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Sample records for antiretroviral therapy adherence

  1. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

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    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV

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    Basavaprabhu Achappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS is now considered as a manageable chronic illness. There has been a dramatic reduction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV related morbidity and mortality due to antiretroviral therapy. A high level of adherence (>95% is required for antiretroviral therapy to be effective. There are many barriers to adherence in both developed and developing countries. Aim: The aim of our study was to determine adherence levels and factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, 116 HIV positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 1 year were interviewed using a semi structured questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS version 11.5. Chi-square test was done. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of 116 participants, 63.7% reported adherence ≥ 95%. Mean adherence index was 91.25%. Financial constraints, forgetting to take medication, lack of family care, depression, alcohol use, social stigma and side effects to antiretroviral therapy were barriers for adherence in our study. Conclusion: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in south India is suboptimal. Intensive adherence counseling should be provided to all patients before initiation ofantiretroviral therapy. Health care providers must identify possible barriers to adherence at the earliest and provide appropriate solutions.

  3. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: are we doing enough?

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    Read, T; Mijch, A; Fairley, C K

    2003-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a powerful predictor of response to therapy. For optimal antiretroviral therapy response, individuals need to take more than 95% of their prescribed medication. The most widely used method for measuring adherence is self-report of the number of missed doses and this should be done at every clinic visit. There are several well-recognized predictors of poor adherence, such as illicit drug use, depression, limited knowledge or ambivalence about starting treatment. Adherence can be improved by addressing these issues or through other means such as pill boxes or electronic reminders. PMID:12752896

  4. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

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    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  5. Namibian prisoners describe barriers to HIV antiretroviral therapy adherence.

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    Shalihu, Nauyele; Pretorius, Louise; van Dyk, Agnes; Vander Stoep, Ann; Hagopian, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Little is available in scholarly literature about how HIV-positive prisoners, especially in low-income countries, access antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication. We interviewed 18 prisoners at a large prison in Namibia to identify barriers to medication adherence. The lead nurse researcher was a long-standing clinic employee at the prison, which afforded her access to the population. We identified six significant barriers to adherence, including (1) the desire for privacy and anonymity in a setting where HIV is strongly stigmatized; (2) the lack of simple supports for adherence, such as availability of clocks; (3) insufficient access to food to support the toll on the body of ingesting taxing ART medications; (4) commodification of ART medication; (5) the brutality and despair in the prison setting, generally leading to discouragement and a lack of motivation to strive for optimum health; and (6) the lack of understanding about HIV, how it is transmitted, and how it is best managed. Because most prisoners eventually transition back to communitysettings when their sentences are served, investments in prison health represent important investments in public health. PMID:24499371

  6. Do disability grants influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy?

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    Ashraf Kagee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal data suggest that some South Africans living with HIV who receive disability grants from the state deliberately default on their antiretroviral medication in an attempt to lower their CD4 count to remain eligible for grants. No actual empirical data however exist to show that disability grants act as such perverse incentives and are a valid reason for non-adherence. This article examines some of the complexities of antiretroviral adherence in the context of a resource-constrained environment. The multitude of structural barriers, including sometimes difficult patient-doctor conversations about the renewal of disability grants, shape patients’ experiences of the clinic environment and influence their adherence to care.

  7. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a context of universal access, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Remien, R. H.; BASTOS, F. I.; Terto, V.; RAXACH, J. C.; Pinto, R.m.; Parker, R. G.; BERKMAN, A.; HACKER, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Adherence is integral to improving and maintaining the health and quality of life of people living with HIV. Two-hundred HIV-positive adults recruited from teaching hospitals and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Rio de Janeiro City were assessed on socio-demographic factors, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and psychosocial factors hypothesized to be associated with ART. Predictors of non-adherence were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Self-reported medicat...

  8. Barriers to and Facilitators of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

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    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Patient's adherence is crucial to get the best out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study explores in-depth the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence among Nepalese patients and service providers prescribing ART. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 participants. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and translated into English before being analyzed thematically. ART-prescribed patients described a range of barriers for failing to adhere to ART. Fina...

  9. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

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    van Loggerenberg, F; Gray, D.; Gengiah, S; Kunene, P; Gengiah, TN; Naidoo, K.; Grant, AD

    2015-01-01

    Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, includ...

  10. Correlates of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-positive drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hanoi, Vietnam.

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    Jordan, M R; Obeng-Aduasare, Y; Sheehan, H; Hong, S Y; Terrin, N; Duong, D V; Trung, N V; Wanke, C; Kinh, N V; Tang, A M

    2014-08-01

    The HIV epidemic in Vietnam is concentrated, with high prevalence estimates among injection drug users and commercial sex workers. Socio-demographics, substance use and clinical correlates of antiretroviral therapy non-adherence were studied in 100 HIV-1 infected drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months in Hanoi, Vietnam. All study participants were men with a mean age of 29.9 ± 4.9 years. The median duration on antiretroviral therapy was 16.2 ± 12.7 months; 83% reported 'very good' or 'perfect' adherence in the past 30 days on a subjective one-item Likert scale at time of study enrollment; 48% of participants reported drug use within the previous 6 months, with 22% reporting current drug use. Injection drug use with or without non-injection drug use in the past 6 months (95% C.I. 2.19, 1.30-3.69) and years on antiretroviral therapy (95% C.I. 1.43, 1.14-1.78) were correlated with suboptimal adherence. These findings support Vietnam's ongoing scale-up of harm reduction programmes for injection drug users and their integration with antiretroviral therapy delivery. Moreover, results highlight the need to identify and implement new ways to support high levels of antiretroviral therapy adherence as duration on antiretroviral therapy increases.

  11. A pilot study of health beliefs and attitudes concerning measures of antiretroviral adherence among prisoners receiving directly observed antiretroviral therapy.

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    White, Becky L; Wohl, David A; Hays, Ron D; Golin, Carol E; Liu, Honghu; Kiziah, C Nichole; Simpson, Gregory; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2006-06-01

    High level adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve and maintain suppression of HIV replication. Although directly observed therapy (DOT) has been suggested as an intervention to improve adherence, there is a paucity of data describing the attitudes and beliefs regarding DOT for ART among HIV-infected individuals. This study was designed to evaluate the acceptability and psychometric properties of a survey instrument for use in assessing barriers and facilitators of adherence to ART DOT in prison. From July 1, 1999 to April 1, 2000, we piloted an interviewer-administered questionnaire to assess health beliefs and attitudes regarding HIV treatment among 65 HIV-infected prison inmates receiving one or more of their antiretrovirals via directly observed therapy (DOT). The first 24 participants were administered the questionnaire to determine the feasibility of surveying prisoners in a correctional setting. There were no adherence data collected on these participants. The remaining 41 participants had their adherence measured in addition to receiving the questionnaire. Thirty-one were included in the final analysis because 10 did not complete the study. Multiple antiretroviral adherence measures (electronic device medication monitoring [eDEM] caps, medication administration records [MARs], and pill counts) were assessed among a subset of the participants (n = 31) and correlated to the instrument response items. The median internal consistency reliability coefficient for the multi-item scales was 0.79. The strongest correlation between inmates' beliefs and their adherence was between "positive beliefs about protease inhibitors" and the MAR adherence measure (r = 0.72; p < 0.001). This study provides preliminary support for the psychometric properties of the survey in this correctional setting. PMID:16789854

  12. Trauma History and Depression Predict Incomplete Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapies in a Low Income Country

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    Kathryn Whetten; Kristen Shirey; Brian Wells Pence; Jia Yao; Nathan Thielman; Rachel Whetten; Julie Adams; Bernard Agala; Jan Ostermann; Karen O'Donnell; Amy Hobbie; Venance Maro; Dafrosa Itemba; Elizabeth Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Background As antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs), understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care. Methodology Th...

  13. Factors associated with non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya

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    Wakibi Samwel N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART requires high-level (> 95% adherence. Kenya is rolling out ART access programmes and, issue of adherence to therapy is therefore imperative. However, published data on adherence to ART in Kenya is limited. This study assessed adherence to ART and identified factors responsible for non adherence in Nairobi. Methods This is a multiple facility-based cross-sectional study, where 416 patients aged over 18 years were systematically selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire about their experience taking ART. Additional data was extracted from hospital records. Patients were grouped into adherent and non-adherent based on a composite score derived from a three questions adherence tool developed by Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE. Multivariate regression model was used to determine predictors of non-adherence. Results Overall, 403 patients responded; 35% males and 65% females, 18% were non-adherent, and main (38% reason for missing therapy were being busy and forgetting. Accessing ART in a clinic within walking distance from home (OR = 2.387, CI.95 = 1.155-4.931; p = 0.019 and difficulty with dosing schedule (OR = 2.310, CI.95 = 1.211-4.408, p = 0.011 predicted non-adherence. Conclusions The study found better adherence to HAART in Nairobi compared to previous studies in Kenya. However, this can be improved further by employing fitting strategies to improve patients' ability to fit therapy in own lifestyle and cue-dose training to impact forgetfulness. Further work to determine why patients accessing therapy from ARV clinics within walking distance from their residence did not adhere is recommended.

  14. Anxiety and depression symptoms as risk factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazil.

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    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Remien, Robert H

    2010-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common among HIV-infected people and rank among the strongest predictors of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This longitudinal study aimed to assess whether symptoms of anxiety and depression are predictors of non-adherence among patients initiating ART at two public referral centers (n = 293) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Prevalence of severe anxiety and depression symptoms before starting ART was 12.6% and 5.8%, respectively. Severe anxiety was a predictor of non-adherence to ART during follow-up period (RH = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.14-3.06) adjusted for low education, unemployment, alcohol use in the last month and symptoms of AIDS; while a history of injection drug use had borderline statistical significance with non-adherence. These findings suggest that using a brief screening procedure to assess anxiety and depression symptoms before initiating ART help identify individuals for interventions to improve adherence and quality of life.

  15. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

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    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  16. Patient retention and adherence to antiretrovirals in a large antiretroviral therapy program in Nigeria: a longitudinal analysis for risk factors.

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    Man Charurat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Substantial resources and patient commitment are required to successfully scale-up antiretroviral therapy (ART and provide appropriate HIV management in resource-limited settings. We used pharmacy refill records to evaluate risk factors for loss to follow-up (LTFU and non-adherence to ART in a large treatment cohort in Nigeria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between March 2005 and July 2006 at five health facilities. Patients were classified as LTFU if they did not return >60 days from their expected visit. Pharmacy refill rates were calculated and used to assess non-adherence. We identified risk factors associated with LTFU and non-adherence using Cox and Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE regressions, respectively. Of 5,760 patients initiating ART, 26% were LTFU. Female gender (p 350 and 2 hours to the clinic (p = 0.03, had total ART duration of >6 months (p200 at ART initiation were at a higher risk of non-adherence. Patients who disclosed their HIV status to spouse/family (p = 0.01 and were treated with tenofovir-containing regimens (p < or = 0.001 were more likely to be adherent. CONCLUSIONS: These findings formed the basis for implementing multiple pre-treatment visit preparation that promote disclosure and active community outreaching to support retention and adherence. Expansion of treatment access points of care to communities to diminish travel time may have a positive impact on adherence.

  17. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  18. Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy initiation on adherence to antituberculosis treatment

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    Marlene Knight

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare workers are often reluctant to start combination antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients receiving tuberculosis (TB treatment because of the fear of high pill burden, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and side-effects.Object: To quantify changes in adherence to tuberculosis treatment following ART initiation.Design: A prospective observational cohort study of ART-naïve individuals with baseline CD4 count between 50 cells/mm3 and 350 cells/mm3 at start of TB treatment at a primary care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Adherence to TB treatment was measured by pill count,self-report, and electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (eMEMS before and after initiation of ART.Results: ART tended to negatively affect adherence to TB treatment, with an 8% – 10% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to pill count and an 18% – 22% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to eMEMS in the first month following ART initiation, independent of the cut-off used to define adherence (90%, 95% or 100%. Reasons for non-adherence were multi factorial, and employment was the only predictor for optimal adherence (adjusted odds ratio 4.11, 95% confidence interval 1.06–16.0.Conclusion: Adherence support in the period immediately following ART initiation could optimise treatment outcomes for people living with TB and HIV.

  19. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and its correlates among HIV infected pediatric patients in Ethiopia

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    Amberbir Alemayehu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART has resulted in striking reductions in HIV-related mortality. Despite increased availability of ART, children remain a neglected population. This may be due to concerns that failure to adhere appears to be related to continued viral replication, treatment failure and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of HIV. This study determines the rates and factors associated with adherence to Antiretroviral (ARV Drug therapy in HIV-infected children who were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2008. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in Addis Ababa from February 18 – April 28, 2008. The study population entailed parents/caretaker and index children who were following ART in the health facilities. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Results A total of 390 children respondents were included in the study with a response rate of 91%. The majority, equaling 205 (52.6% of the children, were greater than 9 years of age. Fifty five percent of the children were girls. A total of 339 children (86.9% as reported by caregivers were adherent to antiretroviral drugs for the past 7 days before the interview. Numerous variables were found to be significantly associated with adherence: children whose parents did not pay a fee for treatment [OR = 0.39 (95%CI: 0.16, 0.92], children who had ever received any nutritional support from the clinic [OR = 0.34 (95%CI: 0.14, 0.79] were less likely to adhere. Whereas children who took co-trimoxazole medication/syrup besides ARVs [OR = 3.65 (95%CI: 1.24, 10.74], children who did not know their sero-status [OR = 2.53 (95%CI: 1.24, 5.19] and children who were not aware of their caregiver's health problem [OR = 2.45 (95%CI: 1.25, 4.81] were more likely to adhere than their counterparts. Conclusion Adherence to HAART in children in Addis Ababa was higher than

  20. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

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    Kathryn Whetten

    Full Text Available As antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs, understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care.The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+ participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468. Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART.Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence.This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of

  1. Short term adherence tool predicts failure on second line protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: an observational cohort study

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    Court, Richard; Leisegang, Rory; Stewart, Annemie; Sunpath, Henry; Murphy, Richard; Winternheimer, Philip; Ally, Mashuda; Maartens, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background Most patients who experience virologic failure (VF) on second line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low-middle income countries fail due to poor adherence rather than antiretroviral resistance. A simple adherence tool designed to detect VF would conserve resources by rationally limiting need for viral load (VL) testing and, in those countries with access to third line ART, the need for resistance testing. Methods We conducted an observational cohort study of patients who initiated s...

  2. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

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    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test. PMID:27695297

  3. Highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and its determinants in selected regions in Indonesia

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    Felix F. Widjaja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART can reduce morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients. However, it depends upon adherence to medication. The objective of this study was to examine the adherence to HAART and to evaluate individual patient characteristics i.e. self-efficacy, depression level, and social support and to finally determine HAART adherence in selected regions in Indonesia.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Jakarta, Malang, Bandung, Makasar and Banda Aceh. The subject of the study was HIV-infected patients who were older than 13 years old and had taken HAART for at least a month. They were recruited consecutively then asked how many pills they had missed during the previous month. Poor adherence can be stated if the percentage of adherence rate is below 95%. HIV treatment adherence self-efficacy scale  (HIVASES, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL was adapted to assess self-efficacy, depression level and social support, respectively.Results: We found that 96% (n=53 of the subjects adhered to HAART. There were no associations between adherence with self-efficacy, depression level, and social support. The main cause of non-adherence in this study was ‘simply  forget’.Conclusion: Adherence to HAART was found to be high and not associated with self-efficacy, depression level and social support in some central regions in Indonesia. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:50-5Keywords: adherence, depression, HAART, HIV, self-efficacy, social support

  4. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

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    Dagli-Hernandez C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Dagli-Hernandez,1 Rosa Camila Lucchetta,1 Tales Rubens de Nadai,2 José Carlos Fernandez Galduróz,3 Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni1 1Department of Drugs and Medications, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, 2Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Americo Brasiliense State Hospital, 3Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Objectives: To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ] and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP] to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results: Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion: A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self

  5. Measuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children and adolescents in western Kenya

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    Rachel C Vreeman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART are central to HIV management. The objective of this study was to compare multiple measures of adherence and investigate factors associated with adherence among HIV-infected children in western Kenya. Methods: We evaluated ART adherence prospectively for six months among HIV-infected children aged ≤14 years attending a large outpatient HIV clinic in Kenya. Adherence was reported using caregiver report, plasma drug concentrations and Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS®. Kappa statistics were used to compare adherence estimates with MEMS®. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between child, caregiver and household characteristics with dichotomized adherence (MEMS® adherence ≥90% vs. <90% and MEMS® treatment interruptions of ≥48 hours. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated. Results: Among 191 children, mean age at baseline was 8.2 years and 55% were female. Median adherence by MEMS® was 96.3% and improved over the course of follow-up (p<0.01, although 49.5% of children had at least one MEMS® treatment interruption of ≥48 hours. Adherence estimates were highest by caregiver report, and there was poor agreement between MEMS® and other adherence measures (Kappa statistics 0.04–0.37. In multivariable logistic regression, only caregiver-reported missed doses in the past 30 days (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14–1.39, late doses in the past seven days (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05–1.22 and caregiver-reported problems with getting the child to take ART (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01–1.20 were significantly associated with dichotomized MEMS® adherence. The caregivers reporting that ART made the child sick (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.25 and reporting difficulties in the community that made giving ART more difficult (e.g. stigma (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02–1.27 were significantly associated with MEMS® treatment interruptions in

  6. Limited patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, PT; Sprangers, MAG; Burger, DM; Hoetelmans, RMW; Hugen, PWH; Danner, SA; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Schneider, MME; Schrey, G; Meenhorst, PL; Sprenger, HG; Kauffmann, RH; Jambroes, M; Chesney, MA; de Wolf, F; Lange, JMA

    2001-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency syndrome type 1 (HIV-1) infection is essential to sustain viral suppression and prevent drug resistance. We investigated adherence to HAART among patients in a clinical cohort study. Methods: Patients re

  7. The factors that influence adherence of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS to anti-retroviral therapy

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    Valéria Lima de Barros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the experiences of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS in relation to adherence to antiretroviral therapy in two public hospitals of reference for HIV/AIDS in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study conducted with 24 pregnant women who were in prenatal care and use of antiretroviral therapy. Sociodemographic and obstetric data and information regarding the experience with antiretroviral therapy adherence were collected from July to September 2009, through a semi-structured interview. Results: Womenhad a mean age of 29, low income, low education and a stable partner. It was found that some factors affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Among these, stand out not accepting the diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS. However,the fear of transmitting the virus to the baby acted as a stimulus for pregnant women adhere to treatment. Conclusion: The non-acceptance of diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS negatively affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral treatment. On the other hand, the fear that the child be born with the virus and the desire to continue to live are stimuli to adherence.

  8. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors.

  9. Adherence and Readiness to Antiretroviral Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Södergård, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy places extraordinarily high demands on adherence, since non-adherence affects both individuals and society due to the spread of resistant viral strains. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the prevalence of adherence in Swedish HIV-infected patients, changes in adherence over time, and factors associated with adherence, including patients’ readiness to adhere. Further, to investigate the collaboration between nurses, doctors and pharmacists after the introduction...

  10. Effect of a clinic-wide social marketing campaign to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, Thomas P.; Rodriguez, Sonia; Zhang, Hong; Kallen, Michael A.; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Buscher, April L.; Arya, Monisha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Ross, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This demonstration study tested the impact of a 5-month clinic-wide social marketing campaign at improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The intervention included a video, posters, pens, mugs, and lapel buttons with the campaign slogan “Live the Solution: Take Your Pills Every Day.” Participants self-reported adherence over a 4-week interval, the primary outcome, with a visual analogue scale. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by 141 participants. Adherence did not...

  11. Low-Cost Method to Monitor Patient Adherence to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Using Multiplex Cathepsin Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K; Roberts, LaDeidra M; Caulk, Alexander W; Gleason, Rudolph L; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low-resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART-naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire, 4-6 months after ART initiation. 86 % of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin-positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95 % CI 1.26-4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis-based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource-limited settings. PMID:26589706

  12. Tailored nutrition education and food assistance improve adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy: evidence from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Homero; Palar, Kartika; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity and malnutrition negatively affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with poor HIV clinical outcomes. We examined the effect of providing household food assistance and nutrition education on ART adherence. A 12-month prospective clinical trial compared the effect of a monthly household food basket (FB) plus nutrition education (NE) versus NE alone on ART adherence on 400 HIV patients at four clinics in Honduras. Participants had been receiving ART for an average of 3.7 years and were selected because they had suboptimal adherence. Primary outcome measures were missed clinic appointments, delayed prescription refills, and self-reported missed doses of ART. These three adherence measures improved for both groups over 12 months (p < 0.01), mostly within 6 months. On-time prescription refills improved for the FB plus NE group by 19.6 % more than the group receiving NE alone after 6 months (p < 0.01), with no further change at 12 months. Change in missed appointments and self-reported missed ART doses did not significantly differ by intervention group.

  13. Retention in care and medication adherence: current challenges to antiretroviral therapy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Carol W; Brady, Kathleen A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-04-01

    Health behaviors such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse), patient-enabling factors (e.g., social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and healthcare environment factors (e.g., pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include (1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; (2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; (3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems; (4) provision of reminder devices and tools; (5) general education and counseling; (6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; (7) case management; and (8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the healthcare environment. PMID:25792300

  14. Predicting Malawian women’s intention to adhere to antiretroviral therapy

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    Ogbochi McKinney

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. With the increase in scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART, knowledge of the need for adherence to ART is pivotal for successful treatment outcomes. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2013. We administered theory of planned behaviour (TPB and adherence questionnaires to 358 women aged 18-49 years, from a rural and urban ART-clinics in southern Malawi. Hierarchical linear regression models were used to predict intentions to adhere to ART. Results. Regression models showed that attitude (β=0.47, subjective norm (β=0.31, and perceived behavioral control (β=0.12 explain 55% of the variance in intentions to adhere to ART. The relationship between both food insecurity and perceived side effects with intentions to adhere to ART is mediated by attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. Household (r=0.20 and individual (r=0.21 food insecurity were positively and significantly correlated with perceived behavioural control. Household food insecurity had a negative correlation with perceived side effects (r=-0.11. Perceived side effects were positively correlated with attitude (r=0.25. There was no statistically significant relationship between intentions to adhere to ART in the future and one month self-report of past month adherence. These interactions suggest that attitude predicted adherence only when food insecurity is high or perception of side effects is strong.Conclusions. This study shows that modification might be needed when using TPB constructs in resource constraint environments

  15. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically-vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10–16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00–2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth’s adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92–2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07–2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase ART uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  16. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10-16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00-2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth's adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92-2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV. PMID:27392003

  17. Food insecurity as a barrier to sustained antiretroviral therapy adherence in Uganda.

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    Sheri D Weiser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food insecurity is emerging as an important barrier to antiretroviral (ARV adherence in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere, but little is known about the mechanisms through which food insecurity leads to ARV non-adherence and treatment interruptions. METHODOLOGY: We conducted in-depth, open-ended interviews with 47 individuals (30 women, 17 men living with HIV/AIDS recruited from AIDS treatment programs in Mbarara and Kampala, Uganda to understand how food insecurity interferes with ARV therapy regimens. Interviews were transcribed, coded for key themes, and analyzed using grounded theory. FINDINGS: Food insecurity was common and an important barrier to accessing medical care and ARV adherence. Five mechanisms emerged for how food insecurity can contribute to ARV non-adherence and treatment interruptions or to postponing ARV initiation: 1 ARVs increased appetite and led to intolerable hunger in the absence of food; 2 Side effects of ARVs were exacerbated in the absence of food; 3 Participants believed they should skip doses or not start on ARVs at all if they could not afford the added nutritional burden; 4 Competing demands between costs of food and medical expenses led people either to default from treatment, or to give up food and wages to get medications; 5 While working for food for long days in the fields, participants sometimes forgot medication doses. Despite these obstacles, many participants still reported high ARV adherence and exceptional motivation to continue therapy. CONCLUSIONS: While reports from sub-Saharan Africa show excellent adherence to ARVs, concerns remain that these successes are not sustainable in the presence of widespread poverty and food insecurity. We provide further evidence on how food insecurity can compromise sustained ARV therapy in a resource-limited setting. Addressing food insecurity as part of emerging ARV treatment programs is critical for their long-term success.

  18. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients in Kathmandu District, Nepal

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    Shigdel R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rajesh Shigdel,1 Elise Klouman,2 Anita Bhandari,2 Luai A Ahmed11Department of Health and Care Sciences, 2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, NorwayPurpose: There are a high number of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in the Kathmandu District of Nepal, but information on adherence and factors influencing it are scarce in this population. The present study aimed to estimate ART adherence among HIV-infected patients in the Kathmandu District of Nepal, and to determine the factors associated with ART adherence.Patients and methods: This study included 316 HIV-infected patients attending three ART centers in the Kathmandu District. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, and ART use for the previous 7 days was collected via interview. Participants were considered adherent if they reported taking ≥95% of their ART as prescribed. The association between explanatory variables and ART adherence was measured using logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI.Results: Male participants accounted for 64.6% (n=204. Overall ART adherence was 86.7%. ART adherence in men and women were 84.3% and 91.1%, respectively. Age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.00–1.09, travel time to ART centers (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.12–1.71, history of illegal drug use (OR 3.98; 95% CI 1.71–9.24, and adverse effects (OR 4.88; 95% CI 1.09–21.8, were all independently and negatively associated with ART adherence. Use of reminder tools (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.33–8.91 was independently and positively associated with ART adherence.Conclusion: The observed ART adherence in this study is encouraging. Travel time to ART centers, self-reported adverse effects, illegal drug use, and not using reminder tools were the major determinants of ART adherence. Interventions that take these factors into account could further improve ART

  19. What makes orphans in Kigali, Rwanda, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy? Perspectives of their caregivers

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    Kimiyo Kikuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Every year, approximately 260,000 children are infected with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. The timely initiation and high level of maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART are crucial to reducing the suffering of HIV-positive children. We need to develop a better understanding of the background of children's ART non-adherence because it is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to explore the background related to ART non-adherence, specifically in relation to the orphan status of children in Kigali, Rwanda. Methods: We conducted 19 focus group discussions with a total of 121 caregivers of HIV-positive children in Kigali. The primary data for analysis were verbatim transcripts and socio-demographic data. A content analysis was performed for qualitative data analysis and interpretation. Results: The study found several contextual factors that influenced non-adherence: among double orphans, there was psychological distance between the caregivers and children, whereas economic burden was the primary issue among paternal orphans. The factors promoting adherence also were unique to each orphan status, such as the positive attitude about disclosing serostatus to the child by double orphans’ caregivers, and feelings of guilt about the child's condition among non-orphaned caregivers. Conclusions: Knowledge of orphan status is essential to elucidate the factors influencing ART adherence among HIV-positive children. In this qualitative study, we identified the orphan-related contextual factors that influenced ART adherence. Understanding the social context is important in dealing with the challenges to ART adherence among HIV-positive children.

  20. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its determinants among persons living with HIV/AIDS in Bayelsa state, Nigeria

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    Suleiman IA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high level of adherence is required to achieve the desired outcomes of antiretroviral therapy. There is paucity of information about adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy in Bayelsa State of southern Nigeria. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine the level of adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy among the patients, evaluate the improvement in their immune status and identify reasons for sub-optimal adherence to therapy. Methods: The cross-sectional study involved administration of an adapted and pretested questionnaire to 601 consented patients attending the two tertiary health institutions in Bayesla State, Nigeria: The Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa and the Niger-Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri. The tool was divided into various sections such as socio-demographic data, HIV knowledge and adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy. Information on the patient's CD4+ T cells count was retrieved from their medical records. Adherence was assessed by asking patients to recall their intake of prescribed doses in the last fourteen days and subjects who had 95-100% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs were considered adherent. Results: Three hundred and forty eight (57.9% of the subjects were females and 253 (42.1% were males. The majority of them, 557 (92.7% have good knowledge of HIV and combined anti-retroviral therapy with a score of 70.0% and above. A larger proportion of the respondents, 441 (73.4%, had ≥95% adherence. Some of the most important reasons giving for missing doses include, “simply forgot” 147 (24.5%, and “wanted to avoid the side-effects of drugs” 33(5.5%. There were remarkable improvements in the immune status of the subjects with an increment in the proportion of the subjects with CD4+ T cells count of greater than 350 cells/mm3 from 33 (5.5% at therapy initiation to 338 (56.3% at study period (p<0.0001. Conclusion: The adherence level of 73.4% was low

  1. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and associated factors among patients living with HIV/AIDS in Dessie Referral Hospital, Northern Ethiopia

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    Birhanu Demeke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral therapy has transformed the HIV infection into a chronic manageably disease. Optimal adherence (≥ 95% has required to achieve treatment success; however, still non-adherence remains major problem among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. The aim of this study was to determine adherences rate and evaluate factors affecting adherence among patients on ART in Dessie Referral Hospital (DRH. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study employing both qualitative and quantitative methods was used. A total of 130 people living with HIV/AIDS on ART were included. All patients who came to the hospital during study period were considered based on convenient sampling technique. Chi-Square test is used to examine the association of adherence with associated factors. Both data entry and analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Results: Of 130 respondents, 58(44.6% were males and 72(55.4% were females and 107 (82.3% had 100% adherences, 10(7.7% had 95 -100% and the rest, 13(10% had <95% adherences with overall adherence rate of 90% for last month prior to the study period. The main reasons for non-adherence were 12(37.5% forgetfulness, 7(21.8% being away from home and 4 (12.5% being extremely ill. Use of other medications in addition to antiretroviral drugs (p=0.01, treatment fit into daily routines (p=0.01, family disclosure (p=0.01, active substance use (p=0.04 and living condition (p=0.00 were significantly associated with adherence to ART. Conclusion: The self reported adherence rate to ART (90% was found to be relatively higher which needs inclusion of other methods to ensure consistency of this value. Forgetfulness, being away from home and being extremely ill were the foremost reasons for non-adherence. The patients should be encouraged to maintain this high level of adherence.

  2. Adherence and retention on antiretroviral therapy in a public-private partnership program in Nigeria

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    K Torpey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Nigeria was restricted to secondary and tertiary level hospitals due to weak health systems in primary health centres (PHCs. Shell Petroleum Development Company (SDPC Nigeria and FHI 360 using a systems strengthening approach, piloted ART enrolment in a PHC in south-eastern Nigeria. This study sought to evaluate patients’ adherence and mortality on ART, and associated risk factors. We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between January 2007 and December 2009. Adherence was calculated as the number of days of medication dispensed as a percentage of total number of days evaluated. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12 and 24 months on ART. Competing risks regression models were used to assess potential predictors associated with mortality. Total of 196 patients (64.8% males were initiated on ART. Patients’ median age was 35 years (IQR 30–44; median CD4 at initiation was 132 cells/mm3 (IQR 82–212, Patients in WHO stage III and IV constituted 73 (37.6% and 83 (42.8% respectively. Majority (108 [55.1%] of patients had adherence rates >95%. Adherence levels ranged: 70–85%, 50–65% and <50% in 29 (14.8%, 30 (15.3% and 29 (14.8% of patients respectively. Nucleoside backbone use were AZT/3TC (69.4% d4T/3TC (28.6% and TDF/FTC (2%. At 12 months of follow up, 80.6% (158 were alive and on ART, mortality accounted for 12.8% (25, 11 (5.6% were LTFU and 2 (1.1% transferred out. At 24 months on ART survival decreased to 64.3% (126, 20.4% (40 died, 9.2% (18 were LTFU and 12 (6.1% transferred out. Competing risks regression models revealed that patients’ factors significantly associated with mortality include: bedridden patients (HR=3.6 [95% CI: 1.11–11.45], p=0.03, referent: working, <50% adherence levels (HR=27.7 [95% CI: 8.55–89.47], p<0.0001, referent: >95% adherence level. In conclusion, majority of attrition was

  3. Measuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy in northern Tanzania: feasibility and acceptability of the Medication Event Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyimo, R.A.; Boogaard, van den J.; Msoka, E.; Hospers, H.J.; Ven, van der A.A.; Mushi, D.; Bruin, de M.

    2011-01-01

    An often-used tool to measure adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), an electronic pill-cap that registers date and time of pill-bottle openings. Despite its strengths, MEMS-data can be compromised by inaccurate use and acceptability problems due

  4. Supporting children to adhere to anti-retroviral therapy in urban Malawi: multi method insights

    OpenAIRE

    Phiri Sam; Chiunguzeni Darles; Nyirenda Jean; Makwiza Ireen; Weigel Ralf; Theobald Sally

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ensuring good adherence is critical to the success of anti-retroviral treatment (ART). However, in resource-poor contexts, where paediatric HIV burden is high there has been limited progress in developing or adapting tools to support adherence for HIV-infected children on ART and their caregivers. We conducted formative research to assess children's adherence and to explore the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of caregivers towards children's treatment. Methods All chi...

  5. Facilitators and barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence among adolescents in Ghana

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    Ankrah DNA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Daniel NA Ankrah,1,2 Ellen S Koster,2 Aukje K Mantel-Teeuwisse,2 Daniel K Arhinful,3 Irene A Agyepong,4 Margaret Lartey5,6 1Pharmacy Department, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana; 2Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana (Legon, 4Health Policy, Planning and Management, University of Ghana School of Public Health, 5Department of Medicine, University of Ghana Medical School, 6Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is known to be challenging among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, notwithstanding the life-saving importance of this therapy. Of the global total number of adolescents living with HIV in 2013, 83% reside in sub-Saharan Africa. The study aimed to identify facilitators of and barriers to antiretroviral treatment adherence among adolescents in Ghana. Methods: A cross-sectional qualitative study using semi-structured interviews for data collection was carried out among adolescents (aged 12–19 years at the adolescents HIV clinic at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. Predominantly open-ended questions relating to ART were used. Interviews were done until saturation. In total, 19 interviews were conducted. Analysis was done manually to maintain proximity with the text. Findings: The main facilitators were support from health care providers, parental support, patient’s knowledge of disease and self-motivation, patient’s perceived positive outcomes, and dispensed formulation. The identified barriers were patient’s forgetfulness to take medicines, perceived stigmatization due to disclosure, financial barriers, and adverse effects of ART. Support from health care workers was the most frequently mentioned facilitator, and patient’s forgetfulness and perceived

  6. Factors influencing medication adherence beliefs and self-efficacy in persons naive to antiretroviral therapy: a multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nancy R; Testa, Marcia A; Marc, Linda G; Chesney, Margaret A; Neidig, Judith L; Smith, Scott R; Vella, Stefano; Robbins, Gregory K

    2004-06-01

    It is widely recognized that adherence to antiretroviral therapy is critical to long-term treatment success, yet rates of adherence to antiretroviral medications are frequently subtherapeutic. Beliefs about antiretroviral therapy and psychosocial characteristics of HIV-positive persons naive to therapy may influence early experience with antiretroviral medication adherence and therefore could be important when designing programs to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy. As part of a multicenter AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG 384) study, 980 antiretroviral-naive subjects (82% male, 47% White, median age 36 years, and median CD4 cell count 278 cells/mm3) completed a self-administered questionnaire prior to random treatment assignment of initial antiretroviral medications. Measures of symptom distress, general health and well-being, and personal and situational factors including demographic characteristics, social support, self-efficacy, depression, stress, and current adherence to (nonantiretroviral) medications were recorded. Associations among variables were explored using correlation and regression analyses. Beliefs about the importance of antiretroviral adherence and ability to take antiretroviral medications as directed (adherence self-efficacy) were generally positive. Fifty-six percent of the participants were "extremely sure" of their ability to take all medications as directed and 48% were "extremely sure" that antiretroviral nonadherence would cause resistance, but only 37% were as sure that antiretroviral therapy would benefit their health. Less-positive beliefs about antiretroviral therapy adherence were associated with greater stress, depression, and symptom distress. More-positive beliefs about antiretroviral therapy adherence were associated with better scores on health perception, functional health, social-emotional-cognitive function, social support, role function, younger age, and higher education (r values = 0.09-0.24, all p < .001). Among

  7. System-level factors as predictors of adherence to clinical appointment schedules in antiretroviral therapy in Cambodia.

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    Daigle, Gary T; Jolly, Pauline E; Chamot, Eric A M; Ehiri, John; Zhang, Kui; Khan, Edward; Sou, Sanith

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to clinical appointment schedules by patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is necessary for the prevention of medication interruptions, viral rebound, and the development of drug resistance. An observational study conducted in 2010, Enablers and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Cambodia, sought to identify factors that predict on-time clinical appointment attendance by patients on ART. Clinical data, including appointment attendance across five consecutive visits, were collected from hospital records on a random sample of ART patients at government referral hospitals (RHs) in Battambang Province, Cambodia. Interviews were conducted to obtain quantitative information from patients on their experiences of support services provided by local NGOs and RHs. This information was used to identify ART patient care and support system factors that could potentially enable patients to adhere to clinical appointment schedules. These factors included adherence counseling, support groups, home-based care (HBC) services, and support provided for transportation to ART appointments. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to assess relationships between system variables and the ART appointment adherence outcome. Of the 289 study participants, 20.4% had missed at least one of the five appointments in the study period. The hospital source of ART services, participation in a hospital-based support group, receiving a loan from a microfinance institution, and the frequency of adherence counseling were found to be associated with ART appointment adherence. No significant associations were found between other support system factors such as HBC, transportation support, food/monetary support, and appointment adherence. PMID:25803006

  8. Factors linked to transitions in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected illicit drug users in a Canadian setting

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Brenden; Kerr, Thomas; Puskas, Cathy M; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive people who use illicit drugs typically achieve lower levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and experience higher rates of sub-optimal HIV/AIDS treatment outcomes. Given the dearth of longitudinal research into ART adherence dynamics, we sought to identify factors associated with transitioning into and out of optimal adherence to ART in a longitudinal study of HIV-infected people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) in a setting of universal no-cost HIV/AIDS treatment. Using data ...

  9. Predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons: a prospective study in Southwest Ethiopia

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    Girma Belaineh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The devastating impact of AIDS in the world especially in sub-Saharan Africa has led to an unprecedented global effort to ensure access to antiretroviral (ARV drugs. Given that medication-taking behavior can immensely affect an individual's response; ART adherence is now widely recognized as an 'Achilles heel' for the successful outcome. The present study was undertaken to investigate the rate and predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in southwest Ethiopia. Methods The study was conducted in the antiretroviral therapy unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. A prospective study was undertaken on a total of 400 HIV infected person. Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire at first month (M0 and third month (M3 follow up visits. Results A total of 400 and 383 patients at baseline (M0 and at follow up visit (M3 respectively were interviewed. Self-reported dose adherence in the study area was 94.3%. The rate considering the combined indicator (dose, time and food was 75.7%. Within a three month follow up period, dose adherence decreased by 2% and overall adherence rate decreased by more than 3%. Adherence was common in those patients who have a social support (OR, 1.82, 95%CI, 1.04, 3.21. Patients who were not depressed were two times more likely to be adherent than those who were depressed (OR, 2.13, 95%CI, 1.18, 3.81. However, at the follow up visit, social support (OR, 2.42, 95%CI, 1.29, 4.55 and the use of memory aids (OR, 3.29, 95%CI, 1.44, 7.51 were found to be independent predictors of adherence. The principal reasons reported for skipping doses in this study were simply forgetting, feeling sick or ill, being busy and running out of medication in more than 75% of the cases. Conclusion The self reported adherence rate was high in the study area. The study showed that adherence is a dynamic process which changes overtime and cannot

  10. Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among Women in Southern Malawi: Healthcare Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Ogbochi; Modeste, Naomi N; Lee, Jerry W; Gleason, Peter C; Maynard-Tucker, Gisele

    2014-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare providers' perspectives on antiretroviral (ART) adherence in two ART clinics in southern Malawi. Nonadherence to ART is a significant hindrance to the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Methods. A one-on-one semistructured interview was conducted with eight healthcare providers in two ART clinics in rural and urban southern Malawi. The interviews were focused on factors facilitating or hindering ART adherence and strategies to improve adherence. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and content-analyzed with the use of the constant comparison approach. Results. Of the eight participants, 63% were between the ages of 20 and 30 years and 37% were HIV counselors. Factors facilitating adherence include patients' belief and knowledge, HIV/AIDS education, and a supportive network. Barriers to adherence include discrimination, nondisclosure of HIV status, food insecurity, medication side effects, religion, misinformation, and staff and drug shortages. Strategies to improve adherence were identified by participants to include nutritional/food supplementation for malnourished or undernourished patients and patient counseling. Conclusions. There is a need for collaborative efforts between healthcare providers, patients, and faith-based organizations to identify and address hindrances and facilitators to patients' adherence. Further research is needed to develop strategies addressing religion, staff, and drug shortages.

  11. Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among Women in Southern Malawi: Healthcare Providers’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbochi McKinney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare providers’ perspectives on antiretroviral (ART adherence in two ART clinics in southern Malawi. Nonadherence to ART is a significant hindrance to the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Methods. A one-on-one semistructured interview was conducted with eight healthcare providers in two ART clinics in rural and urban southern Malawi. The interviews were focused on factors facilitating or hindering ART adherence and strategies to improve adherence. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and content-analyzed with the use of the constant comparison approach. Results. Of the eight participants, 63% were between the ages of 20 and 30 years and 37% were HIV counselors. Factors facilitating adherence include patients’ belief and knowledge, HIV/AIDS education, and a supportive network. Barriers to adherence include discrimination, nondisclosure of HIV status, food insecurity, medication side effects, religion, misinformation, and staff and drug shortages. Strategies to improve adherence were identified by participants to include nutritional/food supplementation for malnourished or undernourished patients and patient counseling. Conclusions. There is a need for collaborative efforts between healthcare providers, patients, and faith-based organizations to identify and address hindrances and facilitators to patients’ adherence. Further research is needed to develop strategies addressing religion, staff, and drug shortages.

  12. Effect of directly observed antiretroviral therapy compared to self-administered antiretroviral therapy on adherence and virological outcomes among HIV-infected prisoners: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Becky L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; Kiziah, C Nichole; Richardson, Amy; Hudgens, Michael G; Wohl, David A; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    The effect of directly observed therapy (DOT) versus self-administered therapy (SAT) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence and virological outcomes in prison has never been assessed in a randomized, controlled trial. Prisoners were randomized to receive ART by DOT or SAT. The primary outcome was medication adherence [percent of ART doses measured by the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and pill counts] at the end of 24 weeks. The changes in the plasma viral loads from baseline and proportion of participants virological suppressed (prisoners declined participation. Participants in the DOT arm (n = 20) had higher viral loads than participants in the SAT (n = 23) arm (p = 0.23). Participants, with complete data at 24 weeks, were analyzed as randomized. There were no significant differences in median ART adherence between the DOT (n = 16, 99% MEMS [IQR 93.9, 100], 97.1 % pill count [IQR 95.1, 99.3]) and SAT (n = 21, 98.3 % MEMS [IQR 96.0, 100], 98.5 % pill count [95.8, 100]) arms (p = 0.82 MEMS, p = 0.40 Pill Count) at 24 weeks. Participants in the DOT arm had a greater reduction in viral load of approximately -1 log 10 copies/mL [IQR -1.75, -0.05] compared to -0.05 [IQR -0.45, 0.51] in the SAT arm (p value = 0.02) at 24 weeks. The proportion of participants achieving virological suppression in the DOT vs SAT arms was not statistically different at 24 weeks (53 % vs 32 %, p = 0.21). These findings suggest that DOT ART programs in prison settings may not offer any additional benefit on adherence than SAT programs. PMID:25055766

  13. Predictors and Profiles of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among African American Adolescents and Young Adult Males Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Israel Moses; Hosek, Sybil; Richards, Maryse Heather; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for thwarting HIV disease progression and reducing secondary HIV transmission, yet youth living with HIV (YLH) struggle with adherence. The highest rates of new HIV infections in the United States occur in young African American men. A sample of 387 HIV-positive young African American males on ART was selected from a cross-sectional assessment of (YLH) receiving medical care within the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) from 2010 to 2012 (12-24 years old, median 22.00, SD 2.08). Participants completed self-reported adherence, demographic, health, and psychosocial measures. Sixty-two percent self-reported 100% ART adherence. Optimal data analysis identified frequency of cannabis use during the past 3 months as the strongest independent predictor of adherence, yielding moderate effect strength sensitivity (ESS) = 27.1, p psychological distress and minimal alcohol use (82% were adherent). Participants least likely to be adherent were those with higher psychological distress and engaged in weekly cannabis use (69% were nonadherent). Findings suggest multiple profiles of ART adherence for young African American males living with HIV and argue for targeted psychosocial interventions. PMID:27410496

  14. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: Findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Alison D. Grant; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n=150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n=147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43....

  15. Assessment of factors influencing adherence to anti-retroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus positive mothers and their infected children

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    Arun Kumar De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Mothers and children are biologically related and dependent. They should be considered as a single unit which is very important regarding adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART. Very high levels of adherence are required for effective ART. We therefore carried out this study to examine the adherence levels and different factors associated with adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children receiving ART. Design and Setting: A hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Ninety-four HIV-positive mothers and their 94 HIV-positive children under ART attending the ART center of a tertiary care hospital were recruited in this study. Consenting mothers were asked to complete the "Case Study Form" containing socio-demographic and care-giving details. Mothers were also asked to complete the Beck′s depression inventory, State trait anxiety inventory, and Ways of coping inventory. Adherence was assessed using pill count. Criteria for good and poor adherence were defined. Current CD4 counts were retrieved from the hospital record. Results: Fifty-six percent of respondent mothers and 65.8% of respondent children showed good adherence to ART. Different factors were associated with poor adherence in both mothers and their children. Conclusion: Adherence of HIV-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children to ART is influenced by multiple factors and identification of these factors is necessary to get complete adherence to ART. There is statistically significant relationship between maternal and pediatric adherence to ART.

  16. Effect of a clinic-wide social marketing campaign to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Thomas P; Rodriguez, Sonia; Zhang, Hong; Kallen, Michael A; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Buscher, April L; Arya, Monisha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Ross, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This demonstration study tested the impact of a 5-month clinic-wide social marketing campaign at improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The intervention included a video, posters, pens, mugs, and lapel buttons with the campaign slogan "Live the Solution: Take Your Pills Every Day." Participants self-reported adherence over a 4-week interval, the primary outcome, with a visual analogue scale. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by 141 participants. Adherence did not change over time (absolute mean change -2.02 %, paired t test P = 0.39). Among the 39.7 % of participants who correctly identified the campaign slogan on the post-intervention survey, adherence increased by 3.3 %, while it decreased in the other participants by 5.5 % (paired t test P = 0.07). The well-received campaign did not increase short-term adherence to ART, but adherence tended to increase in participants who were more engaged with the intervention. Future interventions should engage patients more completely and have a more potent effect on adherence. PMID:22983536

  17. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf. PMID:25355176

  18. Associations among correlates of schedule adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART): a path analysis of a sample of crack cocaine using sexually active African-Americans with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J S; Schönnesson, L Nilsson; Williams, M L; Timpson, S C

    2008-02-01

    Adherence to HIV medication regimens is a function of multiple dimensions including psychological functioning, social support, adherence self-efficacy and optimism regarding treatment. Active substance use can also negatively affect adherence. An understanding of the nature of the associations among the correlates of adherence can better inform the design of interventions to improve adherence. This study developed an exploratory path model of schedule adherence using data from a sample 130 African-American HIV-positive crack cocaine users on highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). This model was based on the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman. Following the theory, the effects of psychological distress on schedule adherence were mediated by patients' relationship with their doctor and optimism towards antiretroviral treatment. Adherence was also associated with patients' self-efficacy regarding their medical regimen which, in turn, was associated with their social support.

  19. The factors that influence adherence of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS to anti-retroviral therapy - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p396

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Lima de Barros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the experiences of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS in relation to adherence to antiretroviral therapy in two public hospitals of reference for HIV/AIDS in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study conducted with 24 pregnant women who were in prenatal care and use of antiretroviral therapy. Sociodemographic and obstetric data and information regarding the experience with antiretroviral therapy adherence were collected from July to September 2009, through a semi-structured interview. Results: Women had a mean age of 29, low income, low education and a stable partner. It was found that some factors affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Among these, stand out not accepting the diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS. However, the fear of transmitting the virus to the baby acted as a stimulus for pregnant women adhere to treatment. Conclusion: The non-acceptance of diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS negatively affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral treatment. On the other hand, the fear that the child be born with the virus and the desire to continue to live are stimuli to adherence.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy initiation and adherence in rural South Africa: community health workers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeliger, Kelsey B; Niccolai, Linda M; Mtungwa, Lillian N; Moll, Anthony; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-08-01

    South Africa has the largest global HIV/AIDS epidemic, but barriers along the HIV care continuum prevent patients from initiating and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To qualitatively explore reasons for poor ART initiation and adherence rates from the unique perspective of community health workers (CHWs), we conducted focus groups during May-August 2014 with 21 CHWs in rural Msinga, KwaZulu-Natal. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated from Zulu into English. Hybrid deductive and inductive analytical methods were applied to identify emergent themes. Multiple psychosocial, socioeconomic, and socio-medical barriers acted at the level of the individual, social network, broader community, and healthcare environment to simultaneously hinder initiation of and adherence to ART. Key themes included insufficient patient education and social support, patient dissatisfaction with healthcare services, socioeconomic factors, and tension between ART and alternative medicine. Fear of lifelong therapy thwarted initiation whereas substance abuse principally impeded adherence. In conclusion, HIV/AIDS management requires patient counselling and support extending beyond initial diagnosis. Treating HIV/AIDS as a chronic rather than acute infectious disease is key to improving ART initiation and long-term adherence. Public health strategies include expanding CHWs' roles to strengthen healthcare services, provide longitudinal patient support, and foster collaboration with alternative medicine providers. PMID:27043077

  1. Bounded agency in humanitarian settings: a qualitative study of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among refugees situated in Kenya and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Joshua B; Rhodes, Tim; Spiegel, Paul; Schilperoord, Marian; Burton, John Wagacha; Balasundaram, Susheela; Wong, Chunting; Ross, David A

    2014-11-01

    HIV-positive refugees confront a variety of challenges in accessing and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and attaining durable viral suppression; however, there is little understanding of what these challenges are, how they are navigated, or how they may differ across humanitarian settings. We sought to document and examine accounts of the threats, barriers and facilitators experienced in relation to HIV treatment and care and to conduct comparisons across settings. We conducted semi-structured interviews among a purposive sample of 14 refugees attending a public, urban HIV clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (July-September 2010), and 12 refugees attending a camp-based HIV clinic in Kakuma, Kenya (February-March 2011). We used framework methods and between-case comparison to analyze and interpret the data, identifying social and environmental factors that influenced adherence. The multiple issues that threatened adherence to antiretroviral therapy or precipitated actual adherence lapses clustered into three themes: "migration", "insecurity", and "resilience". The migration theme included issues related to crossing borders and integrating into treatment systems upon arrival in a host country. Challenges related to crossing borders were reported in both settings, but threats pertaining to integration into, and navigation of, a new health system were exclusive to the Malaysian setting. The insecurity theme included food insecurity, which was most commonly reported in the Kenyan setting; health systems insecurity, reported in both settings; and emotional insecurity, which was most common in the Kenyan setting. Resilient processes were reported in both settings. We drew on the concept of "bounded agency" to argue that, despite evidence of personal and community resilience, these processes were sometimes insufficient for overcoming social and environmental barriers to adherence. In general, interventions might aim to bolster individuals' range of action with

  2. Bounded agency in humanitarian settings: a qualitative study of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among refugees situated in Kenya and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Joshua B; Rhodes, Tim; Spiegel, Paul; Schilperoord, Marian; Burton, John Wagacha; Balasundaram, Susheela; Wong, Chunting; Ross, David A

    2014-11-01

    HIV-positive refugees confront a variety of challenges in accessing and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and attaining durable viral suppression; however, there is little understanding of what these challenges are, how they are navigated, or how they may differ across humanitarian settings. We sought to document and examine accounts of the threats, barriers and facilitators experienced in relation to HIV treatment and care and to conduct comparisons across settings. We conducted semi-structured interviews among a purposive sample of 14 refugees attending a public, urban HIV clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (July-September 2010), and 12 refugees attending a camp-based HIV clinic in Kakuma, Kenya (February-March 2011). We used framework methods and between-case comparison to analyze and interpret the data, identifying social and environmental factors that influenced adherence. The multiple issues that threatened adherence to antiretroviral therapy or precipitated actual adherence lapses clustered into three themes: "migration", "insecurity", and "resilience". The migration theme included issues related to crossing borders and integrating into treatment systems upon arrival in a host country. Challenges related to crossing borders were reported in both settings, but threats pertaining to integration into, and navigation of, a new health system were exclusive to the Malaysian setting. The insecurity theme included food insecurity, which was most commonly reported in the Kenyan setting; health systems insecurity, reported in both settings; and emotional insecurity, which was most common in the Kenyan setting. Resilient processes were reported in both settings. We drew on the concept of "bounded agency" to argue that, despite evidence of personal and community resilience, these processes were sometimes insufficient for overcoming social and environmental barriers to adherence. In general, interventions might aim to bolster individuals' range of action with

  3. Supporting children to adhere to anti-retroviral therapy in urban Malawi: multi method insights

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    Phiri Sam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring good adherence is critical to the success of anti-retroviral treatment (ART. However, in resource-poor contexts, where paediatric HIV burden is high there has been limited progress in developing or adapting tools to support adherence for HIV-infected children on ART and their caregivers. We conducted formative research to assess children's adherence and to explore the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of caregivers towards children's treatment. Methods All children starting ART between September 2002 and January 2004 (when ART was at cost in Malawi were observed for at least 6 months on ART. Their adherence was assessed quantitatively by asking caregivers of children about missed ART doses during the previous 3 days at monthly visits. Attendance to clinic appointments was also monitored. In June and July 2004, four focus group discussions, each with 6 to 8 caregivers, and 5 critical incident narratives were conducted to provide complementary contextual data on caregivers' experiences on the challenges to and opportunities of paediatric ART adherence. Results We followed prospectively 47 children who started ART between 8 months and 12 years of age over a median time on ART of 33 weeks (2–91 weeks. 72% (34/47 never missed a single dose according to caregivers' report and 82% (327/401 of clinic visits were either as scheduled, or before or within 1 week after the scheduled appointment. Caregivers were generally knowledgeable about ART and motivated to support children to adhere to treatment despite facing multiple challenges. Caregivers were particularly motivated by seeing children begin to get better; but faced challenges in meeting the costs of medicine and transport, waiting times in clinic, stock outs and remembering to support children to adhere in the face of multiple responsibilities. Conclusion In the era of rapid scale-up of treatment for children there is need for holistic support strategies that focus

  4. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ population from Bata, Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanton-García, Jon; Herrador, Zaida; Ruiz-Seco, Pilar; Nzang-Esono, Jesús; Bendomo, Veronica; Bashmakovic, Emma; Nseng-Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a serious public health problem in Equatorial Guinea, with a prevalence of 6.2% among adults. the high-activity antiretroviral treatment (HAART) coverage data is 10 points below the overall estimate for Sub-Saharan Africa, and only 61% patients continue with HAART 12 months after it started. This study aims to assess HAART adherence and related factors in Litoral Province of Equatorial Guinea. In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and clinical data were collected at Regional Hospital of Bata, during June-July 2014. Adherence to treatment was assessed by using the Spanish version of CEAT-VIH. Bivariate and linear regression analyses were employed to assess HAART adherence-related factors. We interviewed 50 men (35.5%) and 91 women (64.5%), with a mean age of 47.7 ± 8.9 and 36.2 ± 11.2, respectively (p VIH score varied by ethnic group (p = .005). There was a positive correlation between CEAT-VIH score and current CD4 T-cells count (p = .013). The Cronbach's α value was 0.52. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess HAART adherence in Equatorial Guinea. Internal reliability for CEAT-VIH was low, nonetheless the positive correlation between the CEAT-VIH score and the immunological status of patients add value to our findings. Our results serve as baseline for future research and will also assist stakeholders in planning and undertaking contextual and evidence-based policy initiatives.

