associated with increases in staff support of treatment goals (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.01) and life goals (66% vs. 50%, p<0.01), the perceived likelihood of other patients' adherence (54% vs. 32%, p<0.01), support from other patients (71% vs. 60%, p = 0.03), and being very satisfied with care (53% vs. 35%, p<0.01). This novel intervention has the potential to improve the clinic experience, short-term retention in care, and ART adherence. Future studies are needed to expand the generalizability of the approach and evaluate effectiveness on

  17. Rationale and design of a randomized study of short-term food and cash assistance to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among food insecure HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I; Njau, Prosper F; Czaicki, Nancy L; Kadiyala, Suneetha; Jewell, Nicholas P; Dow, William H; Padian, Nancy S

    2015-10-28

    Food insecurity is an important barrier to retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV infection (PLHIV). However, there is a lack of rigorous evidence about how to improve food security and HIV-related clinical outcomes. To address this gap, this randomized trial will evaluate three delivery models for short-term food and nutrition support for food insecure PLHIV in Shinyanga, Tanzania: nutrition assessment and counseling (NAC) alone, NAC plus food assistance, and NAC plus cash transfers. At three HIV care and treatment sites, 788 participants will be randomized into one of three study arms in a 3:3:1 ratio, stratified by site: NAC plus food assistance, NAC plus cash transfer, and NAC only. Eligible participants are: 1) at least 18 years of age; 2) living with HIV infection; 3) initiated ART in the past 90 days; and 4) food insecure, as measured with the Household Hunger Scale. PLHIV who are severely malnourished (body mass index (BMI) food or cash transfers are eligible to receive assistance for up to six months, conditional on attending regularly scheduled visits with their HIV care provider. Participants will be followed for 12 months: the initial 6-month intervention period and then for another 6 months post-intervention. The primary outcome is ART adherence measured with the medication possession ratio. Secondary outcomes include 1) retention in care; 2) nutritional indicators including changes in food security, BMI, and weight gain; 3) viral suppression and self-reported ART adherence; and 4) participation in the labor force. This rigorously designed trial will inform policy decisions regarding supportive strategies for food insecure PLHIV in the early stages of treatment. The study will measure outcomes immediately after the period of support ends as well as 6 months later, providing information on the duration of the interventions' effect. The comparison of food to cash transfers will better inform policies

  18. Prices of second-line antiretroviral treatment for middle-income countries inside versus outside sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Bryony; Hill, Andrew; Ford, Nathan; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Antiretrovirals are available at low prices in sub-Saharan Africa, but these prices may not be consistently available for middle-income countries in other regions with large HIV epidemics. Over 30% of HIV infected people live in countries outside sub-Saharan Africa. Several key antiretrovirals are still on patent, with generic production restricted. We assessed price variations for key antiretroviral drugs inside versus outside sub-Saharan Africa. HIV drug prices used in national programmes (2010-2014) were extracted from the WHO Global Price Reporting Mechanism database for all reporting middle-income countries as classified by the World Bank. Treatment costs (branded and generic) were compared for countries inside sub-Saharan Africa versus those outside. Five key second-line antiretrovirals were analysed: abacavir, atazanavir, darunavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, raltegravir. Prices of branded antiretrovirals were significantly higher outside sub-Saharan Africa (psub-Saharan Africa versus $4689 (IQR $4075-5717) in non-African middle-income countries, an increase of 541%. However, when supplied by generic companies, most antiretrovirals were similarly priced between countries in sub-Saharan Africa and other regions. Pharmaceutical companies are selling antiretrovirals to non-African middle-income countries at prices 74-541% higher than African countries with similar gross national incomes. However, generic companies are selling most of these drugs at similar prices across regions. Mechanisms to ensure fair pricing for patented antiretrovirals across both African and non-African middle-income countries need to be improved, to ensure sustainable treatment access.

  19. Tenofovir treatment in an unselected cohort of highly antiretroviral experienced HIV positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kristiansen, Thomas B; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the treatment effect of tenofovir as implemented in clinical practice. Data are presented on 34 patients. 11 patients had tenofovir added to a stable anti-retroviral treatment (ART) and 23 patients had drugs other than tenofovir. CD4 counts, HIV......-RNA levels and genotypic resistance were determined at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. After initiation of tenofovir treatment, a mean decrease in HIV-RNA for all 34 patients was observed (-0.43 log1o copies/ml (+/- 1.22) and -0.49 log10 copies/ml (+/- 1.36) after 3 and 6 months, respectively, (p = 0...... initiation of tenofovir treatment, no significant increases in CD4 count were observed. All new NRTI-associated mutations could be explained by the background treatment. In conclusion, we observed a significant decrease in HIV-RNA only when tenofovir was prescribed, in conjunction with other anti...

  20. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F; Saag, Michael S; Benson, Constance A; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Hoy, Jennifer F; Mugavero, Michael J; Sax, Paul E; Thompson, Melanie A; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Landovitz, Raphael J; Smith, Davey M; Jacobsen, Donna M; Volberding, Paul A

    2016-07-12

    monitoring