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Sample records for antiretroviral drug resistance

  1. Combined antiretroviral and anti- tuberculosis drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these epidemics, many challenges remain.[3] Antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance pose considerable threats to the control of these epidemics.[4,5]. The breakdown in HIV/TB control within prisons is another emerging threat.[6,7] We describe one of the first reports of combined antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance ...

  2. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  3. Insulin resistance induced by antiretroviral drugs: Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the prognosis of patients with AIDS, but it has also increased the incidence of various metabolic disorders, in particular insulin resistance accompanied by dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and lipodystrophy. This is often accompanied by frank type 2 ...

  4. Antiretroviral drug resistance: A guide for the southern African clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both private and public sector see a bewildering clinical array of patients taking failing antiretroviral (ARV) regimens. We intend this article to provide a practical guide to help clinicians understand and manage ARV drug resistance in an African context. ARV resistance is a rapidly evolving field, requiring expertise in dealing ...

  5. Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Bellan, Steven E

    2017-06-28

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of infection and modelled the patients' life expectancy as a function of ART initiation timing. We fitted this model to the annual AIDS incidence and death data directly, and to resistance data and demographic data indirectly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. Using counterfactual scenarios, we assessed the impact on total and drug-resistant HIV incidence of ART initiation timing, frequency of acquired drug resistance, and second-line drug effectiveness (defined as the combination of resistance monitoring, biomedical drug efficacy and adherence). Earlier ART initiation could decrease the number of both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence when second-line drug effectiveness is sufficiently high (greater than 80%), but increase the proportion of new infections that are drug resistant. Thus, resistance may paradoxically appear to be increasing while actually decreasing. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. The status of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Derdelinckx, Inge; van Vugt, Michèle; Stevens, Wendy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for persons infected with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa has greatly improved over the past few years. However, data on long-term clinical outcomes of Africans receiving HAART, patterns of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs and implications of

  7. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N.; Stevens, Wendy S.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Hamers, Raph L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load

  8. Primary antiretroviral drug resistance among HIV type 1-infected individuals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinz, Eduardo; Netto, Eduardo M; Patelli, Maria; Lima, J S; Lima, Maria Patelli J S; Furtado, Juvênao J D; da Eira, Margareth; Zajdenverg, Roberto; Madruga, José V; Lewi, David S; Machado, Alcyone A; Pedro, Rogério J; Soares, Marcelo A

    2009-09-01

    Infection with drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been documented in all countries that have surveyed for it and may result in an unfavorable response to therapy. The prevalence and characteristics of individuals with transmitted resistance to antiretroviral drugs have been scarcely described in Brazil. We performed antiretroviral resistance testing prior to initiation of therapy in 400 subjects enrolled from 20 centers in 13 Brazilian cities between March and September 2007. Genotyping was conducted using PCR-amplified HIV pol products by automated sequencing, and genotype interpretation was done according to the IAS-USA consensus. Of 400 eligible participants, 387 (95.8%) were successfully tested. Seven percent of antiretroviral-naive patients carried viruses with one or more major mutation associated with drug resistance. The prevalence of these mutations was 1.0% for protease inhibitors, 4.4% for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 1.3% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The frequency of multidrug resistance among the resistant strains was 13.6%. Among subjects infected with drug-resistant virus, the majority were infected with subtype B viruses (91%). Subjects from the city of São Paulo had higher transmitted resistance mutations compared to the rest of the country. Reporting a partner taking antiretroviral medications was associated with a higher chance of harboring HIV variants with major drug resistance mutations [odds ratio = 2.57 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-6.16); p = 0.014]. Resistance testing in drug-naive individuals identified 7% of subjects with mutations associated with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs. Continued surveillance of drug-resistant HIV-1 in Brazil is warranted when guidelines for HIV prophylaxis and treatment are updated. Resistance testing among drug-naive patients prior to treatment initiation should be considered, mainly directed at subjects whose partners are

  9. HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive individuals with HIV-1-associated tuberculous meningitis initiating antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thao, Vu P.; Le, Thuy; Török, Estee M.; Yen, Nguyen T. B.; Chau, Tran T. H.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; van Doorn, Rogier H.; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Dunstan, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals in Vietnam is rapidly expanding, but there are limited data on HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) to guide ART strategies. Methods: We retrospectively conducted HIVDR testing in 220 ART-naive individuals recruited to a

  10. Combined antiretroviral and antituberculosis drug resistance following incarceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Elizabeth Stott

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infection from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, characterised by drug resistance in both pathogens. The development of drug resistance was linked temporally to two periods of incarceration. This highlights the urgent need for improved integration of HIV/TB control strategies within prison health systems and within the broader public health framework.

  11. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  12. Antiretroviral Drug Resistance- implications for HIV/AIDS reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa and other developing countries. ... Abstract: Background: The introduction of the highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s has significantly reduced morbidities and prolonged the lifespan of people living with HIV. However ...

  13. [Characteristics of antiretroviral drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Esteban; Tuset, Montse; Martín, Maite; del Cacho, Elena

    2011-05-01

    As of November 2010, a total of 22 antiretroviral agents are marketed in Spain. These agents are divided into 6 classes according to their mechanism of action: 1) nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) (abacavir, didanosine, emtricitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, zidovudine, and tenofovir), 2) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) (efavirenz, etravirine, and nevirapine), 3) protease inhibitors (PI) (atazanavir, darunavir, fosamprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, tipranavir), 4) entry inhibitors (enfuvirtide), 5) coreceptor CCR5 inhibitors (maraviroc), and 6) integrase inhibitors (raltegravir). All 22 agents are indicated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral drugs. Most have also proven to be active against HIV-2 (except the NNRTIs, enfuvirtide, and maraviroc) and some are active against hepatitis B virus (lamivudine, emtricitabine, and tenofovir). The present article reviews the main characteristics of the different antiretroviral agents and classes, namely, commercial presentations, paediatric and adult dosages, dose adjustments in renal and hepatic insufficiency, pharmacokinetics and interactions, mechanism of action, treatment indications, resistance, adverse effects, and safety during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Some of the characteristics of antiretrovirals are class-specific and common to other agents of the same class, and others are individual and different from those of other drugs in the same class. Knowledge of these characteristics enables us to prepare efficacious therapeutic regimens according to the specific requirements of the patient (tolerability, simplicity, adaptability to lifestyle) and clinical setting (naive, simplification, rescue, resistance). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    A narrow therapeutic window. □ Good correlation between drug ... Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an additional monitoring tool to assist in the management of HIV-infected patients. Antiretroviral TDM is ... Antiretroviral TDM could play an important adjunctive role in our area. Clearly this will be a limited ...

  15. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    . The median number of resistance mutations was eight (interquartile range 2-10), and 81 (61%) patients had mutations conferring resistance towards all three major drug classes. In a regression model adjusted for CD4+ T-cell count, HIV RNA, year of TCF, age, gender and previous inferior antiretroviral therapy...... of death according to the number of mutations and individual mutations was estimated by Cox regression analysis and adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Resistance tests were done for 133 of the 179 patients who experienced TCF. The median number of resistance mutations was eight (interquartile...... range 2-10), and 81 (61%) patients had mutations conferring resistance towards all three major drug classes. In a regression model adjusted for CD4+ T-cell count, HIV RNA, year of TCF, age, gender and previous inferior antiretroviral therapy, harbouring > or =9 versus

  16. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Stevens, Wendy S; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Hamers, Raph L

    2016-11-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load monitoring, feasible and affordable technologies to detect drug-resistant HIV could help maximise the durability and rational use of available drug regimens. Potential low-cost technologies include in-house Sanger and next-generation sequencing in centralised laboratories, and point mutation assays and genotype-free systems that predict response to antiretroviral therapy at point-of-care. Strengthening of centralised high-throughput laboratories, including efficient systems for sample referral and results delivery, will increase economies-of-scale while reducing costs. Access barriers can be mitigated by standardisation of in-house assays into commercial kits, use of polyvalent instruments, and adopting price-reducing strategies. A stepwise rollout approach should improve feasibility, prioritising WHO-recommended population-based surveillance and management of complex patient categories, such as patients failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. Implementation research, adaptations of existing WHO guidance, and political commitment, will be key to support the appropriate investments and policy changes. In this Personal View, we discuss the potential role of HIV drug resistance testing for population-based surveillance and individual patient management in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the strengths and challenges of promising low-cost technologies and how they can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HIV-1 genetic diversity, geographical linkages and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saeed; Zahid, Maria; Qureshi, Muhammad Asif; Mughal, Muhammad Nouman; Ujjan, Ikram Din

    2018-01-01

    Worldwide antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the mortality and morbidity rates in individuals with HIV infection. However, the increasing occurrence of drug resistance is limiting treatment options. In recent years, Pakistan has witnessed a concentrated epidemic of HIV. It is very important to identify geographical linkages and mutations that generate selective pressure and drive resistance of HIV in our population. The aim of this work was to identify genetic diversity and drug resistance patterns of HIV in Pakistan, using available sequences and bioinformatics tools, which may help in selecting effective combination of available drugs. A total of 755 Pakistani HIV gag, pol and env sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos HIV database. Sequences were aligned with reference sequences of different subtypes. For geographical linkages, sequences of predominant subtypes were aligned with sequences of the same subtypes from different countries. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the maximum-likelihood method in MEGA 7 software. For drug resistance analysis, sequences were entered into the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Phylogenetic trees for studying genetic diversity showed that 82% of the sequences were of subtype A, while the rest of the sequences were of subtypes B (9.5%), K (2%), D (2%) and AE (1%). Moreover, trees that were constructed to examine geographical linkages showed close clustering of strains with those of the neighboring countries Afghanistan and India, as well as some African countries. A search for drug resistance mutations showed that 93% of the sequences had no major or minor mutations. The remaining 7% of the sequences contained a major mutation, Y115F, which causes the virus to exhibit low to intermediate resistance against lamivudine and emtricitabine. Our data indicate that HIV subtype A is the major subtype, while subtypes K, D and AE are also present in our country, suggesting gradual viral evolution and

  18. Low-abundance HIV drug-resistant viral variants in treatment-experienced persons correlate with historical antiretroviral use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Le

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is largely unknown how frequently low-abundance HIV drug-resistant variants at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasi-species are present in antiretroviral-experienced persons experiencing virologic failure. Further, the clinical implications of low-abundance drug-resistant variants at time of virologic failure are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma samples from 22 antiretroviral-experienced subjects collected at time of virologic failure (viral load 1380 to 304,000 copies/mL were obtained from a specimen bank (from 2004-2007. The prevalence and profile of drug-resistant mutations were determined using Sanger sequencing and ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Genotypes were interpreted using Stanford HIV database algorithm. Antiretroviral treatment histories were obtained by chart review and correlated with drug-resistant mutations. Low-abundance drug-resistant mutations were detected in all 22 subjects by deep sequencing and only in 3 subjects by Sanger sequencing. In total they accounted for 90 of 247 mutations (36% detected by deep sequencing; the majority of these (95% were not detected by standard genotyping. A mean of 4 additional mutations per subject were detected by deep sequencing (p<0.0001, 95%CI: 2.85-5.53. The additional low-abundance drug-resistant mutations increased a subject's genotypic resistance to one or more antiretrovirals in 17 of 22 subjects (77%. When correlated with subjects' antiretroviral treatment histories, the additional low-abundance drug-resistant mutations correlated with the failing antiretroviral drugs in 21% subjects and correlated with historical antiretroviral use in 79% subjects (OR, 13.73; 95% CI, 2.5-74.3, p = 0.0016. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low-abundance HIV drug-resistant mutations in antiretroviral-experienced subjects at time of virologic failure can increase a subject's overall burden of resistance, yet commonly go unrecognized by conventional

  19. Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Among Children and Youth in the United States With Perinatal HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Russell B; Patel, Kunjal; Kagan, Ron M; Karalius, Brad; Traite, Shirley; Meyer, William A; Tassiopoulos, Katherine K; Seage, George R; Seybolt, Lorna M; Burchett, Sandra; Hazra, Rohan; Lurie, Robert H; Yogev, Ram; Sanders, Margaret Ann; Malee, Kathleen; Hunter, Scott; Shearer, William; Paul, Mary; Cooper, Norma; Harris, Lynnette; Purswani, Murli; Baig, Mahboobullah; Cintron, Anna; Puga, Ana; Navarro, Sandra; Garvie, Patricia; Blood, James; Burchett, Sandra; Karthas, Nancy; Kammerer, Betsy; Wiznia, Andrew; Burey, Marlene; Nozyce, Molly; Dieudonne, Arry; Bettica, Linda; Adubato, Susan; Chen, Janet; Bulkley, Maria Garcia; Ivey, Latreaca; Grant, Mitzie; Knapp, Katherine; Allison, Kim; Wilkins, Megan; Acevedo-Flores, Midnela; Rios, Heida; Olivera, Vivian; Silio, Margarita; Jones, Medea; Sirois, Patricia; Spector, Stephen; Norris, Kim; Nichols, Sharon; McFarland, Elizabeth; Katai, Alisa; Dunn, Jennifer; Paul, Suzanne; Scott, Gwendolyn; Bryan, Patricia; Willen, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Among 234 US youths with perinatal human immunodeficiency virus, 75% had antiretroviral resistance, substantially higher than that of the reference laboratory overall (36%-44%). Resistance to newer antiretrovirals and to all antiretrovirals in a class was uncommon. The only factor independently associated with future resistance was a higher peak viral load. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  1. HIV drug resistance following a decade of the free antiretroviral therapy programme in India: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karade, Santosh; Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Sen, Sourav; Joshi, Rajneesh K; Kulkarni, Smita S; Shankar, Subramanian; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review was to assess the burden of HIV drug resistance mutations (DRM) in Indian adults exposed to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) as per national guidelines. An advanced search of the published literature on HIV drug resistance in India was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases. Data pertaining to age, sex, CD4 count, viral load, and prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM were extracted from each publication. Year-wise Indian HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos HIV database and mutation analyses were performed. A time trend analysis of the proportion of sequences showing NRTI resistance mutations among individuals exposed to first-line ART was conducted. Overall, 23 studies (1046 unique RT sequences) were identified indicating a prevalence of drug resistance to NRTI and NNRTI. The proportion of RT sequences with any DRM, any NRTI DRM, and any NNRTI DRM was 78.39%, 68.83%, and 73.13%, respectively. The temporal trend analysis of individual DRM from sequences retrieved during 2004-2014 indicated a rising trend in K65R mutations (p=0.013). Although the overall burden of resistance against first-line ART agents remained steady over the study decade, periodic monitoring is essential. There is the need to develop an HIV-1 subtype C-specific resistance database in India. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected drug users does not have an impact on antiretroviral resistance: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Duncan Smith-Rohrberg; Kozal, Michael J; Bruce, R Douglas; Springer, Sandra A; Altice, Frederick L

    2007-12-15

    Directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) is an effective intervention that improves clinical outcomes among HIV-infected drug users. Its effects on antiretroviral drug resistance, however, are unknown. We conducted a community-based, prospective, randomized controlled trial of DAART compared with self-administered therapy (SAT). We performed a modified intention-to-treat analysis among 115 subjects who provided serum samples for HIV genotypic resistance testing at baseline and at follow-up. The main outcomes measures included total genotypic sensitivity score, future drug options, number of new drug resistance mutations (DRMs), and number of new major International AIDS Society (IAS) mutations. The adjusted probability of developing at least 1 new DRM did not differ between the 2 arms (SAT: 0.41 per person-year [PPY], DAART: 0.49 PPY; adjusted relative risk [RR] = 1.04; P = 0.90), nor did the number of new mutations (SAT: 0.76 PPY, DAART: 0.83 PPY; adjusted RR = 0.99; P = 0.99) or the probability of developing new major IAS new drug mutations (SAT: 0.30 PPY, DAART: 0.33 PPY; adjusted RR = 1.12; P = 0.78). On measures of GSS and FDO, the 2 arms also did not differ. In this trial, DAART provided on-treatment virologic benefit for HIV-infected drug users without affecting the rate of development of antiretroviral medication resistance.