  5. Impact of Adherence Counseling Dose on Antiretroviral Adherence and HIV Viral Load among HIV-Infected Methadone Maintained Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Cooperman, Nina A.; Heo, Moonseong; Berg, Karina M.; Li, Xuan; Litwin, Alain H.; Nahvi, Shadi; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence counseling can improve antiretroviral adherence and related health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. However, little is known about how much counseling is necessary to achieve clinically significant effects. We investigated antiretroviral adherence and HIV viral load relative to the number of hours of adherence counseling received by 60 HIV-infected drug users participating in a trial of directly observed antiretroviral therapy delivered in methadone clinics. Our adherence couns...

  6. Developing an adherence support intervention for patients on antiretroviral therapy in the context of the recent IDU-driven HIV/AIDS epidemic in Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Uusküla, Anneli; Sharma, Anjali; Jack A Dehovitz; Amico, K. Rivet

    2013-01-01

    There is limited data on and experience with interventions for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence support for patients on ART in Eastern Europe. We sought to identify a feasible adherence support intervention for delivery amongst HIV-positive adults receiving care in Estonia, where the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been mainly concentrated among injection drug users. Our application of intervention mapping strategies used existing literature, formative research and multidisciplinary team input to...

  7. Characterizing HIV medication adherence for virologic success among individuals living with HIV/AIDS: Experience with the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort

    OpenAIRE

    B. Biswas; Spitznagel, E.; Collier, A.C.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S; McCutchan, J A; CLIFFORD, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV related illness from terminal to chronic by suppressing viral load which results in immunologic and clinical improvement. Success with ART is dependent on optimal adherence, commonly categorized as >95%. As medication type, class and frequency of use continue to evolve, we assessed adherence levels related to viral suppression. Using a cross-sectional analysis with secondary data (n = 381) from an ongoing multi-site study on impact of ART on the Ce...

  8. A randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of motivational counseling with observed therapy for antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Kathy; Gerkovich, Mary M; Williams, Karen B; Banderas, Julie W; Catley, Delwyn; Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Wagner, Glenn J; Stanford, James; Neville, Sally; Kumar, Vinutha K; Bamberger, David M; Clough, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    This study determined whether motivational interviewing-based cognitive behavioral therapy (MI-CBT) adherence counseling combined with modified directly observed therapy (MI-CBT/mDOT) is more effective than MI-CBT counseling alone or standard care (SC) in increasing adherence over time. A three-armed randomized controlled 48-week trial with continuous electronic drug monitored adherence was conducted by randomly assigning 204 HIV-positive participants to either 10 sessions of MI-CBT counseling with mDOT for 24 weeks, 10 sessions of MI-CBT counseling alone, or SC. Poisson mixed effects regression models revealed significant interaction effects of intervention over time on non-adherence defined as percent of doses not-taken (IRR = 1.011, CI = 1.000-1.018) and percent of doses not-taken on time (IRR = 1.006, CI = 1.001-1.011) in the 30 days preceding each assessment. There were no significant differences between groups, but trends were observed for the MI-CBT/mDOT group to have greater 12 week on-time and worse 48 week adherence than the SC group. Findings of modest to null impact on adherence despite intensive interventions highlights the need for more effective interventions to maintain high adherence over time.

  9. The Impact of DSM-IV Mental Disorders on Adherence to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Among Adult Persons Living with HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Springer, Sandra A.; Dushaj, Azem; Azar, Marwan M.

    2012-01-01

    This is a systematic review of eighty-two published studies investigating the impact of DSM-IV mental disorders on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence and persistence among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Sixty-two articles examined depression, with 58 % (N = 32/62) finding lower cART adherence and persistence. Seventeen articles examined one or more anxiety disorders, with the majority finding no association with cART adherence or persistence. Eighty percent of the stud...

  10. Effects of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung T P; Tran, Bach X; Hwang, Lu Y; Markham, Christine M; Swartz, Michael D; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Phan, Huong T T; Latkin, Carl A; Vidrine, Damon J

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is increasingly recognized as an indicator for inferior adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive patients. Given the limited body of work on this issue, we aimed to explore the relations between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence, and ART adherence in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 1050 HIV-positive people was conducted from January to September 2013 in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural city). Adherence to ART during the last 30 days was measured by the 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence) were self-reported by participants. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with ART nonadherence. Using the established VAS cut point of 95 to indicate adequate adherence, the prevalence of ART nonadherence was 30.9%. Approximately 35.5% of the sample reported current smoking. No association between smoking status and ART nonadherence was found. However, participants with greater nicotine dependence (OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 1.0-1.2 per unit increase) were more likely to be nonadherent. Also, individuals who were female (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.19-2.42), receiving ART in Nam Dinh (OR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.1-2.4), and currently feeling anxiety (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1) had a higher likelihood of ART nonadherence. Additionally, current smokers reporting current pain (OR = 1.9, 95%CI = 1.2-3.1) were more likely to be nonadherent. Conversely, protective factors included living with a spouse/partner (OR = 0.5, 95%CI = 0.3-0.7) and having more than a high school education (OR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.1-1.0). Given the high prevalence of suboptimal adherence and current smoking among HIV-positive patients, screening for smoking status and nicotine dependence during ART treatment may help to improve patients' adherence to medication. More efforts

  11. A simplified combination antiretroviral therapy regimen enhances adherence, treatment satisfaction and quality of life : results of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, N.; Sprenger, H. G.; Gisolf, E. H.; Reiss, P.; Sprangers, M. A. G.; Legrand, J. C.; Richter, C.; Nieuwkerk, P. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a simplified regimen, in terms of reducing pill burden, dietary requirements and possible adverse effects, on patients' adherence, treatment satisfaction and quality of life (QoL). Methods Antiretroviral-naive patients who achieved a v

  12. Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe R Mutwa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD, and in-depth interviews (IDI to better understand adherence barriers for Rwandan adolescents. Forty-two HIV positive adolescents (ages 12-21 and a selection of their primary caregivers were interviewed. All were perinatally-infected and received (cART for ≥ 12 months. Topics discussed during FGDs and IDIs included learning HIV status, disclosure and stigma, care and treatment issues, cART adherence barriers. RESULTS: Median age was 17 years, 45% female, 45% orphaned, and 48% in boarding schools. We identified three overarching but inter-related themes that appeared to influence adherence. Stigma, perceived and experienced, and inadvertent disclosure of HIV status hampered adolescents from obtaining and taking their drugs, attending clinic visits, carrying their cARTs with them in public. The second major theme was the need for better support, in particular for adolescents with different living situations, (orphanages, foster-care, and boarding schools. Lack of privacy to keep and take medication came out as major barrier for adolescents living in congested households, as well the institutionalization of boarding schools where privacy is almost non-existent. The third important theme was the desire to be 'normal' and not be recognized as an HIV-infected individual, and to have a normal life not perturbed by taking a regimen of medications or being forced to disclose where others would treat them differently. CONCLUSIONS: We propose better management of HIV-infected adolescents integrated into boarding school, orphanages, and foster care; training of school-faculty on how to support students and allow them privacy for taking their medications. To provide better care and

  13. Substance abuse, adherence with antiretroviral therapy, and clinical outcomes among HIV-infected individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. Substance abuse is an important comorbidity that affects the delivery and outcomes of HIV medical management. In this paper I will review data examining the associations between substance abuse and HIV treatment and potential strategies to improve outcomes in this population that warrant further investigation. Current - but not past - substance abuse adversely affects engagement in care, acceptance of antiretrovir...

  14. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients: a cross-sectional study in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.T. Pinheiro

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted on HIV-infected adults being treated with antiretroviral drugs at a reference service in Southern Brazil. Participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire and were tested by scales assessing sociocognitive variables. Adherence to treatment was assessed by a self-report inventory developed for the study. Clinical information was obtained from the patients' records. Significance tests were conducted using univariate logistic regressions followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 195 patients participated in the study and 56.9% of them reported > or = 95% adherence on the previous two days. In univariate analysis, the odds of adherence increased with self-efficacy (a person's conviction that he/she can successfully execute the behavior required to produce a certain desired outcome in taking medications as prescribed (OR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.90-6.55, and decreased with perception of negative affect and physical concerns (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.53-0.95. The odds were lower for taking antiretroviral medications >4 times a day (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.94 and higher for patients with 8 years of schooling (OR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.12-4.66. In the multivariate analysis, self-efficacy (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.69-6.56 and taking medication >4 times a day (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.80 were independently associated with adherence. Self-efficacy was the most important predictor of adherence, followed by number of times antiretroviral medication was taken per day. Among sociodemographic and clinical variables, only the number of years of schooling was associated with adherence. Motivational interventions based on self-efficacy may be useful for increasing treatment adherence.

  15. A framework for community ownership of a text messaging programme to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and client-provider communication: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Bonono-Momnougui, Renee-Cecile; Thabane, Lehana; Kouanfack, Charles; Smieja, Marek; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile phone text messaging has been shown to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and to improve communication between patients and health care workers. It is unclear which strategies are most appropriate for scaling up text messaging programmes. We sought to investigate acceptability and readiness for ownership (community members designing, sending and receiving text messages) of a text message programme among a community of clients living with human immunodeficiency virus...

  16. Developing an adherence support intervention for patients on antiretroviral therapy in the context of the recent IDU-driven HIV/AIDS epidemic in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Uusküla, Anneli; Sharma, Anjali; DeHovitz, Jack A; Amico, K Rivet

    2013-01-01

    There is limited data on and experience with interventions for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence support for patients on ART in Eastern Europe. We sought to identify a feasible adherence support intervention for delivery amongst HIV-positive adults receiving care in Estonia, where the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been mainly concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). Our application of intervention mapping (IM) strategies used existing literature, formative research and multidisciplinary team input to produce a brief clinic-based intervention entitled the Situated Optimal Adherence Intervention Estonia (sOAI Estonia) which uses both Next-Step Counseling (NSC) and Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model approach to facilitate integration of ART into the context and demands of daily life. We present the intervention development process, the resulting sOAI Estonia approach, and describe a randomized controlled trial (RCT) which is under way to evaluate the intervention (results due in spring 2013). PMID:23391132

  17. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, B T; Barfod, T S; Kirk, O;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... copies/mL) among 293 patients randomized to two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)+ritonavir+saquinavir (RS-arm) (n=115), two NRTIs+nevirapine+nelfinavir (NN-arm) (n=118), or abacavir+stavudine+didanosine (ASD-arm) (n=60) followed up for a median of 90 weeks. Data on adherence were...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...

  18. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n = 150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n = 147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1 % male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119,000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at 9 months was achieved in 89.8 % of didactic and 87.9 % of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p = 0.62). 82.9 % of didactic and 79.5 % of motivational counselling participants achieved >95 % adherence by pill count at 6 months (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting.

  19. Considerations in using text messages to improve adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy: a qualitative study among clients in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbuagbaw L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lawrence Mbuagbaw1,2, Renée Cécile Bonono-Momnougui1, Lehana Thabane2,31Centre for the Development of Best Practices in Health (CDBPH, Yaoundé Central Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 3Biostatistics Unit, Father Sean O'Sullivan Research Centre, St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Poor adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is a major hindrance to the reduction of mortality and morbidity due to HIV. This qualitative study used focus groups to explore the views and experiences of HIV patients on HAART with adherence reminders, especially the text message (SMS [short message service]. The ethnographic data obtained were used to design a clinical trial to assess the effect of motivational text messages versus usual care to enhance adherence to HAART among HIV patients in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Participants appreciated the idea of a timely SMS reminder, and cited the physician as a role model. They expressed concerns about privacy. Long-term life goals were a motivating factor to adhere. Overall, text messaging was viewed positively as a tool with a dual function of reminder and motivator. Messages coming from the attending physician may have a stronger impact. Trials investigating the use of text messages to improve adherence to HAART need to consider the content and timing of SMS, taking into account technical challenges and privacy.Keywords: focus groups, adherence, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, text message, short message service (SMS, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

  20. Challenges faced by elderly guardians in sustaining the adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Grandparents throughout sub-Saharan Africa have shown immense courage and fortitude in providing care and support for AIDS-affected children. However, growing old comes with a number of challenges which can compromise the care and support given to children affected by AIDS, particularly for children infected by HIV and enrolled on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) programmes. For ART to have an impact, and for children not to develop drug-resistance, a rigid treatment regimen...

  1. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashindran, V K; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  2. Mobile phones to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the Indian National AIDS Control Programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Rodrigues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is critical to maintaining health and good clinical outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. To address poor treatment adherence, low-cost interventions using mobile communication technology are being studied. While there are some studies that show an effect of mobile phone reminders on adherence to ART, none has reported on the costs of such reminders for national AIDS programmes. This paper aims to study the costs of mobile phone reminder strategies (mHealth interventions to support adherence in the context of India's National AIDS Control Program (NACP. Methods: The study was undertaken at two tertiary level teaching hospitals that implement the NACP in Karnataka state, South India. Costs for a mobile phone reminder application to support adherence, implemented at these sites (i.e. weekly calls, messages or both were studied. Costs were collected based on the concept of avoidable costs specific to the application. The costs that were assessed were one-time costs and recurrent costs that included fixed and variable costs. A sequential procedure for costing was used. Costs were calculated at national-programme level, individual ART-centre level and individual patient level from the NACP's perspective. The assessed costs were pooled to obtain an annual cost per patient. The type of application, number of ART centres and number of patients on ART were varied in a sensitivity analysis of costs. Results: The Indian NACP would incur a cost of between 79 and 110 INR (USD 1.27–1.77 per patient per year, based on the type of reminder, the number of patients on ART and the number of functioning ART centres. The total programme costs for a scale-up of the mHealth intervention to reach the one million patients expected to be on treatment by 2017 is estimated to be 0.36% of the total five-year national-programme budget. Conclusions: The cost of the mHealth intervention for ART-adherence support in

  3. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  4. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  5. High levels of adherence and viral suppression in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy for 6, 12 and 18 months in Rwanda.

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    Batya Elul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalizable data are needed on the magnitude and determinants of adherence and virological suppression among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Africa. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with chart abstraction, patient interviews and site assessments in a nationally representative sample of adults on ART for 6, 12 and 18 months at 20 sites in Rwanda. Adherence was assessed using 3- and 30-day patient recall. A systematically selected sub-sample had viral load (VL measurements. Multivariable logistic regression examined predictors of non-perfect (40 copies/ml. RESULTS: Overall, 1,417 adults were interviewed and 837 had VL measures. Ninety-four percent and 78% reported perfect adherence for the last 3 and 30 days, respectively. Eighty-three percent had undetectable VL. In adjusted models, characteristics independently associated with higher odds of non-perfect 30-day adherence were: being on ART for 18 months (vs. 6 months; younger age; reporting severe (vs. no or few side effects in the prior 30 days; having no documentation of CD4 cell count at ART initiation (vs. having a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/µL; alcohol use; and attending sites which initiated ART services in 2003-2004 and 2005 (vs. 2006-2007; sites with ≥600 (vs. <600 patients on ART; or sites with peer educators. Participation in an association for people living with HIV/AIDS; and receiving care at sites which regularly conduct home-visits were independently associated with lower odds of non-adherence. Higher odds of having a detectable VL were observed among patients at sites with peer educators. Being female; participating in an association for PLWHA; and using a reminder tool were independently associated with lower odds of having detectable VL. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of adherence and viral suppression were observed in the Rwandan national ART program, and associated with potentially modifiable factors.

  6. Feasibility of interactive text message response (ITR) as a novel, real-time measure of adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV+ youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowshen, Nadia; Kuhns, Lisa M; Gray, Camdin; Lee, Susan; Garofalo, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Youth living with HIV/AIDS (YLH) face unique challenges to optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Accurate, real-time methods to assess adherence are needed to facilitate early intervention and promote viral suppression. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and validity of interactive text message response (ITR) as a measure of adherence to ART among YLH. This study was part of a larger pilot text message reminder intervention conducted at a US community-based, LGBT-focused health center providing clinical services to YLH. Eligibility criteria for this pilot study included HIV-positive serostatus, aged 14-29, use of personal cell phone, English-speaking, and on ART with demonstrated adherence difficulties. During the 24-week study period, participants received personalized daily short message system reminders with a follow-up message 1 hour later asking whether they took medication and directing a response via return text message. To determine whether or not ITR would be a feasible, valid measure of adherence, we calculated the proportion of positive responses indicating medication had been taken divided by the total number of messages requesting a response and compared this response rate to a self-reported adherence measure, the visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants (n = 25) were on average 23 years old, largely male (92%), Black (60%) and behaviorally infected (84%). Over the course of the intervention, study participants responded to prompts via text to indicate whether or not they had taken their medication approximately 61% of the time. The overall mean ITR adherence rate (i.e., positive responses) was 57.4% (SD = 28.5%). ITR and VAS measures were moderately, positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.05) during the first 6 weeks of the study period. ITR adherence rates were significantly higher on weekdays versus weekends (p < 0.05). This pilot study showed both moderate responsiveness of individuals to daily ITR and a moderate

  7. Feasibility of interactive text message response (ITR) as a novel, real-time measure of adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV+ youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowshen, Nadia; Kuhns, Lisa M; Gray, Camdin; Lee, Susan; Garofalo, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Youth living with HIV/AIDS (YLH) face unique challenges to optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Accurate, real-time methods to assess adherence are needed to facilitate early intervention and promote viral suppression. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and validity of interactive text message response (ITR) as a measure of adherence to ART among YLH. This study was part of a larger pilot text message reminder intervention conducted at a US community-based, LGBT-focused health center providing clinical services to YLH. Eligibility criteria for this pilot study included HIV-positive serostatus, aged 14-29, use of personal cell phone, English-speaking, and on ART with demonstrated adherence difficulties. During the 24-week study period, participants received personalized daily short message system reminders with a follow-up message 1 hour later asking whether they took medication and directing a response via return text message. To determine whether or not ITR would be a feasible, valid measure of adherence, we calculated the proportion of positive responses indicating medication had been taken divided by the total number of messages requesting a response and compared this response rate to a self-reported adherence measure, the visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants (n = 25) were on average 23 years old, largely male (92%), Black (60%) and behaviorally infected (84%). Over the course of the intervention, study participants responded to prompts via text to indicate whether or not they had taken their medication approximately 61% of the time. The overall mean ITR adherence rate (i.e., positive responses) was 57.4% (SD = 28.5%). ITR and VAS measures were moderately, positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.05) during the first 6 weeks of the study period. ITR adherence rates were significantly higher on weekdays versus weekends (p < 0.05). This pilot study showed both moderate responsiveness of individuals to daily ITR and a moderate

  8. Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Mobile Text Messaging to Promote Retention and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for People Living With HIV in Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Denis; Artavia-Mora, Luis; Bedi, Arjun; Thiombiano, Boundia Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Background Retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) is a critical challenge in many African countries including Burkina Faso. Delivering text messaging (short message service, SMS) interventions through mobile phones may help facilitate health service delivery and improve patient health. Despite this potential, no evaluations have been delivered for national scale settings to demonstrate the impact of mobile health (mHealth) for PLHIV. Objectives This study aims to test the impact of SMS text messaging reminders for PLHIV in Burkina Faso, who are under ART. The evaluation identifies whether patients who receive SMS text messages are more likely to (1) retain in care (measured as a dichotomous variable), (2) adhere to antiretroviral regimens (measured as the number of doses missed in the past 7 days), and (3) experience slower disease progression (measured with T-lymphocytes cells). The second objective is to assess its effects on the frequency of health center visits, physical and psychosocial health, nutrition and whether the type of message (text vs image) and frequency (weekly vs semiweekly) have differential impacts including the possibility of message fatigue over time. Methods This 24-month, wide-scale intervention implements a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the impact of four variants of a mHealth intervention versus a control group. Our sample comprises adult patients (>15 years of age) undergoing antiretroviral therapy with access to mobile phone services. Multivariate regression analysis will be used to analyze the effect of the intervention on the study population. Data collection is done at baseline and three follow-up waves 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention starts. Results The targeted 3800 patients were recruited between February 2015 and May 2015. But political uncertainty delayed the launch of the intervention until October 2015. Data

  9. Patterns of Geographic Mobility Predict Barriers to Engagement in HIV Care and Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A.; Khan, Shah Z.; Garduño, L. Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6...

  10. “The sky is the limit”: adhering to antiretroviral therapy and HIV self-management from the perspectives of adolescents living with HIV and their adult caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Denison

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Worldwide, HIV-related mortality among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV increased by 50% from 2005 to 2012 and is attributed in part to a lack of support for adolescent retention to care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART. This vulnerability reinforces the need to better understand incomplete ART adherence among ALHIV, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the world's 2.1 million ALHIV reside. Methods: From December 2011 to February 2012, we conducted in-depth interviews with 32 ALHIV (aged 15 to 18 and 23 of their adult caregivers in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. Interviews were transcribed and translated. An iterative qualitative process was used to code and analyze the data and main themes were summarized regarding the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence. Results: More than a quarter of ALHIV reported missing a day or more of ART (ranging from one day to six months. Barriers to ART adherence included fear of disclosure and anticipated stigma. Few youth were willing to take their drugs outside of the home, which led to missed doses of ART. Similarly, families tended to manage HIV within the home only. As a result, although caregivers and families were often the greatest source of emotional and instrumental support, they coped with HIV in isolation of other potential support from their communities, schools or churches. Factors that supported ART adherence included attending clinic-sponsored youth groups, wanting to maintain one's health and using phone and clock alarms. Involvement of adult caregivers in HIV management varied greatly and was often based on the age and health status of the youth. Some caregivers struggled with letting the adolescents assume responsibility for their medication, and ALHIV had few self-management skills and tools to help them regularly take ART. Conclusions: These data highlight the importance of families and home environments in supporting adherence to

  11. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  12. Exploring the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest Nigeria.

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    Okoror, Titilayo A; Falade, Catherine O; Olorunlana, Adetayo; Walker, Ebunlomo M; Okareh, Oladapo T

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the cultural context of HIV stigma on antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in southwest Nigeria. Using purposive sampling, participants were recruited through a community-based organization. Consenting PLWHA participated in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions that were audio-taped. Using Deacon's conceptual framework of stigma, four opinion guides facilitated the interviews and discussions. Interviews and discussions were conducted in three languages, and lasted from 45 min to 2 h. A total of 35 women and men participated in the study. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 58 years, with an average of 4 years since clinical diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. All participants were receiving ART, and self-reported high adherence level. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: life before ART, life after ART, and strategies used in ART adherence. In describing their lives before ART, participants reported experiencing self, anticipated and enacted stigmas due to their sickly appearance from HIV-related complications. After initiating ART, participants talked about friends and families "returning to them" and "apologizing for abandoning" them once they started "looking well." In response to anticipated stigma, many reported sticking to their medications. Drawing from the cultural milieu as part of their strategies, participants discussed the use of plastic bags for medications and àkònpó, as ways of diverting attention from their use of many medications. Implications for ART program policies and stigma interventions were discussed, along with limitation of a short-term ART study on stigma since long-term use of ART can contribute to stigma by way of lipoatrophy as PLWHA age.

  13. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study

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    Maria L.S. Cruz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL < 50 copies/mL. Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VL < 50 copies/mL. In the univariate analyses, HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection, lower caregiver scores for anxiety, and higher scores in physical and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL < 50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01. Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89 and median interval between pharmacy visits < 33 days (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98 were independently associated with VL < 50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19 and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50 were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence.

  14. Vulnerability and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV patients, Minas Gerais State, Brazil Vulnerabilidade e não-adesão à terapia antiretroviral, Minas Gerais, Brasil

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    Palmira de Fátima Bonolo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe vulnerability profiles and to verify their association with non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART among 295 HIV-patients receiving their first prescription in two public-referral centers in Minas Gerais States, Brazil. The cumulative incidence of non-adherence was 36.9%. Three pure vulnerability profiles (lower, medium and higher were identified based on the Grade of Membership method (GoM. Pure type patients of the "higher vulnerability" profile had, when compared to the overall sample, an increased probability of being younger, not understanding the need of ART, having a personal reason to be HIV-tested, not disclosing their HIV status, having more than one (non-regular sexual partner, reporting use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs, and having sex among men. Non-adherence to ART was statistically associated (p Este estudo teve como objetivos descrever os perfis de vulnerabilidade e verificar suas associações com a não-adesão à terapia anti-retroviral (TARV entre os 295 pacientes com HIV que recebiam suas primeiras prescrições em dois serviços públicos de referência de Minas Gerais, Brasil. A incidência cumulativa de não-adesão foi 36,9%. Foram identificados três perfis puros de vulnerabilidade (baixa, média e alta baseados no método Grade of Membership (GoM. Os tipos puros de pacientes do perfil de "alta vulnerabilidade" tinham, comparados aos outros, probabilidade maior de serem jovens, de não perceberem a necessidade da TARV, de terem uma razão pessoal para realização do teste HIV, de não terem revelado seu status HIV, de terem mais de um (não fixo parceiro sexual, de relatarem uso de álcool, tabaco e drogas ilícitas e sexo entre homens. Não-adesão à TARV foi associada significativamente a esse perfil (p < 0,001. A heterogeneidade da amostra foi alta, pois mais de 40% dos pacientes eram tipos mistos. Conclui-se que os profissionais de saúde devem ser

  15. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Smartphone App for Daily Reports of Substance Use and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, Sarahmona M; Eliseo-Arras, Rebecca K; Krawiec, Gabriela; Gower, Emily; Dermen, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    While substance use is one of the most consistent predictors of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), few studies among people living with HIV (PLH) have utilized mobile phone-based assessment of these health behaviors. PLH were recruited from primary care clinics to report ART and substance use using a smartphone application (app) for 14 consecutive days. The app's feasibility as a data collection tool was evaluated quantitatively via surveys and qualitatively via in-depth interviews to assess daily report completion, compliance, and study satisfaction. Overall, 26 participants (M = 49.5 years, 76% male) completed 95.3% of time-based daily reports. Participants reported high satisfaction with the app and expressed future interest in using smartphones to report daily behaviors. High completion rates and participant acceptability suggest that smartphones are a feasible, acceptable method for collecting substance use and ART data among PLH. Potential areas of concern such as sufficient training and assistance for those with limited smartphone experience should be considered for future app-based research studies among PLH. PMID:27610243

  16. Efficacy, adherence and tolerability of once daily tenofovir DF-containing antiretroviral therapy in former injecting drug users with HIV-1 receiving opiate treatment: results of a 48-week open-label study

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    Esser S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess efficacy, adherence and tolerability of once daily antiretroviral therapy containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (DF 300 mg in HIV-1-infected former injecting drug users receiving opiate treatment (IVDU. Methods European, 48-week, open-label, single-arm, multicenter study. Patients were either antiretroviral therapy-naïve, restarting therapy after treatment discontinuation without prior virological failure or switching from existing stable treatment. Results Sixty-seven patients were enrolled in the study and 41 patients completed treatment. In the primary analysis (intent-to-treat missing = failure at week 48, 34% of patients (23/67; 95% CI: 23%-47% had plasma HIV-1 RNA 3. Although self-reported adherence appeared high, there were high levels of missing data and adherence results should be treated with caution. No new safety issues were identified. Conclusions Levels of missing data were high in this difficult-to-treat population, but potent antiretroviral suppression was achieved in a substantial proportion of HIV-infected IVDU-patients.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral therapy adherence among patients with HIV in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dlama; da Silva Te, David; Rodkjær, Lotte Ørneborg;

    2013-01-01

    -structured interviews were conducted with 20 adult, HIV infected individuals receiving ART at a HIV treatment centre in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data. Results indicated that HIV-related knowledge was a determining factor for optimal adherence. The facilitators...

  18. Knowledge and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among adult people living with HIV/AIDS at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia

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    Ruth Demessie

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Older age, good knowledge on treatment plan and regimen, use of memory aids, treatment satisfaction, and not having co-medications and regimen switch showed more adherence to ART. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 320-330

  19. HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in Malawian adults and effect on adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy: a cross sectional study.

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    Christine M Kelly

    Full Text Available Little is known about the prevalence and burden of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND among patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated the prevalence of HAND in adult Malawians on cART and investigated the relationship between HAND and adherence to cART.HIV positive adults in Blantyre, Malawi underwent a full medical history, neurocognitive test battery, depression score, Karnofsky Performance Score and adherence assessment. The Frascati criteria were used to diagnose HAND and the Global Deficit Score (GDS was also assessed. Blood was drawn for CD4 count and plasma nevirapine and efavirenz concentrations. HIV negative adults were recruited from the HIV testing clinic to provide normative scores for the neurocognitive battery.One hundred and six HIV positive patients, with median (range age 39 (18-71 years, 73% female and median (range CD4 count 323.5 (68-1039 cells/µl were studied. Symptomatic neurocognitive impairment was present in 15% (12% mild neurocognitive disorder [MND], 3% HIV associated dementia [HAD]. A further 55% fulfilled Frascati criteria for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI; however factors other than neurocognitive impairment could have confounded this estimate. Neither the symptomatic (MND and HAD nor asymptomatic (ANI forms of HAND were associated with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz concentrations, adjusted odds ratio 1.44 (CI. 0.234, 8.798; p = 0.696 and aOR 0.577 (CI. 0.09, 3.605; p = 0.556 respectively. All patients with subtherapeutic nevirapine/efavirenz levels had a GDS of less than 0.6, consistent with normal neurocognition.Fifteen percent of adult Malawians on cART had a diagnosis of MND or HAD. Subtherapeutic drug concentrations were found exclusively in patients with normal neurocognitive function suggesting HAND did not affect cART adherence. Further study of HAND requires more robust locally derived normative neurocognitive values and

  20. Frequency and factors associated with adherence to and completion of combination antiretroviral therapy for prevention of mother to child transmission in western Kenya

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    Paul Ayuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this analysis was to identify points of disruption within the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT continuum from combination antiretroviral therapy (CART initiation until delivery. Methods: To address this objective, the electronic medical records of all antiretroviral-naïve adult pregnant women who were initiating CART for PMTCT between January 2006 and February 2009 within the Academic Model Providing Access To Healthcare (AMPATH, western Kenya, were reviewed. Outcomes of interest were clinician-initiated change or stop in regimen, disengagement from programme (any, early, late and self-reported medication adherence. Disengagement was categorized as early disengagement (any interval of greater than 30 days between visits but returning to care prior to delivery or late disengagement (no visit within 30 days prior to the date of delivery. The association between covariates and the outcomes of interest were assessed using bivariate (Kruskal-Wallis test for continuous variables and the Chi-square test for categorical variables and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 4284 antiretroviral-naïve pregnant women initiated CART between January 2006 and February 2009. The majority of women (89% reported taking all of their medication at every visit. There were 18 (0.4% deaths reported. Clinicians discontinued CART in 10 patients (0.7% while 1367 (31.9% women disengaged from care. Of those disengaging, 404 (29.6% disengaged early and 963 (70.4% late. In the multivariate model, the odds of disengagement decreased with increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 0.982; confidence interval [CI] 0.966–0.998 and increasing gestational age at CART initiation (OR 0.925; CI 0.909–0.941. Women receiving care at a district hospital (OR 0.794; CI 0.644–0.980 or tuberculosis medication (OR 0.457; CI 0.202–0.935 were less likely to disengage. The odds of disengagement were higher in married women (OR

  1. Adherence and virologic suppression during the first 24 weeks on antiretroviral therapy among women in Johannesburg, South Africa - a prospective cohort study

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    Katzenstein David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence is a necessary part of successful antiretroviral treatment (ART. We assessed risk factors for incomplete adherence among a cohort of HIV-infected women initiating ART and examined associations between adherence and virologic response to ART. Methods A secondary data analysis was conducted on a cohort of 154 women initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based ART at a single site in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ninety women had been enrolled in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (pMTCT program and were exposed to single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP >18 months earlier. Women were interviewed pre-treatment and clinical, virologic and adherence data were collected during follow-up to 24 weeks. Incomplete adherence to ART was defined as returning >5% of medications, estimated by pill counts at scheduled visits. Multivariable logistic regression analysis and unadjusted odds ratio (95%CI were performed, using STATA/SE (ver 10.1. Results About half of the women (53% were 400 copies/ml at 24 weeks and 37% had incomplete adherence at one or more visits. Incomplete adherence was associated with less education (p = 0.01 and lack of financial support from a partner (p = 0.02 after adjustment for confounders. Only when adherence levels dropped below 80% was there a significant association with viremia in the group overall (p = 0.02 although adherence Conclusion Virologic response to NNRTI-treatment in the cohort was excellent. However, women who received sdNVP were at greater risk of virologic failure when adherence was

  2. Antiretroviral regimen and suboptimal medication adherence are associated with low-level human immunodeficiency virus viremia.

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    Konstantopoulos, Christina; Ribaudo, Heather; Ragland, Kathleen; Bangsberg, David R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of human immunodeficiency virus low-level viremia (LLV) are common in the clinical setting, but its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen and adherence remains unclear. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was evaluated in participants of the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless cohort by unannounced pill counts. Factors associated with increased risk of LLV include treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (ritonavir-boosted PI vs nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor: adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.1; P = .01) and lower ART adherence over the past 3 months (HR, 1.1 per 5% decreased adherence, adjusted; P = .050). Patients with LLV may benefit from ART adherence counseling and potentially regimen modification. PMID:25884007

  3. Adherence to antiretrovirals in people coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Larissa de Araújo; Fiuza, Maria Luciana Teles; Reis, Renata Karina; Ferrer, André Carvalho; Gir, Elucir; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: assess the adherence levels to antiretroviral therapy in people coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis and correlate these levels with the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the study population. Method: cross-sectional study involving 74 male and female adults coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis. For the data collection, a sociodemographic and clinical assessment form and the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Assessment Questionnaire were used. For the data analysis, the software STATA version 11 was used, through descriptive statistics, Fisher's chi-square exact test and the probability test. Results: men were predominant (79.7%), between 30 and 39 years of age (35.1%), low income (75.7%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (71.6%). Adherence to antiretroviral therapy was inappropriate in 78.1% of the men; 61.0% of single people; 47.0% unemployed and 76.5% among people gaining less than one minimum wage. A significant difference was observed between compliance and length of use of antiretrovirals (p=0.018), sexual orientation (p=0.024) and number of children (p=0.029). Conclusion: the coinfected patients presented inappropriate adherence to the antiretrovirals, a fact that negatively affects the health conditions of the people living with HIV/tuberculosis coinfection. A statistically significant correlation was found between the levels of adherence and some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PMID:27192416

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  5. Food insecurity is associated with increased risk of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo: a cross-sectional study.

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    Patou Masika Musumari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food insecurity is increasingly reported as an important barrier of patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in both resource-poor and rich settings. However, unlike in resource rich-settings, very few quantitative studies to date have investigated the association of food insecurity with patient adherence to ART in Sub-Saharan Africa. The current study examines the association between food insecurity and adherence to ART among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This is a cross-sectional quantitative study of patients receiving ART at three private and one public health facilities in Kinshasa, DRC. Participants were consecutively recruited into the study between April and November 2012. Adherence was measured using a combined method coupling pharmacy refill and self-reported adherence. Food insecurity was the primary predictor, and was assessed using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS. Of the 898 participants recruited into the study, 512 (57% were food insecure, and 188 (20.9% were not adherent to ART. Food insecurity was significantly associated with non-adherence to ART (AOR, 2.06; CI, 1.38-3.09. We also found that perceived harmfulness of ART and psychological distress were associated respectively with increased (AOR, 1.95; CI, 1.15-3.32 and decreased (AOR, 0.31; CI, 0.11-0.83 odds of non-adherence to ART. CONCLUSION: Food insecurity is prevalent and a significant risk factor for non-adherence to ART among HIV-infected individuals in the DRC. Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to improve food access among HIV-infected on ART in order to ensure patient adherence to ART and ultimately the long-term success of HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Assessment of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and associated factors among people living with HIV at Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

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    Ketema AK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abush Kebede Ketema,1 Zewdu Shewangizaw Weret21Regional Monitoring and Evaluation Advisor, Management Sciences for Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 2College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Arbaminch University, Arbaminch, EthiopiaAbstract: Patient adherence to antiretroviral combination therapy is a critical component to successful treatment outcome. Nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is a major challenge to AIDS care, and the risks associated with it are extensive. The intention of this study was to determine prevalence and associated factors with adherence to highly active ART among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA at the Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center, Northeast Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design with systematic random sampling conducted by the use of a structured, pretested self-rating adherence questionnaire was used to conduct the study among 422 respondents from the Debrebrihan Referral Hospital and Health Center. A single population proportion formula at 95% CI with 5% of marginal error at 50% of prevalence of occurrence was used to determine sample size. Adherence was defined as not missing a single ART dose during the 30-day period prior to filling out the self-report. Adherence was measured by self-reports by the patients. These results were then used in binary logistic regression analysis. Covariates were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate logistic regression with SPSS statistical software. The total number of respondents in this study was 422; their median age was 35 years. Among the participants, 95.5% were taking their medication without missing a dose. Factors such as having emotional or practical support positively encouraged ART adherence (adjusted odds ratio 0.16 [95% CI 0.05–0.49]. However, users of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM (adjusted odds ratio 4.7 [95% CI 1.06–21.22] had nearly a five times higher risk for ART nonadherence (P<0.05 than those not using

  7. Risk factors for suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana: a pilot cross-sectional study

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    Ndiaye M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maimouna Ndiaye,1,2 Peter Nyasulu,1 Hoang Nguyen,6,7 Elizabeth D Lowenthal,8,9 Robert Gross,10 Edward J Mills,3 Jean B Nachega4–6 1School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Central Medical Stores, Ministry of Health, Gaborone, Botswana; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; 4Department of Medicine and Centre for Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; 5Department of Epidemiology, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research Program, Pittsburgh University Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Departments of Epidemiology and International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 7Tay Ho Clinics, Department of Medicine, Hanoi Health Services, Hanoi, Vietnam; 8Departments of Pediatrics and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 9Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 10Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Objective: Little is known about factors associated with suboptimal antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence among adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our objective was to determine the level of ART adherence and predictors of non-adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected adolescents at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 82 HIV-infected adolescents receiving ART and their caregivers were administered a structured questionnaire. The patient's clinical information was retrieved from medical records. Outcome measures included excellent pill count ART adherence (>95% and virologic suppression

  8. Timing Is Everything: Antiretroviral Non-adherence is Associated with Impairment in Time-based Prospective Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Steven Paul; Dawson, Matthew S.; Weber, Erica; Gibson, Sarah; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton

    2009-01-01

    Non-adherence to combination antiretroviral therapies (cART) is highly prevalent and significantly increases the risk of adverse HIV disease outcomes. The current study evaluated the hypothesis that prospective memory – a dissociable aspect of episodic memory describing the ability to execute a future intention – plays an important role in successful cART adherence. Seventy-nine individuals with HIV infection who were prescribed at least one antiretroviral medication underwent a comprehensive...

  9. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence.

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children: a study of prevalence and associated factors Adesão aos anti-retrovirais em crianças: um estudo da prevalência e fatores associados

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    Neiva Isabel Raffo Wachholz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with AIDS has increased considerably with the use of more effective antiretrovirals, but the benefits of this therapy are limited by the difficulty of adherence to the treatment. This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of non-adherence to antiretrovirals among children residents in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and identifying associated factors. There were 194 child caregivers interviewed. The technique utilized to evaluate adherence allowed the detection of lack of understanding of the prescribed antiretroviral regimens, as well as conscious loss of doses. Non-adherence was defined when the child had taken less than 80% of the prescribed medication during the 24h period prior to the interview. A general prevalence of non-adherence was 49.5%, which was higher than that estimated. The non-institutional caregivers had a prevalence rate of 55.7%, while the institutional caregivers had 22.2%. In multivariate analysis, the education of the caregiver was found to have a borderline association with the outcome. Institutionalized children and those taken care of by people with a higher educational level appeared to have more protection against non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy.A sobrevida de crianças com AIDS teve um aumento considerável com o emprego de anti-retrovirais mais efetivos, porém os benefícios dessa terapêutica são limitados pela dificuldade na adesão ao tratamento. Este estudo transversal teve como objetivo estimar a prevalência da não-adesão aos anti-retrovirais entre crianças residentes em Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, e identificar os fatores associados. Foram entrevistados 194 cuidadores de crianças. A técnica utilizada para aferir a adesão permitiu detectar tanto as perdas por falhas no entendimento do esquema anti-retroviral prescrito quanto das perdas conscientes de doses. Foi definida como não-aderente a criança que ingeriu menos de 80

  11. Can Urine Lamivudine Be Used to Monitor Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence?

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    Kumar Agibothu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patient adherence to treatment is an important factor in the effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. Adherence to treatment could be monitored by estimation of antiretroviral drugs in biological fluids. We aimed to obtain information on the quantity and duration of excretion of lamivudine in urine following oral administration of a single dose of 300 mg and to assess its suitability for adherence monitoring purposes. Spot urine samples were collected before dosing and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 28, 32, 48, 72, and 96 hours post dosing from 10 healthy subjects, and lamivudine was estimated by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Lamivudine values were expressed as a ratio of urine creatinine. About 91% of the ingested drug was excreted by 24 hours, and the concentration thereafter in urine was very negligible. A lamivudine value of 0.035 mg/mg creatinine or less at 48 hours is suggestive of a missed dose in the last 24 hours. The study findings showed that estimation of urine lamivudine in spot specimens could be useful in monitoring patient adherence to antiretroviral treatment. However, this needs to be confirmed on a larger sample size and among patients on once-daily and twice-daily treatment regimens.

  12. When to start antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred M;

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) have traditionally focused on providing treatment to persons who stand to benefit immediately from initiating the therapy. There is global consensus that any HIV+ person with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/μl should initiate ART. However...... always been vigorously debated. The lack of an evidence base from randomized trials, in conjunction with varying degrees of therapeutic aggressiveness and optimism tempered by the risks of drug resistance and side effects, has resulted in divided expert opinion and inconsistencies among treatment...

  13. Treatment adherence to an antiretroviral regime: the lived experience of Native Hawaiians and kokua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, L

    2001-09-01

    Treatment adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is a critical issue in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care. HAART can extend the longevity of people living with HIV, but treatment efficacy relies on strict adherence that is difficult for many consumers to manage. Results presented in this article are based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with Native Hawaiian consumers (n = 6) who reported moderate to low levels of overall HAART adherence, and based on their kokua, or primary support. All interviews were recorded on audiotape, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Grounded Theory methods. Research questions that guided the inquiry, included: What are the challenges of Hawaiians who report moderate to low levels of HAART adherence? How does non-adherence occur? What is the role of the kokua (primary caregiver) and/or family members in treatment adherence? What types of support enhance adherence? The unpredictability of living with HIV was a major challenge to adherence. Symptom distress and active use of alcohol and other drugs interfered with the capacity to appropriately adhere. Two patterns of non-adherence were identified: interrupted regime and intermittent use. Tangible and emotional types of support, sometimes delivered in culture-specific ways, were viewed as helpful in maintaining compliance and in resuming the regime when difficulties arose. The findings complement extant research on HAART by providing an understanding of adherence as a lived experience among Native Hawaiians and their kokua. PMID:12180508

  14. Durable Suppression of HIV-1 after Virologic Monitoring-Based Antiretroviral Adherence Counseling in Rakai, Uganda.

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    Alexander Billioux

    Full Text Available HIV viral load is recommended for monitoring antiretroviral treatment and identifying treatment failure. We assessed the durability of viral suppression after viral load-triggered adherence counseling among patients with HIV viremia 6 months after ART initiation.Observational cohort enrolled in an antiretroviral treatment program in rural Uganda.Participants who underwent routine viral load determination every 24 weeks and had at least 48 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Patients with viral loads >400 copies/ml at 24 weeks of treatment were given additional adherence counseling, and all patients were followed to assess the duration of viral suppression and development of virologic failure.1,841 participants initiating antiretroviral therapy were enrolled in the Rakai Health Sciences Program between June 2005 and June 2011 and were followed with viral load monitoring every 24 weeks. 148 (8% of patients did not achieve viral suppression at 24 weeks and were given additional adherence counseling. 85 (60% of these patients had undetectable viral loads at 48 weeks, with a median duration of viral suppression of 240 weeks (IQR 193-288 weeks. Failure to achieve an undetectable viral load at 48 weeks was associated with age 2,000 copies/ml in multivariate logistic regression analysis.The majority of patients with persistent viremia who were provided adherence counseling achieved robust viral suppression for a median 4.6 years. Access to virologic monitoring and adherence counseling is a priority in resource-limited settings.

  15. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

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    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  16. Adherence as a predictor of sexual behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS during the first year of antiretroviral therapy in rural Cameroon: data from Stratall ANRS 12110/ESTHER trial.

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    Gilbert Ndziessi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the time pattern of inconsistence condom use (ICU during the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART and its relationship with treatment adherence in naïve HIV-infected adult patients. METHODS: Data collection was nested within a longitudinal trial on HIV treatment. ICU was defined as reporting to have "never", "sometimes" or "nearly always" used condoms with one's main or casual partner(s--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status in the three previous months. Adherence was defined as taking 100% of their ART prescribed doses in the 4 days before the visit and "not having interrupted treatment", even once, for more than two consecutive days during the 4 previous weeks. Mixed logistic regression was used to study the relationship between adherence and ICU. RESULTS: Among the 459 patients enrolled, 212 (46% during 334 visits reported to have had sexual intercourse at least once with their partner(s--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status--during the first 12 months of ART. The proportion of ICU was 76%, 50% and 59% at month 0 (M0, month 6 (M6 and month 12 (M12, while 60% and 66% of patients were ART-adherent at M6 and M12, respectively. After adjustment for the frequency of sexual activity, type of sexual partner(s, perceived social class and desire for a child, patients adherent to ART were less likely to report ICU when compared with baseline (AOR [95% CI]: 0.38 [0.19-0.76]; P = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to ART is associated with a lower risk of ICU but this result needs to be interpreted carefully. As adherence behaviors are not only determined by problems with the healthcare systems but also by social barriers encountered by patients in their daily life, counseling should not only be ART adherence-centered but also patient-centered, including sexual risk minimization and psychosocial support.

  17. The charms and challenges of antiretroviral therapy in Uganda: the DART experience.

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    Nyanzi-Wakholi, B; Lara, AM; Munderi, P.; Gilks, C.; Dart Trial Team, (incl. Grosskurth, H. )

    2012-01-01

    : Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, adherence remains a challenge. A total of eight focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with participants from a randomised controlled trial that monitored strategies for managing ART in African adults: Development of Antiretroviral Therapy. All FGD participants had received ART for at least one year. Perceived benefits of ART were key motivators for adherence. These benefits included imp...