  3. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  4. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahov David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  5. Low-Frequency Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected Ugandans on Antiretroviral Treatment Is Associated with Regimen Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kyeyune, Fred; Gibson, Richard M.; Nankya, Immaculate; Venner, Colin; Metha, Samar; Akao, Juliet; Ndashimye, Emmanuel; Kityo, Cissy M.; Salata, Robert A.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Arts, Eric J.; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Uganda continue to fail their treatment regimen even if a dominant drug-resistant HIV-1 genotype is not detected. In a recent retrospective study, we observed that approximately 30% of HIV-infected individuals in the Joint Clinical Research Centre (Kampala, Uganda) experienced virologic failure with a susceptible HIV-1 genotype based on standard Sanger sequencing. Selection of minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants (not detectable by Sanger se...

  6. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Siwale, Margaret; Wallis, Carole L.; Labib, Moheb; van Hasselt, Robbert; Stevens, Wendy S.; Schuurman, Rob; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess

  7. Detection of HIV drug resistance during antiretroviral treatment and clinical progression in a large European cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE(S): To investigate the relationship between detection of HIV drug resistance by 2 years from starting antiretroviral therapy and the subsequent risk of progression to AIDS and death. DESIGN: Virological failure was defined as experiencing two consecutive viral loads of more than 400...

  8. Drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive children newly diagnosed with HIV-1 in Manaus, Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Solange Dourado de; Sabidó, Meritxell; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Benzaken, Adele Schwartz; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of drug resistance mutations (DRM), the prevalence of drug susceptibility [transmitted drug resistance (TDR)] and the prevalence of HIV-1 variants among treatment-naive HIV-infected children in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil. Children born to HIV-infected mothers and diagnosed with HIV in an HIV reference service centre and with available pol sequence between 2010 and 2015 prior to antiretroviral initiation were included. TDR was identified using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool. HIV-1 subtypes were defined by Rega and phylogenetic analyses. One hundred and seventeen HIV-infected children with a median age of 3.7 years were included. Among them, 28.2% had been exposed to some form of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). HIV DRM were present in 21.4% of all children. Among PMTCT-exposed children, 3% had NRTI mutations, 15.2% had NNRTI mutations and 3% had PI mutations. Among PMTCT-unexposed children, 1.2% had NRTI mutations, 21.4% had non-NNRTI mutations and 1.2% had PI mutations. The most common DRM was E138A (8.5%). The prevalence of TDR was 16.2%; 21.1% among PMTCT-exposed children and 14.3% among PMTC-unexposed children. The analysis of HIV-1 subtypes revealed that 80.2% were subtype B, 6.0% were subtype C, 3.4% were subtype F1 and 10.3% were possible unique recombinant forms (BF1, 4.3%; DB, 4.3%; BC, 0.9%; KC, 0.9%). We report a high prevalence of DRM in this population, including in almost a quarter of children with no reported PMTCT. The high prevalence of TDR observed might compromise ART effectiveness. Results show extensive HIV-1 diversity and expansion of subtype C, which highlights the need for surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes in Amazonas state.

  9. Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive patients aged less than 25 years, in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Chantratita, Wasun

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR) is a concern after global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). World Health Organization had developed threshold survey method for surveillance of TDR in resource-limited countries. ART in Thailand has been scaling up for >10 years. To evaluate the current TDR in Thailand, a cross-sectional study was conducted among antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients aged Thailand after a decade of rapid scale-up of ART. Interventions to prevent TDR at the population level are essentially needed in Thailand. Surveillance for TDR in Thailand has to be regularly performed.

  10. Prevalence of drug resistance and importance of viral load measurements in Honduran HIV-infected patients failing antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Wendy; de Rivera, I L; Parham, L; Jovel, E; Palou, E; Karlsson, A C; Albert, J

    2010-02-01

    The Honduran HIV/AIDS Program began to scale up access to HIV therapy in 2002. Up to May 2008, more than 6000 patients received combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). As HIV drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective treatment, the purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance in Honduran HIV-1-infected individuals. We collected samples from 138 individuals (97 adults and 41 children) on cART with virological, immunological or clinical signs of treatment failure. HIV-1 pol sequences were obtained using an in-house method. Resistance mutations were identified according to the 2007 International AIDS Society (IAS)-USA list and predicted susceptibility to cART was scored using the ANRS algorithm. Resistance mutations were detected in 112 patients (81%), 74% in adults and 98% in children. Triple-, dual- and single-class drug resistance was documented in 27%, 43% and 11% of the study subjects, respectively. Multiple logistic regression showed that resistance was independently associated with type of treatment failure [virological failure (odds ratio (OR) = 1) vs. immunological failure (OR = 0.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.030-0.43) vs. clinical failure (OR = 0.037; 95% CI 0.0063-0.22)], route of transmission (OR = 42.8; 95% CI 3.73-491), and years on therapy (OR = 1.81; 95% CI 1.11-2.93). The prevalence of antiretroviral resistance was high in Honduran HIV-infected patients with signs of treatment failure. A majority of study subjects showed dual- or triple-class resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. Virologically defined treatment failure was a strong predictor of resistance, indicating that viral load testing is needed to correctly identify patients with treatment failure attributable to resistance.

  11. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of potential responses to future high levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral drug-naive populations beginning treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Miners, Alec

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With continued roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, evidence is emerging of increasing levels of transmitted drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different potential public health responses to substantial......-effectiveness threshold. Results from our model will help inform WHO recommendations on monitoring of HIV drug resistance in people starting ART. FUNDING: WHO (with funds provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), CHAIN (European Commission)....

  12. Brief Report: HIV Drug Resistance in Adults Failing Early Antiretroviral Treatment: Results From the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M; Hudelson, Sarah E; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi C; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Santos, Breno R; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350-550 cells per cubic millimeter and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7 of 8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts.

  13. The incidence rate of HIV type-1 drug resistance in patients on antiretroviral therapy: a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study 1999-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, A.M.; Lohse, N.; Obel, N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV carry a lower risk of inducing drug resistance mutations. We estimated changes in incidence rates (IRs) of new mutations in HIV-infected individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Population-based data...

  14. Small-molecule inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA splicing as a novel antiretroviral therapy to overcome drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bakkour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises antiretroviral therapy efficacy and limits therapeutic options. Therefore, it is an ongoing task to identify new targets for antiretroviral therapy and to develop new drugs. Here, we show that an indole derivative (IDC16 that interferes with exonic splicing enhancer activity of the SR protein splicing factor SF2/ASF suppresses the production of key viral proteins, thereby compromising subsequent synthesis of full-length HIV-1 pre-mRNA and assembly of infectious particles. IDC16 inhibits replication of macrophage- and T cell-tropic laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and strains with high-level resistance to inhibitors of viral protease and reverse transcriptase. Importantly, drug treatment of primary blood cells did not alter splicing profiles of endogenous genes involved in cell cycle transition and apoptosis. Thus, human splicing factors represent novel and promising drug targets for the development of antiretroviral therapies, particularly for the inhibition of multidrug-resistant viruses.

  15. Effect of misclassification of antiretroviral treatment status on the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Hannah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of the prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR in a population are derived from resistance tests performed on samples from patients thought to be naïve to antiretroviral treatment (ART. Much of the debate over reliability of estimates of the prevalence of TDR has focused on whether the sample population is representative. However estimates of the prevalence of TDR will also be distorted if some ART-experienced patients are misclassified as ART-naïve. Methods The impact of misclassification bias on the rate of TDR was examined. We developed methods to obtain adjusted estimates of the prevalence of TDR for different misclassification rates, and conducted sensitivity analyses of trends in the prevalence of TDR over time using data from the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database. Logistic regression was used to examine trends in the prevalence of TDR over time. Results The observed rate of TDR was higher than true TDR when misclassification was present and increased as the proportion of misclassification increased. As the number of naïve patients with a resistance test relative to the number of experienced patients with a test increased, the difference between true and observed TDR decreased. The observed prevalence of TDR in the UK reached a peak of 11.3% in 2002 (odds of TDR increased by 1.10 (95% CI 1.02, 1.19, p(linear trend = 0.02 per year 1997-2002 before decreasing to 7.0% in 2007 (odds of TDR decreased by 0.90 (95% CI 0.87, 0.94, p(linear trend Conclusion The effect of misclassification of ART on estimates of the prevalence of TDR may be appreciable, and depends on the number of naïve tests relative to the number of experienced tests. Researchers can examine the effect of ART misclassification on their estimates of the prevalence of TDR if such a bias is suspected.

  16. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub......-Saharan Africa is sparse. METHODS: HIV viral load (VL) and resistance mutations pre-ART and after 6 months were determined in a prospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Jimma, Ethiopia. VL measurements were done at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Genotypic HIV drug...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  17. Antiretroviral Resistance in HIV/AIDS Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosuthi, W.; MD

    2018-03-01

    The higher prevalence of HIV drug resistance was observed in areas with greater ART coverage. The HIV resistance-associated mutations occur when people have inadequate levels of antiretroviral drugs as well as inadequate potency, inadequate adherence, and preexisting resistance. The degree to drug cross-resistance is observed depends on the specific mutations and number of mutation accumulation. In the Southeast Asia region, the challenging of people with treatment failure is the availability and accessibility to subsequent new antiretroviral drugs to construct he second and salvage regimen. Genotypic resistance testing is a useful tool because it can identify the existing drug resistance-associated mutations under the selective drug pressure. Thus, understanding the basic interpretation of HIV drug resistance- associated mutation is useful in guiding clinical decisions for treatment-experienced people living with HIV.

  18. The First Characterization of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance Mutations among Antiretrovirally Treated Patients in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Reza; Baesi, Kazem; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Farrokhi, Molood; McFarland, Willi; Parsamajd, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient therapy during HIV-1 replication can promote the emergence of drug-resistant strains, reduce the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and increase the likelihood of the onward transmission of drug-resistant viruses. We characterized, for the first time, the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance mutations in a western region of Iran. This study was conducted among 122 patients on ART at a major referral center in Kermanshah, Iran. Nested PCR was performed using RT gene-specific primers from the pol gene. Sequencing was followed by amplification and purification of the desired sequence. Subtypes and mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database. Most patients (92.6%) had subtype CRF 35-AD; 7.4% had subtype B. In total, 36.1% of the patients had at least 1 mutation associated with resistance RT inhibitors. The greatest rates of high-level resistance were observed for nevirapine (21.3%) and efavirenz (19.7%). Our results showed a high prevalence of drug resistance mutations in strains isolated from patients on treatment. At our center, we therefore recommend that genotyping be performed. This would allow the physician to prescribe appropriate drugs, reduce treatment costs, and increase the longevity and quality of life of patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance among newly diagnosed antiretroviral therapy-naive pregnant women in Lilongwe and Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Banda, Richard; Moyo, Kundai; M'bang'ombe, Maurice; Chiwaula, Mabvuto; Porter, Carol; Jordan, Michael R

    2012-05-01

    In 2006, a survey of transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (TDR) was conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi. The survey followed the World Health Organization method to classify TDR to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and protease inhibitors (PIs) among primigravid women aged Blantyre. Findings show that in Lilongwe TDR to NRTIs and PIs was Blantyre, TDR was <5% to all drug classes. Observed moderate TDR in Lilongwe is cause for concern and signals the need for closer monitoring of Malawi's antiretroviral therapy program.

  20. Patterns of HIV-1 Drug Resistance After First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Failure in 6 Sub-Saharan African Countries: Implications for Second-Line ART Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Wensing, Annemarie M.; Wallis, Carole L.; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob; Siwale, M.; Njovu, C.; Labib, M.; Menke, J.; Botes, M. E.; Conradie, F.; Ive, P.; Sanne, I.; Wallis, C. L.; Letsoalo, E.; Stevens, W. S.; Hardman, M.; Wellington, M.; Luthy, R.; Mandaliya, K.; Abdallah, S.; Jao, I.; Dolan, M.; Namayanja, G.; Nakatudde, L.; Nankya, I.; Kiconco, M.; Abwola, M.; Mugyenyi, P.; Osibogun, A.; Akanmu, S.; Schuurman, R.; Wensing, A. M.; Straatsma, E.; Wit, F. W.; Dekker, J.; van Vugt, M.; Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African

  1. HIV type 1 drug resistance patterns among patients failing first and second line antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koigi, Peter; Ngayo, Musa Otieno; Khamadi, Samoel; Ngugi, Caroline; Nyamache, Anthony Kebira

    2014-12-09

    The ever-expanding rollout of antiretroviral therapy in poor resource settings without routine virological monitoring has been accompanied with development of drug resistance that has resulted in limited treatment success. A cross-sectional study with one time viral load was conducted during the period between 2012 and 2013 to determine treatment failure and drug resistance mutations among adults receiving first-line (44) (3TC_d4T/AZT_NVP/EFV) and second-line (20) (3TC/AZT/LPV/r) in Nairobi, Kenya. HIV-1 pol-RT genotyping for drug resistance was performed using an in-house protocol. A total of 64 patients were recruited (mean age 36.9 yrs.) during the period between 2012 and 2013 of the 44 adult patients failing first-line 24 (40.9%) had drug resistance mutations. Eight (8) patients had NRTI resistance mutations with NAMS M184V (54.2%) and K65R (8.4%) mutations being the highest followed by TAMs T215Y and K70R (12.5%). In addition, among patients failing second-line (20), six patients (30%) had NNRTI resistance; two patients on K103N and G190A mutations while V106A, Y184V, A98G, Y181C mutations per patient were also detected. However, for NRTI two patients had TAM T215Y. M184V mutation occurred in one patient. The study findings showed that HIV-1 drug resistance was significantly high in the study population. The detected accumulated resistance strains show that emergence of HIV drug resistance will continue to be a big challenge and should be given more attention as the scale up of treatment in the country continues.

  2. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  3. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV-infected patients remaining on a virologically failing combination antiretroviral therapy regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    (t0 and t1) when viral load was > 400 copies/ml. METHODS: Accumulation of resistance between t0 and t1 was measured using genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS) obtained by counting the total number of active drugs (according to the Rega system v6.4.1) among all licensed antiretrovirals as of 1...... to the failing regimen were still receiving benefit from treatment. An overall 6-monthly increase of 1.96 (SD, 2.23) International Aids Society-mutations and an average loss of 1.25 (SD, 1.81) active drugs were estimated. In comparison with patients with GSS_f-t0 = 0, the number of active drugs lost was -1...

  4. Effect of transmitted drug resistance on virological and immunological response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV (EuroCoord-CHAIN joint project): a European multicohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittkop, Linda; Günthard, Huldrych F; de Wolf, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The effect of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) on first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV-1 needs further study to inform choice of optimum drug regimens. We investigated the effect of TDR on outcome in the first year of cART within a large European collaboration....

  5. Characterization of HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance after second-line treatment failure in Mali, a limited-resources setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Fofana, Djeneba Bocar; Cisse, Mamadou; Diallo, Fodié; Maiga, Moussa Youssoufa; Traore, Hamar Alassane; Maiga, Issouf Alassane; Sylla, Aliou; Fofana, Dionke; Taiwo, Babafemi; Murphy, Robert; Katlama, Christine; Tounkara, Anatole; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We describe the outcomes of second-line drug resistance profiles and predict the efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy in patients monitored without the benefit of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) or resistance testing. Methods We recruited 106 HIV-1-infected patients after second-line treatment failure in Mali. VL was determined by the Abbott RealTime system and the resistance by the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system. The resistance testing was interpreted using the latest version of the Stanford algorithm. Results Among the 106 patients, 93 had isolates successfully sequenced. The median age, VL and CD4 cells were respectively 35 years, 72 000 copies/mL and 146 cells/mm3. Patients were exposed to a median of 4 years of treatment and to six antiretrovirals. We found 20% of wild-type viruses. Resistance to etravirine was noted in 38%, to lopinavir in 25% and to darunavir in 12%. The duration of prior nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure was associated with resistance to abacavir (P < 0.0001) and tenofovir (P = 0.0001), and duration of prior protease inhibitor treatment with resistance to lopinavir (P < 0.0001) and darunavir (P = 0.06). Conclusion Long duration of therapy prior to failure was associated with high levels of resistance and is directly related to limited access to VL monitoring and delayed switches to second-line treatment, precluding efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy. This study underlines the need for governments and public health organizations to recommend the use of VL monitoring and also the availability of darunavir and raltegravir for third-line therapies in the context of limited-resource settings. PMID:22888273

  6. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT, nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. METHOD: 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F, NVP (K103N/Y181C and 3TC (M184V at detection limits of <1%. RESULTS: 50/87 HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64; all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40% women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%, NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18% and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%. Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. CONCLUSION: Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase

  7. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Andrea; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Lau, Inga; Ziske, Judith; Theuring, Stefanie; Kuecherer, Claudia; Harms, Gundel; Kunz, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT), nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD) at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC) during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F), NVP (K103N/Y181C) and 3TC (M184V) at detection limits of HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64); all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40%) women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%), NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18%) and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%). Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase the frequency of AZT-resistance mutations. Given its impact on

  8. Incidence and associated factors of HIV drug resistance in Chinese HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A critical indicator of the future success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is the incidence of HIV drug resistance, which has not been studied in China on the national scale. METHODS: HIV drug resistance baseline survey was conducted in the eight provinces with the largest numbers of patients on HAART in 2009, and a prospective cohort study with 12-month follow-up was completed in 2010. Patients completed an interviewer-administrated questionnaire and provided blood for CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4 count, HIV viral load (VL, and HIV drug resistance genotyping. Factors associated with incidence of HIVDR were identified by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of HIV RNA ≥ 1000 copies/ml and HIVDR at baseline was 12.4% and 5.6%, respectively. Incidence of HIVDR in the one year follow-up was 3.5 per 100 person years. Independently associated factors were started treatment with a didanosine-based regimen, received care at township hospital or village clinic, low baseline CD4 counts, and high baseline VL. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of HIVDR in China was higher than that of some developed countries. China urgently needs to provide comprehensive education and training to doctors at village clinics and township hospitals to improve quality community-based care and treatment.

  9. Incidence and associated factors of HIV drug resistance in Chinese HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Hui; Wang, Xia; Liao, Lingjie; Ma, Yanling; Su, Bin; Fu, Jihua; He, Jianmei; Chen, Lin; Pan, Xiaohong; Dong, Yonghui; Liu, Wei; Hsi, Jenny H; Yang, Liting; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    A critical indicator of the future success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is the incidence of HIV drug resistance, which has not been studied in China on the national scale. HIV drug resistance baseline survey was conducted in the eight provinces with the largest numbers of patients on HAART in 2009, and a prospective cohort study with 12-month follow-up was completed in 2010. Patients completed an interviewer-administrated questionnaire and provided blood for CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4 count), HIV viral load (VL), and HIV drug resistance genotyping. Factors associated with incidence of HIVDR were identified by Cox regression analysis. The overall prevalence of HIV RNA ≥ 1000 copies/ml and HIVDR at baseline was 12.4% and 5.6%, respectively. Incidence of HIVDR in the one year follow-up was 3.5 per 100 person years. Independently associated factors were started treatment with a didanosine-based regimen, received care at township hospital or village clinic, low baseline CD4 counts, and high baseline VL. The incidence of HIVDR in China was higher than that of some developed countries. China urgently needs to provide comprehensive education and training to doctors at village clinics and township hospitals to improve quality community-based care and treatment.

  10. CONFERENCE REPORT ANTIRETROVIRAL RESISTANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-08-02

    Aug 2, 2004 ... had achieved full virological suppression (viral load. < 50 copies/ml). Thirty-two per cent of women had nevirapine-resistant virus. A novel strategy to avoid maternal exposure to nevirapine might be administering the drug to the newborn as post- exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Researchers from South Africa3.

  11. Long-term effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy and prevalence of HIV drug resistance in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutwa, Philippe R.; Boer, Kimberly R.; Rusine, John; Muganga, Narcisse; Tuyishimire, Diane; Schuurman, Rob; Reiss, Peter; Lange, Joep M. A.; Geelen, Sibyl P. M.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the long-term outcomes of treatment and prevalence of genotypic drug resistance in children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy. A cross-sectional study (September 2009 to October 2010) in which clinical, immunologic and virologic outcomes were assessed at a

  12. Transmitted drug resistant HIV-1 and association with virologic and CD4 cell count response to combination antiretroviral therapy in the EuroSIDA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (TDR) and factors associated with TDR and to compare virological and CD4 count response to combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: In this study, 525 mostly chronically infected EuroSIDA patients...... with detection of TDR, with virological (viral loadresponse (>or=50% increase) to combination antiretroviral therapy at months 6-12. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of TDR was 11.4%, which was stable over 1996-2004. There were no significant differences in virological suppression...... (those resistant to at least one drug prescribed versus susceptible), adjusted odds ratio: 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.27 to 1.71; P=0.408) or CD4 count response, adjusted odds ratio: 1.65 (95% confidence interval: 0.73 to 3.73; P=0.231). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of TDR in antiretroviral...

  13. Significant interaction between activated charcoal and antiretroviral therapy leading to subtherapeutic drug concentrations, virological breakthrough and development of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Alice L; la Porte, Charles; Salit, Irving E

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year-old, treatment-experienced woman, virologically suppressed on tenofovir/emtricitabine and boosted atazanavir, experienced virological breakthrough, drop in CD4(+) T-cell count and undetectable drug concentrations. Adherence to treatment was confirmed, but repeat testing yielded similar results. After 2 months, the patient stated that she had been taking activated charcoal to manage gastrointestinal symptoms associated with her combination antiretroviral therapy, but she had recently discontinued the charcoal. Atazanavir concentrations were therapeutic but the patient's viral load rebounded and genotype testing revealed new reverse transcriptase mutations. The patient was changed to zidovudine, lamivudine, and boosted darunavir and achieved viral suppression. At 1 year follow-up, her viral load remained activated charcoal and atazanavir/ritonavir leading to virological breakthrough and development of resistance.

  14. Impact of low-level-viremia on HIV-1 drug-resistance evolution among antiretroviral treated-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Delaugerre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug-resistance mutations (DRAM are frequently selected in patients with virological failure defined as viral load (pVL above 500 copies/ml (c/mL, but few resistance data are available at low-level viremia (LLV. Our objective was to determine the emergence and evolution of DRAM during LLV in HIV-1-infected patients while receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients presenting a LLV episode defined as pVL between 40 and 500 c/mL on at least 3 occasions during a 6-month period or longer while on the same ART. Resistance genotypic testing was performed at the onset and at the end of LLV period. Emerging DRAM was defined during LLV if never detected on baseline genotype or before. RESULTS: 48 patients including 4 naive and 44 pretreated (median 9 years presented a LLV episode with a median duration of 11 months. Current ART included 2NRTI (94%, ritonavir-boosted PI (94%, NNRTI (23%, and/or raltegravir (19%. Median pVL during LLV was 134 c/mL. Successful resistance testing at both onset and end of the LLV episode were obtained for 37 patients (77%, among who 11 (30% acquired at least 1 DRAM during the LLV period: for NRTI in 6, for NNRTI in 1, for PI in 4, and for raltegravir in 2. During the LLV period, number of drugs with genotypic resistance increased from a median of 4.5 to 6 drugs. Duration and pVL level of LLV episode, duration of previous ART, current and nadir CD4 count, number of baseline DRAM and GSS were not identified as predictive factors of resistance acquisition during LLV, probably due to limited number of patients. CONCLUSION: Persistent LLV episodes below 500 c/ml while receiving ART is associated with emerging DRAM for all drug classes and a decreasing in further therapeutic options, suggesting to earlier consider resistance monitoring and ART optimization in this setting.

  15. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance in New York State, 2006-2008: results from a new surveillance system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Readhead

    Full Text Available HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR is a public health concern because it has the potential to compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART at the population level. In New York State, high prevalence of TDR in a local cohort and a multiclass resistant case cluster led to the development and implementation of a statewide resistance surveillance system.We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 13,109 cases of HIV infection that were newly diagnosed and reported in New York State between 2006 and 2008, including 4,155 with HIV genotypes drawn within 3 months of initial diagnosis and electronically reported to the new resistance surveillance system. We assessed compliance with DHHS recommendations for genotypic resistance testing and estimated TDR among new HIV diagnoses.Of 13,109 new HIV diagnoses, 9,785 (75% had laboratory evidence of utilization of HIV-related medical care, and 4,155 (43% had a genotype performed within 3 months of initial diagnosis. Of these, 11.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.2%-12.1% had any evidence of TDR. The proportion with mutations associated with any antiretroviral agent in the NNRTI, NRTI or PI class was 6.3% (5.5%-7.0%, 4.3% (3.6%-4.9% and 2.9% (2.4%-3.4%, respectively. Multiclass resistance was observed in <1%. TDR did not increase significantly over time (p for trend = 0.204. Men who have sex with men were not more likely to have TDR than persons with heterosexual risk factor (OR 1.0 (0.77-1.30. TDR to EFV+TDF+FTC and LPV/r+TDF+FTC regimens was 7.1% (6.3%-7.9% and 1.4% (1.0%-1.8%, respectively.TDR appears to be evenly distributed and stable among new HIV diagnoses in New York State; multiclass TDR is rare. Less than half of new diagnoses initiating care received a genotype per DHHS guidelines.