  18. Evaluation of multiple measures of antiretroviral adherence in the Eastern European country of Georgia

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    Nikoloz Chkhartishvili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is little information on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in the Eastern European region. This prospective study evaluated multiple measures of adherence and their association with viral suppression among HIV patients in Georgia. Methods: A prospective cohort study enrolled 100 consecutive antiretroviral-naïve adult (age ≥18 years patients, who were followed for three months. Adherence was assessed by medication refill and three self-report measures (an AIDS Clinical Trial Group [ACTG] tool for four-day adherence, a visual analogue scale [VAS] and a rating task for 30-day adherence. The VAS represented a line anchored by 0 and 100% corresponding to the percentage of prescribed doses taken. The rating task asked patients to rate their ability to take all medications as prescribed, with responses categorized into six levels of adherence: very poor (0%, poor (20%, fair (40%, good (60%, very good (80% and excellent (100%. Patients with adherence of ≥95% by medication refill, ACTG and VAS, and ≥80% by rating task, were defined as adherent. Results: Of 100 patients enrolled, eight had missing data and were excluded from analysis. Among the remaining 92 patients, the median age was 39 years, and 70% were men. Major modes of HIV acquisition were injection drug use (IDU; 47.3% and heterosexual contact (44.1%. The proportions of adherent patients were as follows: 68% by medication refill, 90% by ACTG questionnaire, 38% by VAS and 42% by rating task. On average, four months after commencing ART, 52 (56.5% patients had a viral load <400 copies/ml and 26 (28.3% patients had a viral load <50 copies/ml. Of 43 persons with a history of IDU, 22 (51.2% reached a viral load of <400 copies/ml. In multivariate analysis, only refill adherence was a statistically significant predictor of viral suppression of <400 copies/ml: the risk ratio was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.1–2.8. Refill adherence, VAS and rating task were associated with viral

  19. Correlates of antiretroviral and antidepressant adherence among depressed HIV-infected patients.

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    Bottonari, Kathryn A; Tripathi, Shanti P; Fortney, John C; Curran, Geoff; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Gifford, Allen L; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2012-05-01

    Although crucial for efficacy of pharmacotherapy, adherence to prescribed medication regimens for both antiretrovirals and antidepressants is often suboptimal. As many depressed HIV-infected individuals are prescribed both antiretrovirals and antidepressants, it is important to know whether correlates of nonadherence are similar or different across type of regimen. The HIV Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (HI-TIDES) study was a single-blinded, longitudinal, randomized controlled effectiveness trial comparing collaborative care to usual depression care at three Veterans Affairs HIV clinics. The current investigation utilized self-report baseline interview and chart-abstracted data. Participants were 225 depressed HIV-infected patients who were prescribed an antidepressant (n=146), an antiretroviral (n=192), or both (n=113). Treatment adherence over the last 4 days was dichotomized as "less than 90% adherence" or "90% or greater adherence." After identifying potential correlates of nonadherence, we used a seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) bivariate probit model, in which the probability of adherence to HIV medications and the probability of adherence to antidepressant medications are modeled jointly. Results indicated that 75.5% (n=146) of those prescribed antiretrovirals reported 90%-plus adherence to their antiretroviral prescription and 76.7% (n=112) of those prescribed antidepressants reported 90%-plus adherence to their antidepressant prescription, while 67% of those prescribed both (n=113) reported more than 90% adherence to both regimens. SUR results indicated that education, age, and HIV symptom severity were significant correlates of antiretroviral medication adherence while gender and generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis were significant correlates of adherence to antidepressant medications. In addition, antiretroviral adherence did not predict antidepressant adherence (β=1.62, p=0.17), however, antidepressant adherence

  20. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Spain: A meta-analysis Adherencia al tratamiento antirretroviral de gran actividad (TARGA en España: Un metaanálisis

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    Carmen Ortego

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the percentage of adherence to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Spanish observational studies and to identify the variables associated with adherence. Methods: Seven electronic databases were used to locate the studies. Six inclusion criteria were established. Two coders codified the variables independently. Intercoder reliability was calculated. Publication bias was analyzed through the Begg, Egger and Trim and Fill tests. Homogeneity was evaluated using the Q test and the l² index. A random effects model was assumed to estimate both the overall percentage of adherence and to explain heterogeneity. Results: This meta-analysis included 23 observational studies, yielding a total of 34 adherence estimates. The sample was composed of 9,931 HIV-positive individuals (72% men older than 18 years under treatment with HAART. The percentage of patients adhering to an intake of >90% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs was 55%. Wide heterogeneity was detected (I²=91.20; 95%CI: 88.75-93.13. Adherence was mainly measured using a single strategy (47.8%, the most widely used being self-report (48.7%. In the univariate analysis, the following factors were significant: infection stages A (β=0.68, p 200 copies/ml (β=-0.41, p Objetivo: Calcular el porcentaje de adherencia al TARGA en estudios observacionales españoles, así como identificar las variables asociadas a ella. Métodos: Para localizar los estudios se emplearon siete bases bibliográficas. Se establecieron seis criterios de inclusión. Dos codificadores realizaron la codificación de forma independiente. Se calculó la fiabilidad intercodificadores. El sesgo de publicación se evaluó mediante los tests de Begg y de Egger, y Trim & Fill. La homogeneidad se estimó mediante la prueba Q y el índice I². Se asumió un modelo de efectos aleatorios tanto para la estimación del porcentaje global de adherencia como para explicar la heterogeneidad. Resultados: El

  1. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

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    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  2. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite declines in morbidity and mortality with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, its effectiveness is limited by adverse events, problems with adherence, and resistance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: We randomly assigned persons infected with HIV wh...

  3. Adherence as therapeutic citizenship: impact of the history of access to antiretroviral drugs on adherence to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh-Kim; Ako, Cyriaque Yapo; Niamba, Pascal; Sylla, Aliou; Tiendrébéogo, Issoufou

    2007-10-01

    A dramatic increase in the use of antiretroviral drugs in Africa has increased focus on adherence to treatment, which has so far been equivalent if not superior to that in northern contexts. The reasons for this exceptional adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine adherence in the historical and ethnographic context of access to treatment in Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and Mali. Living where there is no social security and minimal, if any, medical care, individuals diagnosed with HIV are faced with the threat of illness, death, ostracism and destitution, and were obliged to negotiate conflicting networks of obligation, reciprocity, and value. HIV and AIDS programmes value efforts to address social, and indeed biological, vulnerability. In contrast, kinship-based social relationships may value individuals in other ways. These conflicting moral economies often intersect in the worlds of people living with HIV. HIV status can be used to claim resources from the public or non-governmental organization programmes. This may interfere with social networks that are the most stable source of material and emotional support. Self-help and empowerment techniques provided effective tools for people living with HIV to fashion themselves into effective advocates. In the early years of the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), access to treatment was thus mediated by confessional practices and forms of social triage. We introduce the term 'therapeutic citizenship' to describe the way in which people living with HIV appropriate ART as a set of rights and responsibilities to negotiate these at times conflicting moral economies. Exemplary adherence should be viewed through the lens of therapeutic citizenship. PMID:18090265

  4. Retention in care, viral suppression, treatment adherence and quality of life in a public antiretroviral therapy program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Mekuria, L.A. (Legese A.)

    2016-01-01

    In his thesis, Legese A. Mekuria presents the results of a PhD study which was undertaken in 10 health-care facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The overall aim was to estimate retention in HIV care, viral suppression, medication adherence and patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL). An additional aim was to investigate the predictors of attrition, detectable viremia, sub-optimal adherence and poor HRQoL. A total of 870 patients who initiated cART between May 2009 and April 2012 were...

  5. The cameroon mobile phone sms (CAMPS trial: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of mobile phone text messaging versus usual care for improving adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy

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    Mba Robert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This trial aims at testing the efficacy of weekly reminder and motivational text messages, compared to usual care in improving adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in patients attending a clinic in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methods and Design This is a single-centered randomized controlled single-blinded trial. A central computer generated randomization list will be generated using random block sizes. Allocation will be determined by sequentially numbered sealed opaque envelopes. 198 participants will either receive the mobile phone text message or usual care. Our hypothesis is that weekly motivational text messages can improve adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment and other clinical outcomes in the control group by acting as a reminder, a cue to action and opening communication channels. Data will be collected at baseline, three months and six months. A blinded program secretary will send out text messages and record delivery. Our primary outcomes are adherence measured by the visual analogue scale, self report, and pharmacy refill data. Our secondary outcomes are clinical: weight, body mass index, opportunistic infections, all cause mortality and retention; biological: Cluster Designation 4 count and viral load; and quality of life. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat. Covariates and subgroups will be taken into account. Discussion This trial investigates the potential of SMS motivational reminders to improve adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in Cameroon. The intervention targets non-adherence due to forgetfulness and other forms of non-adherence. Trial Registration Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201011000261458 http://clinicaltrials.gov/NCT01247181

  6. Factors that influence adherence to antiretroviral treatment in an urban population, Jakarta, Indonesia.

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    Emma Rosamond Nony Weaver

    Full Text Available Although the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in Indonesia has increased in recent years, little is known about the specific characteristics affecting adherence in this population. Indonesia is different from most of its neighbors given that it is a geographically and culturally diverse country, with a large Muslim population. We aimed to identify the current rate of adherence and explore factors that influence ART adherence.Data were collected from ART-prescribed outpatients on an HIV registry at a North Jakarta hospital in 2012. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were explored as factors associated with adherence using logistics regression analyses. Chi squared test was used to compare the difference between proportions. Reasons for missing medication were analyzed descriptively.Two hundred and sixty-one patients participated, of whom 77% reported ART adherence in the last 3 months. The level of social support experienced was independently associated with adherence where some social support (p = 0.018 and good social support (p = 0.039 improved adherence compared to poor social support. Frequently cited reasons for not taking ART medication included forgetting to take medication (67%, busy with something else (63% and asleep at medication time (60%.This study identified that an increase in the level of social support experienced by ART-prescribed patients was positively associated with adherence. Social support may minimize the impact of stigma among ART prescribed patients. Based on these findings, if social support is not available, alternative support through community-based organizations is recommended to maximize treatment success.

  7. Patterns of geographic mobility predict barriers to engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barbara S; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A; Khan, Shah Z; Garduño, L Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  8. Long-term postpartum adherence to antiretroviral drugs among women in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitchmann, Regis; Coelho, Debora Fernandes; Kakehasi, Fabiana Maria; Hofer, Cristina Barroso; Read, Jennifer S; Losso, Marcelo; Haberer, Jessica E; Siberry, George K; Harris, D Robert; Yu, Qilu

    2016-04-01

    Antiretroviral adherence in the postpartum period is crucial for maternal health and decreasing the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission and transmission to sexual partners. Self-reported antiretroviral adherence was examined between 6- to 12-weeks and 30 months postpartum among 270 HIV-infected women enrolled in a prospective cohort study from 2008 to 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence data were collected at each study visit to quantify the proportion of prescribed antiretrovirals taken during the previous three days, assess the timing of the last missed dose, and identify predictors of adherence. Mean adherence rates were 89.5% at 6-12 weeks and 92.4% at 30 months; the proportions with perfect adherence were 80.3% and 83.6%, respectively. The overall trend for perfect adherence was not significant (p = 0.71). In adjusted regression modelling, younger age was associated with an increased probability of non-perfect adherence at 18 and 24 months postpartum. Other factors associated with increased probability of non-perfect adherence were higher parity, current use of alcohol and tobacco, and more advanced HIV disease. Women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads. Interventions for alcohol and tobacco use cessation, and support for young women and those with advanced HIV disease should be considered to improve postpartum adherence. PMID:25931238

  9. Multiple measures reveal antiretroviral adherence successes and challenges in HIV-infected Ugandan children.

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    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART among children in developing settings is poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the level, distribution, and correlates of ART adherence behavior, we prospectively determined monthly ART adherence through multiple measures and six-monthly HIV RNA levels among 121 Ugandan children aged 2-10 years for one year. Median adherence levels were 100% by three-day recall, 97.4% by 30-day visual analog scale, 97.3% by unannounced pill count/liquid formulation weights, and 96.3% by medication event monitors (MEMS. Interruptions in MEMS adherence of ≥ 48 hours were seen in 57.0% of children; 36.3% had detectable HIV RNA at one year. Only MEMS correlated significantly with HIV RNA levels (r = -0.25, p = 0.04. Multivariable regression found the following to be associated with <90% MEMS adherence: hospitalization of child (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-5.5; p = 0.001, liquid formulation use (AOR 1.4, 95%CI 1.0-2.0; p = 0.04, and caregiver's alcohol use (AOR 3.1, 95%CI 1.8-5.2; p<0.0001. Child's use of co-trimoxazole (AOR 0.5, 95%CI 0.4-0.9; p = 0.009, caregiver's use of ART (AOR 0.6, 95%CI 0.4-0.9; p = 0.03, possible caregiver depression (AOR 0.6, 95%CI 0.4-0.8; p = 0.001, and caregiver feeling ashamed of child's HIV status (AOR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.6; p<0.0001 were protective against <90% MEMS adherence. Change in drug manufacturer (AOR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5-11.5; p = 0.009 and caregiver's alcohol use (AOR 5.5, 95%CI 2.8-10.7; p<0.0001 were associated with ≥ 48-hour interruptions by MEMS, while second-line ART (AOR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1-0.99; p = 0.049 and increasing assets (AOR 0.7, 95%CI 0.6-0.9; p = 0.0007 were protective against these interruptions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Adherence success depends on a well-established medication taking routine, including caregiver support and adequate education on medication changes. Caregiver-reported depression and

  10. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

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    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  11. Prevention is better than cure – the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment

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    Leith Kwaan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The much-used phrase ‘prevention is better than cure’ is applicable to many circumstances, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In recent years suggestions have been made for a move towards treatment strategies that emphasise prevention of foreseeable adherence problems on a patient-by-patient basis, through focused patient preparation before commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART. This is well elucidated in a statement made in 2004 by Coetzee et al.:1 ‘As it is difficult to ascertain robust predictors of adherence, there has been a move to concentrate on patient preparation before the initiation of ART rather than the use of non-clinical predictors of adherence or selection criteria. A paradigm focused on preparation rather than selection is better suited to the aggressive targets for the scaling up of ART in countries with large epidemics (such as in South Africa, where the view of ART as a very expensive rationed intervention is rapidly changing.’

  12. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy in adults

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    G Meintjes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available These guidelines are intended as an update to those published in the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine in January 2008. Since the release of the previous guidelines, the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in Southern Africa has continued to grow. Cohort studies from the region show excellent clinical outcomes; however, ART is still being started late (in advanced disease, resulting in relatively high early mortality rates. New data on antiretroviral (ARV tolerability in the region and several new ARV drugs have become available. Although currently few in number, some patients in the region are failing protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line regimens. To address this, guidelines on third-line (or ‘salvage’ therapy have been expanded.

  13. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on ef...

  14. Terapia anti-retroviral: fatores que interferem na adesão de crianças com HIV/AIDS Terapia anti-retroviral: factores que interfieren en la adherencia de niños con VIH/SIDA Antiretroviral therapy: factors interfering in the adherence of children with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claúdia Feitosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi conhecer os fatores que interferem na adesão à terapêutica medicamentosa em crianças infectadas pelo HIV/AIDS, relatados por 12 cuidadores em um serviço de referência em AIDS, em Fortaleza-CE. Os dados foram obtidos mediante entrevista, e, com eles, foram apurados fatores que dificultaram a adesão terapêutica, evidenciando relatos referentes à apresentação da droga, horário da tomada do medicamento, efeitos colaterais, falta na distribuição de medicamento gratuito, dificuldade de acesso regular ao serviço de saúde e problemas financeiros. Constatou-se a importância de conhecer o contexto social no qual a criança está inserida e as dificuldades no uso dos anti-retrovirais para intervir de forma eficiente e possibilitar uma melhor qualidade de vida às crianças.La finalidad de este estudio fue conocer los factores que interfieren en la adherencia a la terapéutica medicamentosa en niños infectados por el VIH/sida relatados por 12 cuidadores en un servicio de referencia en sida, en Fortaleza-CE, Brasil. Los datos fueron obtenidos mediante entrevista, y, con ellos fueran apurados factores que dificultaron la adherencia terapéutica, evidenciando relatos referentes a la presentación de la droga, horario de la toma del medicamento, efectos colaterales, falta en la distribución de medicamento gratuito, dificultad de acceso regular al servicio de salud y problemas financieros. Se constató la importancia de conocer el contexto social en que el niño está insertado y las dificultades en el uso de los anti-retrovirales para intervenir de forma eficiente y posibilitar una mejor calidad de vida a los niños.This study aimed to get to know the factors that interfere in medication treatment adherence among children infected by HIV/aids, as reported by 12 caregivers in a service reference to aids in Fortaleza/CE, Brazil. Data were collected through interviews, verifying factors that made treatment adherence

  15. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

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    Janet Gare

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12 of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91, pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84 with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01 and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037 were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033. Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  16. Psychosocial Burdens Negatively Impact HIV Antiretroviral Adherence in Gay, Bisexual, and other MSM Ages 50 and Older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Perez-Figueroa, Rafael Eduardo; Carreiro, Timothy; Kingdon, Molly J.; Kupprat, Sandra A.; Eddy, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    We sought to characterize HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and psychosocial correlates of adherence in a sample of gay, bisexual, and other non-gay or –bisexual identified MSM ages 50 and over. As part of a cross-sectional study we recruited a community-based sample of 199 men and assessed adherence to current ART medications along four domains: 1) missing doses in the past 4 days, 2) taking doses on the specified schedule in the past 4 days, 3) following instructions about how to take the medications (e.g. to take medications with food), and 4) missing doses in the last weekend. A total adherence score was also computed. Bivariable analyses indicated negative associations between depression, sexual compulsivity, and HIV-related stigma with each of the individual adherence variables and the composite adherence score, while an older age was found to be protective. In multivariable analyses, controlling for age and educational attainment, a higher likelihood of missing doses and failing to follow instructions were related to higher levels of HIV-related stigma, while dosing off-schedule was associated with higher levels of sexual compulsivity. These results indicate that psychosocial burdens undermine the adherence behaviors of older HIV-positive sexual minority men. Programming and services to address this compromising health behavior must embrace a holistic approach to health as informed by syndemics theory, while attending to the developmental and age-specific needs of older men. PMID:24865599

  17. Clinic Attendance for Medication Refills and Medication Adherence amongst an Antiretroviral Treatment Cohort in Uganda: A Prospective Study

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    Setor Kunutsor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regular clinic attendance for antiretroviral (ARV drug refills is important for successful clinical outcomes in HIV management. Methods. Clinic attendance for ARV drug refills and medication adherence using a clinic-based pill count in 392 adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in a district hospital in Uganda were prospectively monitored over a 28-week period. Results. Of the 2267 total scheduled clinic visits, 40 (1.8% were missed visits. Among the 392 clients, 361 (92% attended all appointments for their refills (regular attendance. Clinic attendance for refills was statistically significantly associated with medication adherence with regular attendant clients having about fourfold greater odds of achieving optimal (≥95% medication adherence [odds ratio (OR=3.89, 95% CI: 1.48 to 10.25, exact P=.013]. In multivariate analysis, clients in age category 35 years and below were less likely to achieve regular clinic attendance. Conclusion. Monitoring of clinic attendance may be an objective and effective measure and could be a useful adjunct to an adherence measure such as pill counting in resource-constrained settings. Where human resource constraints do not allow pill counts or other time-consuming measures, then monitoring clinic attendance and acting on missed appointments may be an effective proxy measure.

  18. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

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    Parya Saberi

    Full Text Available As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive. Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  19. Pattern and Determinants of Antiretroviral Drug Adherence among Nigerian Pregnant Women

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    S. O. Ekama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for a high level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs has remained a major hurdle to achieving maximal benefit from its use in pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the level of adherence and identify factors that influence adherence during pregnancy. Method. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a semistructured questionnaire. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine factors independently associated with good drug adherence during pregnancy. Result. 137 (80.6% of the interviewed 170 women achieved adherence level of ≥95% using 3 day recall. The desire to protect the unborn child was the greatest motivation (51.8% for good adherence. Fear of being identified as HIV positive (63.6% was the most common reason for nonadherence. Marital status, disclosure of HIV status, good knowledge of ART, and having a treatment supporter were found to be significantly associated with good adherence at bivariate analysis. However, after controlling for confounders, only HIV status disclosure and having a treatment partner retained their association with good adherence. Conclusion. Disclosure of HIV status and having treatment support are associated with good adherence. Maternal desire to protect the child was the greatest motivator for adherence.

  20. Oxidative Imbalance in HIV-1 Infected Patients Treated with Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Antonella Mandas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that oxidative stress is involved in HIV infection. However, the role in oxidative balance of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART is still debated. In our study we assessed serum oxidant and antioxidant levels in an HIV-1-infected population treated with HAART, and compared them with those of untreated HIV-1 patients and HIV-1-negative subjects. The study included 116 HIV-1-infected patients (86 HAART-treated and 30 untreated, and 46 HIV-negative controls. Serum oxidant levels were significantly higher in the HIV-1 treated group as compared to untreated and control groups. In addition, a decrease of serum total antioxidant status was observed in the HIV-1 treated group. To be noted is that patients who rigorously follow antiretroviral therapy (optimal HAART adherence have significantly higher oxidative status than those who do not closely follow the therapy (poor HAART adherence. Analysis of variance revealed no significant further increase in oxidative status in HIV-1-infected patients taking antiretroviral and other drugs with the exception of psychiatric drugs (e.g. anxiolytics or antidepressants. Taken together, our results indicate that HAART may affect oxidative stress in HIV-1-infected patients and suggest that antiretroviral therapy plays an important role in the synergy of HIV infection and oxidative stress.

  1. Excellent adherence to antiretrovirals in HIV+ Zambian children is compromised by disrupted routine, HIV nondisclosure, and paradoxical income effects.

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    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A better understanding of pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to develop interventions to sustain high levels of adherence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adherence among 96 HIV-infected Zambian children (median age 6, interquartile range [IQR] 2,9 initiating fixed-dose combination ART was measured prospectively (median 23 months; IQR 20,26 with caregiver report, clinic and unannounced home-based pill counts, and medication event monitoring systems (MEMS. HIV-1 RNA was determined at 48 weeks. Child and caregiver characteristics, socio-demographic status, and treatment-related factors were assessed as predictors of adherence. Median adherence was 97.4% (IQR 96.1,98.4% by visual analog scale, 94.8% (IQR 86,100% by caregiver-reported last missed dose, 96.9% (IQR 94.5,98.2% by clinic pill count, 93.4% (IQR 90.2,96.7% by unannounced home-based pill count, and 94.8% (IQR 87.8,97.7% by MEMS. At 48 weeks, 72.6% of children had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml. Agreement among adherence measures was poor; only MEMS was significantly associated with viral suppression (p = 0.013. Predictors of poor adherence included changing residence, school attendance, lack of HIV disclosure to children aged nine to 15 years, and increasing household income. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Adherence among children taking fixed-dose combination ART in sub-Saharan Africa is high and sustained over two years. However, certain groups are at risk for treatment failure, including children with disrupted routines, no knowledge of their HIV diagnosis among older children, and relatively high household income, possibly reflecting greater social support in the setting of greater poverty.

  2. Improving adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Uganda with a low-resource facility-based intervention

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    Celestino Obua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effects of facility-based interventions using existing resources to improve overall patient attendance and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART at ART-providing facilities in Uganda. Methods: This was an interventional study which tracked attendance and treatment adherence of two distinct cohorts: experienced patients who had been on treatment for at least 12 months prior to the intervention and patients newly initiated on ART before or during the intervention. The interventions included instituting appointment system, fast-tracking, and giving longer prescriptions to experienced stable patients. Mixed-effects models were used to examine intervention effects on the experienced patients, while Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the intervention effects on time until newly treated patients experienced gaps in medication availability. Results: In all, 1481 patients’ files were selected for follow-up from six facilities – 720 into the experienced cohort, and 761 into the newly treated cohort. Among patients in the experienced cohort, the interventions were associated with a significant reduction from 24.4 to 20.3% of missed appointments (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.59–0.77; a significant decrease from 20.2 to 18.4% in the medication gaps of three or more days (AOR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.60–0.79; and a significant increase from 4.3 to 9.3% in the proportion of patients receiving more than 30 days of dispensed medication (AOR: 2.35; 95% CI: 1.91–2.89. Among newly treated patients, the interventions were associated with significant reductions of 44% (adjusted hazard rate (AHR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.42–0.74 and 38% (AHR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.45–0.85 in the hazards of experiencing a medication gap of 7 and 14 days or more, respectively. Conclusions: Patients’ adherence was improved with low-cost and easily implemented interventions using existing health facilities

  3. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, S; Martin, FA; Zalwango, F; Namukwaya, S; Nalugya, R; Muhumuza, R; Katongole, J; Seeley, J.

    2016-01-01

    : The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH's motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH's self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH's self-management...

  4. Southern African HIV Clinicians Society adult antiretroviral therapy guidelines: Update on when to initiate antiretroviral therapy

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    Graeme Meintjes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The most recent version of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s adult antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines was published in December 2014. In the 27 August 2015 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, two seminal randomised controlled trials that addressed the optimal timing of ART in HIV-infected patients with high CD4 counts were published: Strategic timing of antiretroviral therapy (START and TEMPRANO ANRS 12136 (Early antiretroviral treatment and/or early isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults. The findings of these two trials were consistent: there was significant individual clinical benefit from starting ART immediately in patients with CD4 counts higher than 500 cells/μL rather than deferring until a certain lower CD4 threshold or clinical indication was met. The findings add to prior evidence showing that ART reduces the risk of onward HIV transmission. Therefore, early ART initiation has the public health benefits of potentially reducing both HIV incidence and morbidity. Given this new and important evidence, the Society took the decision to provide a specific update on the section of the adult ART guidelines relating to when ART should be initiated.

  5. Public health implications of antiretroviral therapy and HIV drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, M A; Friedland, G

    1998-06-24

    Widespread use of antiretroviral agents and increasing occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains resistant to these drugs have given rise to a number of important issues. Some of these concerns are distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure and have potentially widespread public health implications. The relevant issues include but are not limited to the following: (1) frequency with which drug-resistant virus may be transmitted via sexual, intravenous, or mother-to-child routes; (2) ability of drug-resistant variants to be transmitted, a question that relates, in part, to the relative fitness of such strains; (3) effectiveness of antiviral therapy in diminishing viral burden in both blood and genital secretions, and whether this may be compromised in persons harboring resistant virus; and (4) importance of patient adherence to antiviral therapy and its relationship to sustained reduction in viral load to minimize the appearance in and transmission of drug-resistant virus from both blood and genital secretions. Thus, prevention of both development of HIV drug resistance as well as transmission of drug-resistant variants is a central issue of public health importance. Unless this topic is appropriately addressed, the likelihood is that drug-resistant variants of HIV, if able to successfully replicate, will sustain the epidemic and limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapy. PMID:9643862

  6. Understanding the facilitators and barriers of antiretroviral adherence in Peru: A qualitative study

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    Cabello Robinson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral scale-up is increasing in resource-constrained settings. To date, few studies have explored the barriers and facilitators of adherence to ART in these settings. Facilitators and barriers of antiretroviral adherence in Peru are not completely understood. Methods At two clinics that serve a large number of HIV-positive individuals in Lima, Peru, 31 in-depth interviews were carried out in 2006 with adult HIV-positive individuals receiving ART. Purposive sampling was used to recruit the participants. Interviews were transcribed and coded using two Spanish-speaking researchers and a content analysis approach to identify themes in the data. Results Among the participants, 28/31 (90% were male, 25/31 (81% were self-identified as mestizo, and 19/31 (61% had an education above high school. The most frequently discussed barriers to adherence included side effects, simply forgetting, inconvenience, dietary requirements, being away from home, and fear of disclosure/stigma. The most frequently discussed facilitators to adherence included having a fixed routine, understanding the need for compliance, seeing positive results, treatment knowledge, and faith in treatment. Conclusions Overall, these findings were similar to the facilitators and challenges experienced by individuals on ART in other resource constrained settings. Further treatment support tools and networks should be developed to decrease the challenges of ART adherence for HIV-positive individuals in Lima, Peru.

  7. Psoriasis: improving adherence to topical therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, S.R.; Horn, E.J.; Balkrishnan, R.; Basra, M.K.; Finlay, A.Y.; McCoy, D.; Menter, A.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2008-01-01

    Topical therapy has an important role in psoriasis treatment. It is efficacious and has a favorable safety profile as demonstrated in clinical trials. However, poor treatment outcomes from topical therapy regimens likely result from poor adherence and ineffective use of the medication. The Internati

  8. Experiences and Impact of Stigma and Discrimination among People on Antiretroviral Therapy in Dar es Salaam: A Qualitative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Maisara Mhode; Tumaini Nyamhanga

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of stigma on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been less studied in Tanzania. Recent studies indicate that people on ART still experience stigma. Qualitative information on the subject matter is especially insufficient. Objective. This paper reports on the dimensions of stigma and discrimination and their impact on adherence to ART as experienced by people living with HIV (PLHIV). Design. A phenomenological approach was used to gather information on the live...

  9. CBT for Medication Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Methadone Maintenance Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroudi, Nafisseh; Perez, Giselle K.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Greer, Joseph A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Otto, Michael W.; Safren, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    For individuals with HIV who are current or former injection drug users, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes the feasibility and outcome, in a case series approach, of cognitive behavioral therapy to improve adherence…

  10. Approaches to antiretroviral therapy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruce; L; GILLIAM; Robert; R; REDFIELD

    2005-01-01

    China has recognized the threat of HIV to its population and responded with a national antiretroviral treatment (ART)program. However, high ART failure rates and the spread of resistance within populations are important realities to consider when developing and managing ART programs in China and worldwide. Concepts which will define treatment success and local and national programmatic goals are 1) access to ART, 2) durability of ART at the patient level, 3)scalability of treatment modalities, and the 4) sustainability of the program at the community or national level. In the face of limited resources, China must also consider when to start ARV therapy, which agents to use, when to switch them, and how to treat highly experienced patients with drug resistance. The optimal ARV regimen to start with is changing frequently with the introduction of new agents and the presentation of new data. Currently, a regimen including tenofovir, emtricitabine or lamivudine and a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor appears to have optimal characteristics to treat HIV/AIDS in China. However, critical to all of these choices is the evaluation of programs implemented to insure wide scale success. China has wisely begun this process of evaluating the performance of local programs through systematic monitoring and evaluation of treatment outcomes. This will allow regimens and programs that work to be expanded, and programs with high failure rates to be eliminated. In the end,evidence based data supporting treatment strategies will allow China to successfully confront its AIDS epidemic early and prevent its tragic consequences

  11. Childhood sexual abuse and depression in Latino men who have sex with men: Does resilience protect against nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda, John A; Wiebe, John S; Simoni, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    This study tested depression as a mediator between childhood sexual abuse and adherence to antiretroviral therapy, an effect moderated by resilience. In total, 149 HIV+ Latino men who have sex with men were recruited for this study. Using a regression-based bootstrap approach, depression mediated the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and antiretroviral therapy adherence, with worse adherence for participants at lowest percentiles of the resilience index. The prevalence of childhood sexual abuse and depression in HIV+ men who have sex with men is high and must be addressed to better prevent disease progression and reduce transmission, especially in expanding Latino populations. PMID:25156387

  12. HIV antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: experiences from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krain, Alysa; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2005-06-01

    An unprecedented international effort to expand high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to resource-poor nations has been launched. The World Health Organization (WHO) has created antiretroviral (ARV) treatment guidelines adapted to resource-poor settings. The first-line regimen is two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NsRTIs) and one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). Therapy is initiated by clinical staging and CD4 T-cell counts when available. Adherence is the responsibility of health care workers. The use of ARV therapy in resource-poor settings faces several challenges, including the poverty of patients, political and social upheavals and violence, social stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, unreliable pharmacy systems, tuberculosis, and lack of trained health care workers. Using our experience in Haiti, we describe how we have addressed these challenges with the goal of increasing access to care for the poor with HIV/AIDS.

  13. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  14. Adherence to extended postpartum antiretrovirals is associated with decreased breastmilk HIV-1 transmission: Results of the BAN study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVIS, Nicole L.; MILLER, William C.; HUDGENS, Michael G.; CHASELA, Charles S.; SICHALI, Dorothy; KAYIRA, Dumbani; NELSON, Julie A. E.; STRINGER, Jeffrey S. A.; ELLINGTON, Sascha R.; KOURTIS, Athena P.; JAMIESON, Denise J; VAN DER HORST, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimate association between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and breastmilk HIV-1 transmission Design Prospective cohort study Methods Mother-infant pairs were randomized after delivery to immediately begin receiving 28 weeks of either triple maternal antiretrovirals (zidovudine, lamivudine, and either nevirapine, nelfinavir, or lopinavir-ritonavir) or daily infant nevirapine as part of the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study. Associations between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and rate of breastmilk HIV-1 transmission were estimated using Cox models. We measured adherence over four postpartum time intervals using pill count, suspension bottle weight, and maternal self-report. Adherence was categorized and lagged by one interval. Missing adherence measures were multiply imputed. Infant HIV-1 infection was determined by DNA PCR every 2-6 weeks. The primary endpoint was infant HIV-1 infection by 38 weeks of age among infants alive and uninfected at 5 weeks. Results Analyses included 1479 mother-infant pairs and 45 transmission events. Using pill count and bottle weight information, 22-40% of mother-infant pairs at any given interval were <90% adherent. Having ≥90% adherence was associated with a 52% (95% CI 3-76%) relative reduction in the rate of breastmilk HIV-1 transmission, compared with having <90% adherence when controlling for study arm, breastfeeding status, and maternal characteristics. Complete case analysis rendered similar results (n=501; relative reduction 59%, 95% CI 6-82%). Conclusion Non-adherence to extended postpartum ART regimens in ‘real world’ settings is likely to be higher than that seen in BAN. Identifying mothers with difficulty adhering to antiretrovirals, and developing effective adherence interventions, will help maximize benefits of ARV provision throughout breastfeeding. PMID:25493600

  15. The Clarification of Depression and Social Support’s Contribution to the Prediction of Antiretroviral Medication Adherence and the Rate of CD4 in People with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Goodarzi, Mohammad Ali; Joulaei, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of the antiretroviral therapy, the number of the people with HIV is increasing; therefore, identifying the factors affecting HIV is of great importance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the antiretroviral medication adherence and the rate of CD4 with depression and social support in the people with HIV. The research method was a descriptive study kind of correlation. The statistical population included all patients with HIV in Shiraz, of whom, 220 people who had referred to the Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center were selected using the available sampling method. Philips et al.’s Social Support Questionnaire, Beck’s Depression Questionnaire II, and ACTG Medication Adherence Questionnaire were used as the research tools. Results were analyzed using the stepwise regression and stepwise hierarchical multiple regression. Regression analysis showed that social support and depression variables could predict totally 47% (Pdepression could predict only 2% (P<0.01) of rate variance of CD4. PMID:27157183

  16. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment and correlation with risk of hospitalization among commercially insured HIV patients in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Sax

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A lower daily pill burden may improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART and clinical outcomes in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This study assessed differences in adherence using the number of pills taken per day, and evaluated how adherence correlated with hospitalization. METHODOLOGY: Commercially insured patients in the LifeLink database with an HIV diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification code 042.xx between 6/1/2006 and 12/31/2008 and receipt of a complete ART regimen were selected for inclusion. Patients were grouped according to their daily pill count and remained on ART for at least 60 days. Outcomes included adherence and rates of hospitalization. Adherence was measured as the proportion of days between the start and end of the regimen in which the patient maintained supply of all initiated ART components. Logistic regressions assessed the relationship between pills per day, adherence, and hospitalization, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, and ART-naïve (vs. experienced status. RESULTS: 7,073 patients met the study inclusion criteria, and 33.4%, 5.8%, and 60.8% received an ART regimen comprising one, two, or three or more pills per day, respectively. Regression analysis showed patients receiving a single pill per day were significantly more likely to reach a 95% adherence threshold versus patients receiving three or more pills per day (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59; P<0.001. Regardless of the number of pills received per day, patients were over 40% less likely to have a hospitalization if they were adherent to therapy (OR = 0.57; P<0.001. Patients receiving a single pill per day were 24% less likely to have a hospitalization versus patients receiving three or more pills per day (OR = 0.76; P = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: ART consisting of a single pill per day was associated with significantly better adherence and lower risk of hospitalization in patients

  17. Contemporary issues on the epidemiology and antiretroviral adherence of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a narrative review

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    Olurotimi A Adejumo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescents are a unique and sometimes neglected group in the planning of healthcare services. This is the case in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, where more than eight out of ten of the world's HIV-infected adolescents live. Although the last decade has seen a reduction in AIDS-related mortality worldwide, largely due to improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART, AIDS remains a significant contributor to adolescent mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although inadequate access to ART in parts of the subcontinent may be implicated, research among youth with HIV elsewhere in the world suggests that suboptimal adherence to ART may play a significant role. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology of HIV among sub-Saharan African adolescents and review their adherence to ART, emphasizing the unique challenges and factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search of online databases for articles, relevant abstracts, and conference reports from meetings held between 2010 and 2014. Our search terms included “adherence,” “compliance,” “antiretroviral use” and “antiretroviral adherence,” in combination with “adolescents,” “youth,” “HIV,” “Africa,” “interventions” and the MeSH term “Africa South of the Sahara.” Of 19,537 articles and abstracts identified, 215 met inclusion criteria, and 148 were reviewed. Discussion: Adolescents comprise a substantial portion of the population in many sub-Saharan African countries. They are at particular risk of HIV and may experience worse outcomes. Although demonstrated to have unique challenges, there is a dearth of comprehensive health services for adolescents, especially for those with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. ART adherence is poorer among older adolescents than other age groups, and psychosocial, socio-economic, individual, and treatment-related factors influence adherence behaviour among adolescents

  18. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide information on responses to combination antiretroviral therapy in children, adolescents and older HIV-infected persons. DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. SUBJECTS:: Forty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty-one antiretroviral-naive indiv......OBJECTIVE: To provide information on responses to combination antiretroviral therapy in children, adolescents and older HIV-infected persons. DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. SUBJECTS:: Forty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty-one antiretroviral...... using survival methods. Ten age strata were chosen: less than 2, 2-5, 6-12, 13-17, 18-29, 30-39 (reference group), 40-49, 50-54, 55-59 and 60 years or older; those aged 6 years or more were included in multivariable analyses. RESULTS: The four youngest age groups had 223, 184, 219 and 201 individuals...... and the three oldest age groups had 2693, 1656 and 1613 individuals. Precombination antiretroviral therapy CD4 cell counts were highest in young children and declined with age. By 12 months, 53.7% (95% confidence interval: 53.2-54.1%) and 59.2% (58.7-59.6%) had experienced a virological and immunological...

  19. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART.

  20. Crack cocaine use and adherence to antiretroviral treatment among HIV-infected black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Tanya Telfair; Lee, Lisa M; Nakashima, Allyn K; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Fleming, Patricia L

    2004-04-01

    Since the appearance of crack cocaine in the 1980s, unprecedented numbers of women have become addicted. A disproportionate number of female crack users are Black and poor. We analyzed interview data of HIV-infected women > or = 18 years of age reported to 12 health departments between July 1997 and December 2000 to ascertain if Black women reported crack use more than other HIV-infected women and to examine the relationship between crack use and antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among Black women. Of 1655 HIV-infected women, 585 (35%) were nonusers of drugs, 694 (42%) were users of other drugs and 376 (23%) were crack users. Of the 1196 (72%) Black women, 306 (26%) were crack users. We used logistic regression to examine the effect of crack use on adherence to ART, controlling for age and education among Black women. In multivariate analysis, crack users and users of other drugs were less likely than non-users to take their ART medicines exactly as prescribed (odds ratio [OR] = 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.56), OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.36-0.68), respectively. HIV-infected Black women substance users, especially crack cocaine users, may require sustained treatment and counseling to help them reduce substance use and adhere to ART.

  1. In vivo assessment of antiretroviral therapy-associated side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Milton Ramos-Sanchez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has been associated with side effects, either from the drug itself or in conjunction with the effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Here, we evaluated the side effects of the protease inhibitor (PI indinavir in hamsters consuming a normal or high-fat diet. Indinavir treatment increased the hamster death rate and resulted in an increase in triglyceride, cholesterol and glucose serum levels and a reduction in anti-oxLDL auto-antibodies. The treatment led to histopathological alterations of the kidney and the heart. These results suggest that hamsters are an interesting model for the study of the side effects of antiretroviral drugs, such as PIs.

  2. Adherence to national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral regimens in HIV patients: a Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, TS; Andersen, SE; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    -four% initiated a recommended regimen or were included in a clinical trial. Intravenous drug use predicted initiation of a non-recommended regimen and delay in start of HAART, while non-Caucasians were less likely to be included in clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS In a Western world setting, the adherence to national......WHAT IS ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS SUBJECT • National guidelines for start of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in HIV infected patients are available in many Western world countries. However the impact of the guidelines on clinical practice is poorly documented. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS...... risk factors for delayed initiation of treatment and chance of being included in clinical trials. RESULTS The study included 3223 patients, 74% of whom initiated HAART in the study period. Ninety-four% fulfilled the criteria for start of HAART, with minor differences over calendar periods. Ninety...

  3. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Chapman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard H Chapman1, Elise M Pelletier1, Paula J Smith1, Craig S Roberts21US Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Global Outcomes Research, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USAObjective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen.Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure.Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on, mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001. After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]. Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen.Keywords: adherence, amlodipine, atorvastatin, cardiovascular disease, persistence, single-pill

  4. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesselring, Anouk M; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D; Gill, M John; Gatell, Jose M; Rauch, Andri; Montaner, Julio S; de Wolf, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Mocroft, Amanda; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1 Januar

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a substudy cohort within a clinical trial of serodiscordant couples in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available Randomized clinical trials of oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for HIV prevention have widely divergent efficacy estimates, ranging from 0% to 75%. These discrepancies are likely due to differences in adherence. To our knowledge, no studies to date have examined the impact of improving adherence through monitoring and/or intervention, which may increase PrEP efficacy, or reported on objective behavioral measures of adherence, which can inform PrEP effectiveness and implementation.Within the Partners PrEP Study (a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir among HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda, we collected objective measures of PrEP adherence using unannounced home-based pill counts and electronic pill bottle monitoring. Participants received individual and couples-based adherence counseling at PrEP initiation and throughout the study; counseling was intensified if unannounced pill count adherence fell to 80% adherence. Study limitations include potential shortcomings of the adherence measures and use of a convenience sample within the substudy cohort.The high PrEP adherence achieved in the setting of active adherence monitoring and counseling support was associated with a high degree of protection from HIV acquisition by the HIV-uninfected partner in heterosexual serodiscordant couples. Low PrEP adherence was associated with sexual behavior, alcohol use, younger age, and length of PrEP use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  6. Diagnosis, antiretroviral therapy, and emergence of resistance to antiretroviral agents in HIV-2 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Hightower

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and type 2 (HIV-2 are the causative agents of AIDS. HIV-2 is prevalent at moderate to high rates in West African countries, such as Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, and Cape Verde. Diagnosis of HIV-2 is made with a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 ELISA or simple/rapid assay, followed by one or two confirmatory tests specific for HIV-2. Following CD4+ T cell counts, HIV-2 viral burden and clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are beneficial in monitoring HIV-2 disease progression. Although non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are ineffective in treating HIV-2, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can be effective in dual and triple antiretroviral regimens. Their use can decrease HIV-2 viral load, increase CD4+ T cell counts and improve AIDS-related symptoms. HIV-2 resistance to various nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, including zidovudine, lamivudine, ritonavir and indinavir, has been identified in some HIV-2 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The knowledge of HIV-2 peculiarities, when compared to HIV-1, is crucial to helping diagnose and guide the clinician in the choice of the initial antiretroviral regimen and for monitoring therapy success.

  7. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Arroyo MJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available María Jesús Hernández Arroyo,1 Salvador Enrique Cabrera Figueroa,2 Rosa Sepúlveda Correa,3 María de la Paz Valverde Merino,1 Alicia Iglesias Gómez,4 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil Hurlé5 On behalf of the Tormes Team 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 2Pharmacy Institute, University Austral of Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 3Department of Statistics, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 4Infectious Disease Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 5Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Background: Antiretroviral treatments (ART form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1 to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2 to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods: A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR. The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010. Results: A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01. Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001, and there was a

  8. Video observations of treatment administration to children on antiretroviral therapy in rural KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    For children younger than five years, caregivers are responsible for the measurement and administration of antiretroviral medication doses to children. Failure to adhere to the regimen as prescribed may lead to high viral loads (VLs), immune suppression and ultimately drug resistance. In the content of this study, adherence refers to adequate dosing of the medication by a caregiver. Acquired drug resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is prevalent amongst children in South Africa, and poor adherence to the dosing regimen by caregivers may be associated with this problem. In this qualitative study, we purposively recruited 33 caregiver-child dyads from the Hlabisa HIV Treatment and Care Programme database. Children were divided into three groups based on their VL at the time of recruitment. Children with a VL ≥ 400 cps/ml were grouped as unsuppressed (n = 11); children with a VL ≤ 400 cps/ml were grouped as suppressed (n = 12); and children with no VL data were grouped as newly initiated (n = 10). Caregiver-child dyads were visited at their households twice to document, by means of video recording, how treatment was administered to the child. Observational notes and video recordings were entered into ATLAS.ti v 7 and analysed thematically. Results were interpreted through the lens of Ecological Systems Theory and the information-motivation-behavioural skills model was used to understand and reflect on several of the factors influencing adherence within the child's immediate environment as identified in this study. Thematic video analysis indicated context- and medication-related factors influencing ART adherence. Although the majority of children in this sample took their medicine successfully, caregivers experienced several challenges with the preparation and administration of the medications. In the context of emerging drug resistance, efforts are needed to carefully monitor caregiver knowledge of treatment administration by

  9. Medication-Taking Practices of Patients on Antiretroviral HIV Therapy: Control, Power, and Intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Panter, Abigail T; Mouw, Mary S; Amola, Kemi; Stein, Kathryn E; Murphy, Joseph S; Maiese, Eric M; Wohl, David A

    2015-11-01

    Among people living with HIV (PLWH), adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for health, but patients face numerous challenges achieving sustained lifetime adherence. We conducted six focus groups with 56 PLWH regarding ART adherence barriers and collected sociodemographics and ART histories. Participants were recruited through clinics and AIDS service organizations in North Carolina. Dedoose software was used to support thematic analysis. Participants were 59% male, 77% black, aged 23-67 years, and living with HIV 4-20 years. Discussions reflected the fluid, complex nature of ART adherence. Maintaining adherence required participants to indefinitely assert consistent control across multiple areas including: their HIV disease, their own bodies, health care providers, and social systems (e.g., criminal justice, hospitals, drug assistance programs). Participants described limited control over treatment options, ART's impact on their body, and inconsistent access to ART and subsequent inability to take ART as prescribed. When participants felt they had more decision-making power, intentionally choosing whether and how to take ART was not exclusively a decision about best treating HIV. Instead, through these decisions, participants tried to regain some amount of power and control in their lives. Supportive provider relationships assuaged these struggles, while perceived side-effects and multiple co-morbidities further complicated adherence. Adherence interventions need to better convey adherence as a continuous, changing process, not a fixed state. A perspective shift among care providers could also help address negative consequences of the perceived power struggles and pressures that may drive patients to exert control via intentional medication taking practices.

  10. Feasibility of a breath test for monitoring adherence to vaginal administration of antiretroviral microbicide gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Timothy E; Wasdo, Scott; Wishin, Judith; Quinn, Brian; van der Straten, Ariane; Booth, Matthew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Derendorf, Hartmut; Melker, Richard J; Dennis, Donn M

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to microbicide gel use is critical to optimizing effectiveness in preventing human immunodeficiency virus transmission. The authors hypothesized that ester taggants added to vaginal gels would generate exhaled alcohol and ketone metabolites and provide a "breath test" for vaginal gel use. This 2-arm (vaginal and dermal), randomized, participant-blinded, pilot study tested this hypothesis. On 8 visits, healthy women (n = 8) received intravaginal taggant (2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, isopropyl butyrate, or 2-pentyl butyrate; 30 mg) formulated in hydroxyethylcellulose or tenofovir placebo gel. A second group (n = 4) of women received the same formulations administered dermally on the forearm to determine if skin administration might confound the system. Breath samples were collected using bags before and after taggant administration for 1 hour. Samples were measured using a miniature gas chromatograph and/or gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for ester taggant, alcohol, and ketone concentrations. After vaginal administration, 2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, and metabolites were observed in breath, whereas isopropyl butyrate, 2-pentyl butyrate, and metabolites were not. Some women reported self-resolving, mild burning (24/64 visits) with vaginal administration or a "bubblegum" taste (7/64 visits). No taggants or metabolites were detected following dermal application. A "breath test" for adherence to antiretroviral vaginal gel application appears physiologically and technically feasible. PMID:23400750

  11. COMPARISON OF ANTIRETROVIRAL SCHEMES USED IN INITIAL THERAPY FOR TREATMENT OF HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana LENZI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A problem of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in HIV patients is their adherence to treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the schemes adopted in the initial therapy of these treatments with their adherence, changes in HAART schemes and treatment costs. The study included patients over 16 years old, HIV positive, in treatment for more than 30 days. Adherence to HAART was calculated based on the withdrawal of the drug, which was related to the total treatment time. We evaluated how many patients changed HAART. The costs of each regimen were also estimated and related to the benefit of each treatment. 142 patients who were between 38 and 1,150 days of treatment were included (57.7% women. The schemes with lower costs, highest adherence and greater benefit were efavirenz with biovir and efavirenz with lamivudine and tenofovir. This study suggested the advantageous therapeutic regimens to start of treatment, both from the point of view of patients and the health system. This information can serve as a subsidy to clinicians in the decision of starting HAART.

  12. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from randomized trials are lacking on the benefits and risks of initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who have a CD4+ count of more than 350 cells per cubic millimeter. METHODS: We randomly assigned HIV...... entry, the median HIV viral load was 12,759 copies per milliliter, and the median CD4+ count was 651 cells per cubic millimeter. On May 15, 2015, on the basis of an interim analysis, the data and safety monitoring board determined that the study question had been answered and recommended that patients...... in patients with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells per cubic millimeter. The risks of a grade 4 event were similar in the two groups, as were the risks of unscheduled hospital admissions. CONCLUSIONS: The initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive adults with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells...

  13. Patient-Related Risks for Nonadherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Youth in the United States: A Study of Prevalence and Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Rudy, Bret J.; Murphy, Debra A.; Harris, D. Robert; Muenz, Larry; Ellen, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Adherence continues to be a major barrier to successful treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected adolescents and young adults face a lifetime of treatment with HAART. Often, individuals who struggle with adherence to HAART face multiple barriers that would therefore impact on the success of any single modality intervention. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the prevalence of personal barriers to...

  14. Long-Term Outcomes on Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large Scale-Up Program in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Seema T.; Chang, Charlotte A.; Eisen, Geoffrey; Jolayemi, Toyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While there has been a rapid global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programs over the past decade, there are limited data on long-term outcomes from large cohorts in resource-constrained settings. Our objective in this evaluation was to measure multiple outcomes during first-line antiretroviral therapy in a large treatment program in Nigeria. Methods We conducted a retrospective multi-site program evaluation of adult patients (age ≥15 years) initiating antiretroviral therapy between June 2004 and February 2012 in Nigeria. The baseline characteristics of patients were described and longitudinal analyses using primary endpoints of immunologic recovery, virologic rebound, treatment failure and long-term adherence patterns were conducted. Results Of 70,002 patients, 65.2% were female and median age was 35 (IQR: 29–41) years; 54.7% were started on a zidovudine-containing and 40% on a tenofovir-containing first-line regimen. Median CD4+ cell counts for the cohort started at 149 cells/mm3 (IQR: 78–220) and increased over duration of ART. Of the 70,002 patients, 1.8% were reported as having died, 30.1% were lost to follow-up, and 0.1% withdrew from treatment. Overall, of those patients retained and with viral load data, 85.4% achieved viral suppression, with 69.3% achieving suppression by month 6. Of 30,792 patients evaluated for virologic failure, 24.4% met criteria for failure and of 45,130 evaluated for immunologic failure, 34.0% met criteria for immunologic failure, with immunologic criteria poorly predicting virologic failure. In adjusted analyses, older age, ART regimen, lower CD4+ cell count, higher viral load, and inadequate adherence were all predictors of virologic failure. Predictors of immunologic failure differed slightly, with age no longer predictive, but female sex as protective; additionally, higher baseline CD4+ cell count was also predictive of failure. Evaluation of long-term adherence patterns revealed that the majority of patients

  15. Social, Cultural, and Environmental Challenges Faced by Children on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe: a Mixed Method Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macherera, MSc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART, many children, particularly in the rural communities of Zimbabwe, remain vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors and challenges facing children on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Brunapeg area of Mangwe District, Zimbabwe.Methods:A mixed-method approach involving interviewer-guided focus group discussions and piloted semi-structured questionnaires was utilized to collect data from different key population groups. The data obtained were analyzed through content coding procedures based on a set of predetermined themes of interest.Results:A number of challenges emerged as barriers to the success of antiretroviral therapy for children. Primary care givers were less informed about HIV and AIDS issues for people having direct impact on the success of antiretroviral therapy in children whilst some were found to be taking the antiretroviral drugs meant for the children. It also emerged that some primary care givers were either too young or too old to care for the children while others had failed to disclose to the children why they frequently visited the Opportunistic Infections (OI clinic. Most primary care givers were not the biological parents of the affected children. Other challenges included inadequate access to health services, inadequate food and nutrition and lack of access to clean water, good hygiene and sanitation. The lack of community support and stigma and discrimination affected their school attendance and hospital visits. All these factors contributed to non-adherence to antiretroviral drugs.Conclusions and Public Health Implications:Children on ART in rural communities in Zimbabwe remain severely compromised and have unique problems that need multi-intervention strategies both at policy and programmatic levels. Effective mitigating measures must be fully established and implemented in rural communities of developing countries in the fight for

  16. Opioid analgesic misuse is associated with incomplete antiretroviral adherence in a cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults in San Francisco

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevanjee, S; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Bangsberg, DR; Kushel, MB

    2014-01-01

    There is little or no data examining the association between either pain or the use or misuse of opioid analgesic with adherence to antiretroviral medications (ARVs) among HIV-infected adults. We interviewed a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults prescribed antiretroviral medications (ARVs) quarterly to examine the association between (1) pain, (2) receipt of opioid analgesics, and (3) opioid analgesic misuse with self-reported ARV adherence. Of 281 participants, most (82.5 ...