  16. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

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    Theresa M Rossouw

    Full Text Available Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors.Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis.The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3] with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease, severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4], high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47 and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66% at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05; longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005; unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001; tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048 and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038. On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033.Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent protease inhibitor dosing strategy

  17. Drug resistance mutations after the first 12 months on antiretroviral therapy and determinants of virological failure in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahimana, Jean d'Amour; Riedel, David J; Mwumvaneza, Mutagoma; Sebuhoro, Dieudone; Uwimbabazi, Jean Claude; Kubwimana, Marthe; Mugabo, Jules; Mulindabigwi, Augustin; Kirk, Catherine; Kanters, Steve; Forrest, Jamie I; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Peel, Sheila A; Ribakare, Muhayimpundu; Redfield, Robert R; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and determinants of virological failure in a large cohort of patients receiving first-line tenofovir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. A nationwide retrospective cohort from 42 health facilities was assessed for virological failure and development of HIVDR mutations. Data were collected at ART initiation and at 12 months of ART on patients with available HIV-1 viral load (VL) and ART adherence measurements. HIV resistance genotyping was performed on patients with VL ≥1000 copies/ml. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with treatment failure. Of 828 patients, 66% were women, and the median age was 37 years. Of the 597 patients from whom blood samples were collected, 86.9% were virologically suppressed, while 11.9% were not. Virological failure was strongly associated with age CD4 counts <200 cells/μl (aOR 3.4; 95% CI: 1.9-6.2). Overall, 9.1% of all patients on ART had drug resistance mutations after 1 year of ART; 27% of the patients who failed treatment had no evidence of HIVDR mutations. HIVDR mutations were not observed in patients on the recommended second-line ART regimen in Rwanda. The last step of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target appears within grasp, with some viral failures still due to non-adherence. Nonetheless, youth and late initiators are at higher risk of virological failure. Youth-focused programmes could help prevent further drug HIVDR development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. HIV drug resistance early warning indicators in cohorts of individuals starting antiretroviral therapy between 2004 and 2009: World Health Organization global report from 50 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Diane E; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Hong, Steven Y; Ravasi, Giovanni; McMahon, James H; Saadani, Ahmed; Kelley, Karen F

    2012-05-01

    The World Health Organization developed a set of human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) early warning indicators (EWIs) to assess antiretroviral therapy clinic and program factors associated with HIVDR. EWIs are monitored by abstracting data routinely recorded in clinical records, and the results enable clinics and program managers to identify problems that should be addressed to minimize preventable emergence of HIVDR in clinic populations. As of June 2011, 50 countries monitored EWIs, covering 131 686 patients initiating antiretroviral treatment between 2004 and 2009 at 2107 clinics. HIVDR prevention is associated with patient care (appropriate prescribing and patient monitoring), patient behavior (adherence), and clinic/program management efforts to reduce treatment interruptions (follow up, retention on first-line ART, procurement and supply management of antiretroviral drugs). EWIs measure these factors and the results have been used to optimize patient and population treatment outcomes.

  19. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance in Honduras after a Decade of Widespread Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Meza, Rita I; Nuñez, Sandra M; Parham, Leda; Flores, Norma A; Valladares, Diana; Pineda, Luisa M; Flores, Dixiana; Motiño, Roxana; Umanzor, Víctor; Carbajal, Candy; Murillo, Wendy; Lorenzana, Ivette; Palou, Elsa Y; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed HIV drug resistance (DR) in individuals failing ART (acquired DR, ADR) and in ART-naïve individuals (pre-ART DR, PDR) in Honduras, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART. 365 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 381 ART-experienced Honduran individuals were enrolled in 5 reference centres in Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba, and Choluteca between April 2013 and April 2015. Plasma HIV protease-RT sequences were obtained. HIVDR was assessed using the WHO HIVDR mutation list and the Stanford algorithm. Recently infected (RI) individuals were identified using a multi-assay algorithm. PDR to any ARV drug was 11.5% (95% CI 8.4-15.2%). NNRTI PDR prevalence (8.2%) was higher than NRTI (2.2%) and PI (1.9%, p500 vs. Honduras remains at the intermediate level, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART. Evidence of ADR influencing the presence of PDR was observed by phylogenetic analyses and ADR/PDR mutation frequency correlations.

  20. Global HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baxter, J D; Dunn, D; White, E

    2015-01-01

    of resistance testing in START trial participants. METHODS: In the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial, baseline genotypic resistance testing results were collected at study entry and analysed centrally to determine the prevalence of TDR in the study population. Resistance was based...... on a modified 2009 World Health Organization definition to reflect newer resistance mutations. RESULTS: Baseline resistance testing was available in 1946 study participants. Higher rates of testing occurred in Europe (86.7%), the USA (81.3%) and Australia (89.9%) as compared with Asia (22.2%), South America (1...

  1. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance in Honduras after a Decade of Widespread Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Meza, Rita I.; Nuñez, Sandra M.; Parham, Leda; Flores, Norma A.; Valladares, Diana; Pineda, Luisa M.; Flores, Dixiana; Motiño, Roxana; Umanzor, Víctor; Carbajal, Candy; Murillo, Wendy; Lorenzana, Ivette; Palou, Elsa Y.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We assessed HIV drug resistance (DR) in individuals failing ART (acquired DR, ADR) and in ART-naïve individuals (pre-ART DR, PDR) in Honduras, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART. Methods 365 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 381 ART-experienced Honduran individuals were enrolled in 5 reference centres in Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba, and Choluteca between April 2013 and April 2015. Plasma HIV protease-RT sequences were obtained. HIVDR was assessed using the WHO HIVDR mutation list and the Stanford algorithm. Recently infected (RI) individuals were identified using a multi-assay algorithm. Results PDR to any ARV drug was 11.5% (95% CI 8.4–15.2%). NNRTI PDR prevalence (8.2%) was higher than NRTI (2.2%) and PI (1.9%, p500 vs. <350 CD4+ T cells/μL. PDR in recently infected individuals was 13.6%, showing no significant difference with PDR in individuals with longstanding infection (10.7%). The most prevalent PDR mutations were M46IL (1.4%), T215 revertants (0.5%), and K103NS (5.5%). The overall ADR prevalence in individuals with <48 months on ART was 87.8% and for the ≥48 months on ART group 81.3%. ADR to three drug families increased in individuals with longer time on ART (p = 0.0343). M184V and K103N were the most frequent ADR mutations. PDR mutation frequency correlated with ADR mutation frequency for PI and NNRTI (p<0.01), but not for NRTI. Clusters of viruses were observed suggesting transmission of HIVDR both from ART-experienced to ART-naïve individuals and between ART-naïve individuals. Conclusions The global PDR prevalence in Honduras remains at the intermediate level, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART. Evidence of ADR influencing the presence of PDR was observed by phylogenetic analyses and ADR/PDR mutation frequency correlations. PMID:26558396

  2. Bioanalysis, metabolism & clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, R. ter

    2009-01-01

    The aims of all studies described in this thesis were to develop new bioanalytical and more patient friendly methods for studying the clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs and to ultimately improve antiretroviral treatment.

  3. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF TDM. The vast majority of drugs used in clinical practice do not require TDM. It is far easier for clinicians to adopt a 'one size fits all' approach to dosing. Alternatively doses may be modified according to response. However, with some drugs this will result in high rates of toxicity, or suboptimal ...

  4. HIV drug resistance following a decade of the free antiretroviral therapy programme in India: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Karade

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the overall burden of resistance against first-line ART agents remained steady over the study decade, periodic monitoring is essential. There is the need to develop an HIV-1 subtype C-specific resistance database in India.

  5. Low primary and secondary HIV drug-resistance after 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in human immune-deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals from Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine, John; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Boer, Kimberly Rachel; Mukantwali, Enatha; Karita, Etienne; Gasengayire, Agnes; Jurriaans, Suzanne; de Jong, Menno; Ondoa, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Treatment outcomes of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Rwanda are scarcely documented. HIV viral load (VL) and HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR) outcomes at month 12 were determined in a prospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in

  6. Surveillance of HIV-1 pol transmitted drug resistance in acutely and recently infected antiretroviral drug-naïve persons in rural western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Onywera

    Full Text Available HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR is of increasing public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa with the rollout of antiretroviral (ARV therapy. Such data are, however, limited in Kenya, where HIV-1 drug resistance testing is not routinely performed. From a population-based household survey conducted between September and November 2012 in rural western Kenya, we retrospectively assessed HIV-1 TDR baseline rates, its determinants, and genetic diversity among drug-naïve persons aged 15-59 years with acute HIV-1 infections (AHI and recent HIV-1 infections (RHI as determined by nucleic acid amplification test and both Limiting Antigen and BioRad avidity immunoassays, respectively. HIV-1 pol sequences were scored for drug resistance mutations using Stanford HIVdb and WHO 2009 mutation guidelines. HIV-1 subtyping was computed in MEGA6. Eighty seven (93.5% of the eligible samples were successfully sequenced. Of these, 8 had at least one TDR mutation, resulting in a TDR prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 4.7-17.1. No TDR was observed among persons with AHI (n = 7. TDR prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 1.8-11.2 for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 6.9% (95% CI 3.2-14.2 for non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, and 1.2% (95% CI 0.2-6.2 for protease inhibitors. Three (3.4% 95% CI 0.8-10.1 persons had dual-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance. Predominant TDR mutations in the reverse transcriptase included K103N/S (4.6% and M184V (2.3%; only M46I/L (1.1% occurred in the protease. All the eight persons were predicted to have different grades of resistance to the ARV regimens, ranging from potential low-level to high-level resistance. HIV-1 subtype distribution was heterogeneous: A (57.5%, C (6.9%, D (21.8%, G (2.3%, and circulating recombinant forms (11.5%. Only low CD4 count was associated with TDR (p = 0.0145. Our findings warrant the need for enhanced HIV-1 TDR monitoring in order to inform on population-based therapeutic guidelines

  7. Clinical and virologic follow-up in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Madrid with triple-class antiretroviral drug-resistant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Sánchez, P; de Mulder, M; Fernandez-Cooke, E; Prieto, L; Rojo, P; Jiménez de Ory, S; José Mellado, M; Navarro, M; Tomas Ramos, J; Holguín, Á

    2015-06-01

    Drug resistance mutations compromise the success of antiretroviral treatment in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. We report the virologic and clinical follow-up of the Madrid cohort of perinatally HIV-infected children and adolescents after the selection of triple-class drug-resistant mutations (TC-DRM). We identified patients from the cohort carrying HIV-1 variants with TC-DRM to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors according to IAS-USA-2013. We recovered pol sequences or resistance profiles from 2000 to 2011 and clinical-immunologic-virologic data from the moment of TC-DRM detection until December 2013. Viruses harbouring TC-DRM were observed in 48 (9%) of the 534 children and adolescents from 2000 to 2011, rising to 24.4% among those 197 with resistance data. Among them, 95.8% were diagnosed before 2003, 91.7% were Spaniards, 89.6% carried HIV-1-subtype B and 75% received mono/dual therapy as first regimen. The most common TC-DRM present in ≥50% of them were D67NME, T215FVY, M41L and K103N (retrotranscriptase) and L90M (protease). The susceptibility to darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine and rilpivirine was 67.7%, 43.7%, 33.3% and 33.3%, respectively, and all reported high resistance to didanosine, abacavir and nelfinavir. Despite the presence of HIV-1 resistance mutations to the three main antiretroviral families in our paediatric cohort, some drugs maintained their susceptibility, mainly the new protease inhibitors (tipranavir and darunavir) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (etravirine and rilpivirine). These data will help to improve the clinical management of HIV-infected children with triple resistance in Spain. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance and Its Impacts on HIV-1 Virological Failures in Jiangsu, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Ying Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been shown to improve survival of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and to reduce HIV-1 transmission. Therefore, the Chinese central government initiated a national program to provide ART free of charge to HIV-1 patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu province to determine the level of drug resistance (DR in HIV-1 infected patients and the correlates of DR in virological failures in 2012. Approximately 10.4% of the HIV-1 patients in the study experienced virological failure after one year of ART and were divided into drug sensitive and drug resistant groups based on genotype determination. The viral loads (VLs in the drug resistant group were significantly lower than the drug sensitive group. There were two independent predictors of virological failure: male gender and increasing duration of treatment. The primary mutations observed in the study were against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs which were M184V (79.45% and K103N (33.70% in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. The overall rate of DR in Jiangsu province is still relatively low among treated patients. However, close monitoring of drug resistance in male patients in the early stages of treatment is vital to maintaining and increasing the benefits of HIV ART achieved to date.

  9. The calculated genetic barrier for antiretroviral drug resistance substitutions is largely similar for different HIV-1 subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, D.A. van de; Wensing, A.M.J.; Angarano, G.; Asjo, B.; Balotta, C.; Camacho, R.; Chaix, M.; Costagliola, D.; De Luca, A.; Derdelinckx, I.; Grossman, Z.; Hamouda, O.; Hatzakis, A.; Hemmer, R.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Horban, A.; Korn, K.; Kücherer, C.; Leitner, T.; Loveday, C.; MacRae, E.; Maljkovic, I.; Mendoza, C. de; Meyer, L.; Nielsen, C.; Op de Coul, E.L.M.; Omaasen, V.; Paraskevis, D.; Perrin, L.; Puchhammer-Stöckl, E.; Salminen, M.; Schmit, J.; Scheider, F.; Schuurman, R.; Soriano, V.; Stanczak, G.; Stanojevic, M.; Vandamme, A.; Laethem, K. van; Violin, M.; Wilde, K.; Yerly, S.; Zazzi, M.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    The genetic barrier, defined as the number of mutations required to overcome drug-selective pressure, is an important factor for the development of HIV drug resistance. Because of high variability between subtypes, particular HIV-1 subtypes could have different genetic barriers for drug

  10. Initial Virologic Response and HIV Drug Resistance Among HIV-Infected Individuals Initiating First-line Antiretroviral Therapy at 2 Clinics in Chennai and Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingankar, Nitin K.; Thorat, Smita R.; Deshpande, Alaka; Rajasekaran, S.; Chandrasekar, C.; Kumar, Suria; Srikantiah, Padmini; Chaturbhuj, Devidas N.; Datkar, Sharda R.; Deshmukh, Pravin S.; Kulkarni, Smita S.; Sane, Suvarna; Reddy, D. C. S.; Garg, Renu; Jordan, Michael R.; Kabra, Sandhya; Paranjape, Ramesh S.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) in cohorts of patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at clinics in Chennai and Mumbai, India, was assessed following World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Twelve months after ART initiation, 75% and 64.6% of participants at the Chennai and Mumbai clinics, respectively, achieved viral load suppression of Mumbai due to high rates of loss to follow-up. Findings highlight the need for defaulter tracing and scale-up of routine viral load testing to identify patients failing first-line ART. PMID:22544202

  11. Patterns of HIV-1 drug resistance after first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure in 6 sub-Saharan African countries: implications for second-line ART strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Raph L; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Wensing, Annemarie M; Wallis, Carole L; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Schuurman, Rob

    2012-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African countries and predicted their impact on second-line drug susceptibility. A total of 2588 antiretroviral-naive individuals initiated ART consisting of different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbones (zidovudine, stavudine, tenofovir, or abacavir, plus lamivudine or emtricitabine) with either efavirenz or nevirapine. Population sequencing after 12 months of ART was retrospectively performed if HIV RNA was >1000 copies/mL. The 2010 International Antiviral Society-USA list was used to score major DRMs. The Stanford algorithm was used to predict drug susceptibility. HIV-1 sequences were generated for 142 participants who virologically failed ART, of whom 70% carried ≥1 DRM and 49% had dual-class resistance, with an average of 2.4 DRMs per sequence (range, 1-8). The most common DRMs were M184V (53.5%), K103N (28.9%), Y181C (15.5%), and G190A (14.1%). Thymidine analogue mutations were present in 8.5%. K65R was frequently selected by stavudine (15.0%) or tenofovir (27.7%). Among participants with ≥1 DRM, HIV-1 susceptibility was reduced in 93% for efavirenz/nevirapine, in 81% for lamivudine/emtricitabine, in 59% for etravirine/rilpivirine, in 27% for tenofovir, in 18% for stavudine, and in 10% for zidovudine. Early failure detection limited the accumulation of resistance. After stavudine failure in African populations, zidovudine rather than tenofovir may be preferred in second-line ART. Strategies to prevent HIV-1 resistance are a global priority.