  17. A family group approach to increasing adherence to therapy in HIV-infected youths: results of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Maureen E; Trexler, Connie; Akpan-Townsend, Carleen; Pao, Maryland; Selden, Keith; Fletcher, Jean; Addlestone, Irene C; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel, pilot program in which a combined family group and peer approach were used to increase adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected youths. Twenty-three HIV-positive youths, 15-22 years of age and 23 family members or "treatment buddies" participated in one of three 12-week programs. The intervention had six biweekly family and youth education sessions and six biweekly youth-only education sessions. Devices to increase adherence to antiretroviral therapy such as pill boxes, calendars, and watch alarms were introduced at youth-only sessions. Eighteen of the 23 youths completed a group. Ninety-one percent of youths self-reported increased adherence to medications after completion of a group. Four participants experienced a one-log reduction in viral loads to undetectable levels during the intervention. Two participants continued to decline antiretroviral medications at the end of the intervention and demonstrated no decrease in viral load. Participants tested five devices and rated the multiple alarm watch as the best aid for improving adherence to medication. Family/treatment buddies rated the overall program as highly helpful, citing social support as most valuable. An unanticipated benefit was an increase in other health behaviors, including medical and dental appointments, hepatitis B and influenza immunizations, and referrals to mental health and substance abuse treatment. PMID:12880493

  18. How does directly observed therapy work? The mechanisms and impact of a comprehensive directly observed therapy intervention of highly active antiretroviral therapy in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sonya; Muñoz, Maribel; Zeladita, Jhon; Slavin, Sam; Caldas, Adolfo; Sanchez, Eduardo; Callacna, Miriam; Rojas, Christian; Arevalo, Jorge; Sebastian, Jose Luis; Bayona, Jaime

    2011-05-01

    From December 2005 through August 2008, we provided community-based accompaniment with supervised antiretroviral therapy (CASA) to impoverished individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy. Adherence support was provided for 18 months by a community-based team comprised of several nurses and two types of community health workers: field supervisors and directly observed therapy (DOT) volunteers. To complement our quantitative data collection in 2008 using purposive sampling, we conducted two gender-mixed focus group discussions with 13 CASA patient participants and 13 DOT volunteers from Lima, Peru to identify the mediating mechanisms by which CASA improved well-being, and to understand the benefits of the intervention, as perceived by these individuals. Using standard qualitative methods for the review and analysis of transcripts and interview notes, we identified central themes and developed a coding scheme for categorising participants' statements. Two individuals blinded to each other's coding, coded interview transcripts for theme and content from which a third reviewer compared their coding to arbitrate discrepancies. Additional domains were added if necessary and all domains were integrated into a theoretical scheme. Among the forms of support delivered by the CASA team, DOT volunteers reported emotional support, instrumental support, directly observed therapy, building trust, education, advocacy, exercise of moral authority and preparation for transition off CASA support. CASA participants described outcomes of improved adherence, ability to resume social roles, increased self-efficacy, hopefulness, changes in non-HIV-related behaviour, reduced internalised and externalised stigma, as well as ability to disclose. Both sets of focus group participants highlighted remaining challenges after completion of CASA support: stigma in the community, difficulties achieving economic recovery and persistent barriers to health services. Based on our prior

  19. Delayed HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodi, Sara; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Touloumi, Giota;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Europe and elsewhere, health inequalities among HIV-positive individuals are of concern. We investigated late HIV diagnosis and late initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) by educational level, a proxy of socioeconomic position. DESIGN AND METHODS: We used data from...... included individuals diagnosed with HIV between 1996 and 2011, aged at least 16 years, with known educational level and at least one CD4 cell count within 6 months of HIV diagnosis. We examined trends by education level in presentation with advanced HIV disease (AHD) (CD4

  20. Maternal deaths following nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Bera

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases illustrating that it is too simplistic to link nevirapine (NVP toxicity exclusively to individuals with immune preservation. Not enough is known about the mechanism of hepatotoxicity or cutaneous eruption to predict these events. This type of hypersensitivity reaction occurs rarely among HIV-exposed infants taking NVP prophylaxis or antiretroviral therapy (ART-experienced adults with complete plasma viral load suppression. Conversely, HIV-uninfected adults and ART-naive pregnant women appear to be disproportionately affected by the adverse effects of NVP.

  1. Nutritional and metabolic assessment of HIV patients in use of antiretroviral therapy at Northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Aguiar Braga; Carlos Antonio Bruno da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate nutritional and metabolic changes in HIV infected (HIV+) patients on use of antiretroviral therapy. Methods:  A cross-sectional descriptive study involving HIV+ patients on use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). The demographic data studied were gender, birth date and time of use of antiretroviral medication. Anthropometric variables were weight and height with calculation of body mass index (BMI). Biochemical data were lipid profile, blood glucose, renal ...

  2. Antiretroviral therapy outcome in human immuno-deficiency virus infected patients in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hasitha Diana Manohar; Smita Shenoy; Muralidhar Varma; Asha Kamath; Chaithanya Malalur; Kurady Laxminarayana Bairy; Amod Tilak; Kavitha Saravu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presently accounts for the highest number of deaths due to any infective agent in the world. The present study assessed the one year treatment outcome following antiretroviral therapy in HIV positive, treatment na and iuml;ve patients in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: Adult HIV positive, antiretroviral treatment naive patients who were started on antiretroviral therapy (ART) between 1st January 2011 and 31st May 2013 were included in the s...

  3. Correlation between lamivudine plasma concentrations and patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment in experienced HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzi OM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi1, V Mugoyela2, LL Gustafsson31Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is important to achieve treatment success in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Most HIV clinics apply the patient self-report (PSR method. However, the reliability of this method in experienced HIV patients remains questionable.Purpose: To validate the PSR method for measuring adherence to ART using lamivudine (3TC plasma concentrations in experienced HIV patients.Methods: The study was conducted in Dar Es Salaam and involved 220 patients who were receiving ART services at HIV clinics for more than 12 months. Self-reported adherence information to ART was obtained on the day of HIV clinic visit. The patients were asked to mention the number of doses missed within the past 7 days. In addition, blood samples (2 mL were collected from each patient on the same day. The blood samples were determined for 3TC plasma concentrations. The target 3TC plasma concentration as indicator concentration for adherent patients was determined in 20 patients who took their evening dose of antiretrovirals under supervision. The blood from these patients was drawn 3 hours after drug administration.Results: Complete drug levels of 3TC and self-reported adherence data was obtained in 200 treatment-experienced HIV patients. Lamivudine plasma concentrations obtained in these patients ranged between 0.02–17.36 µg/mL. The mean time from dose administration to blood drawing was 3.1 ± 1.2 hours with coefficient of variation >39%. The mean 3TC plasma concentration obtained in 20 patients who took their antiretroviral dose under supervision was

  4. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users

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    David J. Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB, n = 20 were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9. Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P<0.05. The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277.

  5. Medication possession ratio associated with short-term virologic response in individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Steven Y; Jerger, Logan; Jonas, Anna; Badi, Alfons; Cohen, Steven; Nachega, Jean B; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Tang, Alice M; Wanke, Christine; Terrin, Norma; Pereko, Dawn; Blom, Abraham; Trotter, Andrew B; Jordan, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The visual-analogue scale (VAS), Likert item (rating scale), pills identification test (PIT), and medication possession ratio (MPR) provide estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence which correlate with HIV viral suppression. These simple adherence measures are inexpensive and easy to administer; however, require validation and adjustment prior to implementation. The objective of this study was to define the optimal adherence assessment measure in Namibia to identify patients at risk for sub-optimal adherence and poor virologic response 6 months after ART initiation. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in HIV-infected adults receiving ART for 6-12 months prior to the adherence assessment. Adherence measures included 30-day VAS, 30-day Likert item, self-reported treatment interruptions, PIT, and MPR. Association of adherence measures with 6-month HIV-1 RNA level was assessed using two thresholds (1000 copies/mL and 5000 copies/mL). Adherence was assessed in 236 patients, mean age 37.3 years, 54% female. Mean adherence was 98.1% by 30-day VAS, 84.7% by 30-day Likert item, 97.0% by self-reported treatment interruptions, 90.6% by PIT, and 98.8% by MPR. Agreement between adherence measures was poor using kappa statistic. 76% had HIV-1 RNA <1000 copies/ml, and 88% had HIV-1 RNA <5000 copies/ml. MPR (continuous) was associated with viral suppression <5000 copies/ml (p = 0.036). MPR <75% was associated with virologic failure at ≥5000 copies/ml with OR 3.89 (1.24, 12.21), p = 0.013. Adherence was high with all measures. Only MPR, was associated with short-term virologic response, suggesting its cross-culturally utility for early identification of patients at high risk for virologic failure.

  6. Prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS children in highly active antiretroviral therapy era. A literature analysis.

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    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Octavio; Castillo, Nydia

    2015-08-01

    SummaryHighly active antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality related to HIV infection, including oral opportunistic infections. This paper offers an analysis of the scientific literature on the epidemiological aspects of oral candidiasis in HIV-positive children in the combination antiretroviral therapy era. An electronic databases search was made covering the highly active antiretroviral therapy era (1998 onwards). The terms used were oral lesions, oral candidiasis and their combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy and HIV/AIDS children. The following data were collected from each paper: year and country in which the investigation was conducted, antiretroviral treatment, oral candidiasis prevalence and diagnostic parameters (clinical or microbiological). Prevalence of oral candidiasis varied from 2.9% in American HIV-positive children undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy to 88% in Chilean HIV-positive children without antiretroviral therapy. With respect to geographical location and antiretroviral treatment, higher oral candidiasis prevalence in HIV-positive children on combination antiretroviral therapy/antiretroviral therapy was reported in African children (79.1%) followed by 45.9% reported in Hindu children. In HIV-positive Chilean children on no antiretroviral therapy, high oral candidiasis prevalence was reported (88%) followed by Nigerian children (80%). Oral candidiasis is still frequent in HIV-positive children in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era irrespective of geographical location, race and use of antiretroviral therapy.

  7. Preferences for characteristics of antiretroviral therapy provision in Johannesburg, South Africa: results of a conjoint analysis.

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    Opuni, Marjorie; Bishai, David; Gray, Glenda E; McIntyre, James A; Martinson, Neil A

    2010-08-01

    A survey was administered to HIV-infected patients and a sample in Soweto and the Johannesburg inner city to measure preferences for antiretroviral therapy (ART) provision. The 25 to 49-year-old male and female respondents viewed 20 sets of three hypothetical ART clinic choices after reading information on ART. Each set had a permutation of four levels of: monthly ART price, clinic waiting times, HIV clinic branding and clinic staff attitudes. For each set, respondents selected the preferred mix of characteristics and indicated if they would pay for it. For every ZAR 100 (USD PPP 25) increase in price, the average probability of selecting a clinic decreased by 2.8 and 3.0% in the HIV patient and household samples, respectively. Cost as well as staff attitude, wait time, and clinic branding may constitute important barriers to ART uptake and adherence in resource-poor settings. PMID:19533322

  8. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased plasma cystatin C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Wyatt, Christina; Szczech, Lynda;

    2009-01-01

    continuous antiretroviral therapy (viral suppression) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial, and to identify factors associated with increased cystatin C. METHODS: Cystatin C was measured in plasma collected at randomization, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months after randomization in a random...

  9. The effects of intermittent, CD4-guided antiretroviral therapy on body composition and metabolic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Martinez; F. Visnegarwala; B. Grund; A. Thomas; C. Gibert; J. Shlay; F. Drummond; D. Pearce; S. Edwards; P. Reiss; W. El-Sadr; A. Carr

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of decreased antiretroviral therapy exposure on body fat and metabolic parameters. Design: Substudy of the Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapy study, in which participants were randomized to intermittent CD4-guided [Drug Conservation (DC) group] or t

  10. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SMOKING, CRACK COCAINE ABUSE AND THE DISCONTINUATION OF COMBINATION ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RECIFE, PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

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    Joanna d'Arc Lyra Batista

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA, nonadherence to medication has become a major threat to its effectiveness. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of self-reported irregular use of antiretroviral therapy and the factors associated with such an irregularity in PLWHA. A cross-sectional study of PLWHA who attended two referral centers in the city of Recife, in Northeastern Brazil, between June 2007 and October 2009 was carried out. The study analyzed socioeconomic factors, social service support and personal habits associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy, adjusted by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of PLWHA who reported irregular use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART was 25.7%. In the final multivariate model, the irregular use of cART was associated with the following variables: being aged less than 40 years (OR = 1.66, 95%-CI: 1.29-2.13, current smokers (OR = 1.76, 95%-CI: 1.31-2.37 or former smokers (OR = 1.43, 95%-CI: 1.05-1.95, and crack cocaine users (OR = 2.79, 95%-CI: 1.24-6.32. Special measures should be directed towards each of the following groups: individuals aged less than 40 years, smokers, former smokers and crack cocaine users. Measures for giving up smoking and crack cocaine should be incorporated into HIV-control programs in order to promote greater adherence to antiretroviral drugs and thus improve the quality of life and prolong life expectancy.

  11. Sclerosing cholangitis by cytomegalovirus in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

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    Carmen Hidalgo-Tenorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing colangitis (SC due to cytomegalovirus (CMV is very rare. It has been described mainly in immunocompromised patients. Currently, in HIV infected patients it is exceptional. The most of cases belong to pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART and those cases were in stage AIDS with less than 100 CD4/μl. The most frequently involved pathogen in pre-HAART period was Cryptosporidium parvum (30-57% and CMV (10-30%; in late HAART period this information are unaware. CMV has been implicated as a possible etiological agent in primary SC partly because of the ability to cause liver damage and its relationship with smooth muscle antibodies. The most effective treatment for SC was the combination of antiretroviral therapy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with sphincterotomy and stent placement. Following, we present the first case of late HAART period which describes a SC extrahepatic without papillary stenosis with CMV as the only cause and clinical presentation of HIV infection in a woman with 177 CD4/μl.

  12. HIV-Antiretroviral Therapy Induced Liver, Gastrointestinal, and Pancreatic Injury

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    Manuela G. Neuman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes possible connections between antiretroviral therapies (ARTs used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and adverse drug reactions (ADRs encountered predominantly in the liver, including hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, as well as throughout the gastrointestinal system, including the pancreas. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has a positive influence on the quality of life and longevity in HIV patients, substantially reducing morbidity and mortality in this population. However, HAART produces a spectrum of ADRs. Alcohol consumption can interact with HAART as well as other pharmaceutical agents used for the prevention of opportunistic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Other coinfections that occur in HIV, such as hepatitis viruses B or C, cytomegalovirus, or herpes simplex virus, further complicate the etiology of HAART-induced ADRs. The aspect of liver pathology including liver structure and function has received little attention and deserves further evaluation. The materials used provide a data-supported approach. They are based on systematic review and analysis of recently published world literature (MedLine search and the experience of the authors in the specified topic. We conclude that therapeutic and drug monitoring of ART, using laboratory identification of phenotypic susceptibilities, drug interactions with other medications, drug interactions with herbal medicines, and alcohol intake might enable a safer use of this medication.

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy-Associated Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy

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    Kimberly N. Capers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome.

  14. Barriers to initiation of antiretrovirals during antituberculosis therapy in Africa.

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    Dominique J Pepper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the developing world, the principal cause of death among HIV-infected patients is tuberculosis (TB. The initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART during TB therapy significantly improves survival, however it is not known which barriers prevent eligible TB patients from initiating life-saving ART. METHOD: Setting. A South African township clinic with integrated tuberculosis and HIV services. Design. Logistic regression analyses of a prospective cohort of HIV-1 infected adults (≥18 years who commenced TB therapy, were eligible for ART, and were followed for 6 months. FINDINGS: Of 100 HIV-1 infected adults eligible for ART during TB therapy, 90 TB patients presented to an ART clinic for assessment, 66 TB patients initiated ART, and 15 TB patients died. 34% of eligible TB patients (95%CI: 25-43% did not initiate ART. Male gender and younger age (<36 years were associated with failure to initiate ART (adjusted odds ratios of 3.7 [95%CI: 1.25-10.95] and 3.3 [95%CI: 1.12-9.69], respectively. Death during TB therapy was associated with a CD4+ count <100 cells/µL. CONCLUSION: In a clinic with integrated services for tuberculosis and HIV, one-third of eligible TB patients--particularly young men--did not initiate ART. Strategies are needed to promote ART initiation during TB therapy, especially among young men.

  15. Impact of Opioid Substitution Therapy on Antiretroviral Therapy Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrea J.; Mburu, Gitau; Welton, Nicky J.; May, Margaret T.; Davies, Charlotte F.; French, Clare; Turner, Katy M.; Looker, Katharine J.; Christensen, Hannah; McLean, Susie; Rhodes, Tim; Platt, Lucy; Hickman, Matthew; Guise, Andy; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected people who inject drugs (PWID) frequently encounter barriers accessing and remaining on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Some studies have suggested that opioid substitution therapy (OST) could facilitate PWID's engagement with HIV services. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of concurrent OST use on ART-related outcomes among HIV-infected PWID. Methods. We searched Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, Global Health, Cochrane, Web of Science, and Social Policy and Practice databases for studies between 1996 to November 2014 documenting the impact of OST, compared to no OST, on ART outcomes. Outcomes considered were coverage and recruitment onto ART, adherence, viral suppression, attrition from ART, and mortality. Meta-analyses were conducted using random-effects modeling, and heterogeneity assessed using Cochran Q test and I2 statistic. Results. We identified 4685 articles, and 32 studies conducted in North America, Europe, Indonesia, and China were included. OST was associated with a 69% increase in recruitment onto ART (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32–2.15), a 54% increase in ART coverage (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17–2.03), a 2-fold increase in adherence (OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.41–3.26), and a 23% decrease in the odds of attrition (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, .63–.95). OST was associated with a 45% increase in odds of viral suppression (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.21–1.73), but there was limited evidence from 6 studies for OST decreasing mortality for PWID on ART (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, .65–1.25). Conclusions. These findings support the use of OST, and its integration with HIV services, to improve the HIV treatment and care continuum among HIV-infected PWID. PMID:27343545

  16. Effect of injectable contraceptive use on response to antiretroviral therapy among women in Rakai, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Chelsea B.; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Ssempijja, Victor; Makumbi, Fredrick E.; Boaz, Iga; Reynolds, Steven J.; Ndyanabo, Anthony; Lutalo, Tom; Wawer, Maria J.; Gray, Ronald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on the effect of injectable contraception on response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design Using modified Poisson regression, we assessed data from 418 female Ugandan ART initiators to examine the effect of injectable contraceptive use on a composite virologic failure outcome (defined as failure to achieve virologic suppression, switch to second line therapy, or death within 12 months of ART initiation), and also assessed ART adherence. Results About 12% of women reported using injectable contraceptives at ART initiation, and their composite virologic failure rates 12 months later were similar to women not using injectable contraceptives at ART initiation (11% vs. 12%, p=0.99). Multivariable Poisson regression suggested no significant differences in virologic failure by injectable contraceptive use at baseline (PRR: 0.85, p=0.71), but power was limited. Adherence to ART increased with time since ART initiation, but did not appear to differ between injectable contraceptive users and non-users. Conclusions Consistent with current WHO guidelines, our results suggest no deleterious effect of injectable contraceptive use on response to ART, but power was limited, injectable contraceptive use patterns over time were inconsistent, and additional evidence is needed. PMID:22717186

  17. The Scale of Self-Efficacy Expectations of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment: A Tool for Identifying Risk for Non-Adherence to Treatment for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Drachler, Carlos Wietzke; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; de Carvalho Leite, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of risk for non-adherence to treatment is a challenge for personalized care for people living with HIV. Standardized questionnaires of patients’ expectations of their capability to overcome obstacles for treatment adherence may be used as a pre-screening for risk identification. A scale of self-efficacy expectations of adherence to antiretroviral treatment (SEA-ART scale) was previously developed. This study assesses the scale validity in predicting non-adherence to ART in adults living with HIV. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study applied a 21-item SEA-ART scale to 275 adults in ART treatment at an outpatient public service for HIV in Southern Brazil. ART medications taken were assessed at one-month follow-up; ART adherence was devised as an intake of 95% and more of the prescribed medication. A SEA-ART score was calculated by adding up the scores of all items. Multivariable logistic regression and the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Curve (AUROC) were applied to examine the ability of the SEA-ART score to predict non-adherence at follow-up. The SEA-ART score varied from 21 to 105; mean 93.9; median 103.0. Non-adherence was 30.3% (n = 81/267). The odds of non-adherence was 8% lower for each unit increase of the SEA-ART score; after adjustment for age, sex, formal education and time in treatment (OR = 0.92; 95%CI 0.90–0.95; LRT for linear trend, p = 0.002). The AUROC was 0.80 (95%CI 0.73–0.87; p<0.001). The SEA-ART optimal cut-off value was 101, providing a sensitivity of 76.5%, a specificity of 73.1%, a positive predictive value of 55.4% and a negative predictive value of 87.7%. There was no evidence of difference in sensitivity, and specificity among groups organized by age, gender, formal education and time in treatment. Conclusions The SEA-ART scale appears to have a good capacity to discriminate between adherents and non-adherents at one-month follow-up. Further studies should confirm these results

  18. Training needs assessment for clinicians at antiretroviral therapy clinics: evidence from a national survey in Uganda

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    Namagala Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To increase access to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings, several experts recommend "task shifting" from doctors to clinical officers, nurses and midwives. This study sought to identify task shifting that has already occurred and assess the antiretroviral therapy training needs among clinicians to whom tasks have shifted. Methods The Infectious Diseases Institute, in collaboration with the Ugandan Ministry of Health, surveyed health professionals and heads of antiretroviral therapy clinics at a stratified random sample of 44 health facilities accredited to provide this therapy. A sample of 265 doctors, clinical officers, nurses and midwives reported on tasks they performed, previous human immunodeficiency virus training, and self-assessment of knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus and antiretroviral therapy. Heads of the antiretroviral therapy clinics reported on clinic characteristics. Results Thirty of 33 doctors (91%, 24 of 40 clinical officers (60%, 16 of 114 nurses (14% and 13 of 54 midwives (24% who worked in accredited antiretroviral therapy clinics reported that they prescribed this therapy (p Conclusion Training initiatives should be an integral part of the support for task shifting and ensure that antiretroviral therapy is used correctly and that toxicity or drug resistance do not reverse accomplishments to date.

  19. Agreement between physicians and non-physician clinicians in starting antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

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    Vasan Ashwin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scarcity of physicians in sub-Saharan Africa – particularly in rural clinics staffed only by non-physician health workers – is constraining access to HIV treatment, as only they are legally allowed to start antiretroviral therapy in the HIV-positive patient. Here we present a pilot study from Uganda assessing agreement between non-physician clinicians (nurses and clinical officers and physicians in their decisions as to whether to start therapy. Methods We conducted the study at 12 government antiretroviral therapy sites in three regions of Uganda, all of which had staff trained in delivery of antiretroviral therapy using the WHO Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness guidelines for chronic HIV care. We collected seven key variables to measure patient assessment and the decision as to whether to start antiretroviral therapy, the primary variable of interest being the Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation. Patients saw either a clinical officer or nurse first, and then were screened identically by a blinded physician during the same clinic visit. We measured inter-rater agreement between the decisions of the non-physician health workers and physicians in the antiretroviral therapy assessment variables using simple and weighted Kappa analysis. Results Two hundred fifty-four patients were seen by a nurse and physician, while 267 were seen by a clinical officer and physician. The majority (> 50% in each arm of the study were in World Health Organization Clinical Stages I and II and therefore not currently eligible for antiretroviral therapy according to national antiretroviral therapy guidelines. Nurses and clinical officers both showed moderate to almost perfect agreement with physicians in their Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation (unweighted κ = 0.59 and κ = 0.91, respectively. Agreement was also substantial for nurses versus physicians for assigning World Health Organization Clinical

  20. Triple-Nucleoside Analog Antiretroviral Therapy: Is There Still a Role in Clinical Practice? A Review

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    Kessler Harold A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and widespread clinical use of coformulated abacavir/lamivudine/zidovudine (ABC/3TC/ZDV as Trizivir represented an important advance in the management of HIV-infected patients, especially those with adherence challenges. With a low pill burden, no food restrictions, limited drug-drug interactions, and a favorable resistance profile, ABC/3TC/ZDV remains an alternative option in the US Department of Health and Human Services Consensus Panel Guidelines as initial treatment in antiretroviral-naive patients. Recent data have shown ABC/3TC/ZDV to be less efficacious in suppressing and/or maintaining suppression of virologic replication compared with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy. Although triple-nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (t-NRTI combinations that do not contain a thymidine analog (ZDV or stavudine have recently shown high virologic failure rates in clinical trials and clinical practice, t-NRTI regimens containing a thymidine analog have consistently been shown to be efficacious.

  1. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  2. Pharmaceutical care interventions, their outcomes and patients’ satisfaction in antiretroviral drug therapy

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    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacist’s interventions (also known as pharmaceutical care plans are means of solving the drug therapy problems identified in pharmaceutical care. Outcomes are the results of pharmacists’ intervention activities. Patients’ satisfaction refers to patients’ feeling of fulfillment, pleasure or happiness with the services they have received. This study was designed to determine the types of pharmacist interventions applied in the pharmaceutical care of HIV patients receiving treatment at a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria, the types of outcomes of such interventions and level of patients’ satisfaction with their drug therapy. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The results showed significant reductions in the frequency of the various interventions and parameters measured after the interventions. The study concluded that pharmaceutical interventions influences patients’ adherence, optimizes their drug therapy and improves rational prescribing and care resulting in significant improvements in the outcomes of their treatment and levels of satisfaction.

  3. Antiretroviral therapy and demand for HIV testing: Evidence from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on demand for HIV testing and of ART-induced testing on demand for risky sexual behavior. I provide a model of sexual behavior decision-making under uncertainty and estimate the structural parameters of the model using nationally representative survey data from Zambia on HIV testing decisions before and after the introduction of ART. The empirical results indicate that although the introduction of ART appears to have increased HIV testing rates by upwards of 50 percent, the ART allocation process may have limited the prevention benefit of ART-induced testing. Simulation results show that eliminating this prevention inefficiency while holding the supply of ART constant would increase the prevention impact of ART-induced testing more than four-fold. More generally, the analysis indicates that existing studies which examine "universal" testing or quasi-experimental testing programs understate the efficacy of standard voluntary counseling and testing programs. PMID:26970992

  4. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

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    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  5. Risk for opportunistic disease and death after reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV previously receiving episodic therapy: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, W M; Grund, B; Neuhaus, J;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4+ cell counts is inferior to continuous antiretroviral therapy. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients who received episodic treatment reduces excess risk for opportunistic disease ...... to episodic treatment reduced excess risk for opportunistic disease or death, but excess risk remained. Episodic antiretroviral therapy, as used in the SMART study, should be avoided....

  6. Use of third line antiretroviral therapy in Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Cesar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known. METHODS: Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART. RESULTS: Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3% failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8% received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-2.00, p = 0.001, younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86-4.10, p<0.001, and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62-2.90, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted.

  7. Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Serum Selenium Concentrations Predict WHO Stages 3, 4 or Death but not Virologic Failure Post-Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak Shivakoti; Nikhil Gupte; Wei-Teng Yang; Noluthando Mwelase; Cecilia Kanyama; Tang, Alice M.; Sandy Pillay; Wadzanai Samaneka; Cynthia Riviere; Sima Berendes; Lama, Javier R.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Patcharaphan Sugandhavesa; Richard D Semba; Parul Christian

    2014-01-01

    A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS)), was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO) stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks) or virologic...

  8. Pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS: variáveis associadas à adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral Persons living with HIV/AIDS: factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Maria Fleury Seidl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou descrever o comportamento de adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral em pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS e investigar preditores da adesão entre as variáveis escolaridade, presença de efeitos colaterais, interrupção anterior da terapia anti-retroviral (TARV por conta própria, auto-estima, expectativa de auto-eficácia, estratégias de enfrentamento, suporte social e satisfação com a relação profissional de saúde-usuário. Adesão foi medida pelo auto-relato da perda do número de comprimidos/cápsulas dos medicamentos anti-retrovirais na última semana e mês, sendo considerada satisfatória na ocorrência de omissão inferior a 5% do total prescrito. Participaram 101 pessoas, 60,4% homens, idades entre 20 a 71 anos (M = 37,9 anos, 73,3% sintomáticos. A coleta de dados incluiu entrevista e instrumentos auto-aplicáveis. A maioria (n = 73; 72,3% relatou adesão igual ou superior a 95%. Nos resultados da regressão logística, interrupção anterior da TARV e expectativa de auto-eficácia foram preditores significativos da adesão. Faz-se necessária a qualificação da assistência pela constituição de equipes interdisciplinares, para o desenvolvimento de abordagens adequadas às dificuldades médicas e psicossociais de adesão das pessoas vivendo com HIV/AIDS.This study aimed to describe the adherence of persons living with HIV/AIDS to antiretroviral therapy (ART and to investigate adherence predictors among the following: level of schooling, presence of side effects, current or previous interruption of ART by the persons themselves, self-esteem, self-efficacy expectation, coping strategies, social support, and satisfaction with the health professional-patient relationship. Adherence was measured by self-reported number of ART pills/capsules missed during the previous week and previous month, evaluated as satisfactory when less than 5%. 101 HIV+ adults took part in this study, 60.4% males, ranging from 20 to 71 years

  9. Immediate Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces Risk of Infection-Related Cancer During Early HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Babiker, Abdel G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  In the Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) study, immediate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation reduced cancer risk by 64%. We hypothesized that risk reduction was higher for infection-related cancer and determined by differences in CD4 cell counts a...

  10. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS: Vi...

  11. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Danish patients with HIV infection: the effect of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Petersen, J; Haugaard, S B;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a subject of debate. We investigated the prevalence of MS in a cohort of Danish HIV-infected patients and estimated the effect of the various classes of antiretroviral...

  12. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS: Vi...

  13. Level of suboptimal adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment & its determinants among HIV positive people in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: National Anti-retroviral treatment (ART programme in India was launched in 2004. Since then, there has been no published country representative estimate of suboptimal adherence among people living with HIV (PLHIV on first line ART in public settings. Hence a multicentric study was undertaken in 15 States of India to assess the level of suboptimal adherence and its determinants among PLHIV. Methods: Using a prospective observational study design, 3285 PLHIV were enrolled and followed up to six months across 30 ART centres in India. Adherence was assessed using pill count and self-reported recall method and determinants of suboptimal adherence were explored based on the responses to various issues as perceived by them. Results: Suboptimal adherence was found in 24.5 per cent PLHIV. Determinants of suboptimal adherence were illiteracy (OR-1.341, CI-1.080-1.665 , on ART for less than 6 months (OR-1.540, CI- 1.280-1.853, male gender (OR for females -0.807, CI- 0.662-0.982, tribals (OR-2.246, CI-1.134-4.447, on efavirenz (EFA regimen (OR- 1.479, CI - 1.190 - 1.837, presence of anxiety (OR- 1.375, CI - 1.117 - 1.692, non-disclosure of HIV status to family (OR- 1.549, CI - 1.176 - 2.039, not motivated for treatment (OR- 1.389, CI - 1.093 - 1.756, neglect from friends (OR-1.368, CI-1.069-1.751, frequent change of residence (OR- 3.373, CI - 2.659 - 4.278, travel expenses (OR- 1.364, CI - 1.138-1.649, not meeting the PLHIV volunteer/community care coordinator at the ART center (OR-1.639, CI-1.330-2.019. Interpretation & conclusions: To enhance identification of PLHIV vulnerable to suboptimal adherence, the existing checklist to identify the barriers to adherence in the National ART Guidelines needs to be updated based on the study findings. Quality of comprehensive adherence support services needs to be improved coupled with vigilant monitoring of adherence measurement.

  14. Patient and regimen characteristics associated with self-reported nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy.

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    Patrick S Sullivan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ARVT is an important behavioral determinant of the success of ARVT. Nonadherence may lead to virological failure, and increases the risk of development of drug resistance. Understanding the prevalence of nonadherence and associated factors is important to inform secondary HIV prevention efforts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used data from a cross-sectional interview study of persons with HIV conducted in 18 U.S. states from 2000-2004. We calculated the proportion of nonadherent respondents (took or=4 medications; living in a shelter or on the street; and feeling "blue" >or=14 of the past 30 days. We found weaker associations with having both male-male sex and injection drug use risks for HIV acquisition; being prescribed ARVT for >or=21 months; and being prescribed a protease inhibitor (PI-based regimen not boosted with ritonavir. The median proportion of doses missed was 50%. The most common reasons for missing doses were forgetting and side effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-reported recent nonadherence was high in our study. Our data support increased emphasis on adherence in clinical settings, and additional research on how providers and patients can overcome barriers to adherence.

  15. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21(st) century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in "medical apocalypse". However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  16. Paradoxes in antiretroviral treatment for injecting drug users: access, adherence and structural barriers in Asia and the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Offered proper support, injection drug users (IDUs) can achieve the same levels of adherence to and clinical benefit from antiretroviral treatment (ARV) as other patients with HIV. Nonetheless, in countries of Asia and the former Soviet Union where IDUs represent the largest share of HIV cases, IDUs have been disproportionately less likely to receive ARV. While analysis of adherence amongst IDUs has focused on individual patient ability to adhere to medical regimens, HIV treatment systems themselves are in need of examination. Structural impediments to provision of ARV for IDUs include competing, vertical systems of care; compulsory drug treatment and rehabilitation services that often offer neither ARV nor effective treatment for chemical dependence; lack of opiate substitution treatments demonstrated to increase adherence to ARV; and policies that explicitly or implicitly discourage ARV delivery to active IDUs. Labeling active drug users as socially untrustworthy or unproductive, health systems can create a series of paradoxes that ensure confirmation of these stereotypes. Needed reforms include professional education and public campaigns that emphasize IDU capacity for health protection and responsible choice; recognition that the chronic nature of injecting drug use and its links to HIV infection require development of ARV treatment delivery that includes active drug users; and integrated treatment that strengthens links between health providers and builds on, rather than seeks to bypass, IDU social networks and organizations.

  17. Improved long-term antiretroviral treatment outcomes amongst patients receiving community-based adherence support in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Mothibi, Eula; Shaikh, Najma; Grimwood, Ashraf

    2016-11-01

    Retaining high levels of patients in care who are virally suppressed over long treatment periods has been an important challenge for antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, the region having the highest HIV burden globally. Clinic-linked community-based adherence support (CBAS) programmes provide home-based adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients. However, there is little evidence of their longer-term impact. This study assessed the effectiveness of CBAS after eight years of ART. CBAS workers are lay healthcare personnel providing regular adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients and their households through home visits addressing household challenges affecting adherence. A multicentre cohort study using routinely collected data was undertaken at six public ART sites in a high HIV-prevalence South African district. Patient retention, loss to follow-up (LTFU), viral suppression and CD4 cell restoration were compared between patients with and without CBAS, using competing-risks regression, linear mixed models and log-binomial regression. 3861 patients were included, of whom 1616 (41.9%) received CBAS. Over 14,792 patient-years of observation, the cumulative incidence of LTFU was 37.3% and 46.2% amongst patients with and without CBAS, respectively, following 8 years of ART; adjusted subhazard ratio (CBAS vs. no CBAS) = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.66-0.84; P resource-limited settings. PMID:27251459

  18. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George R.; Patel, Payal K.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Westbrook, Steven D.; Berg, Deborah; Erlandsen, Josh; Redding, Spencer W.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) remains a common problem in the HIV-infected population despite the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although Candida albicans is the most frequently implicated pathogen, other Candida spp. may also cause infection. The emergence of antifungal resistance within these causative yeasts, especially in patients with recurrent oropharyngeal infection or with long-term use of antifungal therapies, requires a working knowledge of alternative antifungal agents. Identification of the infecting organism and antifungal susceptibility testing enhances the ability of clinicians to prescribe appropriate antifungal therapy. Characterization of the responsible mechanisms has improved our understanding of the development of antifungal resistance and could enhance the management of these infections. Immune reconstitution has been shown to reduce rates of oropharyngeal candidiasis but few studies have evaluated the current impact of ART on the epidemiology of oropharyngeal candidiasis and antifungal resistance in these patients. Preliminary results from an ongoing clinical study showed that in patients with advanced AIDS oral yeast colonization was extensive, occurring in 81.1% of the 122 patients studied and symptomatic infection occurred in a third. In addition, resistant yeasts were still common occurring in 25.3% of patients colonized with yeasts or with symptomatic infection. Thus, oropharyngeal candidasis remains a significant infection in advanced AIDS even with ART. Current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, treatment, and mechanisms of antifungal resistance observed in oropharyngeal candidiasis are important in managing patients with this infection and are the focus of this review. PMID:20156694

  19. Analysis of Antiretrovirals in Single Hair Strands for Evaluation of Drug Adherence with Infrared-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elias P; Thompson, Corbin G; Bokhart, Mark T; Prince, Heather M A; Sykes, Craig; Muddiman, David C; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2016-01-19

    Adherence to a drug regimen can be a strong predictor of health outcomes, and validated measures of adherence are necessary at all stages of therapy from drug development to prescription. Many of the existing metrics of drug adherence (e.g., self-report, pill counts, blood monitoring) have limitations, and analysis of hair strands has recently emerged as an objective alternative. Traditional methods of hair analysis based on LC-MS/MS (segmenting strands at ≥1 cm length) are not capable of preserving a temporal record of drug intake at higher resolution than approximately 1 month. Here, we evaluated the detectability of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs) in hair from a range of drug classes using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with 100 μm resolution. Infrared laser desorption of hair strands was shown to penetrate into the strand cortex, allowing direct measurement by MSI without analyte extraction. Using optimized desorption conditions, a linear correlation between IR-MALDESI ion abundance and LC-MS/MS response was observed for six common ARVs with estimated limits of detection less than or equal to 1.6 ng/mg hair. The distribution of efavirenz (EFV) was then monitored in a series of hair strands collected from HIV infected, virologically suppressed patients. Because of the role hair melanin plays in accumulation of basic drugs (like most ARVs), an MSI method to quantify the melanin biomarker pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (PTCA) was evaluated as a means of normalizing drug response between patients to develop broadly applicable adherence criteria.

  20. Analysis of Antiretrovirals in Single Hair Strands for Evaluation of Drug Adherence with Infrared-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elias P; Thompson, Corbin G; Bokhart, Mark T; Prince, Heather M A; Sykes, Craig; Muddiman, David C; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2016-01-19

    Adherence to a drug regimen can be a strong predictor of health outcomes, and validated measures of adherence are necessary at all stages of therapy from drug development to prescription. Many of the existing metrics of drug adherence (e.g., self-report, pill counts, blood monitoring) have limitations, and analysis of hair strands has recently emerged as an objective alternative. Traditional methods of hair analysis based on LC-MS/MS (segmenting strands at ≥1 cm length) are not capable of preserving a temporal record of drug intake at higher resolution than approximately 1 month. Here, we evaluated the detectability of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs) in hair from a range of drug classes using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with 100 μm resolution. Infrared laser desorption of hair strands was shown to penetrate into the strand cortex, allowing direct measurement by MSI without analyte extraction. Using optimized desorption conditions, a linear correlation between IR-MALDESI ion abundance and LC-MS/MS response was observed for six common ARVs with estimated limits of detection less than or equal to 1.6 ng/mg hair. The distribution of efavirenz (EFV) was then monitored in a series of hair strands collected from HIV infected, virologically suppressed patients. Because of the role hair melanin plays in accumulation of basic drugs (like most ARVs), an MSI method to quantify the melanin biomarker pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (PTCA) was evaluated as a means of normalizing drug response between patients to develop broadly applicable adherence criteria. PMID:26688545

  1. Immune control of HIV-1 infection after therapy interruption: immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernaschi Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal stage for initiating antiretroviral therapies in HIV-1 bearing patients is still a matter of debate. Methods We present computer simulations of HIV-1 infection aimed at identifying the pro et contra of immediate as compared to deferred Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. Results Our simulations highlight that a prompt specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes response is detected when therapy is delayed. Compared to very early initiation of HAART, in deferred treated patients CD8+ T cells manage to mediate the decline of viremia in a shorter time and, at interruption of therapy, the virus experiences a stronger immune pressure. We also observe, however, that the immunological effects of the therapy fade with time in both therapeutic regimens. Thus, within one year from discontinuation, viral burden recovers to the value at which it would level off in the absence of therapy. In summary, simulations show that immediate therapy does not prolong the disease-free period and does not confer a survival benefit when compared to treatment started during the chronic infection phase. Conclusion Our conclusion is that, since there is no therapy to date that guarantees life-long protection, deferral of therapy should be preferred in order to minimize the risk of adverse effects, the occurrence of drug resistances and the costs of treatment.

  2. PATIENTS ON ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY WHO WERE LOST TO FOLLOW-UP AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, PUNE, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep B.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Importance: With increasing number of persons living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV in major cities there is a need to have a comprehensive strategy to reduce the number of drop outs from the anti-retroviral (ART therapy. This can be done effectively only when we study the reasons why patients are lost to follow up. This study has brought to light novel causes of non-adherence to ART, like migration, discordance and resort to alternative therapies. DESIGN: This is a qualitative study conducted at ART Center, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Medical College (BJMC and Sassoon General Hospital (SGH, Pune, a tertiary referral center in India. We included all those patients who were initiated antiretroviral therapy and lost to follow-up (LFU any time during the entire month after three months during which the appointment was scheduled. All these patients were interviewed during restart of ART, in ART center, BJMC and SGH. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: All socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with antiretroviral therapy adherence. RESULTS: Out of a total 51patients lost to follow-up, patients above thirty five years of age and male sex were associated with a higher chance of being lost to LFU. Illiteracy rate was high in age group above 35 years (64.1% and in females. Male drivers were lost to follow-up at a greater extent [14(24.75%]. Out of 24(47.06% married patients, 12(50% male patients were sero-discordant. The chance of defaulting from therapy was high in the first three months and one year later from the initiation of therapy. Migration led to drop out of 13(25.49% patients. Other important factors leading to loss to follow up were: death in family, side effects of drugs and family disturbance. Alcoholism was the cause in 23(45.10% male patients. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: Migration, illiteracy, alcoholism, discordant couples, death in family, low socio-economic status, resorting to alternative therapies were the prominent factors which

  3. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan;

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...

  4. HIV Infection and Risk for Incident Pulmonary Diseases in the Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    OpenAIRE

    Crothers, Kristina; Huang, Laurence; Goulet, Joseph L.; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Brown, Sheldon T.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Oursler, Krisann K.; Rimland, David; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Butt, Adeel A.; Justice, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: In aging HIV-infected populations comorbid diseases are important determinants of morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary diseases have not been systematically assessed in the combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) era.

  5. Acute gouty arthritis as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS in HIV-infected subjects initiating antiretroviral therapy most commonly involves new or worsening manifestations of previously subclinical or overt infectious diseases. Reports of non-infectious IRIS are much less common but represent important diagnostic and treatment challenges. We report on a 34-year-old HIV-infected male patient with no history of gout who developed acute gouty arthritis in a single joint one month after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  6. [Antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infection: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, F; Goujard, C

    2009-06-01

    Since the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, the care of infected patients improved dramatically. Whereas the disease was almost always fatal, the development of new drugs and new therapeutic strategies now allow a prolonged survival. However, the complexity of patient care is increasing and physicians face new clinical events and treatment toxicities. Recent molecules and follow-up according to the recent French recommendations will be presented here. The objectives of the treatment is to decrease mortality and morbidity of the HIV infection, by restoring near normal CD4+ T cell counts and qualitative T CD4+ responses, associated with a sustained reduction in viral replication. This objective must be reached by minimizing toxicity of antiretroviral drugs. Newly developed drugs that are better-tolerated and new therapeutic classes should improve outcome at all stages of HIV infection. Whereas viral eradication remains unrealistic and protective vaccines will not be soon available, direct consequences of long term HIV infection and issues related to an ageing HIV infected population raise up new research topics. Prevention of new infections, improvement in the precocity of care by a better-targeted screening and assessment of therapy before an established immune deficiency appear as the main priorities for the coming years. PMID:19237230

  7. Choosing Initial Antiretroviral Therapy: Current Recommendations for Initial Therapy and Newer or Investigational Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Roy M

    2015-01-01

    There is general consistency among US and European guidelines regarding the initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals. Recent and ongoing trials comparing regimens may lead to reevaluation of initial treatment choices. The choice of antiretroviral regimen will also likely be affected by development, evaluation, and availability of newer drugs. This article reviews currently recommended regimens and characteristics of selected current investigational drugs, including the nucleotide analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir alafenamide, the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor doravirine, the integrase strand transfer inhibitor cabotegravir, the HIV entry inhibitor BMS-663068, and the HIV maturation inhibitor BMS-955176. This article summarizes a presentation by Roy M. Gulick, MD, MPH, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in New York, New York, in March 2015 and September 2015. PMID:26713502

  8. Experiences and Impact of Stigma and Discrimination among People on Antiretroviral Therapy in Dar es Salaam: A Qualitative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisara Mhode

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The impact of stigma on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART has been less studied in Tanzania. Recent studies indicate that people on ART still experience stigma. Qualitative information on the subject matter is especially insufficient. Objective. This paper reports on the dimensions of stigma and discrimination and their impact on adherence to ART as experienced by people living with HIV (PLHIV. Design. A phenomenological approach was used to gather information on the lived experiences of stigma and discrimination. The sample size was determined according to the saturation principle. Results. Respondents experienced different forms of HIV-related stigma such as verbal, social, and perceived stigma. Various forms of discrimination were experienced, including relational discrimination, mistreatment by health care workers, blame and rejection by spouses, and workplace discrimination. HIV-related stigma and discrimination compromised ART adherence by reinforcing concealment of HIV status and undermining social suppport. Conclusion. After nearly a decade of increasing the provision of ART in Tanzania, PLHIV still experience stigma and discrimination; these experiences still appear to have a negative impact on treatment adherence. Efforts to reduce stigma and discrimination remain relevant in the ART period and should be given more impetus in order to maximize positive treatment outcomes.

  9. Experiences and Impact of Stigma and Discrimination among People on Antiretroviral Therapy in Dar es Salaam: A Qualitative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhode, Maisara; Nyamhanga, Tumaini

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of stigma on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been less studied in Tanzania. Recent studies indicate that people on ART still experience stigma. Qualitative information on the subject matter is especially insufficient. Objective. This paper reports on the dimensions of stigma and discrimination and their impact on adherence to ART as experienced by people living with HIV (PLHIV). Design. A phenomenological approach was used to gather information on the lived experiences of stigma and discrimination. The sample size was determined according to the saturation principle. Results. Respondents experienced different forms of HIV-related stigma such as verbal, social, and perceived stigma. Various forms of discrimination were experienced, including relational discrimination, mistreatment by health care workers, blame and rejection by spouses, and workplace discrimination. HIV-related stigma and discrimination compromised ART adherence by reinforcing concealment of HIV status and undermining social suppport. Conclusion. After nearly a decade of increasing the provision of ART in Tanzania, PLHIV still experience stigma and discrimination; these experiences still appear to have a negative impact on treatment adherence. Efforts to reduce stigma and discrimination remain relevant in the ART period and should be given more impetus in order to maximize positive treatment outcomes. PMID:27110395

  10. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesselring, Anouk M; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sabin, Caroline A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1...... to treatment-limiting toxicities and/or patient/physician choice (TOXPC, n = 10,186). Patients were classified according to prior antiretroviral treatment experience and CD4 cell count/viral load at start NVPc. Models were stratified by cohort and adjusted for age, sex, nadir CD4 cell count, calendar year...

  11. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission in HIV-discordant couples

    OpenAIRE

    Anglemyer, Andrew; Rutherford, George W.; Horvath, Tara; Baggaley, Rachel C; Egger, Matthias; Siegfried, Nandi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antiretroviral drugs have been shown to reduce risk of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are also widely used for post-exposure prophylaxis for parenteral and sexual exposures. Sexual transmission may be lower in couples in which one partner is infected with HIV and the other is not and the infected partner is on antiretroviral therapy (ART). OBJECTIVES To determine if ART use in an HIV-infected member of an HIV-discordant couple is ...

  12. Antiretroviral treatment switch strategies for lowering the costs of antiretroviral therapy in subjects with suppressed HIV-1 viremia in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llibre JM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Josep M Llibre,1,2 Gloria Cardona,3 José R Santos,2 Angels Andreu,3 Josep O Estrada,4 Jordi Ara,4 Xavier Bonafont,3 Bonaventura Clotet1,21HIV Unit, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Lluita contra la SIDA Foundation, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Hospital Management, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, SpainBackground: The current economic recession in European countries has forced governments to design emergency measures to reduce spending on drugs, including antiretroviral therapy (ART. Switching antiretroviral drugs for others that have the same efficacy and safety profile at a lower cost (cost-reduction measures, CRM could prove to be a valid means of generating savings.Methods: Descriptive study of prospective consensus-based CRM undertaken in 2011 in a Catalonian hospital HIV unit among patients with prolonged plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL.Results: During the study period, we made 673 switches (87.5% more than the previous year, of which 378 (56.2% were CRM (16% of all patients treated, leading to a savings of €87,410/month. Switching tenofovir/emtricitabine for abacavir/lamivudine was the most common CRM (129, 31.3%, followed by simplification to boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy (bPImono, 102, 26%. The CRM that generated the greatest saving were switching to bPImono (38%, withdrawal or replacement of raltegravir (24%, switching tenofovir/emtricitabine for abacavir/lamivudine (13%, and switching to nevirapine (5%. Cost savings with CRM were slightly higher than those achieved with medication paid for by clinical trial sponsors (€80,333/month or through discount arrangements (€76,389/month.Conclusion: Proactively switching antiretroviral therapy in selected treated patients with sustained virological suppression can generate significant cost savings in pharmacy spending in

  13. Abordagem metabólica e nutricional da lipodistrofia em uso da terapia anti-retroviral Metabolic and nutritional approach of lipodystrophy in the use of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Daniele Tavares Dutra

    2008-08-01

    opportunistic infections were the biggest nutritional problems. Nowadays the main discussion points are the resulting metabolic and morphologic complications, among them lipodystrophy with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, osteopenia and altered distribution of body fat, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Nutrition plays an essential role in supporting the health of these patients, integrating the multidisciplinary teams, improving antiretroviral therapy adherence rates and disease prognosis. However, in order to better understand the therapy, the side effect rates and the nutritional profile of these patients on the short and long run, it is vital to study this subject more deeply to obtain perspectives of a safer therapeutic regimen within its methodological scope, improving the quality of life of these patients.

  14. Pregnancy and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Westreich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although women of reproductive age are the largest group of HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the impact of pregnancy on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in that setting. We examined the effect of incident pregnancy after HAART initiation on virologic response to HAART. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated a prospective clinical cohort of adult women who initiated HAART in Johannesburg, South Africa between 1 April 2004 and 30 September 2009, and followed up until an event, death, transfer, drop-out, or administrative end of follow-up on 31 March 2010. Women over age 45 and women who were pregnant at HAART initiation were excluded from the study; final sample size for analysis was 5,494 women. Main exposure was incident pregnancy, experienced by 541 women; main outcome was virologic failure, defined as a failure to suppress virus to ≤ 400 copies/ml by six months or virologic rebound >400 copies/ml thereafter. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios using marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models and weighted lifetable analysis to calculate adjusted five-year risk differences. The weighted hazard ratio for the effect of pregnancy on time to virologic failure was 1.34 (95% confidence limit [CL] 1.02, 1.78. Sensitivity analyses generally confirmed these main results. CONCLUSIONS: Incident pregnancy after HAART initiation was associated with modest increases in both relative and absolute risks of virologic failure, although uncontrolled confounding cannot be ruled out. Nonetheless, these results reinforce that family planning is an essential part of care for HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa. More work is needed to confirm these findings and to explore specific etiologic pathways by which such effects may operate.