  12. Prevention of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission in Burkina Faso: evaluation of vertical transmission by PCR, molecular characterization of subtypes and determination of antiretroviral drugs resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagna, Tani; Bisseye, Cyrille; Compaore, Tegewende R; Kagone, Therese S; Djigma, Florencia W; Ouermi, Djeneba; Pirkle, Catherine M; Zeba, Moctar T A; Bazie, Valerie J T; Douamba, Zoenabo; Moret, Remy; Pietra, Virginio; Koama, Adjirita; Gnoula, Charlemagne; Sia, Joseph D; Nikiema, Jean-Baptiste; Simpore, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Vertical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is a public health problem in Burkina Faso. The main objective of this study on the prevention of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission was to determine the residual risk of HIV transmission in infants born to mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Moreover, we detect HIV antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance among mother-infant pairs and identify subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF) in Burkina Faso. In this study, 3,215 samples of pregnant women were analyzed for HIV using rapid tests. Vertical transmission was estimated by polymerase chain reaction in 6-month-old infants born to women who tested HIV positive. HIV-1 resistance to ARV, subtypes, and CRFs was determined through ViroSeq kit using the ABI PRISM 3,130 sequencer. In this study, 12.26% (394/3,215) of the pregnant women were diagnosed HIV positive. There was 0.52% (2/388) overall vertical transmission of HIV, with rates of 1.75% (2/114) among mothers under prophylaxis and 0.00% (0/274) for those under HAART. Genetic mutations were also isolated that induce resistance to ARV such as M184V, Y115F, K103N, Y181C, V179E, and G190A. There were subtypes and CRF of HIV-1 present, the most common being: CRF06_CPX (58.8%), CRF02_AG (35.3%), and subtype G (5.9%). ARV drugs reduce the residual rate of HIV vertical transmission. However, the virus has developed resistance to ARV, which could limit future therapeutic options when treatment is needed. Resistance to ARV therefore requires a permanent interaction between researchers, physicians, and pharmacists, to strengthen the network of monitoring and surveillance of drug resistance in Burkina Faso.

  13. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    in the DHCS who experienced TCF between January 1995 and November 2004, and we performed genotypic resistance tests for International AIDS Society (IAS)-USA primary mutations on virus from plasma samples taken around the date of TCF. We computed time to all-cause death from date of TCF. The relative risk...... HIV Cohort Study (DHCS). METHODS: We included all patients in the DHCS who experienced TCF between January 1995 and November 2004, and we performed genotypic resistance tests for International AIDS Society (IAS)-USA primary mutations on virus from plasma samples taken around the date of TCF. We...... computed time to all-cause death from date of TCF. The relative risk of death according to the number of mutations and individual mutations was estimated by Cox regression analysis and adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Resistance tests were done for 133 of the 179 patients who experienced TCF...

  14. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    in the DHCS who experienced TCF between January 1995 and November 2004, and we performed genotypic resistance tests for International AIDS Society (IAS)-USA primary mutations on virus from plasma samples taken around the date of TCF. We computed time to all-cause death from date of TCF. The relative risk...

  15. HIV-1 drug-resistance surveillance among treatment-experienced and -naïve patients after the implementation of antiretroviral therapy in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas I Nii-Trebi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limited HIV-1 drug-resistance surveillance has been carried out in Ghana since the implementation of antiretroviral therapy (ART. This study sought to provide data on the profile of HIV-1 drug resistance in ART-experienced and newly diagnosed individuals in Ghana. METHODS: Samples were collected from 101 HIV-1-infected patients (32 ART-experienced cases with virological failure and 69 newly diagnosed ART-naïve cases, including 11 children, in Koforidua, Eastern region of Ghana, from February 2009 to January 2010. The pol gene sequences were analyzed by in-house HIV-1 drug-resistance testing. RESULTS: The most prevalent HIV-1 subtype was CRF02_AG (66.3%, 67/101 followed by unique recombinant forms (25.7%, 26/101. Among 31 ART-experienced adults, 22 (71.0% possessed at least one drug-resistance mutation, and 14 (45.2% had two-class-resistance to nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors used in their first ART regimen. Importantly, the number of accumulated mutations clearly correlated with the duration of ART. The most prevalent mutation was lamivudine-resistance M184V (n = 12, 38.7% followed by efavirenz/nevirapine-resistance K103N (n = 9, 29.0%, and zidovudine/stavudine-resistance T215Y/F (n = 6, 19.4%. Within the viral protease, the major nelfinavir-resistance mutation L90M was found in one case. No transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance mutation was found in 59 ART-naïve adults, but K103N and G190S mutations were observed in one ART-naïve child. CONCLUSIONS: Despite expanding accessibility to ART in Eastern Ghana, the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance presently appears to be low. As ART provision with limited options is scaled up nationwide in Ghana, careful monitoring of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is necessary.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of HIV drug resistance testing to inform switching to second line antiretroviral therapy in low income settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To guide future need for cheap resistance tests for use in low income settings, we assessed cost-effectiveness of drug resistance testing as part of monitoring of people on first line ART - with switching from first to second line ART being conditional on NNRTI drug resistance mutations...... being identified. METHODS: An individual level simulation model of HIV transmission, progression and the effect of ART which accounts for adherence and resistance development was used to compare outcomes of various potential monitoring strategies in a typical low income setting in sub-Saharan Africa...... outcomes were assessed over 2015-2025 in terms of viral suppression, first line failure, switching to second line regimen, death, HIV incidence, disability-adjusted-life-years averted and costs. Potential future low costs of resistance tests ($30) were used. RESULTS: The most effective strategy, in terms...

  17. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV. Drug-resistance testing results are used to decide which HIV medicines to include in a person’s first HIV regimen. After treatment is started, drug-resistance testing is repeated if ...

  18. The Decline in HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Heavily Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients Is Associated with Optimized Prescriptions in a Treatment Roll-Out Program in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva, Juan J; Larrea, Silvana; Tapia-Maltos, Marco A; Ostrosky-Frid, Mauricio; Lara, Carolina; Aguilar-Salinas, Pedro; Rivera, Héctor; Ramírez, Juan P

    2017-07-01

    A decrease in the rate of acquired antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance (ADR) over time has been documented in high-income settings, but data on the determinants of this phenomenon are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that in heavily ARV-experienced patients in the Mexican ARV therapy (ART) roll-out program, the drop in ADR would be associated with changes in ARV drug usage. Genotypic resistance tests obtained from 974 HIV-infected patients with virological failure and at least 2 previously failed ARV regimens from throughout the country were analyzed for the presence of nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Patients were divided into two groups according to their first ART start date: 488 patients initiated ART before mid-2003 (group 1) and 486 after mid-2003 (group 2). The rate of RAMs, median resistance score of several sentinel ARVs, and composition of ART drugs in patient's entire treatment history were compared between both groups. Patients in group 2 were less likely to have >3 thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs) and >3 PI-mRAMs [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.37; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.25-0.54; p mRAM has significantly declined over time. This can be explained by treatment optimization in the national ART roll-out program in recent years.

  19. Transmitted drug resistance among antiretroviral-naive patients with established HIV type 1 infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and review of the Latin American and Caribbean literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Julie E; Taylor, Barbara S; Rojas Fermín, Rita A; Reyes, Emily Virginia; Vaughan, Catherine; José, Lina; Javier, Carmen; Franco Estévez, Ramona; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy; Batista, Arelis; Lie, Yolanda; Coakley, Eoin; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen

    2012-07-01

    Emergence of HIV resistance is a concerning consequence of global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To date, there is no published information about HIV resistance from the Dominican Republic. The study's aim was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors in a sample of chronically HIV-1-infected patients in one clinic in Santo Domingo. The data are presented in the context of a review of the TDR literature from Latin America and the Caribbean. Genotype testing was successfully performed on 103 treatment-naive adults planning to initiate antiretroviral therapy; the World Health Organization (WHO) list of surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) was used to determine the presence of TDR mutations. WHO SDRM were identified in eight patients (7.8%); none had received sdNVP. There were no significant differences in epidemiologic or clinical variables between those with or without WHO SDRM. The prevalence of WHO SDRM was 1.0% and 6.8% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, respectively. No WHO SDRMs for protease inhibitors were identified. Among 12 studies of TDR in the region with a sample size of at least 100 subjects, the reported prevalence of SDRM ranged from 2.8% to 8.1%. The most commonly identified SDRM was K103N. This information adds to our understanding of the epidemiology of TDR in the region and the possible role such mutations could play in undermining first-line treatment. Ongoing surveillance is clearly needed to better understand the TDR phenomenon in the Caribbean.

  20. HIV multi-drug resistance at first-line antiretroviral failure and subsequent virological response in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Law, Matthew; Kantor, Rami; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Merati, Tuti; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Lee, Christopher KC; Ditangco, Rossana; Mustafa, Mahiran; Singtoroj, Thida; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure often results from the development of resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Three patterns, including thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), 69 Insertion (69Ins) and the Q151M complex, are associated with resistance to multiple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and may compromise treatment options for second-line ART. Methods We investigated patterns and factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure in patients from The TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance – Monitoring study (TASER-M), and evaluated their impact on virological responses at 12 months after switching to second-line ART. RAMs were compared with the IAS-USA 2013 mutations list. We defined multi-NRTI RAMs as the presence of either Q151M; 69Ins; ≥2 TAMs; or M184V+≥1 TAM. Virological suppression was defined as viral load (VL) 2 years (OR=6.25, 95% CI [2.39–16.36], p<0.001). Among 87/105 patients with available VL at 12 months after switch to second-line ART, virological suppression was achieved in 85%. The median genotypic susceptibility score (GSS) for the second-line regimen was 2.00. Patients with ART adherence ≥95% were more likely to be virologically suppressed (OR=9.33, 95% CI (2.43–35.81), p=0.001). Measures of patient resistance to second-line ART, including the GSS, were not significantly associated with virological outcome. Conclusions Multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure were associated with low CD4 level and longer duration of ART. With many patients switching to highly susceptible regimens, good adherence was still crucial in achieving virological response. This emphasizes the importance of continued adherence counselling well into second-line therapy. PMID:25141905

  1. Use of dried-blood-spot samples and in-house assays to identify antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-infected children in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemniak, Carrie; Mengistu, Yohannes; Ruff, Andrea; Chen, Ya-Hui; Khaki, Leila; Bedri, Abubaker; Simen, Birgitte B; Palumbo, Paul; Eshleman, Susan H; Persaud, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring HIV drug resistance is an important component of the World Health Organization's global HIV program. HIV drug resistance testing is optimal with commercially available clinically validated test kits using plasma; however, that type of testing may not be feasible or affordable in resource-constrained settings. HIV genotyping from dried blood spots (DBS) with noncommercial (in-house) assays may facilitate the capture of HIV drug resistance outcomes in resource-constrained settings but has had varying rates of success. With in-house assays for HIV reverse transcriptase, we evaluated the yield of genotyping DBS samples collected from HIV-infected children who were enrolled in two clinical trials conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (median HIV viral load, 5.88 log(10) HIV RNA copies/ml; range, 4.04 to 6.99). Overall, HIV genotypes were obtained for 94 (89.5%) of 105 samples tested (95% and 84% from clinical trials #1 and #2, respectively); however, successful analysis of 15 (16.1%) of the 94 samples required repeat testing using a different set of primers on previously synthesized cDNA. The yield of genotyping was lower on the DBS that were stored suboptimally from clinical trial #2 (56% versus 88% for optimally stored). Concordance with plasma genotypes derived using a clinically validated, commercial kit-based assay (ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system) was also assessed in a subset of children with paired testing. For 34 samples with paired DBS and plasma genotypes, there was 100% concordance for major drug resistance mutations. DBS genotyping using in-house assays provides an alternative for antiretroviral drug resistance testing in children in resource-constrained regions but may require region-specific optimization before widespread use.

  2. Use of Dried-Blood-Spot Samples and In-House Assays To Identify Antiretroviral Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected Children in Resource-Constrained Settings ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemniak, Carrie; Mengistu, Yohannes; Ruff, Andrea; Chen, Ya-Hui; Khaki, Leila; Bedri, Abubaker; Simen, Birgitte B.; Palumbo, Paul; Eshleman, Susan H.; Persaud, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring HIV drug resistance is an important component of the World Health Organization's global HIV program. HIV drug resistance testing is optimal with commercially available clinically validated test kits using plasma; however, that type of testing may not be feasible or affordable in resource-constrained settings. HIV genotyping from dried blood spots (DBS) with noncommercial (in-house) assays may facilitate the capture of HIV drug resistance outcomes in resource-constrained settings but has had varying rates of success. With in-house assays for HIV reverse transcriptase, we evaluated the yield of genotyping DBS samples collected from HIV-infected children who were enrolled in two clinical trials conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (median HIV viral load, 5.88 log10 HIV RNA copies/ml; range, 4.04 to 6.99). Overall, HIV genotypes were obtained for 94 (89.5%) of 105 samples tested (95% and 84% from clinical trials #1 and #2, respectively); however, successful analysis of 15 (16.1%) of the 94 samples required repeat testing using a different set of primers on previously synthesized cDNA. The yield of genotyping was lower on the DBS that were stored suboptimally from clinical trial #2 (56% versus 88% for optimally stored). Concordance with plasma genotypes derived using a clinically validated, commercial kit-based assay (ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system) was also assessed in a subset of children with paired testing. For 34 samples with paired DBS and plasma genotypes, there was 100% concordance for major drug resistance mutations. DBS genotyping using in-house assays provides an alternative for antiretroviral drug resistance testing in children in resource-constrained regions but may require region-specific optimization before widespread use. PMID:21956987

  3. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV-infected patients remaining on a virologically failing combination antiretroviral therapy regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time points...

  4. HIV drug resistance testing among patients failing second line antiretroviral therapy. Comparison of in-house and commercial sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimukangara, Benjamin; Varyani, Bhavini; Shamu, Tinei; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Manasa, Justen; White, Elizabeth; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Luethy, Ruedi; Katzenstein, David

    2017-05-01

    HIV genotyping is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries due to infrastructure requirements and cost. We compared genotype resistance testing in patients with virologic failure, by amplification of HIV pol gene, followed by "in-house" sequencing and commercial sequencing. Remnant plasma samples from adults and children failing second-line ART were amplified and sequenced using in-house and commercial di-deoxysequencing, and analyzed in Harare, Zimbabwe and at Stanford, U.S.A, respectively. HIV drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV drug resistance database. Twenty-six of 28 samples were amplified and 25 were successfully genotyped. Comparison of average percent nucleotide and amino acid identities between 23 pairs sequenced in both laboratories were 99.51 (±0.56) and 99.11 (±0.95), respectively. All pairs clustered together in phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing analysis identified 6/23 pairs with mutation discordances resulting in differences in phenotype, but these did not impact future regimens. The results demonstrate our ability to produce good quality drug resistance data in-house. Despite discordant mutations in some sequence pairs, the phenotypic predictions were not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of drug resistance mutations in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: does competitive advantage drive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Most physicians that treat individuals with HIV-1 disease are able to successfully suppress viral replication with the pharmacologic armamentarium available today. For the majority of patients this results in immune reconstitution and improved quality of life. However, a large fraction of these patients have transient elevations in their viral burden and even persistence of low-level viremia. In fact, many individuals whose viral load is suppressed to < 50 c/ml have evidence of low-level viral replication. The impact of low-level viremia and persistent viral replication is an area of significant study and interest owing to the potential for the development of drug resistance mutations. Here the fundamental question is whether and perhaps what factors provide a venue for the development of resistant virus. The concern is clearly the eventual progression of disease with the exhaustion of treatment options. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the effect of low-level viremia on the development of drug resistance mutations. Herein, we discuss the impact of different levels of viral suppression on the development of mutations. In addition, we look at the role that resistance and fitness play in determining the survival of a breakthrough mutation within the background of drug.

  6. HIV-1 drug resistance before initiation or re-initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Ravindra K.; Gregson, John; Parkin, Neil; Haile-Selassie, Hiwot; Tanuri, Amilcar; Andrade Forero, Liliana; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Watera, Christine; Aghokeng, Avelin; Mutenda, Nicholus; Dzangare, Janet; Hone, San; Hang, Zaw Zaw; Garcia, Judith; Garcia, Zully; Marchorro, Paola; Beteta, Enrique; Giron, Amalia; Hamers, Raph; Inzaule, Seth; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Chung, Michael H.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Pillay, Deenan; Naidoo, Kogie; Kharsany, Ayesha; Kugathasan, Ruthiran; Cutino, Teresa; Hunt, Gillian; Avila Rios, Santiago; Doherty, Meg; Jordan, Michael R.; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Pretreatment drug resistance in people initiating or re-initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) might compromise HIV control in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). We aimed to assess the scale of this problem and whether

  7. Prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance remains low in Guangxi, China, eight years after scale-up of highly-active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojian; Liang, Shujia; Harrison, Tim J; Tang, Zhenzhu; Shen, Zhiyong; Wang, Xueyan; Wu, Xinghua; Liu, Wei; Liang, Fuxiong; Feng, Liushuai; Yang, Jinye; Fang, Zhongliao

    2014-01-01

    Highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was scaled up in Guangxi, China in 2005. The number of individuals receiving free HAART increased dramatically from June 2010 under the Guangxi Government's anti-HIV programme. We aimed to determine the prevalence of HIV-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) of Guangxi. HIV-positive, antiretroviral-naive individuals were recruited from the east (Hezhou), south (Qinzhou), west (Baise), north (Guilin) and centre (Laibin) of Guangxi. The pol gene of the virus from the individuals was analysed. The overall prevalence of HIV TDR was 3.2% (7/216, 95% CI 0.9-5.5). The prevalence rates in Baise, Guilin, Hezhou, Qinzhou and Laibin are 4.9% (2/41, 95% CI -1.7 to 11.5), 2.3% (1/44, 95% CI -2.1 to 5.7), 4.7% (2/43, 95% CI -1.6 to 11.0), 2.6% (1/38, 95% CI -2.5 to 7.7) and 2.0% (1/50, 95% CI -1.9 to 5.9), respectively. No significant difference in the prevalence was found among them. No factors were found to be associated with TDR, including CD4 cell counts, viral loads and genotypes. The subtypes CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and B were found. Subtype CRF08_BC is the predominant subtype in Baise while CRF01_AE is the predominant subtype elsewhere in Guangxi. The prevalence of TDR in antiretroviral-naive patients in Guangxi remains low 8 years after scale-up of HAART. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of potential responses to future high levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral drug-naive populations beginning treatment: modelling study and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Miners, Alec; Revill, Paul; Pillay, Deenan; Lundgren, Jens D; Bennett, Diane; Raizes, Elliott; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; De Luca, Andrea; Vitoria, Marco; Barcarolo, Jhoney; Perriens, Joseph; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    With continued roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, evidence is emerging of increasing levels of transmitted drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different potential public health responses to substantial levels of transmitted drug resistance. We created a model of HIV transmission, progression, and the effects of ART, which accounted for resistance generation, transmission, and disappearance of resistance from majority virus in the absence of drug pressure. We simulated 5000 ART programmatic scenarios with different prevalence levels of detectable resistance in people starting ART in 2017 (t0) who had not previously been exposed to antiretroviral drugs. We used the model to predict cost-effectiveness of various potential changes in policy triggered by different prevalence levels of resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) measured in the population starting ART. Individual-level resistance testing before ART initiation was not generally a cost-effective option, irrespective of the cost-effectiveness threshold. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of US$500 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), no change in policy was cost effective (ie, no change in policy would involve paying less than $500 per QALY gained), irrespective of the prevalence of pretreatment NNRTI resistance, because of the increased cost of the policy alternatives. At thresholds of $1000 or higher, and with the prevalence of pretreatment NNRTI resistance greater than 10%, a policy to measure viral load 6 months after ART initiation became cost effective. The policy option to change the standard first-line treatment to a boosted protease inhibitor regimen became cost effective at a prevalence of NNRTI resistance higher than 15%, for cost-effectiveness thresholds greater than $2000. Cost-effectiveness of potential policies to adopt in response to different levels of pretreatment HIV drug

  9. HIV drug resistance and hepatitis co-infections in HIV-infected adults and children initiating antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine-Bahunde, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART), few data have been generated on outcomes and outcome predictors of ART in adults and children in Rwanda. Equally, the extent of chronic hepatitis virus infections and their impact on the ART outcomes in the country are not known. This information

  10. Population-based surveillance of HIV drug resistance emerging on treatment and associated factors at sentinel antiretroviral therapy sites in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Steven Y; Jonas, Anna; DeKlerk, Michael; Shiningavamwe, Andreas; Desta, Tiruneh; Badi, Alfons; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M; Ledwaba, Johanna; Sheehan, Heidi B; Lau, Kiger; Trotter, Andrew; Tang, Alice M; Wanke, Christine; Jordan, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) prospective surveys of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) evaluate HIVDR emerging after the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and associated factors. Consecutive ART starters in 2009 were enrolled at 3 sentinel sites in Namibia. Genotyping was performed at start and after 12 months in patients with HIV viral load (VL) >1000 copies per mL. HIVDR outcomes were: HIVDR prevention (VL ≤1000 copies/mL), possible HIVDR (VL >1000 copies/mL without detectable HIVDR or loss to follow-up or ART stop), and HIVDR (VL >1000 copies/mL with detectable HIVDR). Adherence was assessed using medication possession ratio (MPR). Of 394 starters, at 12 months, 80% were on first-line ART, 1% died, 4% transferred out, 1% stopped ART, <1% switched to second-line, and 15% were lost to follow-up. Among patients on first-line, 77% had VL testing, and 94% achieved VL ≤1000 copies per mL. At baseline, 7% had HIVDR. After 12 months, among patients with VL testing, 5% had HIVDR. A majority of patients failing therapy had high-level resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors but none to protease inhibitors. All sites achieved the WHO target of ≥70% HIVDR prevention. Factors associated with not achieving HIVDR prevention were: baseline resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [odds ratio (OR) 3.0, P = 0.023], WHO stage 3 or 4 at baseline (OR 2.0, P = 0.012), and MPR <75% (OR 4.9, P = 0.021). Earlier ART initiation and removal of barriers to on-time drug pickups may help to prevent HIVDR. These data inform decisions at national and global levels on the effectiveness of first- and second-line regimens.

  11. Treatment failure and drug resistance in HIV-positive patients on tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Katherine; Diero, Lameck; DeLong, Allison; Balamane, Maya; Reitsma, Marissa; Kemboi, Emmanuel; Orido, Millicent; Emonyi, Wilfred; Coetzer, Mia; Hogan, Joseph; Kantor, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended globally. To evaluate the impact of its incorporation into the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, we examined treatment failure and drug resistance among a cohort of patients on tenofovir-based first-line ART at the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a large HIV treatment programme in western Kenya. We determined viral load (VL), drug resistance and their correlates in patients on ≥six months of tenofovir-based first-line ART. Based on enrolled patients' characteristics, we described these measures in those with (prior ART group) and without (tenofovir-only group) prior non-tenofovir-based first-line ART using Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. Among 333 participants (55% female; median age 41 years; median CD4 336 cells/µL), detectable (>40 copies/mL) VL was found in 18%, and VL>1000 copies/mL (WHO threshold) in 10%. Virologic failure at both thresholds was significantly higher in 217 participants in the tenofovir-only group compared with 116 in the prior ART group using both cut-offs (24% vs. 7% with VL>40 copies/mL; 15% vs. 1% with VL>1000 copies/mL). Failure in the tenofovir-only group was associated with lower CD4 values and advanced WHO stage. In 35 available genotypes from 51 participants in the tenofovir-only group with VL>40 copies/mL (69% subtype A), any resistance was found in 89% and dual-class resistance in 83%. Tenofovir signature mutation K65R occurred in 71% (17/24) of the patients infected with subtype A. Patients with K65R had significantly lower CD4 values, higher WHO stage and more resistance mutations. In this Kenyan cohort, tenofovir-based first-line ART resulted in good (90%) virologic suppression including high suppression (99%) after switch from non-tenofovir-based ART. Lower virologic suppression (85%) and high observed resistance levels (89%) in the tenofovir-only group impact future treatment options, support recommendations for

  12. The prevalence of antiretroviral multidrug resistance in highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with HIV/AIDS between 2004 and 2009 in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ju-yeon; Kwon, Oh-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Park, Mina; Kim, Sung Soon

    2014-06-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) including protease inhibitors (PIs) has been used in South Korea since 1997. Currently, more than 20 types of antiretroviral drugs are used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-infected/acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients in South Korea. Despite the rapid development of various antiretroviral drugs, many drug-resistant variants have been reported after initiating HAART, and the efficiency of HAART is limited by these variants. To investigate and estimate the annual antiretroviral drug resistance and prevalence of antiretroviral multi-class drug resistance in Korean patients with experience of treatment. The amplified HIV-1 pol gene in 535 patients requested for genotypic drug resistance testing from 2004 to 2009 by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was sequenced and analyzed annually and totally. The prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance was estimated based on "SIR" interpretation of the Stanford sequence database. Of viruses derived from 787 specimens, 380 samples (48.3%) showed at least one drug class-related resistance. Predicted NRTI drug resistance was highest at 41.9%. NNRTI showed 27.2% resistance with 23.3% for PI. The percent of annual drug resistance showed similar pattern and slightly declined except 2004 and 2005. The prevalence of multi-class drug resistance against each drug class was: NRTI/NNRTI/PI, 9.8%; NRTI/PI, 21.9%; NNRTI/PI, 10.4%; and NRTI/NNRTI, 21.5%. About 50% and less than 10% of patients infected with HIV-1 have multidrug and multiclass resistance linked to 16 antiretroviral drugs, respectively. The significance of this study lies in its larger-scale examination of the prevalence of drug-resistant variants and multidrug resistance in HAART-experienced patients in South Korea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Abuse of antiretroviral drugs combined with addictive drugs by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports of the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to produce a highly addictive drug called nyaope or whoonga are of major concern as ARVs are easily accessible in sub-Saharan Africa, including to pregnant women. Use of illicit drugs by pregnant women may result in serious adverse effects in their infants. We have ...