  15. Affective disorders in patients with HIV infection: impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, affective disorders (such as depressed mood) were seen in a considerable number of HIV-1-infected individuals. These disorders were a result of the poor physical condition of the patients, brain involvement by the virus (e.g. encephalopathy) or a reaction to disadvantageous living conditions (losing friends, jobs, etc.). In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), mental illness related to physical weakness is declining, as is the incidence of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. However, depressed mood and fatigue caused by efavirenz (a standard component of HAART) is becoming increasingly important, particularly in individuals who are infected long-term with HIV-1. Whatever the cause of affective disorders, their presence has been shown to negatively influence adherence to HAART and HIV-1 disease progression. Specialist knowledge of HIV-1 infection, and HAART and its psychiatric complications (particularly in subgroups of patients such as drug abusers and older people), is needed to care adequately for patients. Furthermore, prospective studies are needed to more fully differentiate between the various aetiologies of affective disorders seen in individuals living with HIV/AIDS and to determine their incidence and prevalence. Such information is important to ensure that affective disorders are recognised and adequately treated, which will in turn improve the efficacy of HAART. PMID:16734500

  16. A feasibility study of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy in children with HIV infection

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    Ubolyam Sasiwimol

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a large immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy (ART study in children. Methods We conducted an open-label pilot randomized clinical trial study in 43 Thai children with CD4 15 to 24% of starting generic AZT/3TC/NVP immediately (Arm 1 or deferring until CD4 Results Recruitment took 15 months. Twenty-six of 69 (37.7% were not eligible due mainly to low CD4%. Twenty four and 19 were randomized to arms 1 and 2 respectively. All accepted the randomized arm; however, 3 in arm 1 stopped ART and 1 in arm 2 refused to start ART. Ten/19 (53% in arm 2 started ART. At baseline, median age was 4.8 yrs, CDC A:B were 36:7, median CD4 was 19% and viral load was 4.8 log. All in arm 1 and 17/19 in arm 2 completed the study (median of 134 weeks. No one had AIDS or death. Four in immediate arm had tuberculosis. Once started on ART, deferred arm children achieved similar CD4 and viral load response as the immediate arm. Adverse events were similar between arms. The deferred arm had a 26% ART saving. Conclusion Almost 40% of children were not eligible due mainly to low CD4% but adherence to randomized treatment and retention in trial were excellent. A larger study to evaluate when to start ART is feasible.

  17. Prevalence of depressive symptoms amongst highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART patients in AIDSRelief Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Shumba

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is limited data on the prevalence of depression in HIV and AIDS patients in Sub- Saharan Africa and little resources have been allocated to address this issue. Depression affects patient adherence to treatment and predisposes patients to resistance which poses a public health threat. It also affects quality of life and productivity of patients. From August 2008 to March 2009, 731 patient adherence surveys were administered to assess disease, treatment knowledge and services received. The primary variable of interest was patients’ level of depressive symptoms score, constructed using factor analysis from five survey questions relating to: sadness, need to be alone, hopelessness and confusion and was categorized as no depressive symptoms (score 0, low depressive symptoms (score 1-2, moderate depressive symptoms (score 3-4 and high depressive symptoms (score 5-10. Majority of the patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART (59% were found to have depressive symptoms and this was more among women than men (66% vs 43%. There was some association of depressive symptoms with non-disclosure (70% of those who had not disclosed had depressive symptoms compared to 53% among those who had disclosed. There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among adult patients on HAART. There is need for in-depth evaluation to find out the root causes of depressive symptoms among HAART patients in AIDSRelief clinics. There is need to integrate mental health management in HIV care and treatment as well as training the existing health workers on mental health management.

  18. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy. PMID:26544766

  19. Behavioral Economics Matters for HIV Research: The Impact of Behavioral Biases on Adherence to Antiretrovirals (ARVs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Stecher, Chad

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral economics (BE) has been used to study a number of health behaviors such as smoking and drug use, but there is little knowledge of how these insights relate to HIV prevention and care. We present novel evidence on the prevalence of the common behavioral decision-making errors of present-bias, overoptimism, and information salience among 155 Ugandan HIV patients, and analyze their association with subsequent medication adherence. 36 % of study participants are classified as present-biased, 21 % as overoptimistic, and 34 % as having salient HIV information. Patients displaying present-bias were 13 % points (p = 0.006) less likely to have adherence rates above 90 %, overoptimistic clients were 9 % points (p = 0.04) less likely, and those not having salient HIV information were 17 % points (p < 0.001) less likely. These findings indicate that BE may be used to screen for future adherence problems and to better design and target interventions addressing these behavioral biases and the associated suboptimal adherence.

  20. Accurate reporting of adherence to inhaled therapies in adults with cystic fibrosis: methods to calculate normative adherence

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    Hoo ZH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhe Hui Hoo,1,2 Rachael Curley,1,2 Michael J Campbell,1 Stephen J Walters,1 Daniel Hind,3 Martin J Wildman1,2 1School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, 2Sheffield Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, 3Sheffield Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Preventative inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis will only be effective in maintaining lung health if used appropriately. An accurate adherence index should therefore reflect treatment effectiveness, but the standard method of reporting adherence, that is, as a percentage of the agreed regimen between clinicians and people with cystic fibrosis, does not account for the appropriateness of the treatment regimen. We describe two different indices of inhaled therapy adherence for adults with cystic fibrosis which take into account effectiveness, that is, “simple” and “sophisticated” normative adherence. Methods to calculate normative adherence: Denominator adjustment involves fixing a minimum appropriate value based on the recommended therapy given a person’s characteristics. For simple normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status. For sophisticated normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status and history of pulmonary exacerbations over the previous year. Numerator adjustment involves capping the daily maximum inhaled therapy use at 100% so that medication overuse does not artificially inflate the adherence level. Three illustrative cases: Case A is an example of inhaled therapy under prescription based on Pseudomonas status resulting in lower simple normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence. Case B is an example of inhaled therapy under-prescription based on previous exacerbation history resulting in lower sophisticated normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence and simple normative adherence

  1. Simplified Assessment of Antiretroviral Adherence and Prediction of Virological Efficacy in HIV-Infected Patients in Cambodia

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    Olivier Segeral

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adherence to antiviral therapy is important for HIV-infected people living in low- and middle-income countries, because of poor access to alternative regimens. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adherence in Cambodian patients enrolled in the ESTHER program and treated with WHO first-line regimen for at least 6 months. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, drug assay, MCV measurement, visual analog scale, and viral load HIV RNA. Results. Two hundred fifty-nine patients treated for a median of 16 months participated in the survey. At inclusion in the program, 158 patients (61% were ARV-naïve. The virological success rate was 71% overall and 81% in previously ARV-naive patients. Considered individually, the measures suggested perfect adherence in 71% to 93% of patients. In multivariate analysis adjusted for sex and therapeutic status before HAART initiation, only the biological markers were associated with virological efficacy. Self-funded treatment before entry to the program was highly predictive of virological failure. Conclusion. Adherence was excellent in these Cambodian patients. Biological markers were predictive of virological efficacy. MCV might thus serve as a simple alternative for assessing adherence and predicting virological efficacy among patients receiving AZT- or d4T-based regimens.

  2. Antiretroviral therapy optimisation without genotype resistance testing: a perspective on treatment history based models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.F. Prosperi; M. Rosen-Zvi; A. Altman; M. Zazzi; S. Di Giambenedetto; R. Kaiser; E. Schülter; D. Struck; P. Sloot; D.A. van de Vijver; A.-M. Vandamme; A. Sönnerborg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although genotypic resistance testing (GRT) is recommended to guide combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), funding and/or facilities to perform GRT may not be available in low to middle income countries. Since treatment history (TH) impacts response to subsequent therapy, we investig

  3. Diabetic ketoacidosis in an HIV-infected patient undergoing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, MR; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Røder, ME

    2006-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a number of metabolic and morphologic alterations, known as HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), have been increasingly common in HIV-infected patients being treated with this therapy. The use of protease...

  4. Adherence to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Ellyn E.; Arnedt, J. Todd; McCarthy, Michaela S.; Cuddihy, Leisha J.; Aloia, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is a significant public health problem worldwide, and insomnia has considerable personal and social costs associated with serious health conditions, greater healthcare utilization, work absenteeism, and motor-vehicle accidents. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI) is an efficacious treatment, yet attrition and suboptimal adherence may diminish its impact. Despite the increasing use of CBTI, surprisingly little attention has been devoted to understanding the role o...

  5. Lay Social Resources for Support of Adherence to Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention Among Serodiscordant Couples in sub-Saharan Africa: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Norma C; Pisarski, Emily E; Haberer, Jessica E; Wyatt, Monique A; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Baeten, Jared M; Celum, Connie L; Bangsberg, David R

    2015-05-01

    Effectiveness of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention will require high adherence. Using qualitative data, this paper identifies potential lay social resources for support of PrEP adherence by HIV serodiscordant couples in Uganda, laying the groundwork for incorporation of these resources into adherence support initiatives as part of implementation. The qualitative analysis characterizes support for PrEP adherence provided by HIV-infected spouses, children, extended family members, and the larger community. Results suggest social resources for support of PrEP adherence in Africa are plentiful outside formal health care settings and health systems and that couples will readily use them. The same shortage of health professionals that impeded scale-up of antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS in Africa promises to challenge delivery of PrEP. Building on the treatment scale-up experience, implementers can address this challenge by examining the value of lay social resources for adherence support in developing strategies for delivery of PrEP.

  6. Exploring the patterns of use and the feasibility of using cellular phones for clinic appointment reminders and adherence messages in an antiretroviral treatment clinic, Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Corless, Inge B; Giddy, Janet; Nicholas, Patrice K; Eichbaum, Quentin; Butler, Lisa M

    2010-11-01

    In preparation for a proposed intervention at an antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic in Durban, South Africa, we explored the dynamics and patterns of cellular phone use among this population, in order to ascertain whether clinic contact via patients' cellular phones was a feasible and acceptable modality for appointment reminders and adherence messages. Adults, who were more than 18 years old, ambulatory, and who presented for treatment at the clinic between October-December 2007, were consecutively recruited until the sample size was reached (n = 300). A structured questionnaire was administered, including questions surrounding sociodemographics, cellular phone availability, patterns of use, and acceptability of clinic contact for the purpose of clinic appointment reminders and adherence support. Most respondents (n = 242; 81%) reported current ownership of a cellular phone with 95% utilizing a prepaid airtime service. Those participants who currently owned a cellular phone reported high cellular phone turnover due to theft or loss (n = 94, 39%) and/or damage (n = 68, 28%). More females than men switched their cell phones off during the day (p = 0.002) and were more likely to not take calls in certain social milieus (p ≤ 0.0001). Females were more likely to share their cell phone with others (p = 0.002) or leave it in a place where someone could access it (p = 0.005). Most respondents were willing to have clinic contact via their cellular phones, either verbally (99%) or via text messages (96%). The use of cellular phones for intervention purposes is feasible and should be further investigated. The findings highlight the value of gender-based analyses in informing interventions.

  7. A one-year clinical trial using didanosine, stavudine and nevirapine for highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hua-ying; ZHENG Yu-huang; ZHANG Chun-ying; DING Pei-pei; ZOU Wen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Antiretroviral therapy is a key determinant in the treatment and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Initial treatment for patients with HIV infection generally includes two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and a protease inhibitor (PI) or a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). The combination antiretroviral therapy (refers to highly active antiretroviral therapy or HAART) showed a significant effect upon reducing morbidity and mortality of HIV disease. Cao and colleagues1 began the clinical application of HAART in 1999 and completed the first clinical trial in China using a combination of two NRTIs and one PI. The result in using combivir (AZT+3TC) and indinavir (2 NRTIs+1 PI) are consistent with those reported in the literature.2 In this study, we report the first virological and immunological outcomes in HIV infected Chinese patients treated with a combination of didanosine, stavudine and nevirapine (2 NRTIs+1 NNRTI) for 52 weeks.

  8. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults.

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    Emmanuel Maganga

    Full Text Available Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART, yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders.In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher's exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders.HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7% vs.11/153 (7.2%, p<0.001 and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0% vs. 8/153 (5.2%, p = 0.001 than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78-11.77, p<0.001. Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%.HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune reconstitution.

  9. A resurgent HIV-1 epidemic among men who have sex with men in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bezemer; F. de Wolf; M.C. Boerlijst; A. van Sighem; T.D. Hollingsworth; M. Prins; R.B. Geskus; L. Gras; R.A. Coutinho; C. Fraser

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Reducing viral load, highly active antiretroviral therapy has the potential to limit onwards transmission of HIV-1 and thus help contain epidemic spread. However, increases in risk behaviour and resurgent epidemics have been widely reported post-highly active antiretroviral therapy. The a

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy Helps HIV-Positive Women Navigate Social Expectations for and Clinical Recommendations against Childbearing in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Kastner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding factors that influence pregnancy decision-making and experiences among HIV-positive women is important for developing integrated reproductive health and HIV services. Few studies have examined HIV-positive women’s navigation through the social and clinical factors that shape experiences of pregnancy in the context of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. We conducted 25 semistructured interviews with HIV-positive, pregnant women receiving ART in Mbarara, Uganda in 2011 to explore how access to ART shapes pregnancy experiences. Main themes included: (1 clinical counselling about pregnancy is often dissuasive but focuses on the importance of ART adherence once pregnant; (2 accordingly, women demonstrate knowledge about the role of ART adherence in maintaining maternal health and reducing risks of perinatal HIV transmission; (3 this knowledge contributes to personal optimism about pregnancy and childbearing in the context of HIV; and (4 knowledge about and adherence to ART creates opportunities for HIV-positive women to manage normative community and social expectations of childbearing. Access to ART and knowledge of the accompanying lowered risks of mortality, morbidity, and HIV transmission improved experiences of pregnancy and empowered HIV-positive women to discretely manage conflicting social expectations and clinical recommendations regarding childbearing.

  11. Combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Weber, R; Monforte, AD; El-Sadr, WM; Reiss, P; Thiebaut, R; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Lundgren, JD; Weber, R; Monteforte, AD; Bartsch, G; Reiss, P; Dabis, F; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Houyez, F; Loeliger, E; Tressler, R; Weller, I.; Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Sjol, A; Lundgren, JD; Sawitz, A; Rickenbach, M; Pezzotti, P; Krum, E; Meester, R; Lavignolle, V.; Sundstrom, A; Poll, B; Fontas, E; Torres, F; Petoumenos, K; Kjaer, J; Hammer, S; Neaton, J; Sjol, A; de Wolf, F; van der Ven, E; Zaheri, S; Van Valkengoed, L; Meester, R; Bronsveld, W; Weigel, H; Brinkman, K; Frissen, P; ten Veen, J; Hillbrand, M; Schieveld, S; Mulder, J; van Gorp, E; Meenhorst, P; Danner, S; Claessen, F; Perenboom, R; Schattenkerk, JKE; Godfried, M; Lange, J; Lowe, S; van der Meer, J; Nellen, F; Pogany, K; van der Poll, T; Reiss, R; Ruys, T; Wit, F; Richter, C; van Leusen, R; Vriesendorp, R; Jeurissen, F; Kauffmann, R; Koger, E; Brevenboer, B; Sprenger, HG; Law, G; ten Kate, RW; Leemhuis, M; Schippers, E; Schrey, G; van der Geest, S; Verbon, A; Koopmans, P; Keuter, M; Telgt, D; van der Ven, A; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Gyssens, I.; de Marie, S; Juttmann, J; van der Heul, C; Schneider, M; Borleffs, J; Hoepelman, I.; Jaspers, C; Matute, A; Schurink, C; Blok, W; Salamon, R; Beylot, J; Dupon, M; Le Bras, M; Pellegrin, JL; Ragnaud, JM; Dabis, F; Chene, G; Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Rhiebaut, R; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Lavignolle, V.; Balestre, E; Blaizeau, MJ; Decoin, M; Formaggio, AM; Delveaux, S; Labarerre, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vimard, E; Merchadou, L; Palmer, G; Touchard, D; Dutoit, D; Pereira, F; Boulant, B; Beylot, J; Morlat, P; Bonarek, M; Bonnet, F; Coadou, B; Gelie, P; Jaubert, D; Nouts, C; Lacoste, D; Dupon, M; Dutronc, H; Cipriano, G; Lafarie, S; Chossat, I.; Lacut, JY; Leng, B; Pellegrin, JL; Mercie, P; Viallard, JF; Faure, I.; Rispal, P; Cipriano, C; Tchamgoue, S; Le Bras, M; Djossou, F; Malvy, D; Pivetaud, JP; Ragnaud, JM; Chambon, D; De La Taille, C; Galperine, T; Lafarie, S; Neau, D; Ochoa, A; Beylot, C; Doutre, MS; Bezian, JH; Moreau, JF; Taupin, JL; Conri, C; Constans, J; Couzigou, P; Castera, L; Fleury, H; Lafon, ME; Masquelier, B; Pellegrin, I.; Trimoulet, P; Moreau, F; Mestre, C; Series, C; Taytard, A; Law, M; Petoumenos, K; Bal, J; Mijch, A; Watson, K; Roth, N; Wood, H; Austin, D; Gowers, A; Baker, B; McFarlane, R; Carr, A; Cooper, D; Chuah, J; Fankhauser, W; Mallal, S; Skett, J; Calvo, G; Torres, F; Mateau, S; Domingo, P; Sambeat, MA; Gatell, J; Del Cacho, E; Cadafalch, J; Fuster, M; Codina, C; Sirera, G; Vaque, A; Clumeck, N; De Wit, S; Gerard, M; Hildebrand, M; Kabeya, K; Konopnicki, D; Payen, MC; Poll, B; Van Laethem, Y; Neaton, J; Bartsch, G; El-Sadr, WM; Krum, E; Thompson, G; Wentworth, D; Luskin-Hawk, R; Telzak, E; El-Sadr, WM; Abrams, DI; Cohn, D; Markowitz, N; Arduino, R; Mushatt, D; Friedland, G; Perez, G; Tedaldi, E; Fisher, E; Gordin, F; Crane, LR; Sampson, J; Baxter, J; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Vetter, N; Clumeck, N; Hermans, P; Colebunders, R; Machala, L; Nielsen, J; Benfield, T; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T; Roge, B; Skinhoj, P; Pedersen, C; Katlama, C; Viard, JP; Saint-Marc, T; Vanhems, P; Pradier, C; Dietrich, M; Manegold, C; van Lunzen, J; Miller, V.; Staszewski, S; Bieckel, M; Goebel, FD; Salzberger, B; Rockstroh, J; Kosmidis, J; Gargalianos, P; Sambatakou, H; Perdios, J; Panos, G; Karydis, I.; Filandras, A; Banhegyi, D; Mulcahy, F; Yust, I.; Turner, D; Pollack, S; Ben-Ishai, Z; Bentwich, Z; Maayan, S; Vella, S; Chiesi, A; Arici, C; Pristera, R; Mazzotta, F; Gabbuti, A; Esposito, R; Bedini, A; Chirianni, A; Montesarchio, E; Vullo, V.; Santopadre, P; Narciso, P; Antinori, A; Franci, P; Zaccarelli, M; Lazzarin, A; Finazzi, R; Monforte, VO; Hemmer, R; Staub, T; Reiss, P; Bruun, J; Maeland, A; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B; Gasiorowski, J; Horban, A; Prokopowicz, D; Boron-Kaczmarska, A; Pnyka, M; Beniowski, M; Trocha, H; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Proenca, R; Gonzalez-Lahoz, J; Diaz, B; Garcia-Benayas, T; Martin-Carbonero, L; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B; Jou, A; Conejero, J; Tural, C; Gatell, JM; Miro, JM; Blaxhult, A; Heidemann, B; Pehrson, P; Ledergerber, B; Weber, R; Francioli, P; Telenti, A; Hirschel, B; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Furrer, H; Fisher, M; Brettle, R; Barton, S; Johnson, AM; Mercey, D; Loveday, C; Johnson, MA; Pinching, A; Parkin, J; Weber, J; Scullard, G; Morfeldt, L; Thulin, G; Sunstrom, A; Akerlund, B; Koppel, K; Karlsson, A; Flamholc, L; Hakangard, C; Monforte, AD; Pezzotti, P; Moroni, M; Monforte, AD; Cargnel, A; Merli, S; Vigevani, GM; Pastecchia, C; Lazzarin, A; Novati, R; Caggese, L; Moioli, C; Mura, MS; Mannazzu, M; Suter, F; Arici, C; Manconi, PE; Piano, P; Mazzotta, F; Lo Caputo, S; Poggio, A; Bottari, G; Pagano, G; Alessandrini, A; Scasso, A; Vincenti, A; Abbadesse, V.; Mancuso, S; Alberici, F; Ruggieri, A; Arlotti, M; Ortolani, P; De Lalla, F; Tositti, G; Piersantelli, N; Piscopo, R; Raise, E; Pasquinucci, S; Soscia, F; Tacconi, L; Tirelli, U; Nasti, G; Santoro, D; Pusterla, L; Carosi, G; Castelli, F; Cadeo, G; Vangi, D; Carnevale, G; Galloni, D; Filice, G; Bruno, R; Sinicco, A; Sciandra, M; Caramello, P; Gennero, L; Soranzo, ML; Bonasso, M; Rizzardini, G; Migliorino, G; Chiodo, F; Colangeli, V.; Magnani, G; Ursitti, M; Menichetti, F; Martinelli, C; Esposito, R; Mussini, C; Ghinelli, F; Sighinolfi, L; Coronado, O; Zauli, T; Ballardini, G; Montroni, M; Zoli, A; Petrelli, E; Cioppi, A; Ortona, L; De Luca, A; Petrosillo, N; Noto, P; Narciso, P; Salcuni, P; Antinori, A; De Longis, P; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M; Pastore, G; Minafra, G; Chiriann, A; Loiacono, L; Piazza, M; Nappa, S; Abrescia, N; De Marco, M; Colomba, A; Prestileo, T; De Stefano, C; La Gala, A; Ferraro, T; Scerbo, A; Grima, P; Tundo, P; Pizzigallo, E; D'Alessandro, M; Grisorio, B; Ferrara, S; Pradier, C; Fontas, E; Caissotti, C; Dellamonica, P; Bentz, L; Bernard, E; Chaillou, S; De Salvador-Guillouet, F; Durant, J; Guttman, R; Heripret, L; Mondain-Miton, V.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B; Pugliese, P; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, PM; Vandenbos, F; Bernasconi, E; Bucher, H; Burgisser, P; Cattacin, S; Egger, M; Erb, P; Fierz, W; Fischer, M; Flepp, M; Fontana, A; Francioli, P; Furrer, HJ; Gorgievski, M; Hirschel, B; Kaiser, L; Kind, C; Klimkait, T; Ledergerber, B; Lauper, U; Opravil, M; Paccaud, F; Pantaleo, G; Perrin, L; Piffaretti, JC; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schupbach, J; Speck, R; Telenti, A; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S; Ten Napel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether exposure to combination antiretroviral treatment increases the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 23,468 patients from 11 previously established cohorts from December 1999 to April 2001 and collect

  12. Implementation and effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, N.; Ladefoged, K.; Obel, N.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses from the Danish HIV Cohort Study showed that, despite comparable economic means and general education of healthcare personnel, antiretroviral treatment of HIV in Greenland began later and has been implemented at a slower pace with lower therapeutic effectiveness than in Denmark. However...

  13. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes.

  14. Contrasting predictors of poor antiretroviral therapy outcomes in two South African HIV programmes: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Robin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many national antiretroviral therapy (ART programmes encourage providers to identify and address baseline factors associated with poor treatment outcomes, including modifiable adherence-related behaviours, before initiating ART. However, evidence on such predictors is scarce, and providers judgement may often be inaccurate. To help address this evidence gap, this observational cohort study examined baseline factors potentially predictive of poor treatment outcomes in two ART programmes in South Africa, with a particular focus on determinants of adherence. Methods Treatment-naïve patients starting ART were enrolled from a community and a workplace ART programme. Potential baseline predictors associated with poor treatment outcomes (defined as viral load > 400 copies/ml or having discontinued treatment by six months were assessed using logistic regression. Exposure variables were organised for regression analysis using a hierarchical framework. Results 38/227 (17% of participants in the community had poor treatment outcomes compared to 47/117 (40% in the workplace. In the community, predictors of worse outcomes included: drinking more than 20 units of alcohol per week, having no prior experience of chronic medications, and consulting a traditional healer in the past year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 15.36, 95% CI 3.22-73.27; aOR 2.30, 95%CI 1.00-5.30; aOR 2.27, 95% CI 1.00-5.19 respectively. Being male and knowing someone on ART were associated with better outcomes (aOR 0.25, 95%CI 0.09-0.74; aOR 0.44, 95%CI 0.19-1.01 respectively. In the workplace, predictors of poor treatment outcomes included being uncertain about the health effects of ART and a traditional healer's ability to treat HIV (aOR 7.53, 95%CI 2.02-27.98; aOR 4.40, 95%CI 1.41-13.75 respectively. Longer pre-ART waiting time (2-12 weeks compared to Conclusion Baseline predictors of poor treatment outcomes were largely unique to each programme, likely reflecting

  15. Reasons for Missing Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from a Multi-Country Study in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

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    Olivier Koole

    Full Text Available To identify the reasons patients miss taking their antiretroviral therapy (ART and the proportion who miss their ART because of symptoms; and to explore the association between symptoms and incomplete adherence.Secondary analysis of data collected during a cross-sectional study that examined ART adherence among adults from 18 purposefully selected sites in Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. We interviewed 250 systematically selected patients per facility (≥ 18 years on reasons for missing ART and symptoms they had experienced (using the HIV Symptom Index. We abstracted clinical data from the patients' medical, pharmacy, and laboratory records. Incomplete adherence was defined as having missed ART for at least 48 consecutive hours during the past 3 months.Twenty-nine percent of participants reported at least one reason for having ever missed ART (1278/4425. The most frequent reason was simply forgetting (681/1278 or 53%, followed by ART-related hunger or not having enough food (30%, and symptoms (12%. The median number of symptoms reported by participants was 4 (IQR: 2-7. Every additional symptom increased the odds of incomplete adherence by 12% (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 1.1-1.2. Female participants and participants initiated on a regimen containing stavudine were more likely to report greater numbers of symptoms.Symptoms were a common reason for missing ART, together with simply forgetting and food insecurity. A combination of ART regimens with fewer side effects, use of mobile phone text message reminders, and integration of food supplementation and livelihood programmes into HIV programmes, have the potential to decrease missed ART and hence to improve adherence and the outcomes of ART programmes.

  16. Improving the counselling skills of lay counsellors in antiretroviral adherence settings: a cluster randomised controlled trial in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Sarah; Mathews, Cathy; Schaay, Nikki; Cloete, Allanise; Simbayi, Leickness; Louw, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Little research has investigated interventions to improve the delivery of counselling in health care settings. We determined the impact of training and supervision delivered as part of the Options: Western Cape project on lay antiretroviral adherence counsellors' practice. Four NGOs employing 39 adherence counsellors in the Western Cape were randomly allocated to receive 53 h of training and supervision in Options for Health, an intervention based on the approach of Motivational Interviewing. Five NGOs employing 52 adherence counsellors were randomly allocated to the standard care control condition. Counselling observations were analysed for 23 intervention and 32 control counsellors. Intervention counsellors' practice was more consistent with a client-centred approach than control counsellors', and significantly more intervention counsellors engaged in problem-solving barriers to adherence (91 vs. 41 %). The Options: Western Cape training and supervision package enabled lay counsellors to deliver counselling for behaviour change in a manner consistent with evidence-based approaches.

  17. Second-line failure and first experience with third-line antiretroviral therapy in Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsuddin Khan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited data on the failure of second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART and the use of third-line ART in people living with HIV in resource-limited settings. Since 2011, the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF HIV/tuberculosis programme in Mumbai, India, has been providing third-line ART to patients in care. Objective: To describe the experiences and programmatic challenges during management of suspected second-line ART failure and third-line ART therapy for patients living with HIV, including the use of HIV viral load (VL testing. Design: This was a retrospective, observational cohort study of patients with suspected second-line ART treatment failure, who were followed for at least 12 months between January 2011 and March 2014. Results: A total of 47 patients with suspected second-line failure met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Twenty-nine of them (62% responded to enhanced adherence support, had a subsequent undetectable VL after a median duration of 3 months and remained on second-line ART. The other 18 patients had to be initiated on a third-line ART regimen, which consisted of darunavir–ritonavir, raltegravir, and one or more appropriate nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, based on the results of HIV genotype testing. Of the 13 patients for whom follow-up VL results were available, 11 achieved virological suppression after a median duration of 3 months on third-line ART (interquartile range: 2.5–3.0. No serious treatment-related adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: With intensive counselling and adherence support in those suspected of failing second-line ART, unnecessary switching to more expensive third-line ART can be averted in the majority of cases. However, there is an increasing need for access to third-line ART medications such as darunavir and raltegravir, for which national ART programmes should be prepared. The cost of such medications and inadequate access to VL

  18. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  19. Detection of lipoatrophy in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected children treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, K.; Verweel, G.; Groot, R. de; Hartwig, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy has been associated with lipodystrophy in adults. Much is unknown about its characteristics, especially in children. OBJECTIVE: To obtain an objective case definition of the lipodystrophy syndrome. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. One invest

  20. Prevalence of Lipodystrophy in HIV-infected Children in Tanzania on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinabo, G.; Sprengers, M.; Msuya, L.J.; Shayo, A.M.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with lipodystrophy (LD) in adults but data are more limited for children. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for LD in Tanzanian children receiving HAART by clinical assessment an

  1. Opportunistic infections and AIDS malignancies early after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Sara; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Bucher, Heiner C.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Logan, Roger; Sterne, Jonathan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Jarrín, Inma; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Jose, Sophie; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; Miró, José M.; Ferrer, Elena; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Rémonie; Vourli, Georgia; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Dabis, Francois; Vandenhede, Mari-Anne; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie; Hernán, Miguel A.; Hernan, Miguel; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Sabin, C.; Dunn, D.; Porter, K.; Glabay, A.; Orkin, C.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Easterbrook, P.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Gilson, R.; Man, S.-L.; Williams, I.; Gompels, M.; Dooley, D.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Phillips, A.; Sabin, C.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D.O.; Gras, L.A.J.; Kesselring, A.M.; Van Sighem, A.I.; Zaheri, S.; Van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Branger, J.; Prins, J.M.; Kuijpers, T.W.; Scherpbier, H.J.; Van Der Meer, J.T.M.; Wit, F.W.M.N.; Godfried, M.H.; Reiss, P.; Van Der Poll, T.; Nellen, F.J.B.; Lange, J.M.A.; Geerlings, S.E.; Van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J.C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M.L.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W.L.; Frissen, P.H.J.; Schouten, W.E.M.; Van Den Berk, G.E.L.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K.D.; Mulder, J.W.; Vrouenraets, S.M.E.; Lauw, F.N.; Van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D.W.M.; Van Agtmael, M.A.; Perenboom, R.M.; Claessen, F.A.P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E.J.G.; Richter, C.; Van Der Berg, J.P.; Gisolf, E.H.; Schippers, E.F.; Van Nieuwkoop, C.; Van Elzakker, E.P.; Leyten, E.M.S.; Gelinck, L.B.S.; Pronk, M.J.H.; Bravenboer, B.; Kootstra, G.J.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprenger, H.G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E.H.; Van Assen, S.; Bierman, W.F.W.; Soetekouw, R.; Ten Kate, R.W.; Van Vonderen, M.G.A.; Van Houte, D.P.F.; Kroon, F.P.; Van Dissel, J.T.; Arend, S.M.; De Boer, M.G.J.; Jolink, H.; Ter Vollaard, H.J.M.; Bauer, M.P.; Weijer, S.; El Moussaoui, R.; Lowe, S.; Schreij, G.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Koopmans, P.P.; Keuter, M.; Van Der Ven, A.J.A.M.; Ter Hofstede, H.J.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Warris, A.; Van Crevel, R.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; De Vries-Sluijs, T.E.M.S.; Schurink, C.A.M.; Nouwen, J.L.; Nispen Tot Pannerden, M.H.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B.J.A.; Van Gorp, E.C.M.; Hassing, R.J.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Driessen, G.J.A.; Den Hollander, J.G.; Pogany, K.; Juttmann, J.R.; Van Kasteren, M.E.E.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M.M.E.; Jaspers, C.A.J.J.; Ellerbroek, P.M.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Arends, J.E.; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Barth, R.E.; Geelen, S.P.M.; Wolfs, T.F.W.; Bont, L.J.; Van Den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Groeneveld, P.H.P.; Alleman, M.A.; Bouwhuis, J.W.; Barin, F.; Burty, C.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Khuong, M.A.; Mahamat, A.; Pilorgé, F.; Tattevin, P.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Abgrall, S.; Costagliola, D.; Grabar, S.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Mary-Krause, M.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J.M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Katlama, C.; Simon, A.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P.M.; Meynard, J.L.; Meyohas, M.C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Pialoux, G.; Clauvel, J.P.; Decazes, J.M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J.M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Bentata, M.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J.L.; Matheron, S.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; De Truchis, P.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Gilquin, J.; Roudière, L.; Viard, J.P.; Boué, F.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Lang, J.M.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J.P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M.F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J.P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Reynes, J.; Daures, J.P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J.L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M.F.; Pontonnier, G.; Viget, N.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pradier, C.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Delmont, J.P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J.A.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J.M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P.A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J.P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Billaud, E.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J.M.; Touraine, J.L.; Cotte, L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Cabié, A.; Gaud, C.; Contant, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Haerry, D.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez De Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Gallois, A.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J.M.; Manzardo, C.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Cifuentes, C.; Dalmau, D.; Jaen, À.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Pérez, I.; Gargoulas, Freyra; Blanco, J.L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; Mallolas, J.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J.F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M.C.; Saumoy, M.; Imaz, A.; Tiraboschi, J.M.; Murillo, O.; Bolao, F.; Peña, C.; Cabellos, C.; Masó, M.; Vila, A.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Jose Amengual, Ma.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Bejarano, G.; Molina, J.; Guadarrama, M.; Alvaro, M.; Mercadal, J.; Fernandez, Juanse; Ospina, Jesus E.; Muñoz, M.A.; Caro-Murillo, A.M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Gomez Sirvent, J.L.; Rodríguez, P.; Aleman, M.R.; Alonso, M.M.; Lopez, A.M.; Hernandez, M.I.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M.E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; De Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, Rl.; Iribarren, J.A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M.J.; Camino, X.; Rodrí-guez-Arrondo, F.; Von Wichmann, M.A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M.A.; Gutierrez, F.; Masia, M.; Ramos, J.M.; Padilla, S.; Sanchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; Berenguer, J.; Lopez, J.C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sanchez, M.; Gutierrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Vilades, C.; Lopez-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J.L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; De Los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J.A.; Blanco, J.R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M.J.; Irigoyen, C.; Moreno, S.; Antela, A.; Casado, J.L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M.J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; García, F.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L.F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A.C.; Fiellin, D.A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K.A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J.L.; Hernán, M.A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J.M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Babiker, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Gilson, R.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Pillay, D.; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Louisa Gnatiuc, S.L.; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S.P.R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, J.A.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Roberts, M.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, N.D.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; De Souza, C.B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; McLean, K.; Franca, A.; Hawkins, D.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P.J.; Mazhude, C.; Gilson, R.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; McHale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Johnson, M.; Rice, P.; Fidler, S.; Mullaney, S.A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Tayal, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Das, R.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M.R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A.M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, V.S.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Wilkins, E.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Roberts, M.; Williams, O.; Luzzi, G.; FitzGerald, M.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Molina, J.M.; Loze, B.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Raffi, F.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M.T.; Bergmann, J.F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Diemer, M.; Parrinello, M.; Girard, P.M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Livrozet, J.M.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A.P.; Allègre, T.; Reynes, J.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle De Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Cabié, A.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Pialoux, G.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Trepo, C.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Thomas, R.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Gourdon, F.; Rouveix, E.; Morelon, S.; Dupont, C.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J.M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J.D.; Lascaux, A.S.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumâitre, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Salmon, D.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M.C.; Drenou, B.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Katlama, C.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Bentata, M.; Touam, F.; Hoen, B.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Massip, P.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J.M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Boué, F.; Bornarel, D.; Verdon, R.; Bazin, C.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Weiss, L.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Herson, S.; Amirat, N.; Simon, A.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Picard, O.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Choutet, P.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; May, T.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; De Truchis, P.; Berthé, H.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Greder Belan, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A.M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Dellamonica, P.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; De Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert De Cursay, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J.L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A.S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J.J.; Quinsat, D.T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Caron, F.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Lepeu, G.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Galanaud, P.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G.A.; Levy, A.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M.S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Weiss, L.; Buisson, M.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Batisse, D.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Leport, C.; Colasante, U.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Duval, X.; Nouaouia, W.; Boucherit, S.; Vilde, J.L.; Girard, P.M.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Meyohas, M.C.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J.L.; Salmon, D.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Launay, O.; Pietrie, M.P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Bourdillon, F.; Lascaux, A.S.; Lelievre, J.D.; Dumont, C.; Dupont, B.; Obenga, G.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Vittecoq, D.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Bricaire, F.; Katlama, C.; Schneider, L.; Herson, S.; Simon, A.; Iguertsira, M.; Stein, A.; Tomei, C.; Ravaux, I.; Dhiver, C.; Tissot Dupont, H.; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Fabre, G.; Dellamonica, P.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J.P.; Karsenti, J.M.; Venti, H.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Rosenthal, E.; Ceppi, C.; Quaranta, M.; Krivitsky, J.A.; Bentata, M.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Del Amo, J.; Alvarez, D.; Monge, S.; Muga, R.; Sanvisens, A.; Clotet, B.; Tor, J.; Bolao, F.; Rivas, I.; Vallecillo, G.; Del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; Vera, M.; Hurtado, I.; Belda, J.; Fernandez, E.; Alastrue, I.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Juan, A.; Trullen, J.; Garcia De Olalla, P.; Cayla, J.; Masdeu, E.; Knobel, H.; Mirò, J.M.; Sambeat, M.A.; Guerrero, R.; Rivera, E.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; De Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.; Ortíz, M.; Paraskevis, D.; Touloumi, G.; Pantazis, N.; Bakoyannis, G.; Gioukari, V.; Antoniadou, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Petrikkos, G.; Daikos, G.; Psichogiou, M.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Katsarou, O.; Kouramba, A.; Ioannidou, P.; Kordossis, T.; Kontos, A.; Lazanas, M.; Chini, M.; Tsogas, N.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Leuow, K.; Kourkounti, S.; Sambatakou, H.; Mariolis, I.; Skoutelis, A.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Baraboutis, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is little information on the incidence of AIDS-defining events which have been reported in the literature to be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation. These events include tuberculosis, mycobacteri

  2. Changes in lipids and lipoprotein particle concentrations after interruption of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Fiona C; Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H;

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lipoprotein particle subclasses has not been studied. We examined short-term changes in lipids and lipoprotein particles among 332 HIV-infected individuals randomized to interrupt or continue ART in the "Strategies for Management of An...

  3. Immunological Analysis of Treatment Interruption After Early Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M.M. Schellens; K. Pogany; G.H.A. Westerlaken; J.A.M. Borghans; F. Miedema; I.G.M. van Valkengoed; F.P. Kroon; J.M.A. Lange; K. Brinkman; J.M. Prins; D. van Baarle

    2010-01-01

    We longitudinally evaluated HIV-specific T-cell immunity after discontinuation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). After treatment interruption (TI), some individuals could maintain a low plasma viral load (<15,000 copies/mL), whereas others could not (>50,000 copies/mL). Before HAART w

  4. T Cell Subsets in HIV Infected Patients after Successful Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Katzenstein, Terese Lea;

    2012-01-01

    Immune activation is decreased by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but residual activation remains and has been proposed as a cause of premature aging and death, but data are lacking. We analyzed the relationship between T-cell...

  5. Evaluation of antiretroviral therapy results in a resource-poor setting in Blantyre, Malawi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, J.J. van; Bodasing, N.; Kumwenda, J.J.; Nyirenda, C.; Mallewa, J.; Cleary, P.R.; Baar, M.P. de; Schuurman, R.; Burger, D.M.; Zijlstra, E.E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment results of the paying antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, a large public and teaching hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. The only ART was a fixed drug combination of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. METHODS: Cross sectional study

  6. Risk factors for mortality among malnourished HIV-infected adults eligible for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodd, Susannah L; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa are malnourished. We aimed to increase understanding of the factors affecting their high mortality, particularly in the high-risk period before ART initiation. METHODS: We analy...

  7. Antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients: a proposal to assess the economic value of the single-tablet regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo,1,2 Sergio Di Matteo,2 Franco Maggiolo31University of Pavia, Department of Drug Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Pavia, Italy, 2Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche, Milan, Italy, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, ItalyBackground: The aim of this study was to assess the economic value of a reduced number of pills in patients infected with the immunodeficiency virus (HIV and on highly active antiretroviral therapy by a cost-effectiveness model.Methods: An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine (TDF-FTC-EFV as a single-tablet regimen versus a multipill regimen, with reference to untreated HIV-infected patients, was carried out from the perspective of the Italian National Health Service. The comparisons were performed with the help of a Markov decision model over a 10-year time horizon. Based on the ADONE (ADherence to ONE pill study, it was then possible to identify the utility score increment in patients switching from a multipill regimen of TDF-FTC + EFV therapy to a single-tablet regimen.Results: The single-tablet regimen (0.755 quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]/year resulted in better patient quality of life, with a higher number of QALYs than for the TDF-FTC + EFV multipill regimen (0.716 QALYs/year. The single-tablet regimen was the most cost-effective treatment strategy, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €22,017.00 versus €26,558.00 for the multipill regimen. A 24% decrease in cost of the multipill regimen determined equivalence with the single-tablet regimen in terms of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Univariate sensitivity and probabilistic analysis carried out on the main variables did not highlight significant variations with respect to the base case scenario.Conclusion: The single-tablet regimen resulted in better adherence, and therefore better quality of life as perceived by patients, corresponding to a €4541.00 lower

  8. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART programme in Zomba, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Rachlis

    Full Text Available Identifying follow-up (FU visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU. Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1 to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2 to determine the median time to late visits, and 3 to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi.Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007-June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date, on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date, or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date. In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128-359. Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects.The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research.

  9. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steve; Martin, Faith; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Nalugya, Ruth; Muhumuza, Richard; Katongole, Joseph; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH's motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH's self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH's self-management processes on ART in resource-limited settings. This paper presents findings from a study of PLWH's self-management and wellbeing in Wakiso District, Uganda. Thirty-eight PLWH (20 women, 18 men) were purposefully selected at ART facilities run by the government and by The AIDS Support Organisation in and around Entebbe. Two in-depth interviews were completed with each participant over three or four visits. Many were struggling economically, however the recovery of health and hope on ART had enhanced wellbeing and motivated self-management. The majority were managing their condition well across three broad domains of self-management. First, they had mobilised resources, notably through good relationships with health workers. Advice and counselling had helped them to reconceptualise their condition and situation more positively and see hope for the future, motivating their work to self-manage. Many had also developed a new network of support through contacts they had developed at the ART clinic. Second, they had acquired knowledge and skills to manage their health, a useful framework to manage their condition and to live their life. Third, participants were psychologically adjusting to their condition and their new 'self': they saw HIV as a normal disease, were coping with stigma and had regained self-esteem, and were finding meaning in life. Our study demonstrates the centrality of social relationships and other non-medical aspects of wellbeing for self-management which ART

  10. Changes in CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA and cognition after starting potent antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marra, C.M.; Lockhart, D.; Zunt, J. R.; Perrin, M.; Coombs, R.W.; Collier, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    The authors assessed CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA and neuropsychological test performance (composite neuropsychological test Z score [NPZ-4]) in 25 HIV-1–infected subjects 4 and 8 weeks after beginning potent antiretroviral therapy that included a protease inhibitor. In the 14 subjects who entered the study on no antiretroviral treatment, NPZ-4 improvement was associated with decline in CSF HIV-1 RNA at both visits (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02), and those treated with zidovudine or indinavir had great...

  11. Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-2 Infection: Recommendations for Management in Low-Resource Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-2 contributes approximately a third to the prevalence of HIV in West Africa and is present in significant amounts in several low-income countries outside of West Africa with historical ties to Portugal. It complicates HIV diagnosis, requiring more expensive and technically demanding testing algorithms. Natural polymorphisms and patterns in the development of resistance to antiretrovirals are reviewed, along with their implications for antiretroviral therapy. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, crucial in standard first-line regimens for HIV-1 in many low-income settings, have no effect on HIV-2. Nucleoside analogues alone are not sufficiently potent enough to achieve durable virologic control. Some protease inhibitors, in particular those without ritonavir boosting, are not sufficiently effective against HIV-2. Following review of the available evidence and taking the structure and challenges of antiretroviral care in West Africa into consideration, the authors make recommendations and highlight the needs of special populations.

  12. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina;

    2002-01-01

    with CMV, MAC, Toxoplasma gondii, or Cryptococcus neoformans in patients with HIV infection can be interrupted after sustained CD4 count increases to greater than 200 (or possibly 100 to 200) x 10(6) cells/L for at least 6 months after the start of potent antiretroviral therapy....

  13. Acute hypophosphataemia and hypokalaemia in a patient starting antiretroviral therapy in Zambia-a new context for refeeding syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Christopher; Zulu, Isaac; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Bagchi, Shashwatee; Potter, Dara; Bosire, Claire; Krishnasami, Zipporah; Heimburger, Douglas C

    2009-01-01

    High mortality rates have been reported in the first 90 days of antiretroviral therapy in Zambia and other low-income countries. We report a case of acute hypophosphataemia and hypokalaemia in the first week of antiretroviral therapy in a patient with extreme AIDS wasting. Given its occurrence in an extremely wasted patient, it may be physiologically similar to refeeding syndrome but other causes could be relevant as well. Acute hypophosphataemia may contribute to early antiretroviral therapy associated mortality in low-income countries.

  14. Pharmacokinetic parameters of nevirapine and efavirenz in relation to antiretroviral efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Leth; B.S. Kappelhoff; D. Johnson; M.H. Losso; A. Boron-Kaczmarska; M.S. Saag; J.M. Livrozet; D.B. Hall; J. Leith; A.D.R. Huitema; F.W. Wit; J.H. Beijnen; J.M.A. Lange

    2006-01-01

    Optimal adherence is essential for successful antiretroviral therapy. We analyzed the relation between minimum plasma drug concentration (C-min) and total drug exposure over 24 hr (AUC(24)) with virologic failure for therapy-adherent patients in the nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV) groups of the

  15. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  16. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes.

  17. Current trends in highly active anti-retroviral therapy in an anti-retroviral therapy centre attached to a remote government medical college of Maharashtra, India: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Pravin S. Rathod; Praveenkumar T Patil; Rekha P. Lohar; A.W. Patil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) became the keystone of national AIDS program. There is lack of awareness and inadequate training about drug safety monitoring among health care professionals in India. Hence, the present study was carried out to study current trends in HAART and pattern of associated adverse drug reactions. Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted at an anti-retroviral therapy (ART) Centre. A total of 151 HIV/AIDS Patients (old and...

  18. Stigma, disclosure, coping, and medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in Northern Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Lyimo; S.E. Stutterheim; H.J. Hospers; T. de Glee; A. van der Ven; M. de Bruin

    2014-01-01

    This study examines a proposed theoretical model examining the interrelationships between stigma, disclosure, coping, and medication adherence among 158 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in northern Tanzania. Perceived and self-stigma, voluntary and involuntary disclosure, positi

  19. Reasons Why High Religiosity Can Co-exist with and Precipitate Discontinuation of Anti-retroviral Therapy among Different HIV Clients in Uganda: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumwine, Christopher; Neema, Stella; Wagner, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 39 very religious people living with HIV (16 had ever and 23 had never discontinued antiretroviral therapy-ART) to assess the role of religion in these treatment decisions and in coping with HIV. Participants who had ever discontinued ART gave reasons such as: teachings and prophecies from religious leaders, and supporting Biblical scriptures all of which led them to feel that God and their faith, not ART, would help them; and testimonies by their "already healed" peers who had stopped ART. Participants who had never discontinued ART gave reasons such as continuous adherence counseling from multiple sources, improvement in physical health as a result of ART, and beliefs that God heals in different ways and that non-adherence is equal to putting God to a test. High religiosity was reported to help participants cope with HIV through engagement in personal and or community protective behaviours, "taking care of other illness", and reducing worries. When high religiosity among people living with HIV (PHAs) becomes a barrier to ART adherence, the adherence counseling provided can draw on experiences of PHAs with high religiosity who have sustained good adherence to ART and achieved good health outcomes.

  20. Health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of earlier eligibility for adult antiretroviral therapy and expanded treatment coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, Jeffrey W; Menzies, Nicolas A; Stover, John;

    2014-01-01

    these estimates should be revisited when more data become available. Scaling up antiretroviral therapy through earlier eligibility and expanded coverage should be considered alongside other high-priority health interventions competing for health budgets. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, WHO....

  1. Nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV/AIDS attending two tertiary care hospitals in district of northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Shukla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a principal predictor for the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV treatment. It remains as a challenge to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS treatment and care with the widespread of the associated risks. Therefore, study aims to assess nonadherence level and factors associated with nonadherence to ART among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted at two tertiary care hospital of Lucknow. A total of 322 adult HIV-positive patients registered in the ART center were included. Systematic random sampling was used to recruit patients. Nonadherence was assessed on the basis of pill count method. Results: A total of 10.9% of patients were found to be nonadherent to ART. Principal causes cited were being busy with other work (40.0%, felt sick or ill (28.5%, not having money (14.2%, and being away from home (11.4. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that nonadherence was significantly associated with nonbeneficial perceptions towards ART (odds ratio (OR 18.5; 95% confidence interval (CI 3.2-106.6; P = 0.001, being counseled for adherence for more than 3 months (OR 13.9; 95% CI 1.6-118.9; P = 0.01, presence of depression (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0-6.7; P = 0.04, and those who were not satisfied with healthcare facilities (OR 5.63; 95% CI 1.88-16.84; P = 0.00. Conclusion: Although adherence to ART varies between individuals and over time, the factors that affect nonadherence can be addressed with proper periodic counseling and motivation of patients and their family members. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could delay the progression of this lethal disease and minimize the risk of developing drug resistance.

  2. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff;

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for a...

  3. The clinical benefits of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients with and without complete viral suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression.......The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression....

  4. Association of knowledge on ART line of treatment, scarcity of treatment options and adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Ramadhani, Habib O.; Muiruri, Charles; Maro, Venance P.; Omondi, Michael; Mushi, Julian B.; Lirhunde, Eileen S.; Bartlett, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is critical piece in the management of HIV infected patients. Despite the benefits of ART, non-adherence to ART persists. This study explores association between patient’s knowledge of the ART line of treatment, availability of future treatment options and adherence. Methods A cross sectional survey of HIV infected adolescent and adults was conducted. Cumulative optimal and sub-optimal adherence was defined as percentage adherence of ≥ 95 %...

  5. Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in Uganda: using supply chain management to appraise health systems strengthening

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhann Florian; Waiswa Peter; Windisch Ricarda; Scheibe Florian; de Savigny Don

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Strengthened national health systems are necessary for effective and sustained expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART and its supply chain management in Uganda are largely based on parallel and externally supported efforts. The question arises whether systems are being strengthened to sustain access to ART. This study applies systems thinking to assess supply chain management, the role of external support and whether investments create the needed synergies to stren...

  6. Neuropathology of HAND With Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy: Encephalitis and Neurodegeneration Reconsidered

    OpenAIRE

    Gelman, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infiltrates the central nervous system (CNS) during the initial infection and thereafter plays a persistent role in producing CNS dysfunction as the disease progresses. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are highly prevalent in HIV-infected patient populations, including currently infected patients with good access to suppressive antiretroviral therapy (cART). cART decreased the severity of CNS dysfunction dramatically and, in doing so, upended the neuropathological foundati...

  7. Adjudicated Morbidity and Mortality Outcomes by Age among Individuals with HIV Infection on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Christopher J.; Baker, Jason V.; Bormann, Alison M.; Erlandson, Kristine M.; Katherine Huppler Hullsiek; Justice, Amy C.; Jacqueline Neuhaus; Roger Paredes; Kathy Petoumenos; Deborah Wentworth; Alan Winston; Julian Wolfson; NEATON, James D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease and non-AIDS defining cancers dominate causes of morbidity and mortality among persons with HIV on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy. Accurate estimates of disease incidence and of risk factors for these conditions are important in planning preventative efforts. METHODS: With use of medical records, serious non-AIDS events, AIDS events, and causes of death were adjudicated using pre-specified criteria by an Endpoint R...

  8. CD8+ Cell Anti-HIV Activity Rapidly Increases Upon Discontinuation of Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Killian, M. Scott; Roop, Jeremy; Ng, Sharon; Frederick M Hecht; Levy, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ lymphocytes can suppress HIV replication without killing the infected cells. This CD8+ cell noncytotoxic anti-HIV response (CNAR) is associated with a beneficial clinical course. In this longitudinal study of 16 participants in the Options Project at UCSF, we measured the ability of CD8+ lymphocytes to suppress HIV replication in CD4+ cells during primary HIV infection, early antiretroviral therapy, and after treatment. CD8+ lymphocytes from subjects with untreated primary HIV-1 in...

  9. Immunodeficiency at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle- and high-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, Dorita; Keri N Althoff; Mugglin, Catrina; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Koller, Manuel; Dabis, François; Nash, Denis; Gsponer, Thomas; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; McGowan, Catherine; May, Margaret; Cooper, David; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Wolff, Marcelo; Collier, Ann

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the CD4 cell count at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in low-income (LIC), lower middle-income (LMIC), upper middle-income (UMIC), and high-income (HIC) countries. METHODS Patients aged 16 years or older starting cART in a clinic participating in a multicohort collaboration spanning 6 continents (International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS and ART Cohort Collaboration) were eligible. Multilevel linear regression models were...

  10. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Romero‐Velez, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero‐Velez G, Lisker‐Cervantes A, Villeda‐Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera‐Posada D, Sierra‐Madero JG, Arreguin‐Camacho LO, and Castillejos‐Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30.

  11. Sex Differences in HIV Outcomes in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Castilho, Jessica L; Melekhin, Vlada V.; Sterling, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    To assess sex disparities in AIDS clinical and laboratory outcomes in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on mortality, disease progression, and laboratory outcomes among persons living with HIV and starting HAART. We performed systematic PubMed and targeted bibliographic searches of observational studies published between January, 1998, and November, 2013, that included persons starting HAART and reported analyses ...

  12. Retention in an antiretroviral therapy programme during an era of decreasing drug cost in Limbe, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Mosoko Jembia J; Akam Wilfred; Weidle Paul J; Brooks John T; Aweh Asabi J; Kinge Thompson N; Pals Sherri; Raghunathan Pratima L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2002, Cameroon initiated scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART); on 1 October 2004, a substantial reduction in ART cost occurred. We assessed the impact of this event and other factors on enrolment and retention in care among HIV-infected patients initiating ART from February 2002 to December 2005 at the single ART clinic serving the Southwest Region in Limbe, Cameroon. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical and pharmacy payment records of HIV-infected patients ...

  13. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Bibiana A Ledesma; Nigro, Monica G; Natalia Vittar; Nestor Rueda; Luis De Carolis; Olga Figueiras; Silvana Carnevale; Marcelo Corti

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 c...

  14. Langerhans cells in periodontal disease of HIV- and HIV+ patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Kato Segundo; Giovanna Ribeiro Souto; Ricardo Alves Mesquita; Fernando Oliveira Costa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare quantitatively the presence of S100+ Langerhans cells (LC) by immunochemistry techniques in HIV+ and HIV- gingivitis and periodontitis subjects. Additionally, it aimed to evaluate the correlation among densities of these cells with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and viral load levels in HIV+ subjects, all using Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). The samples were allocated into four groups: 1) 15 subjects with moderate chronic periodontitis (M...

  15. Dyslipidemia in a Cohort of HIV-infected Latin American Children Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy*

    OpenAIRE

    Brewinski, Margaret; Megazzini, Karen; Freimanis Hance, Laura; Cruz, Miguel Cashat; Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Della Negra, Marinella; Ferreira, Flavia Gomes Faleiro; Marques, Heloisa; Hazra, Rohan

    2010-01-01

    In order to describe the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia in a cohort of HIV-infected children and adolescents in Latin America and to determine associations with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we performed this cross-sectional analysis within the NICHD International Site Development Initiative pediatric cohort study. Eligible children had to be at least 2 years of age and be on HAART. Among the 477 eligible HIV-infected youth, 98 (20.5%) had hypercho...

  16. Interaction between Artemether-Lumefantrine and Nevirapine-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1-Infected Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kredo, T.; Mauff, K.; Van der Walt, J. S.; Wiesner, L.; G. Maartens; Cohen, K.; Smith, P.; Barnes, K. I.

    2011-01-01

    Artemether-lumefantrine and nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) are the most commonly recommended first-line treatments for malaria and HIV, respectively, in Africa. Artemether, lumefantrine, and nevirapine are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme system, which nevirapine induces, creating potential for important drug interactions. In a parallel-design pharmacokinetic study, concentration-time profiles were obtained in two groups of HIV-infected patients: ART-naïve patients...

  17. Artemether-Lumefantrine Exposure in HIV-Infected Nigerian Subjects on Nevirapine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, Sunil; Fehintola, Fatai; Huang, Liusheng; Olson, Alexander; Adedeji, Waheed A.; Darin, Kristin M.; Morse, Gene D.; Robert L Murphy; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Adewole, Isaac F.; Aweeka, Francesca T.; Scarsi, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Coadministration of nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemether-lumefantrine is reported to result in variable changes in lumefantrine exposure. We conducted an intensive pharmacokinetic study with 11 HIV-infected adults who were receiving artemether-lumefantrine plus nevirapine-based ART, and we compared the results with those for 16 HIV-negative adult historical controls. Exposure to artemether and lumefantrine was significantly lower and dihydroartemisinin exposure was unc...

  18. Evaluation of safety and tolerability of antiretroviral therapy in pregnant and non-pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Kamini Tyagi; Veena Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Background: The study was conducted to evaluate safety and tolerability of different components of combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) in pregnant and non-pregnant women and to find out substitute of the drug causing intolerance. Methods: An observational study on 75 pregnant and 125 non pregnant, HIV infected women receiving CART, over a period of 1 year (Jan 2013-Jan 20140 in SRN Hospital affiliated to MLN Medical college, Allahabad. All women were examined clinically and investigated...

  19. Adherence to inhaled therapy, mortality and hospital admission in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Anderson, J A; Calverley, P M A;

    2009-01-01

    between adherence and mortality remained unchanged and statistically significant after adjusting for other factors related to prognosis (hazard ratio 0.40 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.46), p... adherence and hospital admission remained unchanged and significant in a multivariate analysis (rate ratio 0.58 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.73, p... was more pronounced in patients with good adherence than in those with poor adherence. CONCLUSION: Adherence to inhaled medication is significantly associated with reduced risk of death and admission to hospital due to exacerbations in COPD. Further research is needed to understand these strong...

  20. Masculine attitudes of superiority deter men from accessing antiretroviral therapy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumaini M. Nyamhanga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article presents part of the findings from a larger study that sought to assess the role that gender relations play in influencing equity regarding access and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Review of the literature has indicated that, in Southern and Eastern Africa, fewer men than women have been accessing ART, and the former start using ART late, after HIV has already been allowed to advance. The main causes for this gender gap have not yet been fully explained. Objective: To explore how masculinity norms limit men's access to ART in Dar es Salaam. Design: This article is based on a qualitative study that involved the use of focus group discussions (FGDs. The study employed a stratified purposive sampling technique to recruit respondents. The study also employed a thematic analysis approach. Results: Overall, the study's findings revealed that men's hesitation to visit the care and treatment clinics signifies the superiority norm of masculinity that requires men to avoid displaying weakness. Since men are the heads of families and have higher social status, they reported feeling embarrassed at having to visit the care and treatment clinics. Specifically, male respondents indicated that going to a care and treatment clinic may raise suspicion about their status of living with HIV, which in turn may compromise their leadership position and cause family instability. Because of this tendency towards ‘hiding’, the few men who register at the public care and treatment clinics do so late, when HIV-related signs and symptoms are already far advanced. Conclusion: This study suggests that the superiority norm of masculinity affects men's access to ART. Societal expectations of a ‘real man’ to be fearless, resilient, and emotionally stable are in direct conflict with expectations of the treatment programme that one has to demonstrate health-promoting behaviour, such as promptness in attending the care and treatment

  1. Patients’ willingness to take separate component antiretroviral therapy regimens for HIV in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Engelhard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The costs of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART consisting of separate, particularly generic, components are generally much lower than of a single tablet regimen (STR including the same active ingredients. Our aim was to evaluate whether patients in care in the Netherlands would be willing to take separate component regimens (SCR instead of an STR and to examine whether willingness was associated with particular patient characteristics. Materials and Methods: Data from the HIV Monitoring Foundation of all adult HIV-1-infected patients in care taking cART>6 months were used to randomly select 1000 patients. As part of a questionnaire developed for a study assessing patient experience, patients were asked whether they were willing to take an SCR instead of an STR. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between age, gender, region of origin, mode of HIV transmission, socioeconomic status, duration of cART and answering “yes” to the question versus “maybe” or “no.” Variables with p<0.1 in the univariate analysis were entered in a multivariate model. Results: Of the 300 patients who completed the questionnaire, 49% answered “yes,” 24% “maybe” and 27% “no” to the question whether they would be willing to use a SCR. Reasons for answering “no” included difficulties swallowing pills, convenience of STR (especially when travelling/at work, and concerns about side effects. Respondents who answered “maybe” often indicated that they preferred STRs, emphasized the importance of taking the pills once daily, and pointed out that efficacy/safety of an SCR should not be less. Having to pay for medication was reported as a reason to consider switching to an SCR. In the multivariate analysis, respondents who were born outside the Netherlands were less likely; and those with cART use ≥15 yrs were more likely to answer “yes” (Table 1. Conclusions: Half of the respondents were willing to take SCRs

  2. Disengagement of HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women from antiretroviral therapy services: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsin Phillips

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent international guidelines call for expanded access to triple-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive women during pregnancy and postpartum. However, high levels of non-adherence and/or disengagement from care may attenuate the benefits of ART for HIV transmission and maternal health. We examined the frequency and predictors of disengagement from care among women initiating ART during pregnancy in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: We used routine medical records to follow-up pregnant women initiating ART within prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services in Cape Town, South Africa. Outcomes assessed through six months postpartum were (1 disengagement (no attendance within 56 days of a scheduled visit and (2 missed visits (returning to care 14–56 days late for a scheduled visit. Results: A total of 358 women (median age, 28 years; median gestational age, 26 weeks initiated ART during pregnancy. By six months postpartum, 24% of women (n=86 had missed at least one visit and an additional 32% (n=115 had disengaged from care; together, 49% of women had either missed a visit or had disengaged by six months postpartum. Disengagement was more than twice as frequent postpartum compared to in the antenatal period (6.2 vs. 2.4 per 100 woman-months, respectively; p<0.0001. In a proportional hazards model, later gestational age at initiation (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.00–1.07; p=0.030 and being newly diagnosed with HIV (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.07–2.33; p=0.022 were significant predictors of disengagement after adjusting for patient age, starting CD4 cell count and site of ART initiation. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that missed visits and disengagement from care occur frequently, particularly post-delivery, among HIV-positive women initiating ART during pregnancy. Women who are newly diagnosed with HIV may be particularly vulnerable and there is an urgent need for interventions both to promote retention

  3. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  4. Fixed-dose combination for adults accessing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA HIV Clinicians Society

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This document serves to guide clinicians and programme managers on how to switch from 3 separate antiretroviral (ARV drugs to the new, single, fixed-dose combination (FDC tablet containing tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabine (FTC and efavirenz (EFV. Summary Transitioning from individual drugs to an FDC tablet needs to be managed carefully, particularly regarding stock management, ordering processes, supply-chain integrity and comprehensive patient counselling. Priority groups • Initially, FDC supply will be insufficient to provide for all FDC-suitable patients • Therefore, the National Department of Health (NDoH has recommended that the following patient groups be prioritized for FDC initiation/switch: • Priority group 1: All HIV-positive patients newly initiating ART – adults, adolescents and pregnant women (regardless of CD4 count (amendment to the guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT anticipated in April 2013 – and who do not have contra-indications to the FDC component drugs • Priority group 2: HIV-positive pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers currently stable on lamivudine (3TC, TDF and EFV • Priority group 3: Virologically suppressed patients on a stavudine (d4T-based regimen and who have normal renal function • Priority group 4: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have tuberculosis (TB co-infection • Priority group 5: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have other co-morbidites (e.g. hypertension, diabetes • Priority group 6: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who request to switch to the FDC treatment • Priority group 7: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who, after counselling, agree to switch to the FDC treatment. Important: Clinic staff must co-ordinate this process and only switch as many patients to the FDC tablet as stock allows. This should avoid patients being switched back and forth

  5. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Grubb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART, and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Discussion: Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Conclusions: Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including

  6. Optimizing Antiretroviral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with HIV Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.Y. Rakhmanina (Natella)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHIV infection became a newly recognized disease in the mid 1980s. High morbidity and mortality associated with it prompted the urgent development of new therapeutic agents and combination therapies. Throughout the next 20 years the hopes for cure have risen and fallen, and the vaccine re

  7. Nutritional and metabolic assessment of HIV patients in use of antiretroviral therapy at Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Aguiar Braga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate nutritional and metabolic changes in HIV infected (HIV+ patients on use of antiretroviral therapy. Methods:  A cross-sectional descriptive study involving HIV+ patients on use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. The demographic data studied were gender, birth date and time of use of antiretroviral medication. Anthropometric variables were weight and height with calculation of body mass index (BMI. Biochemical data were lipid profile, blood glucose, renal function, albumin, uric acid, oxalacetic and pyruvic transaminases and red blood cells count. Results: The study population comprised 70 patients, 36 (51.4% men and 34 (48.6% women with an average time of HAART-use of 34.5 + 16.5 months. We observed a prevalence of 42 (60% healthy weight for BMI, changes in lipid profile and reduction of lean mass in 18 (50% men and increased abdominal obesity in 23 (67.7% women. Conclusion: The studied subjects in use of HAART showed to have loss of subcutaneous fat, lipid changes and higher prevalence of abdominal obesity in women.

  8. The spectrum of kidney disease in patients with AIDS in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Katz-Malamed, Rebecca; Wei, Catherine; Klotman, Mary E.; Klotman, Paul E.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2009-01-01

    With prolonged survival and aging of the HIV-infected population in the era of antiretroviral therapy, biopsy series have found a broad spectrum of HIV-related and co-morbid kidney disease in these patients. Our study describes the variety of renal pathology found in a prospective cohort of antiretroviral-experienced patients (the Manhattan HIV Brain Bank) who had consented to postmortem organ donation. Nearly one-third of 89 kidney tissue donors had chronic kidney disease, and evidence of some renal pathology was found in 75. The most common diagnoses were arterionephrosclerosis, HIV-associated nephropathy and glomerulonephritis. Other diagnoses included pyelonephritis, interstitial nephritis, diabetic nephropathy, fungal infection and amyloidosis. Excluding 2 instances of acute tubular necrosis, slightly over one-third of the cases would have been predicted using current diagnostic criteria for chronic kidney disease. Based on semi-quantitative analysis of stored specimens, pre-mortem microalbuminuria testing could have identified an additional 12 cases. Future studies are needed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of more sensitive methods for defining chronic kidney disease, in order to identify HIV-infected patients with early kidney disease who may benefit from antiretroviral therapy and other interventions known to delay disease progression and prevent complications. PMID:19052538

  9. Socioeconomic status and survival of persons with AIDS before and after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Lazio AIDS Surveillance Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapiti, E; Porta, D; Forastiere, F; Fusco, D; Perucci, C A

    2000-09-01

    We estimated the AIDS survival by neighborhood socioeconomic status before (1993-1995) and after (1996-1997) the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in Rome, Italy, in a retrospective cohort of persons with AIDS followed through July 31, 1998. Participants included 1,474 persons with AIDS residing in Rome who were diagnosed in 1993-1997. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) of death for two diagnostic periods (before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy was introduced) by neighborhood socioeconomic status categorized into four levels (level I = highest socioeconomic status), using the Cox model and adjusting for gender, age, intravenous drug use, CD4 cell count at diagnosis, AIDS-defining disease, and hospital of diagnosis. Thirty-four per cent of persons with AIDS (N = 503) had survived as of mid-1998. For persons with AIDS diagnosed in 1993-1995, we found little difference in the risk of death by neighborhood socioeconomic status. For 1996-1997, the risk of death was greater for persons with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status, especially for levels III and IV [HR = 2.81 (95% confidence interval = 1.38-5.76), and HR = 2.55 (95% confidence interval = 1.27-5.14), respectively, compared with level I]. Stratified analyses showed that the greatest difference was found for women and drug users. In conclusion, even in a country with universal health coverage that provides therapy at no cost, differences in survival of persons with AIDS have emerged by neighborhood socioeconomic status since highly active antiretroviral therapy was introduced. Inequalities in health-care access or in medical management, or poor adherence to treatment, could explain the observed heterogeneity.

  10. Long-term exposure to combination antiretroviral therapy and risk of death from specific causes: no evidence for any previously unidentified increased risk due to antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda;

    2012-01-01

    . In the first two years on cART the risk of non-AIDS death was significantly lower, but no significant difference in the rate of non-AIDS-related deaths between 2-3.99 years and longer exposure to cART was observed. CONCLUSIONS:: In conclusion, we found no evidence of an increased risk of both all......BACKGROUND:: Despite the known substantial benefits of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), cumulative adverse effects could still limit the overall long-term treatment benefit. Therefore we investigated changes in the rate of death with increasing exposure to cART. METHODS:: 12069 patients...... exposure to cART (=3 antiretrovirals): 8 years. Duration of cART exposure was the cumulative time actually receiving cART. Poisson regression models were fitted for each cause of death separately. RESULTS:: 1297 patients died during 70613 PYFU (IR 18.3 per 1000 PYFU, 95%CI: 17.4-19.4), 413 due to AIDS (5...

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek; Laila M Sherif; Naglaa Mohamed Kamal; Gharib, Amal F.; H M Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening....

  12. HIV-1 subtypes and response to combination antiretroviral therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, WP; Ruiz, L; Loveday, C;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may vary in ability to suppress viral load and increase CD4+ T-cell count in people infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, possibly due to differences in resistance development. Antiretroviral drugs have predominantly been developed in Western......, observational cohort with 11,928 HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Response to cART was analysed in patients with subtypes determined pre-cART, via multivariable logistic regression on the first measurements 6–12 months after starting cART. A virological response was defined as a viral load ...-B-infected patients (P=0.334). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in odds of an immunological response (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.73–1.87, P=0.524). CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of significant differences in virological or immunological response to cART between patients infected with HIV-1 B...

  13. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Janne; Obel, Niels; Gill, Michael John; Crane, Heidi; Boesecke, Christoph; Samji, Hasina; Grabar, Sophie; Cazanave, Charles; Cavassini, Matthias; Shepherd, Leah; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smit, Colette; Saag, Michael; Lampe, Fiona; Hernando, Vicky; Montero, Marta; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy; Miro, Jose; Ingle, Suzanne; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996–1999 and survived for more than ten years. Methods We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA. Results During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5%) patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified) were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years. Conclusions Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes. PMID:27525413

  14. An investigation into frequency and reasons why patients switch antiretroviral therapy and which antiretrovirals are commonly implicated in toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study Previous investigation into antiretroviral (ARV therapy switches in our HIV cohort suggested an annual switch rate of 20% in 2006 with 60% of switches being secondary to toxicity [1]. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this switch rate has changed in recent years, determine reasons why patients change regimens, and identify which ARVs are most likely to be switched for toxicity concerns. Methods The electronic patient database was reviewed to identify all patients within our HIV cohort who switched ARV therapy between 1st December 2009 and 31st May 2011. Details of which ARVs were switched and the reasons why were recorded. Any switches due to toxicity were investigated further to identify the actual or perceived adverse effect. Summary of results Nine hundred and twenty-three regimens were switched over 18 months affecting 12% (n = 722 of patients on treatment during this time. The most common reason for switching medication was due to toxicity, occurring in 452 (49% cases. Other reasons included simplification (15%, clinical trials (8%, virological failure (8% and drug interactions (4%. The remaining 16% switched for various reasons including pregnancy and co-morbidities. Of 452 switches for toxicity (or perceived toxicity, 122 (27% were due to CNS side effects (89 out of a total of 122 were related to efavirenz, 64 (14% gastrointestinal disturbances (38/64 related to protease inhibitors, 54 (12% actual/perceived cardiovascular risk (21/54 related to abacavir and 21/54 related to saquinavir, 54 (12% hepatotoxicity (21/54 related to atazanavir and 14/54 related to efavirenz, 42 (9% metabolic concerns (24/42 related to protease inhibitors and 38 (8% renal toxicity (28/38 related to tenofovir. Other toxicities accounted for 78 (18% switches. An observed toxicity switch rate (OTSR per 1000 patient years (95% CI was calculated for each ARV. Conclusions 12% of patients switched therapy in 18 months, predicting

  15. Hypertriglyceridemia, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Infected Patients: Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy and Adipose Tissue Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    van Wijk, Jeroen P. H.; Manuel Castro Cabezas

    2011-01-01

    The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART) in HIV-infected patients has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, mortality due to non-AIDS conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD) seems to increase in this population. CART has been associated with several metabolic risk factors, including insulin resistance, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and postprandial hyperlipidemia. In addition, HIV itself, as well as specific antiretroviral age...

  16. The Framing and Fashioning of Therapeutic Citizenship Among People Living With HIV Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steve; Namukwaya, Stella; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine how people living with HIV (PLWH) were able to reconceptualize or “reframe” their understanding of HIV and enhance their capacity to self-manage the condition. Two in-depth interviews were held with 38 PLWH (20 women, 18 men) selected from three government and nongovernment antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery sites in Wakiso District, and the narratives analyzed. ART providers played an important role in shaping participants’ HIV self-management processes. Health workers helped PLWH realize that they could control their condition, provided useful concepts and language for emotional coping, and gave advice about practical self-management tasks, although this could not always be put into practice. ART providers in this setting were spaces for the development of a collective identity and a particular form of therapeutic citizenship that encouraged self-management, including adherence to ART. Positive framing institutions are important for many PLWH in resource-limited settings and the success of ART programs. PMID:26246523

  17. The Framing and Fashioning of Therapeutic Citizenship Among People Living With HIV Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steve; Namukwaya, Stella; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we examine how people living with HIV (PLWH) were able to reconceptualize or "reframe" their understanding of HIV and enhance their capacity to self-manage the condition. Two in-depth interviews were held with 38 PLWH (20 women, 18 men) selected from three government and nongovernment antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery sites in Wakiso District, and the narratives analyzed. ART providers played an important role in shaping participants' HIV self-management processes. Health workers helped PLWH realize that they could control their condition, provided useful concepts and language for emotional coping, and gave advice about practical self-management tasks, although this could not always be put into practice. ART providers in this setting were spaces for the development of a collective identity and a particular form of therapeutic citizenship that encouraged self-management, including adherence to ART. Positive framing institutions are important for many PLWH in resource-limited settings and the success of ART programs. PMID:26246523

  18. The Effect Evaluation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy to Patients with AIDS in Hubei Province of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua LI; Yihua XU; Shaofa NIE; Hao XIANG; Chongjian WANG

    2009-01-01

    The effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to patients with AIDS in Hubei province of China were investigated in order to provide scientific evidence to reinforce the management of HAART. Self-made questionnaires and descriptive method of epidemiology were used to collect and describe the changes of clinical symptoms, HIV RNA concentration, and immune function of patients with AIDS. After HAART, the effective rate of fever, cough, diarrhea, lymphadenectasis, weight loss,tetter, debility and fungous infection was 92.4%, 90.85%, 92.91%, 90.73%, 93.69%, 89.04%, 92.34%,and 83.1%, respectively. Of 117 patients with detected HIV RNA concentration, 41.03% had declined over 0.5 log, and 52.99% less than 0.5 log. CD4+T cell count was obviously increased: the average number after HAART for 3 or 6 months was 237/μL (26-755/μL) and 239/μL (17-833/μL), respectively.HAART can improve AIDS patients' clinical symptoms, reduce HIV RNA concentration, and maintain immune function. It is very important for the effectiveness of HAART to raise clinical adherence of pa-tients with AIDS and have a persistent surveillance.

  19. Factors Supporting and Inhibiting Adherence to HIV Medication Regimen in Women: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Fagbami, Oluwakemi; Oluwasanjo, Adetokunbo; Fitzpatrick, Carrie; Fairchild, Rebecca; Shin, Ann; Donato, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy reduces morbidity and mortality; however rates of non-adherence are variable among women for unclear reasons. This study was a single-center qualitative analysis of interviews with 18 female HIV-positive non-adherent patients (defined by virologic failure) to explore psychosocial factors impacting adherence. Factors identified were categorized as promoting, inhibiting or having no effect on adherence. Three themes, characterized as social factors, illness f...

  20. Effects of intermittent IL-2 alone or with peri-cycle antiretroviral therapy in early HIV infection: the STALWART study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavel, Jorge A; Babiker, Abdel; Fox, Lawrence;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Study of Aldesleukin with and without antiretroviral therapy (STALWART) evaluated whether intermittent interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or with antiretroviral therapy (ART) around IL-2 cycles increased CD4(+) counts compared to no therapy. METHODOLOGY: Participants not on continuous ART...... with > or = 300 CD4(+) cells/mm(3) were randomized to: no treatment; IL-2 for 5 consecutive days every 8 weeks for 3 cycles; or the same IL-2 regimen with 10 days of ART administered around each IL-2 cycle. CD4(+) counts, HIV RNA, and HIV progression events were collected monthly. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total...

  1. Effects of intermittent IL-2 alone or with peri-cycle antiretroviral therapy in early HIV infection: the STALWART study

    OpenAIRE

    Tavel, Jorge A.; Abdel Babiker; Lawrence Fox; Daniela Gey; Gustavo Lopardo; Norman Markowitz; Nicholas Paton; Deborah Wentworth; Nicole Wyman

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Study of Aldesleukin with and without antiretroviral therapy (STALWART) evaluated whether intermittent interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or with antiretroviral therapy (ART) around IL-2 cycles increased CD4(+) counts compared to no therapy. METHODOLOGY: Participants not on continuous ART with > or = 300 CD4(+) cells/mm(3) were randomized to: no treatment; IL-2 for 5 consecutive days every 8 weeks for 3 cycles; or the same IL-2 regimen with 10 days of ART administered around each IL-2...

  2. The Impact of Comorbid Depression on Adherence to Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tarrants

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Examine the impact of comorbid depression on adherence to disease-modifying therapy (DMT for multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods. A retrospective database was used to identify patients with MS treated with a DMT. Patients with MS and comorbid depression were matched to patients with MS only. Adherence to DMT was proxied by the medication possession ratio (MPR and multivariate regressions were used to examine the association between comorbid depression and adherence to DMT. Results. Patients with comorbid depression had a 10 point lower MPR (P<0.01 and were less likely to achieve a MPR of at least 80% (odds ratio (OR=0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.42–0.74 than those without depression. While treatment with an antidepressant generally had no significant impact on the likelihood of achieving an MPR threshold of 80% (OR=1.32; 95% CI 0.50–3.48, adherence to antidepressant therapy guidelines were associated with improved adherence to DMT therapy. Conclusions. MS patients with comorbid depression were approximately half as likely to be adherent to their DMT relative to patients with MS without depression. Although treatment with antidepressant therapy generally did not improve the likelihood of adherence, treatment with antidepressants for at least 6 months was associated with better adherence to DMT.

  3. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or…

  4. HIV-1 genotypic resistance profile of patients failing antiretroviral therapy in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Virginia Michelon Toledo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has reduced morbidity and mortality related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, but in spite of this advance, HIV mutations decrease antiretroviral susceptibility, thus contributing to treatment failure in patients. Genotyping HIV-1 allows the selection of new drugs after initial drug failure. This study evaluated the genotypic profile of HIV-1 isolates from treated (drug-experienced patients in Paraná, Brazil. The prevalence of mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes were assessed. We analyzed 467 genotypes of patients with HIV-1 viral loads above 1,000 copies/mL. Mutations at HIV-1 RT and PR genes and previously used ART regimens were recorded. The most prevalent RT mutations were: 184V (68.31%, 215YF (51.6%, 103NS (46%, 41L (39.4%, 67N (38.54%, 210W (23.5%, 190ASE (23.2%, and 181C (17.4%. PR mutations were 90M (33.33%, 82ATFS (29%, 46I (26.8% and 54V (22.2%. The prevalence of mutations was in line with previous national and international reports, except to nonnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors related mutations, which were more prevalent in this study. Previous exposure to antiretroviral drugs was associated with genotypic resistance to specific drugs, leading to treatment failure in HIV patients.

  5. Comparison of two once-daily regimens with a regimen consisting of nelfinavir, didanosine, and stavudine in antiretroviral therapy-naive adults : 48-week results from the antiretroviral regimen evaluation study (ARES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, SH; Wensing, AMJ; Hassink, EAM; ten Kate, RW; Richter, C; Schreij, G; Koopmans, PP; Juttmann, J.; van der Tweel, I.; Lange, JMA; Borleffs, JCC

    2005-01-01

    Background: To improve the dosing frequency and pill burden of antiretroviral therapy, we compared two once-daily dosed regimens to a twice-daily dosed regimen. Method: HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral drug-naive adults were randomized to either twice-daily nelfinavir and stavudine and once-daily dida

  6. Comparison of two once-daily regimens with a regimen consisting of nelfinavir, didanosine, and stavudine in antiretroviral therapy-naive adults: 48-week results from the Antiretroviral Regimen Evaluation Study (ARES).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, S.H.; Wensing, B.M.; Hassink, E.A.M.; Kate, R.W. ten; Richter, C.; Schreij, G.; Koopmans, P.P.; Juttmann, J.R.; Tweel, I. van de; Lange, J.M.A.; Borleffs, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve the dosing frequency and pill burden of antiretroviral therapy, we compared two once-daily dosed regimens to a twice-daily dosed regimen. METHOD: HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral drug-naive adults were randomized to either twice-daily nelfinavir and stavudine and once-daily dida

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Individuals: Recent Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achhra, Amit C; Nugent, Melinda; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene; Wyatt, Christina M

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as an important health concern in HIV-positive individuals. Preventing long-term kidney toxicity from an antiretroviral therapy is therefore critical. Selected antiretroviral agents, especially tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and some ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs), have been associated with increased risk of CKD. However, the CKD risk attributable to these agents is overall small, especially in those with low baseline risk of CKD and normal renal function. CKD risk in HIV-positive individuals can be further minimized by timely identification of those with worsening renal function and discontinuation of potentially nephrotoxic agents. Clinicians can use several monitoring tools, including the D:A:D risk score and routine measurements of estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) and proteinuria, to identify high-risk individuals who may require an intervention. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a TDF alternative, promises to be safer in terms of TDF-associated kidney and bone toxicity. While the short-term data on TAF does indicate lower eGFR decline and lower risk of proteinuria (vs. TDF), long-term data on renal safety of TAF are still awaited. Promising results have also emerged from recent trials on alternative dual-therapy antiretroviral regimens which exclude the nucleoside(tide) reverse transcriptase class as well as possibly the PI/rs, thereby reducing the drug burden, and possibly the toxicity. However, long-term safety or benefits of these dual-therapy regimens are still unclear and will need to be studied in future prospective studies. Finally, addressing risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes will continue to be important in this population. PMID:27130284

  8. Non-adherence to drug therapy and drug acquisition costs in a national population - a patient-based register study

    OpenAIRE

    Hovstadius Bo; Petersson Göran

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to drug therapy is a major problem for society as it is associated with reduced health outcomes. Generally, approximately only 50% of patients with chronic disease in developed countries adhere to prescribed therapy, and the most common non-adherence refers to chronic under-use, i.e. patients use less medication than prescribed or prematurely stop the therapy. Patients' non-adherence leads to high additional costs for society in terms of poor health...

  9. Optimizing the benefit of multiple sclerosis therapy: the importance of treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Patti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Francesco PattiDepartment of Neurology, University of Catania, Catania, ItalyAbstract: Poor treatment adherence is problematic in many therapy areas, including multiple sclerosis (MS. Several immunomodulatory drugs are available for the treatment of MS, all of which require frequent parenteral administration. Current first-line therapies are two formulations of interferon (IFN beta-1a, one of IFN beta-1b, and one of glatiramer acetate. Discontinuation of treatment is common, particularly in the first few months after initiation. Although the true effect of poor adherence to MS therapy is not known, it is likely to lead to a fall in treatment efficacy. Many factors influence a patient’s adherence to treatment, including the patient’s MS subtype and disability level, cognitive impairment resulting from MS, perceived lack of efficacy of the prescribed medication, and adverse events associated with MS therapy. This article summarizes the barriers to adherence to MS therapies, and discusses patient management strategies that can be employed to encourage adherence. Future advances in the field of MS treatment will be explored, including the development of orally administered drugs, which may enhance adherence.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, adherence, compliance, interruption, adverse events, efficacy, tolerability, management

  10. Promoting adherence to nebulized therapy in cystic fibrosis: poster development and a qualitative exploration of adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Jones,1 Nathan Babiker,2 Emma Gardner,2,3 Jane Royle,2 Rachael Curley,3,4 Zhe Hui Hoo,3,4 Martin J Wildman3,4 1Psychology Department, University of Sheffield, 2Psychological Services, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 3Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Northern General Hospital, 4School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF health care professionals recognize the need to motivate people with CF to adhere to nebulizer treatments, yet little is known about how best to achieve this. We aimed to produce motivational posters to support nebulizer adherence by using social marketing involving people with CF in the development of those posters. Methods: The Sheffield CF multidisciplinary team produced preliminary ideas that were elaborated upon with semi-structured interviews among people with CF to explore barriers and facilitators to the use of nebulized therapy. Initial themes and poster designs were refined using an online focus group to finalize the poster designs. Results: People with CF preferred aspirational posters describing what could be achieved through adherence in contrast to posters that highlighted the adverse consequences of nonadherence. A total of 14 posters were produced through this process. Conclusion: People with CF can be engaged to develop promotional material to support adherence, providing a unique perspective differing from that of the CF multidisciplinary team. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these posters to support nebulizer adherence. Keywords: behavior change, social marketing, patient participation, nebulizers, medication adherence

  11. Clinical pharmacist interventions to support adherence to thrombopreventive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla

    individualised interventions and team-based care, e.g. integrating a clinical pharmacist with particular focus on patients’ drug-related problems. One approach with growing evidence of improving medication adherence is motivational interviewing (MI). So far, no clinical pharmacist intervention using MI has......-based patient interview and three follow-up telephone calls. There was no difference in the primary outcome, the composite medication possession ratio (MPR) for antiplatelets, anticoagulants and statins during the year after hospitalisation, as assessed by analysing prescription refill records. At 12 months...... to the one in the first study, except that the patient interview was more structured using the Drug Adherence Work-up (DRAW) tool and an adherence questionnaire for identifying potential adherence and lifestyle-related problems. At 12 months, 20.3% of the patients in the intervention group (N=231) were non...

  12. Associations between HIV Antiretroviral Therapy and the Prevalence and Incidence of Pregnancy in Rakai, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Makumbi, Fredrick E; Gertrude Nakigozi; Reynolds, Steven J.; Anthony Ndyanabo; Tom Lutalo; David Serwada; Fred Nalugoda; Maria Wawer; Ron Gray

    2011-01-01

    Background. Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may be associated with higher pregnancy rates. Methods. The prevalence and incidence of pregnancy was assessed in 712 HIV+ pre-ART women of reproductive age (WRA) (15–45) and 244 HIV+ WRA initiating ART. Prevalence rate ratios (PRR), incidence rate ratios (IRR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were assessed. Results. The incidence of pregnancy was 13.1/100 py among women in pre-ART care compared to 24.6/100 py among women on ART (IRR = 0.54; 95...

  13. Polyacrylamide Gel Treatment of Antiretroviral Therapy-induced Facial Lipoatrophy in HIV Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansor, Samreen; Breiting, Vibeke Bro; Dahlstrøm, Karin;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today, highly active antiretroviral therapy is lifesaving for most HIV-infected patients, but the treatment can result in facial lipoatrophy, which changes the face so radically that patients may develop severe psychological and social problems. Since 2001 polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) has...... been used successfully in HIV patients abroad. This article describes the results of a Danish study. METHODS: Forty HIV patients recruited from two major referral hospitals in the capitol area of Copenhagen, Denmark, each received a series of PAAG gel injections (small deposits in several sessions...

  14. Further research needed to support a policy of antiretroviral therapy as an HIV prevention initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodger, Alison J; Bruun, Tina; Vernazza, Pietro;

    2013-01-01

    The results from the HPTN 052 trial have increased the focus on use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of HIV transmission; however, condom use also effectively prevents HIV transmission. Studies in heterosexual serodiscordant couples with viral suppression have so far only reported...... follow-up data for 330 couple-years when condoms were not being used. Data are even more limited for anal sex in men who have sex with men. Additional data on the effectiveness of ART as prevention when practicing condom-less sex is urgently needed....

  15. AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash Vishnu; Aboulafia, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In economically developed countries, AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL) accounts for a large proportion of malignances in HIV-infected individuals. Since the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, epidemiology and prognosis of ARL have changed. While there is a slight increase in the incidence of Hodgkin’s lymphoma in HIV-infected individuals, use of HAART has contributed to a decline in the incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and also a decrease in the overall ...

  16. Artemether-Lumefantrine Exposure in HIV-Infected Nigerian Subjects on Nevirapine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sunil; Fehintola, Fatai; Huang, Liusheng; Olson, Alexander; Adedeji, Waheed A; Darin, Kristin M; Morse, Gene D; Murphy, Robert L; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Adewole, Isaac F; Aweeka, Francesca T; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2015-12-01

    Coadministration of nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemether-lumefantrine is reported to result in variable changes in lumefantrine exposure. We conducted an intensive pharmacokinetic study with 11 HIV-infected adults who were receiving artemether-lumefantrine plus nevirapine-based ART, and we compared the results with those for 16 HIV-negative adult historical controls. Exposure to artemether and lumefantrine was significantly lower and dihydroartemisinin exposure was unchanged in subjects receiving nevirapine-based ART, compared with controls. Nevirapine exposure was unchanged before and after artemether-lumefantrine administration. PMID:26392500

  17. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina;

    2002-01-01

    maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...... identified: 162 for CMV disease, 103 for MAC infection, 75 for toxoplasmosis, and 39 for cryptococcosis. During 781 person-years of follow-up, five patients had relapse. Two relapses (one of CMV disease and one of MAC infection) were diagnosed after maintenance therapy was interrupted when the CD4 lymphocyte....... One relapse (toxoplasmosis) was diagnosed after maintenance therapy interruption at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 200 x 10(6) cells/L for 15 months. The overall incidences of recurrent CMV disease, MAC infection, toxoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis were 0.54 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 0.07 to 1...

  18. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all heterosex......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all...... counts (adjusted p=0.21). We observed no delay in time to initiation of HAART in women compared to men (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). There were no gender differences in risk of treatment modification of the original HAART regimen during the first year of therapy for either toxicity (IRR 0.97 95% CI 0.......66-1.44) or other/unknown reasons (IRR 1.18 95% CI 0.76-1.82). Finally, CD4 counts and the risk of having a detectable viral load at 1, 3 and 6 years did not differ between genders. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting with free access to healthcare and HAART, gender does neither affect time from eligibility to HAART...

  19. Modelling Hepatotoxicity of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Liver during HIV Monoinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasifa Nampala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver related complications are currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected individuals. In HIV monoinfected individuals on therapy, liver injury has been associated with the use of antiretroviral agents as most of them exhibit some degree of toxicity. In this study we proposed a mathematical model with the aim of investigating hepatotoxicity of combinational therapy of antiretroviral drugs. Therapy efficacy and toxicity were incorporated in the model as dose-response functions. With the parameter values used in the study, protease inhibitors-based regimens were found to be more toxic than nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based regimens. In both regimens, the combination of stavudine and zidovudine was the most toxic baseline nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors followed by didanosine with stavudine. However, the least toxic combinations were zidovudine and lamivudine followed by didanosine and lamivudine. The study proposed that, under the same second line regimens, the most toxic first line combination gives the highest viral load and vice versa.

  20. Nutritional and metabolic assessment of HIV patients in use of antiretroviral therapy at Northeastern Brazil - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2010.p368

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Aguiar Braga; Carlos Antonio Bruno da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate nutritional and metabolic changes in HIV infected (HIV+) patients on use of antiretroviral therapy. Methods:  A cross-sectional descriptive study involving HIV+ patients on use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). The demographic data studied were gender, birth date and time of use of antiretroviral medication. Anthropometric variables were weight and height with calculation of body mass index (BMI). Biochemical data were lipid profile, blood glucose, renal ...

  1. Determinants of highly active antiretroviral therapy duration in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Madrid, Spain, from 1996 to 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palladino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the duration of sequential HAART regimens and predictors of first-line regimen discontinuation among HIV-1 vertically infected children and adolescents. DESIGN: Multicentre survey of antiretroviral-naïve patients enrolled in the HIV-Paediatric Cohor,t CoRISpeS-Madrid Cohort, Spain. METHODS: Patients with a follow-up of ≥ 1 month spent on HAART, with available baseline CD4 count and HIV-viral load (VL were included. Time spent on sequential HAART regimens was estimated and multivariable regression was used to identify predictors of time to first-line regimen discontinuation. RESULTS: 104 patients were followed for a median 8 years after starting HAART among 1996-2012; baseline %CD4 was 21.5 (12.3-34.0and viral load was 5.1 (4.6-5.6 log10 copies/mL. Patients received a mean of 1.9 regimens. Median time on first-line HAART (n = 104 was 64.5 months; second HAART (n = 56 69.8 months; and third HAART (n = 21 66.5 months. Eleven (11% patients were lost to follow-up while on first-line HAART and 54% discontinued (cumulative incidence of 16% and 38% by 1 and 3-year, respectively. The main predictor of first-line regimen discontinuation was suboptimal adherence to antiretrovirals (AHR: 2.60; 95% CI: 1.44-4.70. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to therapy was the main determinant of the duration of the first-line HAART regimen in children. It is important to identify patients at high risk for non-adherence, such as very young children and adolescents, in provide special care and support to those patients.

  2. Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Serum Selenium Concentrations Predict WHO Stages 3, 4 or Death but not Virologic Failure Post-Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Shivakoti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS, was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (<85 μg/L pre-ART and its association with outcomes were examined. Median serum selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR: 57.28–99.89 and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86–95.10 μg/L of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR: 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.30–9.42 of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium.

  3. History of viral suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy as a predictor of virological failure after a treatment change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; Ledergerber, B;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: HIV-infected persons experience different patterns of viral suppression after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The relationship between such differences and risk of virological failure after starting a new antiretroviral could help with patient monitoring strategies....... METHODS: A total of 1827 patients on cART starting at least one new antiretroviral from 1 January 2000 while maintaining a suppressed viral load were included in the analysis. Poisson regression analysis identified factors predictive of virological failure after baseline in addition to traditional...... demographic variables. Baseline was defined as the date of starting new antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Four hundred and fifty-one patients (24.7%) experienced virological failure, with an incidence rate (IR) of 7.3 per 100 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.7-8.0]. After adjustment...

  4. Evaluation of adherence to therapy in patients of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Sontakke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate adherence to medication and study factors associated with non-adherence in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire based study was conducted in Nephrology department of a super specialty hospital. Patients above 18 years of age, suffering from CKD from six months or more were interviewed using self-designed, semi-structured questionnaire to get information about adherence to medication, diet restriction and lifestyle modification (n = 150. Morisky medication adherence questionnaire was used to calculate overall adherence. In this higher score indicates poor adherence. Main outcome measures included prevalence of non-adherence and factors associated with the same. Results: Average number of medicines taken by each patient was 8.0+1.612 (mean+SD per day. Non-adherence to medication schedule was reported in 34% patients. Common causes of non-adherence were high cost (21.3%, complex dosing schedule (20%, fear of adverse effects (16%. Sixty-eight% patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine. Sixteen% stopped taking medicines due to high cost. Forty-two% suggested that government should adopt measures to provide free medicines to poor patients. In Morisky medication adherence questionnaire high, medium and low adherence was reported in 7.3%, 55.3% and 37.3% of patients, respectively. Moderately positive correlation was observed between poor adherence and number of concurrent illnesses and number of medicines taken. Conclusion: Since majority of patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine, creating awareness about the same is essential for improving adherence to therapy. Measures to provide free medicines to non-affording patients need to be implemented since high cost was other major cause of non-adherence.

  5. Adherence to Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention: A Substudy Cohort within a Clinical Trial of Serodiscordant Couples in East Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Haberer, Jessica E.; Baeten, Jared M; Campbell, James; Wangisi, Jonathan; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A.; Ware, Norma C.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Donnell, Deborah; Krows, Meighan; Kidoguchi, Lara; Celum, Connie

    2013-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Every year, about 2.5 million people (mostly living in sub-Saharan Africa) become infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. HIV, which is usually transmitted through unprotected sex with an HIV-infected partner, destroys immune system cells, leaving infected individuals susceptible to other infections. There is no cure for AIDS, although antiretroviral drugs can hold HIV in check, and there is no vaccine against HIV infection. Individuals can reduce their risk...

  6. Cholelithiasis and Nephrolithiasis in HIV-Positive Patients in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Yin Lin

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis among HIV-positive patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of HIV-positive patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography for chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver, or elevated aminotransferases between January 2004 and January 2015. Therapeutic drug monitoring of plasma concentrations of atazanavir was performed and genetic polymorphisms, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 1A1*28 and multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 G2677T/A, were determined in a subgroup of patients who received ritonavir-boosted or unboosted atazanavir-containing combination antiretroviral therapy. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and laboratory testing were collected and analyzed.During the 11-year study period, 910 patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography were included for analysis. The patients were mostly male (96.9% with a mean age of 42.2 years and mean body-mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 and 85.8% being on antiretroviral therapy. The anchor antiretroviral agents included non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (49.3%, unboosted atazanavir (34.4%, ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (20.4%, and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (5.5%. The overall prevalence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 12.5% and 8.2%, respectively. Among 680 antiretroviral-experienced patients with both baseline and follow-up sonography, the crude incidence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the independent factors associated with incident cholelithiasis were exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir for >2 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-35.16 and older age (AOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.09. The positive association between duration of exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir and incident

  7. Understanding reasons for treatment interruption amongst patients on antiretroviral therapy – A qualitative study at the Lighthouse Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Tabatabai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in resource-limited settings moved impressively towards universal access. Along with these achievements, public health HIV programs are facing a number of challenges including the support of patients on lifelong therapy and the prevention of temporary/permanent loss of patients in care. Understanding reasons for treatment interruption (TI can inform strategies for improving drug adherence and retention in care. Objective: To evaluate key characteristics of patients resuming ART after TI at the Lighthouse Clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, and to identify their reasons for interrupting ART. Design: This study uses a mixed methods design to evaluate patients resuming ART after TI. We analysed an assessment form for patients with TI using pre-defined categories and a comments field to identify frequently stated reasons for TI. Additionally, we conducted 26 in-depth interviews to deepen our understanding of common reasons for TI. In-depth interviews also included the patients’ knowledge about ART and presence of social support systems. Qualitative data analysis was based on a thematic framework approach. Results: A total of 347 patients (58.2% female, average age 35.1±11.3 years with TI were identified. Despite the presence of social support and sufficient knowledge of possible consequences of TI, all patients experienced situations that resulted in TI. Analysis of in-depth interviews led to new and distinct categories for TI. The most common reason for TI was travel (54.5%, n=80/147, which further differentiated into work- or family-related travel. Patients also stated transport costs and health-care-provider-related reasons, which included perceived/enacted discrimination by health care workers. Other drivers of TI were treatment fatigue/forgetfulness, the patients’ health status, adverse drug effects, pregnancy/delivery, religious belief or perceived/enacted stigma. Conclusions

  8. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedidja Hedna

    Full Text Available Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT and elevated blood pressure (BP has been advocated.Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP.A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC≥80%: (1 Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2 adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income, clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement and elevated BP was investigated.Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons < 65 years (Odds Ratio, OR 2.75 [95% CI, 1.18-6.43] and with the lowest income (OR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.01-4.16]. Non-adherence to the full AHT regimen was higher among new users (OR 2.04 [95% CI, 1.32-3.15], persons using specialized healthcare (OR 1.63, [95% CI, 1.14-2.32], and having multiple antihypertensive medications (OR 1.85 [95% CI, 1.25-2.75] and OR 5.22 [95% CI, 3.48-7.83], for 2 and ≥3 antihypertensive medications, respectively. Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication a month prior to healthcare visit was associated with elevated BP.Sociodemographic factors were associated with non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication while clinical factors with non-adherence to the full AHT regimen. These

  9. Adherence and persistence to urate-lowering therapies in the Irish setting

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, Bernie

    2014-11-01

    To identify adherence and persistence levels with urate-lowering therapies using the national administrative pharmacy claim database. This was a retrospective, pharmacy claims-based analysis of dispensed anti-gout medications on the Irish national HSE-PCRS scheme database between January 2008 and December 2012. Adherence is defined by the medication possession ratio (MPR), and patients were considered to be adherent if the MPR ≥80 % (good adherers) in any given time period. Persistence was defined as continued use of therapy with no periods exceeding a refill gap of >63 days (9 weeks). Logistic regression analysis was used to predict odd ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for persistence and adherence in relation to age, gender and level of comorbidity. There was a 53 % increase in the number of patients prescribed anti-gout medications between 2008 and 2012 with an increase of 27 % in the associated ingredient cost of these medications. Allopurinol accounted for 87 % of the prescribing and febuxostat accounted for a further 9 %. In patients who started on 100 mg allopurinol, only 14.6 % were titrated to the 300 mg dose. For all those initiating urate-lowering therapies, 45.8 % of patients were persistent with treatment at 6 months decreasing to 22.6 % at 12 months. In multivariate analysis, females had poorer adherence (OR = 0.83 (0.77-0.90)), and increasing age was associated with increased adherence (OR = 4.19 (2.53-6.15)) Increasing comorbidity score was associated with increased adherence and persistence at 6 months (OR = 0.68 (0.59-0.79)). Adherence with anti-gout medications in this study cohort was relatively low. Sustained treatment for gouty arthritis is essential in the prevention of serious adverse outcomes.Significance and Innovations-Poor adherence to medications prescribed to patients for the management of chronic diseases such as gout is an ongoing problem which urgently needs to be addressed.-Some of the reasons identified

  10. Prevalence, correlates and under-diagnosis of clinical depression among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a Tertiary Health Institution in northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdu Wakawa Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a highly debilitating illness, which is often under-diagnosed and negatively impacts on the quality of life of its sufferers. When it co-exists with other medical conditions, its effect is even more incapacitating. Undiagnosed depression in the context of HIV infection leads to accelerated decline in CD4+ cell counts with concomitant increase in the viral load and poor adherence to the antiretroviral medications which lead to viral mutation and the evolution of resistant strains. This study examined the prevalence of depression, its correlates and the frequency of the diagnosis of the condition among HIV+ subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART by the internists and general physicians at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in Northeastern Nigeria. Three hundred and fifty representative samples of HIV+ adults on HAART were drawn from the Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of the Institution. Diagnosis of depression was made using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria based on Composite International Diagnostic Interview generated data. Socio-demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed for their correlation with depression in the subjects. About 20% of the respondents were diagnosed with clinical depression and no diagnosis of the condition was hitherto entertained in all the respondents. The independent determinants of depression in the participants were: female gender [odds ratio (OR=3.87 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.089-7.183], past history of psychiatric illness [OR=43.81 (95% CI: 9.731-197.30] and family history of psychiatric illness in first-degree relatives of the subjects [OR=14.364 (95% CI=5.327- 38.729]. Depression is a relatively common psychiatric condition among adults on HAART, there is therefore the need for routine screening of this condition among HIV+ subjects in order to optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Short-term clinical disease progression in HIV-1-positive patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy: the EuroSIDA risk-score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Ledergerber, Bruno; Zilmer, Kai;

    2007-01-01

    To derive and validate a clinically applicable prognostic score for predicting short-term disease progression in HIV-infected patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).......To derive and validate a clinically applicable prognostic score for predicting short-term disease progression in HIV-infected patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)....

  12. Incidence and risk factors of HIV-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy: a European multicohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlius, Julia; Schmidlin, Kurt; Costagliola, Dominique;

    2009-01-01

    Incidence and risk factors of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are not well defined in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).......Incidence and risk factors of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are not well defined in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)....