  14. High-levels of acquired drug resistance in adult patients failing first-line antiretroviral therapy in a rural HIV treatment programme in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justen Manasa

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency and patterns of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance in a rural primary health care programme in South Africa.Cross-sectional study nested within HIV treatment programme.Adult (≥ 18 years HIV-infected individuals initially treated with a first-line stavudine- or zidovudine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART regimen and with evidence of virological failure (one viral load >1000 copies/ml were enrolled from 17 rural primary health care clinics. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using the in-house SATuRN/Life Technologies system. Sequences were analysed and genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS for standard second-line regimens were calculated using the Stanford HIVDB 6.0.5 algorithms.A total of 222 adults were successfully genotyped for HIV drug resistance between December 2010 and March 2012. The most common regimens at time of genotype were stavudine, lamivudine and efavirenz (51%; and stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine (24%. Median duration of ART was 42 months (interquartile range (IQR 32-53 and median duration of antiretroviral failure was 27 months (IQR 17-40. One hundred and ninety one (86% had at least one drug resistance mutation. For 34 individuals (15%, the GSS for the standard second-line regimen was <2, suggesting a significantly compromised regimen. In univariate analysis, individuals with a prior nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI substitution were more likely to have a GSS <2 than those on the same NRTIs throughout (odds ratio (OR 5.70, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.60-12.49.There are high levels of drug resistance in adults with failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy in this rural primary health care programme. Standard second-line regimens could potentially have had reduced efficacy in about one in seven adults involved.

  15. Virological failure and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among naive and antiretroviral pre-treated patients entering the ESTHER program of Calmette Hospital in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Barennes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In resource limited settings, patients entering an antiretroviral therapy (ART program comprise ART naive and ART pre-treated patients who may show differential virological outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective study, conducted in 2010-2012 in the HIV clinic of Calmette Hospital located in Phnom Penh (Cambodia assessed virological failure (VF rates and patterns of drug resistance of naive and pre-treated patients. Naive and ART pre-treated patients were included when a Viral Load (VL was performed during the first year of ART for naive subjects or at the first consultation for pre-treated individuals. Patients showing Virological failure (VF (>1,000 copies/ml underwent HIV DR genotyping testing. Interpretation of drug resistance mutations was done according to 2013 version 23 ANRS algorithms. RESULTS: On a total of 209 patients, 164 (78.4% were naive and 45 (21.5% were ART pre-treated. Their median initial CD4 counts were 74 cells/mm3 (IQR: 30-194 and 279 cells/mm3 (IQR: 103-455 (p<0.001, respectively. Twenty seven patients (12.9% exhibited VF (95% CI: 8.6-18.2%, including 10 naive (10/164, 6.0% and 17 pre-treated (17/45, 37.8% patients (p<0.001. Among these viremic patients, twenty-two (81.4% were sequenced in reverse transcriptase and protease coding regions. Overall, 19 (86.3% harbored ≥1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs whereas 3 (all belonging to pre-treated patients harbored wild-types viruses. The most frequent DRMs were M184V (86.3%, K103N (45.5% and thymidine analog mutations (TAMs (40.9%. Two (13.3% pre-treated patients harbored viruses that showed a multi-nucleos(tide resistance including Q151M, K65R, E33A/D, E44A/D mutations. CONCLUSION: In Cambodia, VF rates were low for naive patients but the emergence of DRMs to NNRTI and 3TC occurred relatively quickly in this subgroup. In pre-treated patients, VF rates were much higher and TAMs were relatively common. HIV genotypic assays before ART initiation and for ART pre

  16. Genetic diversity and drug resistance among newly diagnosed and antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in western Yunnan: a hot area of viral recombination in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic in China was first recognized in Dehong, western Yunnan. Due to its geographic location, Dehong contributed greatly in bridging HIV-1 epidemics in Southeast Asia and China through drug trafficking and injection drug use; and also extensively to the HIV genetic diversity in Yunnan and China. We attempt to monitor HIV-1 in this area by studying the HIV-1 genetic distribution and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in various at-risk populations. Methods Blood samples from a total of 320 newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals, who were antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, were collected from January 2009 to December 2010 in 2 counties in Dehong. HIV-1 subtypes and pol gene drug resistance (DR) mutations were genotyped. Results Among 299 pol sequences successfully genotyped (93.4%), subtype C accounted for 43.1% (n=129), unique recombinant forms (URFs) for 18.4% (n=55), CRF01_AE for 17.7% (n=54), B for 10.7% (n=32), CRF08_BC for 8.4% (n=25) and CRF07_BC for 1.7% (n=5). Subtype distribution in patients infected by different transmission routes varied. In contract to the previous finding of CRF01_AE predominance in 2002-2006, subtype C predominated in both injecting drug users (IDUs) and heterosexually transmitted populations in this study. Furthermore, we found a high level of BC, CRF01_AE/C and CRF01_AE/B/C recombinants suggesting the presence of active viral recombination in the area. TDR associated mutations were identified in 4.3% (n=13) individuals. A total of 1.3% of DR were related to protease inhibitors (PIs), including I85IV, M46I and L90M; 0.3% to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), including M184I; and 2.7% to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), including K103N/S, Y181C, K101E and G190A. Conclusion Our work revealed diverse HIV-1 subtype distributions and intersubtype recombinations. We also identified a low but significant TDR mutation rate among ART-naive patients. These findings

  17. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure

  18. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Blanco-Heredia

    Full Text Available Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies.We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations.Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64% corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual or DR (median 6 pairs/individual were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001. While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient's virus (mean 68% of cases, responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002.Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides.

  19. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p sistema nervoso central e cardiovascular, mas também podem interferir em testes utilizados para a detecção da resistência do HIV aos medicamentos antirretrovirais. investigar las posibles interacciones fármaco-fármaco (PDDI en inglés) en pacientes con infección por VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles interacciones entre medicamentos, se utilizó el software Micromedex(r). El análisis estadístico se realizó mediante regresión logística binaria, considerando estadísticamente significativo un valor de p de ≤0.05. de todos los participantes, el 52,2% fueron expuestos a posibles interacciones entre fármacos. En total, aparecieron 218 interacciones entre fármacos potenciales, de las que el 79,8% se produjo entre los fármacos utilizados para el tratamiento antirretroviral. Se observó una asociación entre el uso de cinco o más medicamentos y posibles

  20. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations associated to antiretroviral drug resistance in human isolates from Central Brazil Subtipos e mutações associadas à resistência aos anti-retrovirais em isolados de HIV-1 do Distrito Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marreco Cerqueira

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of polymorphisms associated to HIV-1 drug-resistance and genetic subtypes is important for the control and treatment of HIV-1 disease. Drug pressure selects resistant variants that carry mutations in the viral reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes. For a contribution to the public health authorities in planning the availability of therapeutic treatment, we therefore described the genetic variability, the prevalence of mutations associated to drug resistance and the antiretroviral resistance profile in HIV-1 isolates from infected individuals in Central Brazil. Nineteen HIV-1 RNA samples from a Public Health Laboratory of the Federal District were reversely transcribed and cDNAs were amplified by nested PCR. One fragment of 297 bp coding the entire protease gene, and another of 647 bp, corresponding to the partial RT gene (codons 19-234, were obtained. Automated sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed the presence of 17 B and 2 F1 HIV-1 subtypes. The amino acid sequences were analyzed for the presence of resistance-associated mutations. A total of 6 PR mutations, 2 major and 4 accessory, and 8 RT mutations related to drug resistance were found. Our data suggest a high prevalence of HIV-1 B subtype in the studied population of Federal District as well as the presence of genetically-resistant strains in individuals failing treatment.A detecção de polimorfismos do HIV-1 que estejam associados à resistência às drogas anti-retrovirais e aos subtipos genéticos é importante para o controle e tratamento da infecção pelo HIV-1. A pressão exercida pela terapia anti-retroviral seleciona variantes resistentes com mutações nos genes virais da transcriptase reversa (RT e da protease (PR. Assim, visando contribuir com as autoridades de saúde pública na perspectiva de planejar a disponibilidade de um tratamento terapêutico, nós descrevemos a variabilidade genética e a prevalência de mutações associadas à resist

  1. Pregnancy-related changes of antiretroviral pharmacokinetics: an argument for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Cattaneo, Dario; Zanchetta, Nadia; Giacomet, Vania; Micheli, Valeria; Ciminera, Nadia; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a case of an HIV-infected young woman with extensive drug-resistant virus, who was successfully switched from a raltegravir-based regimen to a dolutegravir-based intensified antiretroviral regimen a few days before scheduled caesarean section because of the still detectable viral load. The trough concentrations of all antiretroviral drugs before and after delivery are also described. Our case underlines both the difficult management of young women, HIV-infected at young age with very limited treatment options and the great variability in the pregnancy-related physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics of antiretrovirals.

  2. Maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug strategies that preserve breastfeeding by HIV-Positive women. L Kuhn ... By so doing, it recognises that any intervention that might detract from breast feeding poses a serious threat to infant survival. Since evidence is now strong that antiretroviral drugs used ...

  3. [Prevalence of primary antiretroviral resistance among HIV infected patients in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afani, Alejandro; Beltrán, Carlos; María Gallardo, Ana; Roessler, Patricia; Acevedo, William; Vásquez, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    The main cause of virological failure during AIDS treatment is the resistance to antiretroviral medications (ARV). To search for mutations associated with ARV resistance in recently HIV-1 infected patients naïve to treatment, in Chile. Patients over 18 years old with HIV-1 infection, naïve to anti-retroviral drugs before the study were included. Patients with CD4 cell counts less than 200 cells/mm3, viral load below 2000 copies/mL or any condition indicative of advanced AIDS were excluded. Criteria for diagnosis of recent infection (Chile. Therefore, a genotyping test before starting antiretroviral therapy is not necessary.

  4. Antiretroviral Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS Treatment Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Pin it Email Print Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection All FDA-approved medicines used in the ...

  5. Predictors of poor retention on antiretroviral therapy as a major HIV drug resistance early warning indicator in Cameroon: results from a nationwide systematic random sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Clotaire Billong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retention on lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART is essential in sustaining treatment success while preventing HIV drug resistance (HIVDR, especially in resource-limited settings (RLS. In an era of rising numbers of patients on ART, mastering patients in care is becoming more strategic for programmatic interventions. Due to lapses and uncertainty with the current WHO sampling approach in Cameroon, we thus aimed to ascertain the national performance of, and determinants in, retention on ART at 12 months. Methods Using a systematic random sampling, a survey was conducted in the ten regions (56 sites of Cameroon, within the “reporting period” of October 2013–November 2014, enrolling 5005 eligible adults and children. Performance in retention on ART at 12 months was interpreted following the definition of HIVDR early warning indicator: excellent (>85%, fair (85–75%, poor (<75; and factors with p-value < 0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results Majority (74.4% of patients were in urban settings, and 50.9% were managed in reference treatment centres. Nationwide, retention on ART at 12 months was 60.4% (2023/3349; only six sites and one region achieved acceptable performances. Retention performance varied in reference treatment centres (54.2% vs. management units (66.8%, p < 0.0001; male (57.1% vs. women (62.0%, p = 0.007; and with WHO clinical stage I (63.3% vs. other stages (55.6%, p = 0.007; but neither for age (adults [60.3%] vs. children [58.8%], p = 0.730 nor for immune status (CD4351–500 [65.9%] vs. other CD4-staging [59.86%], p = 0.077. Conclusions Poor retention in care, within 12 months of ART initiation, urges active search for lost-to-follow-up targeting preferentially male and symptomatic patients, especially within reference ART clinics. Such sampling strategy could be further strengthened for informed ART monitoring and HIVDR prevention perspectives.

  6. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  7. Short communication: high rates of thymidine analogue mutations and dual-class resistance among HIV-infected Ugandan children failing first-line antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Kayiwa, Joshua; Musiime, Victor; Calis, Job C. J.; Kaudha, Elizabeth; Mukuye, Andrew; Matama, Christine; Nankya, Immaculate; Nakatudde, Lillian; Dekker, John T.; Hamers, Raph L.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-infected children are at high risk of acquiring drug-resistant viruses, which is of particular concern in settings where antiretroviral drug options are limited. We aimed to assess resistance patterns and predict viral drug susceptibility among children with first-line antiretroviral therapy

  8. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs. Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 37 Number 1 (2010). *P. Mweemba, M.K. Makukula, P.K. Mukwato, M.M. Makoleka. Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ABSTRACT. Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy has led to ...

  9. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Reiss, P; Sabin, CA

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated an association between combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction. It is not clear whether this association differs according to the class of antiretroviral drugs. We conducted a study to investigate the association of cumu...

  10. HIV drug resistance: problems and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Pleuni S. Pennings

    2013-01-01

    Access to combination antiretroviral treatment (ART) has improved greatly over recent years. At the end of 2011, more than eight million HIV infected people were receiving antiretroviral therapy in low-income and middle-income countries. ART generally works well in keeping the virus suppressed and the patient healthy. However, treatment only works as long as the virus is not resistant against the drugs used. In the last decades, HIV treatments have become better and better at slowing down the...

  11. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  12. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  13. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT.Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F. In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System.Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29 of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29 by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24. By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41. The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml, resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage.Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  14. Prevalence and effect of pre-treatment drug resistance on the virological response to antiretroviral treatment initiated in HIV-infected children - a EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC joint project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Wittkop, Linda; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the impact of pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR) on response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in children. The objective of this joint EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC/PENTA project was to assess the prevalence of PDR mutations and their association...... algorithm to infer resistance to prescribed drugs. Time to virological failure (VF) was defined as the first of two consecutive HIV-RNA > 500 copies/mL after 6 months cART and was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models. All models were adjusted for baseline demographic, clinical, immunology.......7-5.7). Of 37 children (7.8 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 5.5-10.6) harboring a virus with ≥1 PDR mutations, 30 children had a virus resistant to ≥1 of the prescribed drugs. Overall, the cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for virological failure was 19.8 % (95 %CI, 16.4-23.9). Cumulative risk for VF tended...

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy for Multidrug-Resistant HIV: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early years of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era, HIV with resistance to two or more agents in different antiretroviral classes posed a significant clinical challenge. Multidrug-resistant (MDR HIV was an important cause of treatment failure, morbidity, and mortality. Treatment options at the time were limited; multiple drug regimens with or without enfuvirtide were used with some success but proved to be difficult to sustain for reasons of tolerability, toxicity, and cost. Starting in 2006, data began to emerge supporting the use of new drugs from the original antiretroviral classes (tipranavir, darunavir, and etravirine and drugs from new classes (raltegravir and maraviroc for the treatment of MDR HIV. Their availability has enabled patients with MDR HIV to achieve full and durable viral suppression with more compact and cost-effective regimens including at least two and often three fully active agents. The emergence of drug-resistant HIV is expected to continue to become less frequent in the future, driven by improvements in the convenience, tolerability, efficacy, and durability of first-line HAART regimens. To continue this trend, the optimal rollout of HAART in both rich and resource-limited settings will require careful planning and strategic use of antiretroviral drugs and monitoring technologies.