  13. Antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one. PMID:20471318

  14. Antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  15. Changes in inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers: a randomized comparison of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Duprez, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    Among a subgroup of participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Trial that were naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART) or off ART (6 months or longer) at study entry, risk of AIDS and serious non-AIDS events were increased for participants who deferred ART...... compared with those randomized to (re)initiate ART immediately. Our objective was to determine whether ART initiation in this group reduced markers of inflammation and coagulation that have been associated with increased mortality risk in SMART. Changes in these biomarkers have been described after...... stopping ART, but not after starting ART in SMART....

  16. Understanding and mitigating HIV-related resource-based stigma in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kathleen; Winskell, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The perception in low-resource settings that investment of resources in people living with HIV (PLHIV) is wasted because AIDS is both an incurable and deadly disease is known as resource-based stigma. In this paper, we draw on in-depth interviews (IDI), focus group discussions (FGD), and key informant interviews (KII) with 77 HIV-positive microfinance participants and nongovernmental organization leaders to examine resource-based stigma in the context of increased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) at an individual, household, and community level in Côte d'Ivoire. The purpose of this exploratory paper is to examine: (1) resource-based stigmatization in the era of ART and (2) the relationship among microfinance, a poverty-reduction intervention, and HIV stigmatization. The frequency with which resource-based stigma was discussed by respondents suggests that it is an important component of HIV-related stigma in this setting. It affected PLHIV's access to material as well as social resources, leading to economic discrimination and social devaluation. Participation in village savings and loans groups, however, mitigated resource-based HIV stigma, suggesting that in the era of increased access to antiretroviral therapy, economic programs should be considered as one possible HIV stigma-reduction intervention. PMID:23394104

  17. Decline in HIV infectivity following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, Travis C.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Page-Shafer, Kimberly A.; Cheng, Amber; Charlebois, Edwin; Grant, Robert M.; Osmond, Dennis H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the degree to which widespread use of antiretroviral therapy in a community reduces uninfected individuals’ risk of acquiring HIV. We estimated the degree to which the probability of HIV infection from an infected partner (the infectivity) declined following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in San Francisco. Design Homosexual men from the San Francisco Young Men’s Health Study, who were initially uninfected with HIV, were asked about sexual practices, and tested for HIV antibodies at each of four follow-up visits during a 6-year period spanning the advent of widespread use of HAART (1994 to 1999). Methods We estimated the infectivity of HIV (per-partnership probability of transmission from an infected partner) using a probabilistic risk model based on observed incident infections and self-reported sexual risk behavior, and tested the hypothesis that infectivity was the same before and after HAART was introduced. Results A total of 534 homosexual men were evaluated. Decreasing trends in HIV seroincidence were observed despite increases in reported number of unprotected receptive anal intercourse partners. Conservatively assuming a constant prevalence of HIV infection between 1994 and 1999, HIV infectivity decreased from 0.120 prior to widespread use of HAART, to 0.048 after the widespread use of HAART – a decline of 60% (P = 0.028). Conclusions Use of HAART by infected persons in a community appears to reduce their infectiousness and therefore may provide an important HIV prevention tool. PMID:15090833

  18. Discordant Treatment Responses to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Rwanda: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Franke, Molly F.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; Wit, Ferdinand WNM; Rich, Michael L.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Some antiretroviral therapy naïve patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) experience a limited CD4 count rise despite virological suppression, or vice versa. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of discordant treatment responses in a Rwandan cohort. Methods A discordant immunological cART response was defined as an increase of health facilities in two regions in Rwanda. Results Among 382 patients with an undetectable VL at 12 months, 112 (29%) had a CD4 rise of travel to the clinic were independent determinants of an immunological discordant response, but sex, baseline CD4 count, body mass index and WHO HIV clinical stage were not. Among 326 patients with a CD4 rise of ≥100 cells/mm3, 56 (17%) had a detectable viral load at 12 months. Male sex was associated with a virological discordant treatment response (P = 0.05), but age, baseline CD4 count, BMI, WHO HIV clinical stage, and travel time to the clinic were not. Conclusions Discordant treatment responses were common in cART-naïve HIV patients in Rwanda. Small CD4 increases could be misinterpreted as a (virological) treatment failure and lead to unnecessary treatment changes. PMID:27438000

  19. Critical Review: What Dose of Rifabutin Is Recommended With Antiretroviral Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapa, H Manisha; Boffito, Marta; Pozniak, Anton

    2016-06-01

    Since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy to successfully treat HIV infection, drug-drug interactions (DDIs) have become a significant problem as many antiretrovirals (ARVs) are metabolized in the liver. Antituberculous therapy traditionally includes rifamycins, particularly rifampicin. Rifabutin (RBT) has shown similar efficacy as rifampicin but induces CYP3A4 to a lesser degree and is less likely to have DDIs with ARVs. We identified 14 DDI pharmacokinetic studies on HIV monoinfected and HIV-tuberculosis coinfected individuals, and the remaining studies were healthy volunteer studies. Although RBT may be coadministered with most nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, identifying the optimal dose with ritonavir-boosted or cobicistat-boosted protease inhibitors is challenging because of concern about adverse effects with increased RBT exposure. Limited healthy volunteer studies on other ARV drug classes and RBT suggest that dose modification may be unnecessary. The paucity of data assessing clinical tuberculosis endpoints concurrently with RBT and ARV pharmacokinetics limits evidence-based recommendations on the optimal dose of RBT within available ARV drug classes. PMID:26855245

  20. Adherence to HAART : processes explaining adherence behavior in acceptors and non-acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; de Grauwe, Annelies; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore and clarify the underlying processes which lead to (non)-adherence behavior in patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a qualitative study was conducted. Thirty-seven in-depth interviews were held with 30 Caucasian HIV-positive patients. Additional dat

  1. Antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Nguyen Thi Thu; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Mogensen, Hanne Overgaard;

    2011-01-01

    -sectional study using structured questionnaires and CD4 cell count was conducted with 353 HIV-positive women recruited from groups of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), by snowball technique through member of PLWHA groups and the local AIDS management system (Provincial AIDS Center (PAC)). The percentage of HIV...

  2. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  3. Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkanuparph Somnuek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients, the data of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand is still limited. This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected Thai patients from 2007 to 2010. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations were assayed by sequencing a region of HIV-1 pol gene. Surveillance drug resistance mutations recommended by the World Health Organization for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in 2009 were used in all analyses. Primary HIV-1 drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more surveillance drug resistance mutations. Results Of 466 patients with a mean age of 38.8 years, 58.6% were males. Risks of HIV-1 infection included heterosexual (77.7%, homosexual (16.7%, and intravenous drug use (5.6%. Median (IQR CD4 cell count and HIV-1 RNA were 176 (42-317 cells/mm3 and 68,600 (19,515-220,330 copies/mL, respectively. HIV-1 subtypes were CRF01_AE (86.9%, B (8.6 and other recombinants (4.5%. The prevalence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance was 4.9%; most of these (73.9% had surveillance drug resistance mutations to only one class of antiretroviral drugs. The prevalence of patients with NRTI, NNRTI, and PI surveillance drug resistance mutations was 1.9%, 2.8% and 1.7%, respectively. From logistic regression analysis, there was no factor significantly associated with primary HIV-1 drug resistance. There was a trend toward higher prevalence in females [odds ratio 2.18; 95% confidence interval 0.896-5.304; p = 0.086]. Conclusions There is a significant emergence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy. Although HIV-1 genotyping prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation is not routinely recommended in Thailand, our results raise concerns about the

  4. Health service delivery models for the provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Nicholson, Joey;

    2014-01-01

    by this review conclude that nurse management of ART compares favourably to physician management. Seven provide evidence of the viability of managing ART at lower levels within the health system, and one indicates that vertical and integrated ART programmes can achieve similar outcomes. Five articles show......OBJECTIVES: In response to the lack of evidence-based guidance for how to continue scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ways that make optimal use of limited resources, to assess comparative studies of ART service delivery models implemented in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: A systematic...... that community/home-based ART management can be as effective as facility-based ART management. Five of seven articles investigating community support link it to better clinical outcomes. The results of four studies suggest that directly observed therapy may not be an important component of ART programmes...

  5. Antiretroviral therapy optimisation without genotype resistance testing: a perspective on treatment history based models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia C F Prosperi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although genotypic resistance testing (GRT is recommended to guide combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, funding and/or facilities to perform GRT may not be available in low to middle income countries. Since treatment history (TH impacts response to subsequent therapy, we investigated a set of statistical learning models to optimise cART in the absence of GRT information. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The EuResist database was used to extract 8-week and 24-week treatment change episodes (TCE with GRT and additional clinical, demographic and TH information. Random Forest (RF classification was used to predict 8- and 24-week success, defined as undetectable HIV-1 RNA, comparing nested models including (i GRT+TH and (ii TH without GRT, using multiple cross-validation and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. Virological success was achieved in 68.2% and 68.0% of TCE at 8- and 24-weeks (n = 2,831 and 2,579, respectively. RF (i and (ii showed comparable performances, with an average (st.dev. AUC 0.77 (0.031 vs. 0.757 (0.035 at 8-weeks, 0.834 (0.027 vs. 0.821 (0.025 at 24-weeks. Sensitivity analyses, carried out on a data subset that included antiretroviral regimens commonly used in low to middle income countries, confirmed our findings. Training on subtype B and validation on non-B isolates resulted in a decline of performance for models (i and (ii. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment history-based RF prediction models are comparable to GRT-based for classification of virological outcome. These results may be relevant for therapy optimisation in areas where availability of GRT is limited. Further investigations are required in order to account for different demographics, subtypes and different therapy switching strategies.

  6. Predictive Utility of Brief AUDIT for HIV Antiretroviral Medication Nonadherence

    OpenAIRE

    Broyles, Lauren Matukaitis; Gordon, Adam J.; Sereika, Susan M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Erlen, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol use negatively affects adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), thus HIV/AIDS providers need accurate, efficient assessments of alcohol use. Using existing data from an efficacy trial of two cognitive-behavioral ART adherence interventions, we sought to determine if results on two common alcohol screening tests (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test—Consumption (AUDIT-C) and its binge-related question (AUDIT-3)) predict ART nonadherence. Twenty seven percent of the sample (n=308...

  7. Current trends in highly active anti-retroviral therapy in an anti-retroviral therapy centre attached to a remote government medical college of Maharashtra, India: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin S. Rathod

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The prescribing pattern of HAART regimens was in accordance with national guidelines for antiretroviral therapy. We recommend a pharmacovigilance system for sustainable management of ADRs in HIV/AIDS patients as we found under reporting of ADRs. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 1011-1016

  8. Variable Impact on Mortality of AIDS-Defining Events Diagnosed during Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: Not All AIDS-Defining Conditions Are Created Equal Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mocroft; J.A.C. Sterne; M. Egger; M. May; S. Grabar; H. Furrer; C. Sabin; G. Fatkenheuer; A. Justice; P. Reiss; A.d.A. Monforte; J. Gill; R. Hogg; F. Bonnet; M. Kitahata; S. Staszewski; J. Casabona; R. Harris; M. Saag

    2009-01-01

    Background. The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods. We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started co

  9. Preliminary outcomes of a paediatric highly active antiretroviral therapy cohort from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holst Helga L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies address the use of paediatric highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Africa. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study to investigate preliminary outcomes of all children eligible for HAART at Sinikithemba HIV/AIDS clinic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Immunologic, virologic, clinical, mortality, primary caregiver, and psychosocial variables were collected and analyzed. Results From August 31, 2003 until October 31, 2005, 151 children initiated HAART. The median age at HAART initiation was 5.7 years (range 0.3–15.4. Median follow-up time of the cohort after HAART initiation was 8 months (IQR 3.5–13.5. The median change in CD4% from baseline (p 95%adherence. Seventeen patients (11.3% had a regimen change; two (1.3% were due to antiretroviral toxicity. The Kaplan-Meier one year survival estimate was 90.9% (95%confidence interval (CI 84.8–94.6. Thirteen children died during follow-up (8.6%, one changed service provider, and no children were lost to follow-up. All 13 deaths occurred in children with advanced HIV disease within 5 months of treatment initiation. In multivariate analysis of baseline variables against mortality using Cox proportional-hazards model, chronic gastroenteritis was associated with death [hazard ratio (HR, 12.34; 95%CI, 1.27–119.71 and an HIV-positive primary caregiver was found to be protective against mortality [HR, 0.12; 95%CI, 0.02–0.88. Age, orphanhood, baseline CD4%, and hemoglobin were not predicators of mortality in our cohort. Fifty-two percent of the cohort had at least one HIV-positive primary caregiver, and 38.4% had at least one primary caregiver also on HAART at Sinikithemba clinic. Conclusion This report suggests that paediatric HAART can be effective despite the challenges of a resource-limited setting.

  10. Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake,…

  11. Therapist adherence and organizational effects on change in youth behavior problems one year after multisystemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Carter, Rickey E; Chapman, Jason E; Sheidow, Ashli J

    2008-09-01

    The current study investigated the relations among therapist adherence to an evidence-based treatment for youth with serious antisocial behavior (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), organizational climate and structure, and improvement in youth behavior problems one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 therapists across 45 provider organizations in North America. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) results showed therapist adherence predicted improvement in youth behavior. Two structure variables and one climate variable predicted changes in youth behavior, and the climate variable also predicted therapist adherence. No statistical support for formal mediation of organizational effects through adherence was found, though examination of changes in parameter estimates suggest a possible interplay of organizational climate with adherence and youth behavior change.

  12. Adherence to inhaled therapies, health outcomes and costs in patients with asthma and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Mika J; Backer, Vibeke; Hedegaard, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    , adverse effects and medication costs. Age is of particular concern given the increasing prevalence of asthma in the young and increased rates of non-adherence in adolescents compared with children and adults. The correlation between adherence to inhaled pharmacological therapies for asthma and COPD...... and clinical efficacy is positive, with improved symptom control and lung function shown in most studies of adults, adolescents and children. Satisfaction with inhaler devices is also positively correlated with improved adherence and clinical outcomes, and reduced costs. Reductions in healthcare utilisation......Suboptimal adherence to pharmacological treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has adverse effects on disease control and treatment costs. The reasons behind non-adherence revolve around patient knowledge/education, inhaler device convenience and satisfaction, age...

  13. Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragna S Boerma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT efforts has increased, the total number of children being born with HIV has significantly decreased. However, those children who do become infected after PMTCT failure are at particular risk of HIV drug resistance, selected by exposure to maternal or paediatric antiretroviral drugs used before, during or after birth. As a consequence, the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART in these children may be compromised, particularly when non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are used as part of the first-line regimen. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART. Discussion: Children generally respond relatively well to ART. Clinical trials show the superiority of protease inhibitor (PI- over NNRTI-based treatment in young children, but observational reports of NNRTI-containing regimens are usually favourable as well. This is reassuring as national guidelines often still recommend the use of NNRTI-based treatment for PMTCT-unexposed young children, due to the higher costs of PIs. After failure of NNRTI-based, first-line treatment, the rate of acquired drug resistance is high, but HIV may well be suppressed by PIs in second-line ART. By contrast, there are currently no adequate alternatives in resource-limited settings (RLS for children failing either first- or second-line, PI-containing regimens. Conclusions: Affordable salvage treatment options for children in RLS are urgently needed.

  14. Antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alvarez, Mar

    2014-02-01

    One to two million people worldwide are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), with highest prevalences in West African countries, but also present in Western Europe, Asia and North America. Compared to HIV-1, HIV-2 infection undergoes a longer asymptomatic phase and progresses to AIDS more slowly. In addition, HIV-2 shows lower transmission rates, probably due to its lower viremia in infected individuals. There is limited experience in the treatment of HIV-2 infection and several antiretroviral drugs used to fight HIV-1 are not effective against HIV-2. Effective drugs against HIV-2 include nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (e.g. zidovudine, tenofovir, lamivudine, emtricitabine, abacavir, stavudine and didanosine), protease inhibitors (saquinavir, lopinavir and darunavir), and integrase inhibitors (raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir). Maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist blocking coreceptor binding during HIV entry, is active in vitro against CCR5-tropic HIV-2 but more studies are needed to validate its use in therapeutic treatments against HIV-2 infection. HIV-2 strains are naturally resistant to a few antiretroviral drugs developed to suppress HIV-1 propagation such as nonnucleoside RT inhibitors, several protease inhibitors and the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide. Resistance selection in HIV-2 appears to be faster than in HIV-1. In this scenario, the development of novel drugs specific for HIV-2 is an important priority. In this review, we discuss current anti-HIV-2 therapies and mutational pathways leading to drug resistance. PMID:24345729

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of lipodystrophy in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, K; Bickel, T M; Klauke, S; Eisen, J; Vogl, T J; Zangos, S

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated retrospectively an automated method for the separate detection of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the abdominal region by magnetic resonance studies in HIV-positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patients were divided into four different groups: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, mixed and the control group. The use of software for the automated detection of abdominal compartment visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was compared to manual evaluation methods (fuzzy C-mean). The results of ROC analysis showed that the parameters, particularly the VAT, are better than the VAT/TAT and at identifying patients with the symptoms of abdominal fat accumulation. A sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 79.5% resulted from a threshold VAT value of >87 cm(2). Moreover, the manual evaluation method was shown to provide greater values for VAT and the VAT/TAT ratio than those given by the automated method. In the present study, a rapid MRI protocol for the detection and assessment of the course of lipodystrophy was presented and tested on a group of patients with signs of HALS, as well as on an antiretroviral naïve control group.

  16. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in HIV-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Pedersen, C; Cozzi-Lepri, A;

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Within EuroSIDA, a multicenter observational cohort of more than 8500 patients from across Europe, the inc...

  17. Treatment of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in HIV-positive men on tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Bentum, P. van; Telting, D.; Gisolf, J.; Richter, C.; Boer, H. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia and bone disease are common in HIV-positive (HIV+) patients on tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing antiretroviral therapy (TDF-containing ART). The underlying etiology is not completely understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of treatment of calcium and vitami

  18. Changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular risk after a switch to abacavir in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, U S; Kofoed, K; Kronborg, G;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, using a longitudinal design, whether biomarkers of cardiovascular risk change after a switch to an abacavir (ABC)-containing regimen in HIV-1-infected individuals already receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Thirty-five HIV-1-infected individuals...

  19. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for women and children in the WHO European Region 2002-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stengaard, Annemarie Rinder; Lazarus, Jeff; Donoghoe, Martin C;

    2009-01-01

    assessed by comparing the percentage of reported HIV cases with the percentage of HAART recipients in women at the end of 2002 and 2006 and in children at the end of 2004 and 2006. Findings. Overall, the data suggest that there is equivalence of access to antiretroviral therapy by gender and age in Europe...

  20. Estimated average annual rate of change of CD4(+) T-cell counts in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mocroft; A.N. Phillips; B. Ledergerber; C. Smith; J.R. Bogner; K. Lacombe; A. Wiercinska-Drapalo; P. Reiss; O. Kirk; J.D. Lundgren

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) might continue treatment with a virologically failing regimen. We sought to identify annual change in CD4(+) T-cell count according to levels of viraemia in patients on cART. Methods: A total of 111,371 CD4(+) T-cell counts and

  1. Association between diarrhea and quality of life in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tramarin, A; Parise, N; Campostrini, S; Yin, DD; Postma, MJ; Lyu, R; Grisetti, R; Capetti, A; Cattelan, AM; Di Toro, MT; Mastroianni, A; Pignattari, E; Mondardini, [No Value; Calleri, G; Raise, E; Starace, F

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common symptom that many HIV patients experience either as a consequence of HIV infection or of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A multicenter, prospective observational study was conducted in 11 AIDS clinics in Italy to determine the effect of diarrhea on health-related q

  2. Steep declines in population-level AIDS mortality following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Reniers; T. Araya; G. Davey; N. Nagelkerke; Y. Berhane; R. Coutinho; E.J. Sanders

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Assessments of population-level effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in Africa are rare. We use data from burial sites to estimate trends in adult AIDS mortality and the mitigating effects of ART in Addis Ababa. ART has been available since 2003, and for free since 2005. Me

  3. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Hamers; M. Siwale; C.L. Wallis; M. Labib; R. van Hasselt; W.S. Stevens; R. Schuurman; A.M.J. Wensing; M. van Vugt; T.F. Rinke de Wit

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess Af

  4. A clinically prognostic scoring system for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: results from the EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda; Gatell, Jose M;

    2002-01-01

    The risk of clinical progression for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons receiving treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is poorly defined. From an inception cohort of 8457 HIV-infected persons, 2027 patients who started HAART during prospective follow-up wer...

  5. Depleted skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, hyperlactatemia, and decreased oxidative capacity in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Pedersen, Steen B;

    2005-01-01

    hyperlactatemia is associated with depletion of skeletal muscle (sm)-mtDNA and decreased oxidative capacity in HIV-infected patients on NRTI based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and whether HIV infection itself is associated with sm-mtDNA depletion. Sm-mtDNA was determined in 42 HIV...... in part could be mediated through an enhanced pro-inflammatory response....

  6. Low Baseline CD4+ Count Is Associated With Greater Bone Mineral Density Loss After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Philip M.; Kitch, Douglas; McComsey, Grace A; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard; Huang, Jeannie; Riddler, Sharon; Tebas, Pablo; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Collier, Ann C; Brown, Todd T.

    2013-01-01

    Low pretreatment CD4+ cell count is an independent risk factor for bone loss after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, providing further evidence for the benefits of early ART. Initiation of ART at higher CD4+ counts may reduce the burden of osteoporosis and fragility fracture.

  7. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is a marker of dysmetabolism in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kofoed, Kristian;

    2008-01-01

    Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects the immune and pro-inflammatory status of the HIV-infected patient. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses suPAR. Independent of the immune response to HAART, suPAR remains elevated in some HIV-infected...

  8. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Hepatic Fibrosis in HIV-1–Monoinfected Adults With Elevated Aminotransferase Levels on Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, Caryn G.; McLaughlin, Mary; Matthews, Lindsay; Proschan, Michael; Thomas, Francine; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Abu-Asab, Mones; Orenstein, Abigail; Engle, Ronald E.; Hu, Xiaojun; Lempicki, Richard; Hadigan, Colleen; Kleiner, David E.; Heller, Theo; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    In a cohort of HIV-infected adults with chronically elevated liver-associated enzymes on antiretroviral therapy in the absence of viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse, liver biopsy identified clinically significant liver disease, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis, in 65% of participants.

  9. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  10. Guideline-adherent initial intravenous antibiotic therapy for hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated pneumonia is clinically superior, saves lives and is cheaper than non guideline adherent therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke MH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP often occurring as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most frequent hospital infection in intensive care units (ICU. Early adequate antimicrobial therapy is an essential determinant of clinical outcome. Organisations like the German PEG or ATS/IDSA provide guidelines for the initial calculated treatment in the absence of pathogen identification. We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with HAP/VAP and assessed whether the initial intravenous antibiotic therapy (IIAT was adequate according to the PEG guidelines Materials and methods We collected data from 5 tertiary care hospitals. Electronic data filtering identified 895 patients with potential HAP/VAP. After chart review we finally identified 221 patients meeting the definition of HAP/VAP. Primary study endpoints were clinical improvement, survival and length of stay. Secondary endpoints included duration of mechanical ventilation, total costs, costs incurred on the intensive care unit (ICU, costs incurred on general wards and drug costs. Results We found that 107 patients received adequate initial intravenous antibiotic therapy (IIAT vs. 114 with inadequate IIAT according to the PEG guidelines. Baseline characteristics of both groups revealed no significant differences and good comparability. Clinical improvement was 64% over all patients and 82% (85/104 in the subpopulation with adequate IIAT while only 47% (48/103 inadequately treated patients improved (p Drug costs for the hospital stay were also lower (EUR 4,069 vs. EUR 4,833 yet not significant. The most frequent types of inadequate therapy were monotherapy instead of combination therapy, wrong type of penicillin and wrong type of cephalosporin. Discussion These findings are consistent with those from other studies analyzing the impact of guideline adherence on survival rates, clinical success, LOS and costs. However, inadequately treated patients had a higher

  11. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  12. Using cost-effectiveness analyses to inform policy: the case of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Gill

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Much emphasis is put on providing evidence to assist policymakers in priority setting and investment decisions. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of interventions is one technique used by policymakers in their decisions around the allocation of scarce resources. However, even where such evidence is available, other considerations may also be taken into account, and even over-ride technical evidence. Antiretroviral therapy (ART is the most effective intervention to reduce HIV-related morbidity and prolong mortality. However, treatment provision in the developing world has been hindered by the high costs of services and drugs, casting doubts on its cost-effectiveness. This paper looks at Thailand's publicly-funded antiretroviral initiative which was first introduced in 1992, and explores the extent to which cost-effectiveness evidence influenced policy. Methods: This article reviews the development of the national ART programme in Thailand between 1992 and 2004. It examines the roles of cost-effectiveness information in treatment policy decisions. Qualitative approaches including document analysis and interview of key informants were employed. Results: Two significant policy shifts have been observed in government-organised ART provision. In 1996, service-based therapy for a few was replaced by a research network to support clinical assessments of antiretroviral medication in public hospitals. This decision was taken after a domestic study illustrated the unaffordable fiscal burden and inefficient use of resources in provision of ART. The numbers of treatment recipients was maintained at 2,000 per year throughout the 1990s. It was not until 2001 that a new government pledged to extend the numbers receiving the service, as part of its commitment to universal coverage. Several elements played a role in this decision: new groups of dominant actors, drug price reductions, a pro-active civil society movement, lessons from experience

  13. Associations between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence-a survey and register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte L; Paulsen, Maja S; Christensen, Palle M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that doctors' personal lifestyle, risk taking personality and beliefs about risk reducing therapies may affect their clinical decision-making. Whether such factors are further associated with patients' adherence with medication is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: T...

  14. Adherence to isoniazid preventive therapy in Indonesian children: A quantitative and qualitative investigation

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    Rutherford Merrin E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recommended that young child contacts of sputum smear positive tuberculosis cases receive isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT but reported adherence is low and risk factors for poor adherence in children are largely unknown. Methods We prospectively determined rates of IPT adherence in children Results Eighty-two children eligible for IPT were included, 61 (74.4% of which had poor adherence. High transport costs (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-10.2 and medication costs (OR 20.0, 95% CI 2.7-414.5 were significantly associated with poor adherence in univariate analysis. Access, medication barriers, disease and health service experience and caregiver TB and IPT knowledge and beliefs were found to be important determinants of adherence in qualitative analysis. Conclusion Adherence to IPT in this setting in Indonesia is extremely low and may result from a combination of financial, knowledge, health service and medication related barriers. Successful reduction of childhood TB urgently requires evidence-based interventions that address poor adherence to IPT.

  15. A qualitative assessment of a community antiretroviral therapy group model in Tete, Mozambique.

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    Freya Rasschaert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve retention on ART, Médecins Sans Frontières, the Ministry of Health and patients piloted a community-based antiretroviral distribution and adherence monitoring model through Community ART Groups (CAG in Tete, Mozambique. By December 2012, almost 6000 patients on ART had formed groups of whom 95.7% were retained in care. We conducted a qualitative study to evaluate the relevance, dynamic and impact of the CAG model on patients, their communities and the healthcare system. METHODS: Between October 2011 and May 2012, we conducted 16 focus group discussions and 24 in-depth interviews with the major stakeholders involved in the CAG model. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Six key themes emerged from the data: 1 Barriers to access HIV care, 2 CAG functioning and actors involved, 3 Benefits for CAG members, 4 Impacts of CAG beyond the group members, 5 Setbacks, and 6 Acceptance and future expectations of the CAG model. The model provides cost and time savings, certainty of ART access and mutual peer support resulting in better adherence to treatment. Through the active role of patients, HIV information could be conveyed to the broader community, leading to an increased uptake of services and positive transformation of the identity of people living with HIV. Potential pitfalls included limited access to CAG for those most vulnerable to defaulting, some inequity to patients in individual ART care and a high dependency on counsellors. CONCLUSION: The CAG model resulted in active patient involvement and empowerment, and the creation of a supportive environment improving the ART retention. It also sparked a reorientation of healthcare services towards the community and strengthened community actions. Successful implementation and scalability requires (a the acceptance of patients as partners in health, (b adequate resources, and (c a well-functioning monitoring and

  16. Dual therapy with darunavir/r plus etravirine is safe and effective as switching therapy in antiretroviral experienced HIV-patients. The BITER Study

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    Joaquín Portilla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Switching therapy studies are usually designed as second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART in patients without previous virologic failures. Combined ART (cART with DRV/r and ETR has a good pharmacokinetic profile, high genetic barrier and has been proved as rescue therapy. The aim of our study was to analyze efficacy and safety of therapy with DRV/r plus ETR in treatment experienced HIV-patients with previous therapeutic failures that need to switch ART. We present results at first 24 weeks. Methods: Multicentre retrospective observational study. Inclusion criteria: adult HIV-patients on ART with HIV-VL <1000 cop/mL who started their ART with DRV/r (600/100 bid or 800/100 qd+ETR by adverse events, non-adherence, tolerability or prevention of future complications. Patients with acute AIDS events, HBV, pregnancy, drug addiction or previous selected mutations to DRV or ETR were excluded. Results: Ninety-nine patients were included, mean age: 47 years (r: 22–79; 70% men, 40.4% previous AIDS event and 39.3% HCV. Ninety-one patients had received ≥3 cART regimens and 45≥5, 75 patients had HIV-VL <50 cop/mL and 24 low-level viremia (LLV: 297.5±261.4 cop/mL, CD4+ 568±279 cells/µL. ART before switching: NRTI+PI/r (33%, NNRTI (17%, PI/r+NNRTI (23%, PI/r+INI (13%, other (14%. Main reason to switching was: toxicity/intolerance 50 patients (renal 32%, gastrointestinal: 14%, hyperlipidaemia 10%; osteopenia/osteoporosis: 6%; improving adherence 26 patients; prevention of complications 19 patients. Nine subjects withdrew ART during follow-up because: intolerance or new toxicity three; non-adherence two; simplification to DRV/r monotherapy two; persistence of previous toxicity one; virologic failure one. At week 24, among patients who continued with DRV/r+ETR (n=90: 81 (89% had VL<50 cop/mL, in those with with HIV-VL<50 at baseline (67/90, 94% persisted with <50 cop., and in those with LLV (24/90, 61% (n=14 achieved a VL<50 cop. We didn

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-infected patients starting first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy during 6 years of observation

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    Maggiolo F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Franco Maggiolo,1 Giorgio L Colombo,2,3 Sergio Di Matteo,3 Giacomo M Bruno,3 Noemi Astuti,1 Elisa Di Filippo,1 Giulia Masini,1 Claudia Bernardini1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy; 2University of Pavia, Department of Drug Sciences, Pavia, Italy; 3SAVE Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche, Milan, Italy Objectives: Costs may play a role in deciding how and when to start highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in a naïve patient. The aim of the present study was to assess the cost- effectiveness of treatment with HAART in a large clinical cohort of naïve adults to determine the potential role of single-tablet regimens in the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio analysis was performed, including a quality-adjusted life year approach. Results: In total, 741 patients (females comprising 25.5% were retrospectively included. The mean age was 39 years, the mean CD4 cell count was 266 cells/µL, and the mean viral load was 192,821 copies/mL. The most commonly used backbone was tenofovir + emtricitabine (77.6%; zidovudine + lamivudine was used in 10%, lamivudine + abacavir in 3%, and other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI or NRTI-free regimens in 9.4% of patients. NNRTIs were used in 52.8% of cases, boosted protease inhibitors in 44.1%, and unboosted protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors in 0.7% and 2.4%, respectively. Starting therapy at CD4 >500 cells/µL and CD4 351–500 cells/µL rather than at <201 cells/µL was the more cost-effective approach. The same consideration was not true comparing current indications with the possibility to start HAART at any CD4 value (eg, >500 cells per µL; in this case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio value was €199,130 per quality-adjusted life year gained, a higher value than the one suggested in guidelines. The single-tablet regimen (STR invariably

  18. Association between medication possession ratio, virologic failure and drug resistance in HIV-1 infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messou, Eugène; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Gabillard, Delphine; Minga, Albert; Losina, Elena; Yapo, Vincent; Kouakou, Martial; Danel, Christine; Sloan, Caroline; Rouzioux, Christine; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Anglaret, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background Adherence is a strong determinant of viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART), but measuring it is challenging. Medication delivery can be measured accurately in settings with computerized prescription databases. We studied the association between Medication Possession Ratio (MPR), virologic suppression, and resistance to ART in Côte d’Ivoire. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-1 infected adults initiating ART in three clinics using computerized monitoring systems. Patients had viral load (VL) tests at month 6 (M6) and month 12 (M12) after ART initiation, and genotype tests if VL was detectable (≥300 copies/ml). MPR was defined as the number of daily doses of antiretroviral drug actually provided divided by the total number of follow-up days since ART initiation. Results Overall, 1,573 patients started ART with stavudine/zidovudine plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. At M6 and M12, 996 and 942 patients were in active follow-up; 20% (M6) and 25% (M12) of patients had detectable VL, including 7% (M6) and 11% (M12) with ≥1 resistance mutation. Among patients with MPR ≥95%, 80–94%, 65–79%, 50–64% and <50% at M12, the proportion with detectable VL [resistance] was 9% [4%], 17% [7%], 45% [24%], 67% [31%], and 85% [37%]. Among patients with ≥1 mutation at M12, 86% were resistant to lamivudine/emtricitabine and/or nevirapine/efavirenz but not to other drugs. Conclusion MPR was strongly associated with virologic outcomes. Half of those with detectable VL at M12 had no resistance mutations. MPR should be used at M6 to identify patients who might benefit from early interventions to reinforce adherence. PMID:21191309

  19. Adherence to statin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: An important dilemma

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    Shadi Farsaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of patients′ adherence to their drug treatments for achieving desired therapeutic goals and the proven role 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins for the health status of patients with cardiovascular diseases, there is not enough information regarding diabetic patients′ adherence to statin therapy in developing countries. In this clinical study we aimed to assess the adherence of diabetes type 2 patients to statin therapy in a research based community clinic in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study which was done at Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, 204 diabetic type 2 patients under treatment with statin were interviewed twice and their demographic data (age, gender, body mass index, education, statin information (type, dose and their serum lipid profile were recorded. Three months after the initial visits, patients were assessed using pill counting method and according to patients′ self-reporting and also assessed low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol goal attainment <100 mg/dl. Results: Adherence rate was 79.7% and 69% according to pill counting and self-reporting among study population. Moreover, 68.4% of patients achieved their LDL cholesterol goal of <100 mg/dl and adherent patients reached therapeutic goal significantly more than those who were considered non-adherence to statin therapy (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Adherence to statin therapy, as reflected by pill count method, is significantly related to LDL cholesterol goal achievement in patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. Pill count method can be used to identify patients who are nonadherent to statin therapy and at high risk for failure to attain LDL cholesterol goals.

  20. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients’ adherence to music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine Lundsfryd;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric vari...... that patients with schizophrenia and personality disorder complete the music therapy treatment.......Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric...... variables such as diagnoses, medication etc., and therapeutic variables. As outcome variable was drop out of treatment. Results: No variables were found to be statistically significant. 11 % dropped out and were identical: No prior music therapy experience, not familiar with the method, all found only maybe...

  1. Feasibility and acceptability of mobile phone short message service as a support for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional study

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    Jiho Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobile phone technologies have been promoted to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART. We studied the receptiveness of patients in a rural Ugandan setting to the use of short messaging service (SMS communication for such purposes. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis measuring mobile phone ownership and literacy amongst patients of The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO in Jinja, Uganda. We performed bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine associations between explanatory variables and a composite outcome of being literate and having a mobile phone. Results: From June 2012 to August 2013, we enrolled 895 participants, of whom 684 (76% were female. The median age was 44 years. A total of 576 (63% were both literate and mobile phone users. Of these, 91% (527/ 576 responded favourably to the potential use of SMS for health communication, while only 38.9% (124/319 of others were favourable to the idea (p<0.001. A lower proportion of literate mobile phone users reported optimal adherence to ART (86.4% vs. 90.6%; p=0.007. Male participants (AOR=2.81; 95% CI 1.83–4.30, sub-optimal adherence (AOR=1.76; 95% CI 1.12–2.77, those with waged or salaried employment (AOR=2.35; 95% CI 1.23–4.49, crafts/trade work (AOR=2.38; 95% CI 1.11–5.12, or involved in petty trade (AOR=1.85; 95% CI 1.09–3.13 (in comparison to those with no income were more likely to report mobile phone ownership and literacy. Conclusions: In a rural Ugandan setting, we found that over 60% of patients could potentially benefit from a mobile phone-based ART adherence support. However, support for such an intervention was lower for other patients.

  2. Duration of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy and Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation: Association with Mortality in HIV-Related Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Claudia P.; Wehbe, Firas H.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Duda, Stephany N.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Gonzalez, Elsa; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Schechter, Mauro; Padgett, Denis; Cesar, Carina; Madero, Juan Sierra; Pape, Jean W.; Masys, Daniel R.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases mortality risk in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients, but the effect of the duration of anti-tuberculosis therapy and timing of anti-tuberculosis therapy initiation in relation to ART initiation on mortality, is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study among HIV-infected persons concomitantly treated with Rifamycin-based anti-tuberculosis therapy and ART in Latin America. The study population included persons for whom 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy is recommended. Results Of 253 patients who met inclusion criteria, median CD4+ lymphocyte count at ART initiation was 64 cells/mm3, 171 (68%) received >180 days of anti-tuberculosis therapy, 168 (66%) initiated anti-tuberculosis therapy before ART, and 43 (17%) died. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for CD4+ lymphocytes and HIV-1 RNA, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation was associated with an increased risk of death compared to tuberculosis diagnosis before ART initiation (HR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15, 5.02; P = 0.02). In a separate model among patients surviving >6 months after tuberculosis diagnosis, after adjusting for CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV-1 RNA, and timing of ART initiation relative to tuberculosis diagnosis, receipt of >6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy was associated with a decreased risk of death (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08, 0.66; P=0.007). Conclusions The increased risk of death among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis after ART initiation highlights the importance of screening for tuberculosis before ART initiation. The decreased risk of death among persons receiving > 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy suggests that current anti-tuberculosis treatment duration guidelines should be re-evaluated. PMID:24066096

  3. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of therapeutic DNA vaccination in individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection.

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    Eric S Rosenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An effective therapeutic vaccine that could augment immune control of HIV-1 replication may abrogate or delay the need for antiretroviral therapy. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG A5187 was a phase I/II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine (VRC-HVDNA 009-00-VP in subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection. (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00125099 METHODS: Twenty healthy HIV-1 infected subjects who were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection and had HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL were randomized to receive either vaccine or placebo. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine. Following vaccination, subjects interrupted antiretroviral treatment, and set-point HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 T cell counts were determined 17-23 weeks after treatment discontinuation. RESULTS: Twenty subjects received all scheduled vaccinations and discontinued antiretroviral therapy at week 30. No subject met a primary safety endpoint. No evidence of differences in immunogenicity were detected in subjects receiving vaccine versus placebo. There were also no significant differences in set-point HIV-1 viral loads or CD4 T cell counts following treatment discontinuation. Median set-point HIV-1 viral loads after treatment discontinuation in vaccine and placebo recipients were 3.5 and 3.7 log(10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The HIV-1 DNA vaccine (VRC-HIVDNA 009-00-VP was safe but poorly immunogenic in subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection. Viral set-points were similar between vaccine and placebo recipients following treatment interruption. However, median viral load set-points in both groups were lower than in historical controls, suggesting a possible role for antiretroviral therapy in persons with acute or early HIV-1

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

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    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening. Evaluation was done through specific questionnaires for the patients as well as serum 6-MP measurements. Results: Nonadherence was detected in around 56% by questionnaires and around 50% by serum 6-MP level measurement. There was a highly significant correlation between nonadherence as found by the questionnaire and 6-MP level (P - 0.001. Nonadherence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic standard, noneducation and low educational level and large family size by both methods. High cost to come for follow-up visits was significant by questionnaire but not by 6-MP measurement. Adolescent age, the higher number of siblings, lack of written instructions, long time spent per visit, were all associated with higher rates of nonadherence, although none reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Nonadherence is a real problem in pediatric patients. Specific questionnaires can be an excellent reliable method for the routine follow-up of these children, and drug level assay can be requested only for confirmation. This protocol is especially effective in developing countries where financial resources may be limited. Every effort should be made to uncover its true incidence, contributing factors, and best methods of intervention.

  6. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients.

  7. Autonomic dysfunction in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy: studies of heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Mehlsen, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of autonomic dysfunction in HIV patients is largely unknown. Early studies found autonomic dysfunction in patients with AIDS. Introduction of highly active antiretroviral combination therapy (ART) has dramatically changed the course of the disease and improved prognosis...... and decreased morbidity. At present it is not known whether introduction of ART also has decreased autonomic dysfunction. AIM: To evaluate whether autonomic dysfunction is present in an ART-treated HIV population. METHODS: HIV patients receiving ART for at least 3 years (n = 16) and an age-matched control group...... guidelines and data reported as median (interquartile range). RESULTS: The resting heart rate was higher in HIV patients compared with controls [69 (62-74) versus 57 (52-60); PHIV group compared with the controls...

  8. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of HIV infection has improved since the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Some patients, however, develop a clinical and radiological deterioration following initiation of HAART due to either the unmasking of occult subclinical infection or an enhanced inflammatory response to a treated infection. This phenomenon is believed to result from the restored ability to mount an immune response and is termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) or immune reconstitution disease. IRIS is widely reported in the literature in adult patients, most commonly associated with mycobacterial infections. There is, however, a paucity of data documenting the radiological findings of IRIS in children. Radiologists need to be aware of this entity. As a diagnosis of exclusion it is essential that the radiological findings be assessed in the context of the clinical presentation. This article reviews the common clinical and radiological manifestations of IRIS in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  9. Four-year treatment outcomes of adult patients enrolled in Mozambique's rapidly expanding antiretroviral therapy program.

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    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mozambique during 2004-2007 numbers of adult patients (≥15 years old enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART increased about 16-fold, from 60 kg, WHO stage IV (AHR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.4, reference group WHO stage I/II, lack of co-trimoxazole prescription (AHR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and later calendar year of ART initiation (AHR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8. Rates of immunologic treatment failure and regimen-switch were 14.0 and 0.6 events per 100-patient years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ART initiation at earlier disease stages and scale-up of co-trimoxazole among ART patients could improve outcomes. Research to determine reasons for low regimen-switch rates and increasing rates of attrition during program expansion is needed.

  10. Factors impacting the provision of antiretroviral therapy to people living with HIV: the view from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzier, Vanessa; Farmer, Paul E; Pape, Jean W; Jerome, Jean-Gregory; Van Onacker, Joelle Deas; Morose, Willy; Joseph, Patrice; Leandre, Fernet; Severe, Patrice; Barry, Donna; Deschamps, Marie-Marcelle; Koenig, Serena P

    2014-01-01

    Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and has the highest number of people living with HIV in the Caribbean, the region most impacted by HIV outside of Africa. Despite continuous political, socioeconomic and natural catastrophes, Haiti has mounted a very successful response to the HIV epidemic. Prevention and treatment strategies implemented by the government in collaboration with non-governmental organizations have been instrumental in decreasing the national HIV prevalence from a high of 6.2% in 1993 to 2.2% in 2012. We describe the history and epidemiology of HIV in Haiti and the expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past decade, with the achievement of universal access to ART for patients meeting the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. We also describe effective models of care, successes and challenges of international funding, and current challenges in the provision of ART. We are optimistic that the goal of providing ART for all in need remains in reach.

  11. Prognosis of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlius, Julia; Schmidlin, Kurt; Costagliola, Dominique;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined survival and prognostic factors of patients who developed HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. METHODS: We included all cART-naive patients......-seven patients (72%) from 22 cohorts met inclusion criteria. Survival at 1 year was 66% [95% confidence interval (CI) 63-70%] for systemic NHL (n = 763) and 54% (95% CI: 43-65%) for primary brain lymphoma (n = 84). Risk factors for death included low nadir CD4 cell counts and a history of injection drug use...... with primary brain lymphoma. More advanced immunodeficiency is the dominant prognostic factor for mortality in patients with HIV-related NHL....

  12. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  13. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients. PMID:15255240

  14. Recognizing Cognitive and Psychiatric Changes in the Post-Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carvalhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amid numerous complications that plague the health and quality of life of people living with HIV, neurocognitive and psychiatric illnesses pose unique challenges. While there remains uncertainty with respect to the pathophysiology surrounding these disorders, their adverse implications are increasingly recognized. Left undetected, they have the potential to significantly impact patient well being, adherence to antiretroviral treatment and overall health outcomes. As such, early identification of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND and psychiatric illnesses will be paramount in the proactive management of affected patients. The present review focuses on strategies to ensure optimal screening and detection of HAND, depression and substance abuse in routine practice. For each topic, currently available screening methods are discussed. These include identification of risk factors, recognition of relevant symptomatology and an update on validated screening tools that can be efficiently implemented in the clinical setting. Specifically addressed in the present review are the International HIV Dementia Scale, a novel screening equation and algorithm for HAND, as well as brief, validated, verbal questionnaires for detection of depression and substance abuse. Adequate understanding and usage of these screening mechanisms can ensure effective use of resources by distinguishing patients who require referral for more extensive diagnostic procedures from those who likely do not.

  15. Adherence to preventive statin therapy according to socioeconomic position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Andersen, Morten; Diderichsen, Finn;

    2013-01-01

    -level Danish registries for 4 years or until censoring events (death, emigration, CVD or diabetes). Only individuals aged 40-84 years for whom information was available on the SEP indicators, education and income were included (N = 76,038). Two different aspects of poor adherence were applied as outcome...... measures: (1) Proportion of days covered (PDC) with medication below 80 %, assuming a daily dose of one tablet (continuity); (2) Discontinuation defined as a gap between two consecutive prescriptions exceeding 365 days (persistence). Stratum-specific logistic regression analyses were applied to estimate...

  16. Directly Observed versus Self-administered Antiretroviral Therapies: Preference of HIV-Positive Jailed Inmates in San Francisco

    OpenAIRE

    Saberi, Parya; Caswell, Nikolai H.; Jamison, Ross; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline P.

    2012-01-01

    Directly observed therapy (DOT) of antiretroviral (ARV) medications has beneficial effects on HIV treatment for incarcerated inmates but has been associated with limited continuation after release and inadvertent disclosure of HIV status. Guided self-administered therapy (g-SAT) may be a preferred method of ARV delivery and may encourage medication-taking behavior. We surveyed the preference of 102 HIV-positive jailed inmates at the San Francisco City and County Jails regarding receiving ARVs...

  17. Individual and contextual factors influencing patient attrition from antiretroviral therapy care in an urban community of Lusaka, Zambia

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    Sonja Merten

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the relatively effective roll-out of free life-prolonging antiretroviral therapy (ART in public sector clinics in Zambia since 2005, and the proven efficacy of ART, some people living with HIV (PLHIV are abandoning the treatment. Drawing on a wider ethnographic study in a predominantly low-income, high-density residential area of Lusaka, this paper reports the reasons why PLHIV opted to discontinue their HIV treatment. Methods: Opened-ended, in-depth interviews were held with PLHIV who had stopped ART (n = 25, ART clinic staff (n = 5, religious leaders (n = 5, herbal medicine providers (n = 5 and lay home-based caregivers (n = 5. In addition, participant observations were conducted in the study setting for 18 months. Interview data were analysed using open coding first, and then interpreted using latent content analysis. The presentation of the results is guided by a social-ecological framework. Findings: Patient attrition from ART care is influenced by an interplay of personal, social, health system and structural-level factors. While improved corporeal health, side effects and need for normalcy diminished motivation to continue with treatment, individuals also weighed the social and economic costs of continued uptake of treatment. Long waiting times for medical care and placing “defaulters” on intensive adherence counselling in the context of insecure labour conditions and livelihood constraints not only imposed opportunity costs which patients were not willing to forego, but also forced individuals to balance physical health with social integrity, which sometimes forced them to opt for faith healing and traditional medicine. Conclusions: Complex and dynamic interplay of personal, social, health system and structural-level factors coalesces to influence patient attrition from ART care. Consequently, while patient-centred interventions are required, efforts should be made to improve ART care by

  18. Immunopathology of the duodenal mucosa of HIV-positive patients during combined antiretroviral therapy

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    F.R. Machado

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the duodenal mucosa of HIV-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy. This was an observational study conducted on HIV-positive patients and a control group. Group 1 comprised 22 HIV-negative individuals while 38 HIV-positive individuals were classified according to the CDC 1993 classification into group 2 (A1 or A2 or group 3 (B2, A3, B3, C2, C3. All subjects were submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative histological analyses were performed. Results were considered significant when P < 0.05. A higher prevalence of inflammatory infiltrate and eosinophilia was observed in the HIV group, together with a reduction in mucosal CD4+ lymphocyte (L counts [median (lower-upper quartiles, 12.82 (8.30-20.33, 6.36 (1.75-11.66 and 1.75 (0.87-3.14 in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively] which was not correlated with disease stage. The extent of CD4+L count reduction was similar in blood and duodenal mucosa. Normal CD8+L and CD45RO+L counts, and normal numbers of macrophages and antigen-presenting cells were also found in the HIV patients. The cytokine pattern did not differ among groups. Tissue HIV, assessed by p24 antigen, correlated with a higher CD45RO+L count (77.0 (61-79.8 and 43.6 (31.7-62.8 in p24+ and p24-, respectively, P = 0.003, and IL-4 positivity (100 and 48.2% in p24+ and p24-, respectively, P = 0.005. The duodenal mucosa of HIV+ patients showed a relatively preserved histological architecture. This finding may be characteristic of a population without opportunistic infections and treated with potent antiretroviral therapy, with a better preservation of the immune status.

  19. Nutritional status and CD4 cell counts in patients with HIV/AIDS receiving antiretroviral therapy

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    Ana Celia Oliveira dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Even with current highly active antiretroviral therapy, individuals with AIDS continue to exhibit important nutritional deficits and reduced levels of albumin and hemoglobin, which may be directly related to their cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 cell counts. The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS and relate the findings to the albumin level, hemoglobin level and CD4 cell count. Methods Patients over 20 years of age with AIDS who were hospitalized in a university hospital and were receiving antiretroviral therapy were studied with regard to clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and sociodemographic characteristics. Body mass index, percentage of weight loss, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and arm muscle circumference were analyzed. Data on albumin, hemoglobin, hematocrit and CD4 cell count were obtained from patient charts. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test for independent variables and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of significance was set to 0.05 (α = 5%. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. Results Of the 50 patients evaluated, 70% were male. The prevalence of malnutrition was higher when the definition was based on arm circumference and triceps skinfold measurement. The concentrations of all biochemical variables were significantly lower among patients with a body mass index of less than 18.5kg/m2. The CD4 cell count, albumin, hemoglobin and hematocrit anthropometric measures were directly related to each other. Conclusions These findings underscore the importance of nutritional follow-up for underweight patients with AIDS, as nutritional status proved to be related to important biochemical alterations.

  20. Lipodystrophy in HIV/AIDS patients with different levels of physical activity while on antiretroviral therapy

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    Aline Francielle Mota Segatto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Lipodystrophy is related to the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and can cause aesthetic stigma and increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Physical activity may be a valid alternative for the treatment and prevention of lipodystrophy. However, few studies address this issue. The objective of this study was to assess lipodystrophy related to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients with different physical activity habits. METHODS: The sample was composed of 42 HIV/AIDS patients taking HAART medication who were visiting the Counseling and Testing Center (CTC in Presidente Prudente. The level of physical activity was obtained using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ; lipodystrophy was diagnosed using a self-report questionnaire that was administered to the patient and then followed up by medical confirmation. The percentage of trunk fat was estimated by dual X-Ray absorptiometry (DEXA. Information about sex, age, length of HAART treatment, CD4+ T lymphocyte count (CD4 and viral load was also collected. RESULTS: A higher prevalence of lipodystrophy was observed in the sedentary group when compared to the physically active group, which indicates that physical activity may be a protective factor in relation to the occurrence of lipodystrophy. The group that had a higher CD4 had a higher proportion of lipodystrophy and a higher proportion of younger and physically active individuals. The patients with lipodystrophy had a higher percentage of trunk fat and were more sedentary than active individuals. CONCLUSIONS: A physically active lifestyle has a protective effect against the occurrence of lipodystrophy related to HAART.

  1. Remission of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following highly active antiretroviral therapy in a man with AIDS

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    Yoganathan K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Katie Yoganathan1, David Brown2, Kathir Yoganathan31Cardiff Medical School, Cardiff, Wales, UK; 2Virus Reference Department, Microbiology Services, Health Protection Agency, London, UK; 3Singleton Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Swansea, UKAbstract: A 43-year-old Caucasian homosexual man with AIDS presented with blurring of vision, change of personality, and memory loss in March 1999. He had first been admitted 2 months previously for treatment of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. A magnetic resonance imaging scan on admission showed multiple white matter lesions involving both subcortical cerebral hemispheres and cerebellar regions, with no mass effect or surrounding edema. JC virus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings were diagnostic of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. His CD4 count was 34 cells/mL, and his HIV ribonucleic acid level was 800,789 copies/mL. He was treated with a combination antiretroviral therapy. He was last reviewed in October 2011. He was fully independent socially and mentally, but he still had some residual neurologic signs with right-sided homonymous hemianopia and visual agnosia. His HIV ribonucleic acid level was undetectable, and his CD4 count was 574 cells/mm3. Although the median survival of patients with PML was poor before the antiretroviral therapy era, our patient, who is now aged 55 years, is still alive 12 years after the diagnosis. The diagnosis of PML and differential diagnosis of focal neurologic signs in HIV-positive patients are discussed in this case report.Keywords: HIV, focal neurologic signs, cerebral toxoplasmosis, primary brain lymphoma, ischaemic stroke

  2. Estimating health workforce needs for antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings

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    Fullem Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to increase access to life-saving treatment, including antiretroviral therapy (ART, for people living with HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings has been the growing focus of international efforts. One of the greatest challenges to scaling up will be the limited supply of adequately trained human resources for health, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other skilled providers. As national treatment programmes are planned, better estimates of human resource needs and improved approaches to assessing the impact of different staffing models are critically needed. However there have been few systematic assessments of staffing patterns in existing programmes or of the estimates being used in planning larger programmes. Methods We reviewed the published literature and selected plans and scaling-up proposals, interviewed experts and collected data on staffing patterns at existing treatment sites through a structured survey and site visits. Results We found a wide range of staffing patterns and patient-provider ratios in existing and planned treatment programmes. Many factors influenced health workforce needs, including task assignments, delivery models, other staff responsibilities and programme size. Overall, the number of health care workers required to provide ART to 1000 patients included 1–2 physicians, 2–7 nurses, Discussion These data are consistent with other estimates of human resource requirements for antiretroviral therapy, but highlight the considerable variability of current staffing models and the importance of a broad range of factors in determining personnel needs. Few outcome or cost data are currently available to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of different staffing models, and it will be important to develop improved methods for gathering this information as treatment programmes are scaled up.

  3. French 2013 guidelines for antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1 infection in adults

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    Bruno Hoen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: These guidelines are part of the French Experts’ recommendations for the management of people living with HIV/AIDS, which were made public and submitted to the French health authorities in September 2013. The objective was to provide updated recommendations for antiretroviral treatment (ART of HIV-positive adults. Guidelines included the following topics: when to start, what to start, specific situations for the choice of the first session of antiretroviral therapy, optimization of antiretroviral therapy after virologic suppression, and management of virologic failure. Methods: Ten members of the French HIV 2013 expert group were responsible for guidelines on ART. They systematically reviewed the most recent literature. The chairman of the subgroup was responsible for drafting the guidelines, which were subsequently discussed within, and finalized by the whole expert group to obtain a consensus. Recommendations were graded for strength and level of evidence using predefined criteria. Economic considerations were part of the decision-making process for selecting preferred first-line options. Potential conflicts of interest were actively managed throughout the whole process. Results: ART should be initiated in any HIV-positive person, whatever his/her CD4 T-cell count, even when >500/mm3. The level of evidence of the individual benefit of ART in terms of mortality or progression to AIDS increases with decreasing CD4 cell count. Preferred initial regimens include two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz or rilpivirine, or a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (atazanavir or darunavir. Raltegravir, lopinavir/r, and nevirapine are recommended as alternative third agents, with specific indications and restrictions. Specific situations such as HIV infection in women, primary HIV infection, severe immune suppression

  4. Long-term costs and health impact of continued global fund support for antiretroviral therapy.

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    John Stover

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: By the end of 2011 Global Fund investments will be supporting 3.5 million people on antiretroviral therapy (ART in 104 low- and middle-income countries. We estimated the cost and health impact of continuing treatment for these patients through 2020. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Survival on first-line and second-line ART regimens is estimated based on annual retention rates reported by national AIDS programs. Costs per patient-year were calculated from country-reported ARV procurement prices, and expenditures on laboratory tests, health care utilization and end-of-life care from in-depth costing studies. Of the 3.5 million ART patients in 2011, 2.3 million will still need treatment in 2020. The annual cost of maintaining ART falls from $1.9 billion in 2011 to $1.7 billion in 2020, as a result of a declining number of surviving patients partially offset by increasing costs as more patients migrate to second-line therapy. The Global Fund is expected to continue being a major contributor to meeting this financial need, alongside other international funders and domestic resources. Costs would be $150 million less in 2020 with an annual 5% decline in first-line ARV prices and $150-370 million less with a 5%-12% annual decline in second-line prices, but $200 million higher in 2020 with phase out of stavudine (d4T, or $200 million higher with increased migration to second-line regimens expected if all countries routinely adopted viral load monitoring. Deaths postponed by ART correspond to 830,000 life-years saved in 2011, increasing to around 2.3 million life-years every year between 2015 and 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Annual patient-level direct costs of supporting a patient cohort remain fairly stable over 2011-2020, if current antiretroviral prices and delivery costs are maintained. Second-line antiretroviral prices are a major cost driver, underscoring the importance of investing in treatment quality to improve retention on first-line regimens.

  5. Use of new antiretroviral drugs and classes in Bahia, Brazil: a real life experience on salvage therapy of AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carlos; Nóbrega, Isabella; Martins Netto, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly evolved in the last decade, with an increasing number of new drugs and classes. Currently, even heavily experienced patients can be successfully treated with new regimens. In Brazil, the recent incorporation of some new antiretroviral drugs made it possible to suppress HIV plasma viremia in most treated patients, with significant benefits in terms of quality of life and survival. However, little has been published on outcomes of patients under new drugs-based regimens. We reviewed the safety and efficacy of antiretroviral regimens using recently introduced drugs in Bahia. Our results confirm that patients using darunavir, raltegravir, enfuvirtide, or etravirine presented with a high rate of virological suppression without significant adverse events, after one year of follow-up.

  6. Health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of earlier eligibility for adult antiretroviral therapy and expanded treatment coverage: a combined analysis of 12 mathematical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eaton, J.W.; Menzies, N.A.; Stover, J.; Cambiano, V.; Chindelevitch, L.; Cori, A.; Hontelez, J.A.; Humair, S.; Kerr, C.C.; Klein, D.J.; Mishra, S.; Mitchell, K.M.; Nichols, B.E.; Vickerman, P.; Bakker, R; Barnighausen, T.; Bershteyn, A.; Bloom, D.E.; Boily, M.C.; Chang, S.T.; Cohen, T.; Dodd, P.J.; Fraser, C.; Gopalappa, C.; Lundgren, J.; Martin, N.K.; Mikkelsen, E.; Mountain, E.; Pham, Q.D.; Pickles, M.; Phillips, A.; Platt, L.; Pretorius, C.; Prudden, H.J.; Salomon, J.A.; Vijver, D.A. van de; Vlas, S.J. de; Wagner, B.G.; White, R.G.; Wilson, D.P.; Zhang, L.; Blandford, J.; Meyer-Rath, G.; Remme, M.; Revill, P.; Sangrujee, N.; Terris-Prestholt, F.; Doherty, M.; Shaffer, N.; Easterbrook, P.J.; Hirnschall, G.; Hallett, T.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New WHO guidelines recommend initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive adults with CD4 counts of 500 cells per muL or less, a higher threshold than was previously recommended. Country decision makers have to decide whether to further expand eligibility for antiretroviral ther

  7. Ability to Work and Employment Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzi, Luigia; Conen, Anna; Patzen, Annalea; Fehr, Jan; Cavassini, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Limited data exist on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals' ability to work after receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate predictors of regaining full ability to work at 1 year after starting cART. Methods.  Antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals reintegration of persons infected with HIV. PMID:26955645

  8. Rinossinusites em crianças infectadas pelo HIV sob terapia anti-retroviral Rhinosinusitis in HIV-infected children undergoing antiretroviral therapy

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    Carlos Diógenes Pinheiro Neto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A associação dos inibidores de protease (IP à terapia anti-retroviral provocou mudanças importantes na morbidade e mortalidade de pacientes infectados pelo HIV. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o impacto desta associação na prevalência de rinossinusite (RS e na contagem sérica de linfócitos CD4 em crianças infectadas pelo HIV. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: A forma de estudo foi cross-sectional com 471 crianças infectadas pelo HIV. Em 1996, inibidores de protease foram liberados para terapia anti-retroviral. Desta forma, dois grupos de crianças foram formados: as que não fizeram uso de IP e as que fizeram uso desta droga após 1996. A prevalência de RS e a contagem sérica de linfócitos CD4 foram comparadas entre estes grupos. RESULTADOS: 14,4% das crianças infectadas pelo HIV apresentaram RS. A RS crônica foi mais prevalente que a RS aguda em ambos os grupos. Crianças menores de 6 anos tratadas com a associação de IP apresentaram maior prevalência de RS aguda. A associação de IP esteve associada à maior contagem de linfócitos CD4 séricos com menor prevalência de RS crônica. CONCLUSÕES: A terapia com IP esteve associada ao aumento na contagem de linfócitos CD4. Crianças abaixo dos 6 anos em uso de IP apresentaram menor tendência à cronificação da doença.The association of protease inhibitors (PI to antiretroviral therapy has generated sensible changes in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients. AIM: Aims at evaluating the impact of this association on the prevalence of rhinosinusitis (RS and CD4+ lymphocyte count in HIV-infected children. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional study of the medical charts of 471 HIV-infected children. In 1996, protease inhibitors were approved for use as an association drug in antiretroviral therapy. Children were divided into two groups: one which did not receive PI and another which received PI after 1996. The prevalence of RS and CD4+ lymphocyte counts were compared between these groups

  9. Adherence to Airway Clearance Therapy in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis: Socioeconomic Factors and Respiratory Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Gabriela R.; Stepanikova, Irena; Gamble, Stephanie; Gutierrez, Hector H.; Harris, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives The evidence linking socioeconomic status (SES) and adherence in cystic fibrosis (CF) is inconclusive and focused on medication uptake. We examined associations between SES, adherence to airway clearance therapy (ACT), and CF respiratory outcomes. Study Design Socioeconomic, clinical, and adherence data of CF patients (N = 110) at a single CF Center were evaluated in this cross-sectional observational study. SES was operationalized as maternal and paternal education and household income. Adherence to ACT was measured with utilization data from the high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) device over 4–6 weeks. Statistical modeling was used to test three hypotheses: (H1) Higher SES is associated with higher ACT adherence; (H2) Higher SES is associated with better respiratory outcomes; and (H3) ACT adherence mediates the relationship between SES and respiratory outcomes. Results In multinomial logistic regression, maternal college education, annual income >$50,000, and more adults in the household were independently related to better adherence (P $100,000, and lack of exposure to smoking were independently related to higher lung function (P < 0.05). Current adherence to ACT with HFCWO was not associated with lung function over 12 months. Conclusions SES is associated both with ACT adherence and respiratory outcomes in pediatric CF patients. However, the link between SES and respiratory outcomes in this study was not mediated by adherence to ACT with HFCWO. These data emphasize the importance of socioeconomic resources and household environment for CF health. Family socio-demographic profiles can help identify patients at increased risk for ACT nonadherence. PMID:26436321

  10. Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection on Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Outcome in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte; Hansen, Ann-Brit E.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...... Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...... results [443 patients [16%

  11. Impact of hepatitis C virus coinfection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...... Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...... results [443 patients [16%

  12. Non-adherence to drug therapy and drug acquisition costs in a national population - a patient-based register study

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    Hovstadius Bo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to drug therapy is a major problem for society as it is associated with reduced health outcomes. Generally, approximately only 50% of patients with chronic disease in developed countries adhere to prescribed therapy, and the most common non-adherence refers to chronic under-use, i.e. patients use less medication than prescribed or prematurely stop the therapy. Patients' non-adherence leads to high additional costs for society in terms of poor health. Non-adherence is also related to the unnecessary sale of drugs. The aim of the present study was to estimate the drug acquisition cost related to non-adherence to drug therapy in a national population. Methods We constructed a model of the drug acquisition cost related to non-adherence to drug therapy based on patient register data of dispensed out-patient prescriptions in the entire Swedish population during a 12-month period. In the model, the total drug acquisition cost was successively adjusted for the assumed different rates of primary non-adherence (prescriptions not being filled by the patient, and secondary non-adherence (medication not being taken as prescribed according to the patient's age, therapies, and the number of dispensed drugs per patient. Results With an assumption of a general primary non-adherence rate of 3%, and a general secondary non-adherence rate of 50%, for all types of drugs, the acquisition cost related to non-adherence totalled SEK 11.2 billion (€ 1.2 billion, or 48.5% of total drug acquisition costs in Sweden 2006. With the assumption of varying primary non-adherence rates for different age groups and different secondary non-adherence rates for varying types of drug therapies, the acquisition cost related to non-adherence totalled SEK 9.3 billion (€ 1.0 billion, or 40.2% of the total drug acquisition costs. When the assumption of varying primary and secondary non-adherence rates for a different number of dispensed drugs

  13. Periodontal status of HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy compared to HIV-therapy naive patients: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although severe oral opportunistic infections decreased with the implementation of highly active antiretroviral therapy, periodontitis is still a commonly described problem in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The objective of the present investigation was to determine possible differences in periodontal parameters between antiretroviral treated and untreated patients. Methods The study population comprised 80 patients infected with HIV divided into two groups. The first group was receiving antiretroviral therapy while the second group was therapy naive. The following parameters were examined: probing pocket depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment level, papilla bleeding score, periodontal screening index and the index for decayed, missed and filled teeth. A questionnaire concerning oral hygiene, dental care and smoking habits was filled out by the patients. Results There were no significant differences regarding the periodontal parameters between the groups except in the clinical marker for inflammation, the papilla bleeding score, which was twice as high (P Conclusion There is no indication for advanced periodontal damage in HIV-infected versus non-infected patients in comparable age groups. Due to their immunodeficiency, HIV-infected patients should be monitored closely to prevent irreversible periodontal damage. Periodontal monitoring and early therapy is recommended independent of an indication for highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  14. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point. PMID:27579326

  15. The Role of Social Capital in Successful Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ware, Norma C; John Idoko; Sylvia Kaaya; Irene Andia Biraro; Wyatt, Monique A.; Oche Agbaji; Guerino Chalamilla; David R Bangsberg

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic has killed more than 25 million people since 1981, and about 30 million people (22 million in sub-Saharan Africa alone) are currently infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. HIV destroys immune system cells, leaving infected individuals susceptible to other infections. Early in the AIDS epidemic, most HIV-infected individuals died within ten years but in 1996, combination antir...

  16. [Pharmacological strategies to improve the adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapé-Laffita, Oneyda

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la adherencia a la terapia antirretroviral es un factor importante para suprimir el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana. El propósito de la investigación que se presenta fue aplicar estrategias farmacológicas basadas en medidas farmacocinéticas para facilitar la adherencia a la terapia antirretroviral. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo durante ocho meses, con 75 pacientes positivos al virus de inmunodeficiencia humana, con criterios clínicos y sociales para una terapia antirretroviral altamente activa, en Opuwo, Namibia. Se analizaron aspectos farmacológicos como la no existencia de efectos adversos graves ni interacciones medicamentosas riesgosas. El análisis de resultado fue realizado con estadística descriptiva. Resultados: fueron detectados tres efectos adversos leves (dos para efavirenz y uno para nevirapina) y uno grave para estavudina/lamivudina. Se evitaron las interacciones medicamentosas riesgosas aplicando medidas farmacocinéticas con efavirenz, estavudina/ lamivudina y zidovudina; así como entre nevirapina y fluconazol (o ketoconazol). Conclusiones: la adherencia a la terapia antirretroviral altamente activa se facilitó al aplicar las estrategias farmacológicas propuestas y se evitaron efectos adversos e interacciones medicamentosas riesgosas.

  17. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients’ adherence to music therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine Lundsfryd; Egelund, Torben; Munk Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric variables such as diagnoses, medication etc., and therapeutic variables. As outcome variable was drop out of treatment. Results: No variables were found to be statistically significant. 11 % dropped out a...

  18. Traditional medicine for HIV infected patients in antiretroviral therapy in a tertiary hospital in Kano, Northwest Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Igbiks Tamuno

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of use of traditional medicines amongst patients with HIV infection receiving therapies of antiretroviral(ARV) drugs at the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital(AKTH), Kano, Northwest Nigeria, and to assess the attitude of these patients to theirARV therapy.Methods: A cross sectional prospective study using pretested structured questionnaires administered on430 patients with antiretroviral therapy attending the AKTH between April and June2009. Data was collected on socio-demographic characteristics, use of traditional medicine and attitude to antiretroviral therapy.Results: A mean age of(33.6±8.4)years old was found with67.2% females and32.8% males. A total of29% had no formal education while 10.5% had postgraduate education;12% earned above 35 000 naira (230 USD) per month;63.8% were married;39.8% had at least2 sexual partners; 27.5% used traditional medicine before commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART), but only4.25% of patients used ARV and traditional medicine concurrently. There was no significant difference in most of the socio-demographic indices between the concurrent users and other patients (P>0.05). A total of 28.8% HIV patients,14.6% patients used traditional medicine beforeART and29.4% concurrent users had missed at least a dose of theirARVs since commencement of therapy. 148 (37%) of the patients had their drug regimen changed at least once while23 (20.90%) patients receiving traditional medicine beforeARTand5 (29.41%) patients having two treatments had their drug regimen changed.Conclusions: A total of4.25% patients used ARV and traditional medicine concurrently. In conclusion, the widespread use of traditional medicine by patients living with HIV/AIDSshould be of concern to clinicians and policy makers.

  19. Engagement with Care, Substance Use, and Adherence to Therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice K. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engagement with care for those living with HIV is aimed at establishing a strong relationship between patients and their health care provider and is often associated with greater adherence to therapy and treatment (Flickinger, Saha, Moore, and Beach, 2013. Substance use behaviors are linked with lower rates of engagement with care and medication adherence (Horvath, Carrico, Simoni, Boyer, Amico, and Petroli, 2013. This study is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional design from a larger randomized controlled trial (n=775 that investigated the efficacy of a self-care symptom management manual for participants living with HIV. Participants were recruited from countries of Africa and the US. This study provides evidence that substance use is linked with lower self-reported engagement with care and adherence to therapy. Data on substance use and engagement are presented. Clinical implications of the study address the importance of utilizing health care system and policy factors to improve engagement with care.

  20. Central nervous system HIV infection in "less-drug regimen" antiretroviral therapy simplification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gianotti, Nicola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Less-drug regimens (LDR) refer to combinations of either two antiretroviral drugs or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy. They may represent a simplification strategy in patients with persistently suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia, with the main benefits of reducing drug-related toxicities and costs. Systemic virological efficacy of LDR is slightly lower as compared with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but patients with failure do not usually develop drug resistance and resuppress HIV replication after reintensification. A major concern of LDR is the lower efficacy in the virus reservoirs, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), where viral compartmentalization and independent evolution of infection may lead to CNS viral escape, often associated with neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed studies of virological and functional CNS efficacy of LDR, particularly of boosted PI monotherapy regimens, for which more information is available. Symptomatic viral CSF escape was observed mainly in PI/r monotherapy patients with plasma failure and low nadir CD4+ cell counts, and resolved upon reintroduction of triple drug cART, whereas asymptomatic viral failure in CSF was not significantly more frequent in patients on PI/r monotherapy compared with patients on standard cART. In addition, there was no difference in functional outcomes between PI monotherapy and cART patients, irrespective of CSF viral escape. More data are needed on the CNS effect of dual ART regimens and, in general, on long-term efficacy of LDR. Simplification with LDR may be an attractive option in patients with suppressed viral load, if they are well selected and monitored for potential CNS complications.

  1. Progress of the National Pediatric Free Antiretroviral Therapy program in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xin; He, Yun; Tang, Zhirong; Peng, Guoping; Liu, Aiwen; Qiao, Xiaochun; Li, Huiqin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Dou, Zhihui; Ma, Ye; Liu, Zhongfu; Zhang, Fujie

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Chinese Government initiated a free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program focusing on adult AIDS patients. Pediatric antiretroviral (ARV) formulations were yet unavailable. It was not until July 2005, with the initiation of a two-stage program implemented by the Chinese Ministry of Health, that pediatric formulations became accessible in China. Initially, the pediatric ART program was piloted in six provinces with the highest incidences of pediatric HIV/AIDS. The pilot stage allowed the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC) to finalize entry criteria, treatment regimen, and patient monitoring and follow-up procedures. The second stage commenced at the end of 2006 when the program was scaled-up nationally. In order to guarantee treatment of pediatric patients, extensive training in the selection of appropriate ARV drug regimen and dosage was provided to doctors, often through on-site collaboration with domestic and international experts. The CCDC simultaneously established a pediatric ARV management system and a pediatric ART information system. CD4 count and other laboratory tests are being routinely performed on these pediatric patients. By the end of June 2009, 1529 pediatric patients had received ARV under the national program. However, challenges remain. Firstly, many children infected with HIV/AIDS live in rural areas where the treatment quality is hindered by the limited number of medical facilities and skilled medical workers. Secondly, much of the pediatric ARV drug supply depends on donation. An effort needs to be made by the Chinese Government to establish China's own drug procurement and supply system.

  2. Formative evaluation of antiretroviral therapy scale-up efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Glenn; Ryan, Gery; Taylor, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    With millions in need of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world, and scarce human and fiscal resources available, we conducted a formative evaluation of scale-up operations at clinics associated with AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Africa to identify lessons learned for improving scale-up efficiency. Site visits were made to six selected clinics in Uganda, Zambia, and South Africa, during which semistructured interviews with key stake-holders and observation of client flows and clinic operations were performed. This evaluation revealed the following lessons related to factors that are critical to efficient ART scale-up: (1) to ensure steady ART uptake, it is important to involve the community and community leaders in outreach, HIV education, and program decision-making; (2) minimizing bottlenecks to smooth patient flow requires efficient staff allocation to appropriate clinical duties, streamlined clinic visit schedule protocols, and tapping clients and the HIV community as a key source of labor; (3) to minimize clients dropping out of care, structures should be developed that enable clients to provide support and a "safety net" for helping each other remain in care; (4) computerized record management systems are essential for accurate antiretroviral inventory and dispensing records, quality assurance monitoring, and client enrollment records and visit scheduling; (5) effective organizational management and human resource policies are essential to maintain high job performance and satisfaction and limit burnout; (6) to maximize impact on social and economic health, it is important for ART programs to develop effective mechanisms for coordinating and referring clients to support service organizations. PMID:18240896

  3. Birth outcomes in South African women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Merwe Karin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, a triple-drug combination, in HIV-infected pregnant women markedly reduces mother to child transmission of HIV and decreases maternal morbidity. However, there remains uncertainty about the effects of in utero exposure to HAART on foetal development. Methods Our objectives were to investigate whether in utero exposure to HAART is associated with low birth weight and/or preterm birth in a population of South African women with advanced HIV disease. A retrospective observational study was performed on women with CD4 counts ≤250 cells/mm3 attending antenatal antiretroviral clinics in Johannesburg between October 2004 and March 2007. Low birth weight ( Results Among HAART-unexposed infants, 27% (60/224 were low birth weight compared with 23% (90/388 of early HAART-exposed (exposed 3 increase, 95% CI 0.45-0.71, p 3 increase, 95% CI 0.55-0.85, p = 0.001. HAART exposure was associated with an increased preterm birth rate (15%, or 138 of 946, versus 5%, or seven of 147, in unexposed infants, p = 0.001, with early nevirapine and efavirenz-based regimens having the strongest associations with preterm birth (AOR 5.4, 95% CI 2.1-13.7, p Conclusions In this immunocompromised cohort, in utero HAART exposure was not associated with low birth weight. An association between NNRTI-based HAART and preterm birth was detected, but residual confounding is plausible. More advanced immunosuppression was a risk factor for low birth weight and preterm birth, highlighting the importance of earlier HAART initiation in women to optimize maternal health and improve infant outcomes.

  4. Interactions of Papua New Guinea medicinal plant extracts with antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erica C.; Hathaway, Laura B.; Lamb, John G.; Pond, Chris D.; Rai, Prem P.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.; Franklin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance A substantial proportion of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) lives with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment requires lifelong use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The majority of people in PNG use traditional medicines (TM) derived from plants for all types of health promotions. Consequently, there is a concern that herb-drug interactions may impact the efficacy of ART. Herb-drug, or drug-drug, interactions occur at the level of metabolism through two major mechanisms: enzyme induction or enzyme inhibition. In this study, extracts of commonly-used medicinal plants from PNG were screened for herb-drug interactions related to cytochrome P450s (CYPs). Materials and Methods Sixty nine methanol extracts of TM plants were screened for their ability to induce CYPs by human aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (hAhR-) and human pregnane X receptor- (hPXR-) dependent mechanisms, utilizing a commercially available cell-based luciferase reporter system. Inhibition of three major CYPs, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP2D6, was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Results Almost one third of the TM plant extracts induced the hAhR-dependent expression of CYP1A2, the hPXR-dependent expression of CYP3A4, or both. Almost two thirds inhibited CYP1A2, CYP3A4, or CYP2D6, or combinations thereof. Many plant extracts exhibited both induction and inhibition properties. Conclusions We demonstrated that the potent and selective ability of extracts from PNG medicinal plants to affect drug metabolizing enzymes through induction and/or inhibition is a common phenomenon. Use of traditional medicines concomitantly with ART could dramatically alter the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in the body; and their efficacy. PNG healthcare providers should counsel HIV patients because of this consequence. PMID:25138353

  5. Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Associated Tuberculous Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to determine whether immediate ART reduced the risk of death. Antiretroviral drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz) were started either at study entry or 2 months after randomization. All patients were treated with standard antituberculosis treatment, adjunctive dexamethasone, and prophylactic co-trimoxazole and were followed up for 12 months. We conducted intention-to-treat, per-protocol, and prespecified subgroup analyses. Results A total of 253 patients were randomized, 127 in the immediate ART group and 126 in the deferred ART group; 76 and 70 patients died within 9 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. Immediate ART was not significantly associated with 9-month mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], .81–1.55; P = .50) or the time to new AIDS events or death (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .87–1.55; P = .31). The percentage of patients with severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse events was high in both arms (90% in the immediate ART group and 89% in the deferred ART group; P = .84), but there were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm (102 in the immediate ART group vs 87 in the deferred ART group; P = .04). Conclusions Immediate ART initiation does not improve outcome in patients presenting with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. There were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm, supporting delayed initiation of ART in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. Clinical Trials Registration ISRCTN63659091. PMID:21596680

  6. Progress of the National Pediatric Free Antiretroviral Therapy program in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xin; He, Yun; Tang, Zhirong; Peng, Guoping; Liu, Aiwen; Qiao, Xiaochun; Li, Huiqin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Dou, Zhihui; Ma, Ye; Liu, Zhongfu; Zhang, Fujie

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Chinese Government initiated a free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program focusing on adult AIDS patients. Pediatric antiretroviral (ARV) formulations were yet unavailable. It was not until July 2005, with the initiation of a two-stage program implemented by the Chinese Ministry of Health, that pediatric formulations became accessible in China. Initially, the pediatric ART program was piloted in six provinces with the highest incidences of pediatric HIV/AIDS. The pilot stage allowed the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC) to finalize entry criteria, treatment regimen, and patient monitoring and follow-up procedures. The second stage commenced at the end of 2006 when the program was scaled-up nationally. In order to guarantee treatment of pediatric patients, extensive training in the selection of appropriate ARV drug regimen and dosage was provided to doctors, often through on-site collaboration with domestic and international experts. The CCDC simultaneously established a pediatric ARV management system and a pediatric ART information system. CD4 count and other laboratory tests are being routinely performed on these pediatric patients. By the end of June 2009, 1529 pediatric patients had received ARV under the national program. However, challenges remain. Firstly, many children infected with HIV/AIDS live in rural areas where the treatment quality is hindered by the limited number of medical facilities and skilled medical workers. Secondly, much of the pediatric ARV drug supply depends on donation. An effort needs to be made by the Chinese Government to establish China's own drug procurement and supply system. PMID:20665285

  7. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: "Adherence" and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Hogue, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the fidelity of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) for depressed adolescents. Trained observers used the therapist behavior rating scale (3rd version) to code therapist behaviors in 45 sessions of ABFT and 45 sessions each from two empirically based treatments for adolescent substance abusers: multidimensional family…

  8. Failure of daily tenofovir to prevent HIV transmission or the establishment of a significant viral reservoir despite continued antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubanke Davies

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Truvada is licenced for HIV-1 prevention in the USA and is available in the private sector. Tenofovir performed as well as Truvada in the PARTNERS PrEP study and is used as HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP in some settings. The clinical efficacy of Tenofovir for PrEP outside a clinical trial is unknown. Antiretroviral therapy (ART at acute HIV-1 infection (AHI limits the size of the reservoir, optimizing the chance of maintaining viral control off therapy. As such ART at acute HIV infection is proposed to offer a functional cure in a minority of subjects. We present two cases where Tenofovir PrEP failed to prevent HIV acquisition and failed to limit viral reservoir. Materials and Methods: Two individuals receiving tenofovir monotherapy for Hepatitis B monoinfection were diagnosed with AHI as defined by a negative HIV antibody test within three months of a positive HIV test following unsafe sex with casual male partners. In-depth histories were taken. Viral genotypes and Tenofovir drug levels were measured from samples taken as close to HIV seroconversion as possible and subsequent samples were analyzed for proviral Total HIV-1 DNA by qPCR. Results: Patient A had received tenofovir for the preceding six years and always maintained an undetectable Hepatitis B viral load with no concerns about adherence. Two weeks preceding the positive HIV antibody test, he experienced mild symptoms (fever, pharyngitis of HIV seroconversion. HIV status was confirmed by a repeat fourth generation HIV antibody test and by Western Blot and an HIV viral load was undetectable. Tenofovir trough level at HIV diagnosis was within normal limits. The regimen was intensified to Eviplera and a total HIV-1 DNA was 1381 copies/million CD4 T cells. Patient B received four regimens for hepatitis B treatment before starting tenofovir monotherapy in 2011 and subsequently maintained an undetectable hepatitis B viral load. After three years of tenofovir monotherapy he

  9. Monitoring Therapy Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients by using Video-Enabled Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Alistair; Garfein, Richard S.; Hayward, Andrew; Rusovich, Valiantsin; Dadu, Andrei; Soltan, Viorel; Oprunenco, Alexandru; Collins, Kelly; Sarin, Rohit; Quraishi, Subhi; Sharma, Mukta; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Varadarajan, Maithili

    2016-01-01

    A recent innovation to help patients adhere to daily tuberculosis (TB) treatment over many months is video (or virtually) observed therapy (VOT). VOT is becoming increasingly feasible as mobile telephone applications and tablet computers become more widely available. Studies of the effectiveness of VOT in improving TB patient outcomes are being conducted. PMID:26891363

  10. Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

  11. Patient Adherence Predicts Outcome from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Maher, Michael J.; Wang, Yuanjia; Bao, Yuanyuan; Foa, Edna B.; Franklin, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of patient adherence on outcome from exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) therapy in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Thirty adults with OCD were randomized to EX/RP (n = 15) or EX/RP augmented by motivational interviewing strategies (n = 15). Both treatments included 3 introductory…

  12. The impact of the Danish Oxygen Register on adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Lange, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of The Danish Oxygen Register on COPD patients' treatment modalities, survival, and adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT).......To evaluate the impact of The Danish Oxygen Register on COPD patients' treatment modalities, survival, and adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT)....

  13. HIV treatment as prevention: Systematic comparison of mathematical models of the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on HIV incidence in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Eaton (Jeffrey); L.F. Johnson (Leigh); J.A. Salomon (Joshua); T. Bärnighausen (Till); A. Bendavid (Avrom); A. Bershteyn (Anna); D.E. Bloom (David); V. Cambiano (Valentina); C. Fraser (Christophe); J.A.C. Hontelez (Jan A.C.); S. Humair (Salal); D.J. Klein (David); E.F. Long (Elisa); A. Phillips (Andrew); C. Pretorius (Carel); J. Stover (John); E.A. Wenger (Edward); B. Williams (Brian); T.B. Hallett (Timothy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Many mathematical models have investigated the impact of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on new HIV infections. Comparing results and conclusions across models is challenging because models have addressed slightly different questions and have reported differe

  14. HIV treatment as prevention: systematic comparison of mathematical models of the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on HIV incidence in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eaton, J.W.; Johnson, L.F.; Salomon, J.A.; Barnighausen, T.; Bendavid, E.; Bershteyn, A.; Bloom, D.E.; Cambiano, V.; Fraser, C.; Hontelez, J.A.C.; Humair, S.; Klein, D.J.; Long, E.F.; Phillips, A.N.; Pretorius, C.; Stover, J.; Wenger, E.A.; Williams, B.G.; Hallett, T.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many mathematical models have investigated the impact of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on new HIV infections. Comparing results and conclusions across models is challenging because models have addressed slightly different questions and have reported different outcome m

  15. Opportunistic disease and mortality in patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C virus in the strategic management of antiretroviral therapy (SMART) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacquie;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Strategic Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, the risk of opportunistic disease (OD) and/or death due to any cause was elevated in the drug conservation (i.e., interrupt antiretroviral therapy until the CD4(+) cell count is ... with the viral suppression (continued use of antiretroviral therapy) group. We assessed whether participants with concurrent hepatitis had an increased risk of the end points evaluated in the SMART study. METHODS: Participants were classified as being positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV) if they had positive...... of antiretroviral therapy is particularly unsafe in persons with hepatitis virus coinfection. Although HCV- and/or HBV-coinfected participants constituted 17% of participants in the SMART study, almost one-half of all non-OD deaths occurred in this population. Viral hepatitis was an unlikely cause of this excess...

  16. Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea M; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnouris...

  17. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Francesca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection.

  18. Disease-modifying therapeutic concepts for HIV in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Scott L; Valdez, Hernan; Westby, Michael; Perros, Manos; June, Carl H; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Levy, Yves; Cooper, David A; Douek, Daniel; Lederman, Michael M; Tebas, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    Chronic HIV infection is associated with persistent immune activation and inflammation even among patients virologically suppressed on antiretroviral therapy for years. Chronic immune activation has been associated with poor outcomes--both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining clinical events--and persistent CD4 T-cell depletion. The cause of chronic immune activation in well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. Proposed drivers include residual viral replication, microbial translocation, and coinfecting pathogens. Therapeutic interventions targeting immune activation are emerging, from approaches that interfere directly with activation and inflammatory pathways to those that prevent microbial translocation or decrease the availability of host target cells for the virus. In the context of the disappointing results of the interleukin-2 trials, the main challenges to developing these disease-modifying therapies include identifying an adequate target population and choosing surrogate endpoints that will provide positive proof-of-concept that the interventions will translate into long-term clinical benefit before embarking on large clinical endpoint trials. PMID:21792065

  19. Arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia in a HIV-positive patient treated with antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Maloberti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART has substantially modified the clinical history and epidemiology of HIV infection with an important decline in infective causes of death and an increase in non-infective comorbidities particularly in cardiovascular complications. HIV infection has been related to an increased cardiovascular risk due to the presence of three factors: classic cardiovascular risk factors (shared with the general population, HIV infection itself (indirectly due to the inflammation and directly due to viral molecule and ART-related chronic metabolic alterations. We describe a peculiar case of metabolic alteration in an HIV infected patient on ART with particular attention to the diagnosis and therapeutic aspects. Giving the higher cardiovascular risk of this specific population it is advisable that the clinician performs a frequent re-assessment of risk factors and cardiovascular organ damage. An early detection of metabolic alteration must lead to an aggressive specific therapy; this must be done by taking care of the HIV-infected subject fragility and the interactions with ART.

  20. KIR-HLA genotypes in HIV-infected patients lacking immunological recovery despite effective antiretroviral therapy.

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    Alessandro Soria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In HIV-infected individuals, mechanisms underlying unsatisfactory immune recovery during effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART have yet to be fully understood. We investigated whether polymorphism of genes encoding immune-regulating molecules, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and their ligands class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA, could influence immunological response to cART. METHODS: KIR and HLA frequencies were analyzed in 154 HIV-infected and cART-treated patients with undetectable viral load divided into two groups: 'immunological non responders' (INR, N = 50, CD4(+ T-cell count 350/mm(3. Molecular KIR were typed using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. Comparisons were adjusted for baseline patient characteristics. RESULTS: The frequency of KIR2DL3 allele was significantly higher in FR than in INR (83.7% vs. 62%, P = 0.005. The functional compound genotype HLA-C1(+/KIR2DL3(+, even at multivariable analysis, when adjusted for nadir CD4(+ T-cell count, was associated with reduced risk of INR status: odds ratio (95% Confidence Intervals 0.34 (0.13-0.88, P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced presence of the inhibitory KIR2DL3 genotype detected in INR might provoke an imbalance in NK function, possibly leading to increased immune activation, impaired killing of latently infected cells, and higher proviral burden. These factors would hinder full immune recovery during therapy.

  1. START or SMART? Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Cardiovascular Risk for People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedner, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    The Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection (START) study has reinforced the benefits of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, a notable secondary finding from that study was that immediate initiation of ART did not prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (0.17 vs 0.20 events/1000 person-years, P = .65). This result appears to contradict a body of evidence, most notably from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, which reported a 70% increased hazard of cardiovascular events for those deferring or interrupting treatment. Thus, an important unresolved question is whether the timing of ART impacts CVD risk. In this review, published data on relationships between timing of ART and CVD risk are reviewed. The data support a role for ART in mitigating CVD risk at lower CD4 counts, but data also suggests that, among those initiating therapy early, ART alone appears to suboptimally mitigate CVD risk. Additional interventions to address CVD risk among human immunodeficiency virus-infected populations are likely to be needed. PMID:26989755

  2. Adherence to Medical Regimens: Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Appraisal, Quality of Life, and Perceived Family Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, Michael P.; Bishop, Malachy; Tschopp, Molly K.; Ferrin, Micheal J.; Frain, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Adherence studies have taken center stage due to the life-threatening risks associated with nonadherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens for people with HIV/AIDS. This study examines adherence through self-report of individuals on HAART regimens in a manner to account for demand characteristic bias, while still attempting…

  3. Compression therapies for chronic venous leg ulcers: interventions and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latz CA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Latz,1 Kellie R Brown,2 Ruth L Bush11Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA; 2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Compression therapy has been the mainstay for the treatment of lower extremity edema, venous insufficiency, and particularly, venous ulcerative disease. Though modern surgical treatments exist, none are completely effective without good compressive options to allow for decreased swelling and better oxygenation of damaged tissues. This review article will describe the pathophysiology and presentation of lower extremity venous ulcerations, as well as current options for compression therapy. The benefits, along with the major pitfall of nonadherence, will also be discussed.Keywords: venous disease, chronic venous insufficiency, venous ulceration

  4. Therapeutic adherence and competence scales for Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy for adolescents with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Gutermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of therapeutic adherence and competence is often neglected in psychotherapy research, particularly in children and adolescents; however, both variables are crucial for the interpretation of treatment effects. Objective: Our aim was to develop, adapt, and pilot two scales to assess therapeutic adherence and competence in a recent innovative program, Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy (D-CPT, for adolescents suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD after childhood abuse. Method: Two independent raters assessed 30 randomly selected sessions involving 12 D-CPT patients (age 13–20 years, M age=16.75, 91.67% female treated by 11 therapists within the pilot phase of a multicenter study. Results: Three experts confirmed the relevance and appropriateness of each item. All items and total scores for adherence (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC]=0.76–1.00 and competence (ICC=0.78–0.98 yielded good to excellent inter-rater reliability. Cronbach's alpha was 0.59 for the adherence scale and 0.96 for the competence scale. Conclusions: The scales reliably assess adherence and competence in D-CPT for adolescent PTSD patients. The ratings can be helpful in the interpretation of treatment effects, the assessment of mediator variables, and the identification and training of therapeutic skills that are central to achieving good treatment outcomes. Both adherence and competence will be assessed as possible predictor variables for treatment success in future D-CPT trials.

  5. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. Patients and Methods: During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. Results: The median age was 50 years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p = 0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (P < 0.001, 0.003, respectively). Fasting, age, performance status, presence of metastases and type of hormonal therapy were not good predictors of adherence. Conclusions: While most of patients receiving OHT for BC are fasting during Ramadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment

  6. Analysis of reasons for low adherence to antiepileptic therapy in patients with symptomatic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Vagina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the major factors that influence treatment adherence.Patients and methods. One hundred patients aged 20 to 68 years (mean age 42.9±3.0 years for women and 43.3±5.0 years for men diagnosed with a ≥3-year history of symptomatic epilepsy were screened. The minimal and maximal durations of the disease were 5 and 59 years, respectively (mean 20.8±3.9 years.Results and discussion. There was a female preponderance in the treatment adherence group. The patients who had secondary special education were unemployed, disabled, and single were in both comparison groups. These data are indicative of social stigmatization in epileptic patients. Patients with severe epilepsy on multiple drug therapy were prevalent. Neuropsychological testing revealed higher levels of anxiety and depression among those who were non-adherent to therapy.Conclusion. The sex, age, and social characteristics (education level, disability of patients with epilepsy and its clinical picture, neurological symptoms and changes were ascertained by magnetic resonance imaging had no significant impact on therapy adherence.The factors influencing treatment adherence should include multiple drug therapy (co-administration of two or three drugs and the high frequency of drug use, which is more frequently observed in patients with severe treatment-resistant epilepsy. Anxiety and depressive disorders in epileptic patients resulted in impaired compliance with anticonvulsant therapy.

  7. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load.......Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load....

  8. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Obel, N; Nielsen, H;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).......The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)....

  9. Accumulation of protease mutations among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy and response to salvage therapy in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E Rawizza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines and programs in resource-limited settings (RLS have focused on 1(st- and 2(nd-line (2 L therapy. As programs approach a decade of implementation, policy regarding access to 3(rd-line (3 L ART is needed. We aimed to examine the impact of maintaining patients on failing 2 L ART on the accumulation of protease (PR mutations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From 2004-2011, the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR Program provided ART to >100,000 people in Nigeria. Genotypic resistance testing was performed on a subset of patients experiencing 2 L failure, defined as 2 consecutive viral loads (VL>1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months on 2 L. Of 6714 patients who received protease inhibitor (PI-based ART, 673 (10.0% met virologic failure criteria. Genotypes were performed on 61 samples. Patients on non-suppressive 2 L therapy for 24 months. Patients developed a median of 0.6 (IQR: 0-1.4 IAS PR mutations per 6 months on failing 2 L therapy. In 38% of failing patients no PR mutations were present. For patients failing >24 months, high- or intermediate-level resistance to lopinavir and atazanavir was present in 63%, with 5% to darunavir. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report assessing the impact of duration of non-suppressive 2 L therapy on the accumulation of PR resistance in a RLS. This information provides insight into the resistance cost of failing to switch non-suppressive 2 L regimens and highlights the issue of 3 L access.

  10. Frequent hepatitis B virus rebound among HIV-hepatitis B virus-coinfected patients following antiretroviral therapy interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dore, Gregory J; Soriano, Vicente; Rockstroh, Jürgen;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients was examined in the Strategic Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) study. METHODS: Plasma HBV DNA was measured in all hepatitis B surface antigen-positive (HBV.......0002), nondetectable HBV DNA at baseline (P = 0.007), and black race (P = 0.03). Time to ART reinitiation was shorter (7.5, 15.6, and 17.8 months; P hepatitis C virus-positive and non-HBV/hepatitis...... C virus participants in the drug conservation arm. No hepatic decompensation events occurred among HBV-positive participants in either arm. CONCLUSION: HBV DNA rebound following ART interruption is common and may be associated with accelerated immune deficiency in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients....

  11. Cellular automata approach for the dynamics of HIV infection under antiretroviral therapies: The role of the virus diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo; Coutinho, Sérgio

    2013-10-01

    We study a cellular automata model to test the timing of antiretroviral therapy strategies for the dynamics of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We focus on the role of virus diffusion when its population is included in previous cellular automata model that describes the dynamics of the lymphocytes cells population during infection. This inclusion allows us to consider the spread of infection by the virus-cell interaction, beyond that which occurs by cell-cell contagion. The results show an acceleration of the infectious process in the absence of treatment, but show better efficiency in reducing the risk of the onset of AIDS when combined antiretroviral therapies are used even with drugs of low effectiveness. Comparison of results with clinical data supports the conclusions of this study.

  12. Retrospective Analysis of Medication Adherence and Cost Following Medication Therapy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Branham, PharmD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine if pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM improves medication adherence in Medicare patients. A secondary objective is to compare the total monthly cost of a patient’s prescription medication regimen 6 months before and 6 months following a comprehensive medication review (CMR. Design: Retrospective analysis of medication adherence, pre-post comparison. Setting: Three independent pharmacies in North Carolina. Patients: 97 Medicare Part D beneficiaries with one or more chronic disease states who participated in a comprehensive medication review (CMR. Intervention: MTM services provided by community pharmacists. Main outcome measure: Change in adherence as measured by the proportion of days covered (PDC and change in medication costs for patients and third party payers. Results: Patients were adherent to chronic disease-state medications before and after MTM (PDC≥ 0.8. Overall, change in mean adherence before and after MTM did not change significantly (0.87 and 0.88, respectively; p = 0.43. However, patients taking medications for cholesterol management, GERD, thyroid and BPH demonstrated improved adherence following a CMR. No change in adherence was noted for patients using antihypertensives and antidiabetic agents. Average total chronic disease-state medication costs for participants were reduced from $210.74 to $193.63 (p=0.08 following the comprehensive medication review. Total costs for patient and third party payers decreased from patients prescribed antilipemics, antihypertensives, GERD and thyroid disorders following a CMR. Conclusions: Pharmacist-provided MTM services were effective at improving medication adherence for some patients managed with chronic medications. Pharmacist-provided MTM services also were effective in decreasing total medication costs.

  13. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

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    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  14. Adjudicated morbidity and mortality outcomes by age among individuals with HIV infection on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease and non-AIDS defining cancers dominate causes of morbidity and mortality among persons with HIV on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy. Accurate estimates of disease incidence and of risk factors for these conditions are important in planning preventative efforts. METHODS: With use of medical records, serious non-AIDS events, AIDS events, and causes of death were adjudicated using pre-specified criteria by an Endpoint Review Committee in two large international trials. Rates of serious non-AIDS which include cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease, decompensated liver disease, and non-AIDS cancer, and other serious (grade 4 adverse events were determined, overall and by age, over a median follow-up of 4.3 years for 3,570 participants with CD4+ cell count ≥300 cells/mm³ who were taking antiretroviral therapy and had an HIV RNA level ≤500 copies/mL. Cox models were used to examine the effect of age and other baseline factors on risk of a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, AIDS, or serious non-AIDS. RESULTS: Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of the composite outcome, overall and by age were 8.3% (overall, 3.6% (<40, 8.7% (40-49 and 16.1% (≥50, respectively (p<0.001. In addition to age, smoking and higher levels of interleukin-6 and D-dimer were significant predictors of the composite outcome. The composite outcome was dominated by serious non-AIDS events (overall 65% of 277 participants with a composite event. Most serious non-AIDS events were due to cardiovascular disease and non-AIDS cancers. CONCLUSIONS: To date, few large studies have carefully collected data on serious non-AIDS outcomes. Thus, reliable estimates of event rates are scarce. Data cited here, from a geographically diverse cohort, will be useful for planning studies of interventions aimed at reducing rates of serious non-AIDS events among people with HIV.

  15. Contrasting Reasons for Discontinuation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Workplace and Public-Sector HIV Programs in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Dahab, Maysoon; Kielmann, Karina; Charalambous, Salome; Karstaedt, Alan S; Hamilton, Robin; La Grange, Lettie; Katherine L Fielding; Churchyard, Gavin J.; GRANT, Alison D

    2011-01-01

    We investigated reasons for clinical follow-up and treatment discontinuation among HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a public-sector clinic and in a workplace clinic in South Africa. Participants in a larger cohort study who had discontinued clinical care by the seventh month of treatment were traced using previously provided locator information. Those located were administered a semistructured questionnaire regarding reasons for discontinuing clinical follow-...

  16. Incidence and Predictors of Pregnancy among a Cohort of HIV-Positive Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Mbarara, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Kaida; Matthews, Lynn T.; Steve Kanters; Jerome Kabakyenga; Conrad Muzoora; A Rain Mocello; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Peter Hunt; Jessica Haberer; Robert S. Hogg; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Many people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa desire biological children. Implementation of HIV prevention strategies that support the reproductive goals of people living with HIV while minimizing HIV transmission risk to sexual partners and future children requires a comprehensive understanding of pregnancy in this population. We analyzed prospective cohort data to determine pregnancy incidence and predictors among HIV-positive women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy Helps HIV-Positive Women Navigate Social Expectations for and Clinical Recommendations against Childbearing in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmine Kastner; Matthews, Lynn T.; Ninsiima Flavia; Francis Bajunirwe; Susan Erikson; Nicole S. Berry; Angela Kaida

    2014-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence pregnancy decision-making and experiences among HIV-positive women is important for developing integrated reproductive health and HIV services. Few studies have examined HIV-positive women’s navigation through the social and clinical factors that shape experiences of pregnancy in the context of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We conducted 25 semistructured interviews with HIV-positive, pregnant women receiving ART in Mbarara, Uganda in 2011 to exp...

  18. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A; Naomi S Levitt; Cohen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern Africa...

  19. Incidence of HIV-associated tuberculosis among individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendesayi Kufa

    Full Text Available Knowledge of tuberculosis incidence and associated factors is required for the development and evaluation of strategies to reduce the burden of HIV-associated tuberculosis.Systematic literature review and meta-analysis of tuberculosis incidence rates among HIV-infected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy.From PubMed, EMBASE and Global Index Medicus databases, 42 papers describing 43 cohorts (32 from high/intermediate and 11 from low tuberculosis burden settings were included in the qualitative review and 33 in the quantitative review. Cohorts from high/intermediate burden settings were smaller in size, had lower median CD4 cell counts at study entry and fewer person-years of follow up. Tuberculosis incidence rates were higher in studies from Sub-Saharan Africa and from World Bank low/middle income countries. Tuberculosis incidence rates decreased with increasing CD4 count at study entry and duration on combination antiretroviral therapy. Summary estimates of tuberculosis incidence among individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy were higher for cohorts from high/intermediate burden settings compared to those from the low tuberculosis burden settings (4.17 per 100 person-years [95% Confidence Interval (CI 3.39-5.14 per 100 person-years] vs. 0.4 per 100 person-years [95% CI 0.23-0.69 per 100 person-years] with significant heterogeneity observed between the studies.Tuberculosis incidence rates were high among individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy in high/intermediate burden settings. Interventions to prevent tuberculosis in this population should address geographical, socioeconomic and individual factors such as low CD4 counts and prior history of tuberculosis.

  20. Small-Molecule Inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA Splicing as a Novel Antiretroviral Therapy to Overcome Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Bakkour; Yea-Lih Lin; Sophie Maire; Lilia Ayadi; Florence Mahuteau-Betzer; Chi Hung Nguyen; Clément Mettling; Pierre Portales; David Grierson; Benoit Chabot; Philippe Jeanteur; Christiane Branlant; Pierre Corbeau; Jamal Tazi

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Over the two decades highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV infection has led to a significant decline in morbidity and mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals. HAART uses a combination of molecules that target the virus itself. However, naturally occurring and extensive genetic variation found in the virus allow the emergence of drug-resistant viruses, which rapidly render individuals un