  16. HIV-1 RNA levels and antiretroviral drug resistance in blood and non-blood compartments from HIV-1-infected men and women enrolled in AIDS clinical trials group study A5077.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Kantor

    Full Text Available Detectable HIV-1 in body compartments can lead to transmission and antiretroviral resistance. Although sex differences in viral shedding have been demonstrated, mechanisms and magnitude are unclear. We compared RNA levels in blood, genital-secretions and saliva; and drug resistance in plasma and genital-secretions of men and women starting/changing antiretroviral therapy (ART in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG 5077 study.Blood, saliva and genital-secretions (compartment fluids were collected from HIV-infected adults (≥ 13 years at 14 United-States sites, who were initiating or changing ART with plasma viral load (VL ≥ 2,000 copies/mL. VL testing was performed on all compartment fluids and HIV resistance genotyping on plasma and genital-secretions. Spearman rank correlations were used to evaluate concordance and Fisher's and McNemar's exact tests to compare VL between sexes and among compartments.Samples were available for 143 subjects; 36% treated (23 men, 29 women and 64% 'untreated' (40 men, 51 women. RNA detection was significantly more frequent in plasma (100% than genital-secretions (57% and saliva (64% (P<0.001. A higher proportion of men had genital shedding versus women (78% versus 41%, and RNA detection was more frequent in saliva versus genital-secretions in women when adjusted for censoring at the limit of assay detection. Inter-compartment fluid VL concordance was low in both sexes. In 22 (13 men, 9 women paired plasma-genital-secretion genotypes from treated subjects, most had detectable resistance in both plasma (77% and genital-secretions (68%. Resistance discordance was observed between compartments in 14% of subjects.HIV shedding and drug resistance detection prior to initiation/change of ART in ACTG 5077 subjects differed among tissues and between sexes, making the gold standard blood-plasma compartment assessment not fully representative of HIV at other tissue sites. Mechanisms of potential sex-dependent tissue

  17. Antiretroviral adverse drug reactions and their management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... This article discusses the common and serious adverse effects (AEs) related to the above antiretrovirals ... transaminases to more than 5 times the upper limit of normal. This is more frequent in ..... The prime suspect for causing the tumours is aloin A, which together with other aloe extracts was removed from ...

  18. Population-based monitoring of emerging HIV-1 drug resistance on antiretroviral therapy and associated factors in a sentinel site in Cameroon: low levels of resistance but poor programmatic performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge C Billong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in resource-limited settings has drastically reduced HIV-related morbidity and mortality. However, challenges in long-term ART, adherence and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR itself, require monitoring to limit HIVDR emergence among ART-experienced populations, in order to ensure regimen efficacy. METHODS: A longitudinal study was conducted from 2009-2011 in a cohort of 141 HIV-infected adult patients (aged >21 at the national social insurance centre hospital in Yaounde, Cameroon. As per-WHO HIVDR protocol, HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase genotyping was performed at baseline and at endpoint (12 months on first-line ART using ViroSeq™ Genotyping kit. RESULTS: At baseline, a prevalence of 3.6% (5/139 HIVDR was observed [protease inhibitors M46I (1/5, G73A (1/5, L90LM (1/5; nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: M184V (1/5, T215F (1/5; non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: K103N (1/5, Y181Y/C (2/5, M230ML (1/5]. At endpoint, 54.0% (76 patients were followed-up, 9.2% (13 died, and 3.5% (5 transferred, 38.5% (47 lost to follow-up (LTFU. 69.7% (53/76 of those followed-up had viremia <40 copies/ml and 90.8% (69/76 <1000 copies/ml. 4/7 patients with viremia ≥1000 copies/ml harbored HIVDR (prevalence: 5.3%; 4/76, with M184V/I (4/4 and K103K/N (3/4 being the most prevalent mutations. LTFU was favored by costs for consultation/laboratory tests, drug shortages, workload (physician/patient ratio: 1/180 and community disengagement. CONCLUSIONS: Low levels of HIVDR at baseline and at endpoint suggest a probable effectiveness of ART regimens used in Cameroon. However the possible high rate of HIVDR among LTFUs limited the strengths of our findings. Evaluating HIVDR among LTFU, improving adherence, task shifting, subsidizing/harmonizing costs for routine follow-up, are urgent measures to ensure an improved success of the country ART performance.

  19. Predicting response to antiretroviral treatment by machine learning: the EuResist project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, Maurizio; Incardona, Francesca; Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Prosperi, Mattia; Lengauer, Thomas; Altmann, Andre; Sonnerborg, Anders; Lavee, Tamar; Schülter, Eugen; Kaiser, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    For a long time, the clinical management of antiretroviral drug resistance was based on sequence analysis of the HIV genome followed by estimating drug susceptibility from the mutational pattern that was detected. The large number of anti-HIV drugs and HIV drug resistance mutations has prompted the development of computer-aided genotype interpretation systems, typically comprising rules handcrafted by experts via careful examination of in vitro and in vivo resistance data. More recently, machine learning approaches have been applied to establish data-driven engines able to indicate the most effective treatments for any patient and virus combination. Systems of this kind, currently including the Resistance Response Database Initiative and the EuResist engine, must learn from the large data sets of patient histories and can provide an objective and accurate estimate of the virological response to different antiretroviral regimens. The EuResist engine was developed by a European consortium of HIV and bioinformatics experts and compares favorably with the most commonly used genotype interpretation systems and HIV drug resistance experts. Next-generation treatment response prediction engines may valuably assist the HIV specialist in the challenging task of establishing effective regimens for patients harboring drug-resistant virus strains. The extensive collection and accurate processing of increasingly large patient data sets are eagerly awaited to further train and translate these systems from prototype engines into real-life treatment decision support tools. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. HIV genotype resistance testing in antiretroviral (ART) exposed Indian children--a need of the hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ira; Parikh, Shefali

    2013-04-01

    Development of drug resistance in HIV infected children with treatment failure is a major impediment to selection of appropriate therapy. HIV genotype resistance assays predict drug resistance on the basis of mutations in the viral genome. However, their clinical utility, especially in a resource limited setting is still a subject of debate. The authors report two cases in which both the children suffered from treatment failure of various antiretroviral therapy regimes. In both the cases, Genotype Resistance Testing (GRT) prompted a radical change from proposed failure therapy as per existing guidelines. GRT was specifically important for the selection of a new dual Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) component of failure regimen by identifying TAMS and M184V mutations in the HIV genome. These case reports highlight the importance of GRT in children failing multiple antiretroviral regimes; and emphasizes the need to recognize situations where GRT is absolutely essential to guide appropriate therapy, even in a resource limited setting.

  1. Basis of selection of first and second line highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS on genetic barrier to resistance: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusiime, Christine; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kambugu, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) continues to improve as treatment choices expand with the development of new antiretroviral agents and regimens. However, the successful long-term treatment of HIV/AIDS is under threat from the emergence of drug-resistant strains to multiple agents and entire drug classes.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  3. Pharmacoepidemiology of antiretroviral drugs in a teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Prescribing, adherence, and adverse drug events to HAART in a large antiretroviral programme in Lagos was evaluated. Design: A retrospective 5 year open cohort study. Setting: The AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) clinic at LUTH is one of the United States Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS ...

  4. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has one of the highest prevalences of HIV and AIDS in the world. HIV/AIDS patients face countless challenges, one of which is the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study aimed to describe the ADRs reported in South Africa with reference to the type of ADRs, antiretrovirals (ARVs) implicated, ...

  5. Quality of antiretroviral drugs, stavudine and indinavir capsules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The number of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) available to HIV/AIDS patients in Tanzania is increasing due to a number of intervention programs such as PEPFAR and the Clinton Foundation. These ARVs are imported from a number of countries. However, currently there are no reports on the quality of these ...

  6. Spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor drug adherence is a major problem in the care of HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Spirituality is one of the several factors that affects ... The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Spirituality (FACIT-Sp) tool was used to determine their level of spirituality. Participants were classified as having high or ...

  7. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gweneth B. Lazenby

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student’s t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p=0.03, OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0–34.8, p=0.05, including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p=0.03, and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p=0.01. PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p=0.08 and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p=0.9. Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  8. Prevalence of drug-drug interactions of antiretroviral agents in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of possible DDIs between antiretrovirals (ARVs) themselves and other drugs. Design. Retrospective drug utilisation study using data from a national medicine claims database for the period 1 January to 31 December 2004. Setting. A section of the ...

  9. [Primary resistance to antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV/AIDS in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afani, Alejandro; Ayala, Marisol; Meyer, Andrea; Cabrera, Roy; Acevedo, William

    2005-03-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral therapy is a determining factor for therapeutic failure in HIV/AIDS. The prevalence of primary resistance (i.e. in those patients that have not received treatment) varies in different parts of the world. To study the prevalence of primary resistance to antiretroviral drugs in patients living in Northern Santiago. Viral load, lymphocyte subpopulations by flow cytometry and genotypic resistance testing were assessed in blood samples from 60 HIV-1 infected patients (mean age 37 years, 54 male). Mean CD4 cell count and viral load was 200 cells/ml and 142,840 RNA copies/ml respectively. Ten mutations were identified: V179D, L10I/V, M361, L63P, A71T/V, Y115F, V118I and K20R. None of these mutations is associated to a high degree of resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogs (NRTI), non nucleoside analogs (NNRTI) or viral protease inhibitors. This is a first approach to study antiretroviral resistance in Chilean patients. This study must be amplified, since the prevalence of resistance may experience changes with time.

  10. Pharmacological interactions between rifampicin and antiretroviral drugs: challenges and research priorities for resource-limited settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semvua, H.H.; Kibiki, G.S.; Kisanga, E.R.; Boeree, M.J.; Burger, D.M.; Aarnoutse, R.

    2015-01-01

    Coadministration of antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy is often inevitable in high-burden countries where tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS. Concurrent use of rifampicin and many antiretroviral drugs is complicated by pharmacokinetic

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Cloning Vectors for Antiretroviral Resistance Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Sutton, Lorraine; De Pasquale, Maria Pia; Savara, Anu V.; D’Aquila, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    Better detection of minority human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) populations containing gene mutations may improve the usefulness of antiretroviral resistance testing for clinical management. Molecular cloning of HIV-1 PCR products which might improve minority detection can be slow and difficult, and commercially available recombinant virus assays test drug susceptibility of virus pools. We describe novel plasmids and simple methods for rapid cloning of HIV-1 PCR products from patient...

  12. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  13. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations : Potential applications for point-of-care Genotypic resistance testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zy, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; De Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  14. Assessment of the World Health Organization's HIV Drug Resistance Early Warning Indicators in Main and Decentralized Outreach Antiretroviral Therapy Sites in Namibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholus Mutenda

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO early warning indicators (EWIs of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR assess factors at individual ART sites that are known to create situations favourable to the emergence of HIVDR.In 2014, the Namibia HIV care and treatment program abstracted the following adult and pediatric EWIs from all public ART sites (50 main sites and 143 outreach sites: On-time pill pick-up, Retention in care, Pharmacy stock-outs, Dispensing practices, and Viral load suppression. Comparisons were made between main and outreach sites and between 2014 and 2012 using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test in a matched analysis.The national estimates were: On-time pill pick-up 81.9% (95% CI 81.1-82.8 for adults and 82.4% (81.3-83.4 for pediatrics, Retention in care 79% retained on ART after 12 months for adults and 82% for pediatrics, Pharmacy stock-outs 94% of months without a stock-out for adults and 88% for pediatrics, and Dispensing practices 0.01% (0.001-0.056 dispensed mono- or dual-therapy for adults and 0.01% (0.001-0.069 for pediatrics. Viral load suppression was significantly affected by low rates of Viral load completion. Main sites had higher On-time pill pick-up than outreach sites for adults (p<0.001 and pediatrics (p<0.001, and no difference between main and outreach sites for Retention in care for adults (p = 0.761 or pediatrics (p = 0.214. From 2012 to 2014 in adult sites, On-time pill pick-up (p = 0.001, Retention in care (p<0.001, and Pharmacy stock-outs (p = 0.002 worsened. In pediatric sites, On-time pill pick-up (p<0.001 and Pharmacy stock-outs (p = 0.012 worsened.Results of EWIs monitoring in Namibia provide evidence about ART programmatic functioning and contextualize results from national surveys of HIVDR. These results are worrisome as they show a decline in program performance over time. The national ART program is taking steps to minimize the emergence of HIVDR by strengthening adherence and retention of patients on ART

  15. Effect on transmission of HIV-1 resistance of timing of implementation of viral load monitoring to determine switches from first to second-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Garnett, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use.......There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use....

  16. HIV-1 genotypic resistance profile of patients failing antiretroviral therapy in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Virginia Michelon Toledo

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has reduced morbidity and mortality related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, but in spite of this advance, HIV mutations decrease antiretroviral susceptibility, thus contributing to treatment failure in patients. Genotyping HIV-1 allows the selection of new drugs after initial drug failure. This study evaluated the genotypic profile of HIV-1 isolates from treated (drug-experienced patients in Paraná, Brazil. The prevalence of mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes were assessed. We analyzed 467 genotypes of patients with HIV-1 viral loads above 1,000 copies/mL. Mutations at HIV-1 RT and PR genes and previously used ART regimens were recorded. The most prevalent RT mutations were: 184V (68.31%, 215YF (51.6%, 103NS (46%, 41L (39.4%, 67N (38.54%, 210W (23.5%, 190ASE (23.2%, and 181C (17.4%. PR mutations were 90M (33.33%, 82ATFS (29%, 46I (26.8% and 54V (22.2%. The prevalence of mutations was in line with previous national and international reports, except to nonnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors related mutations, which were more prevalent in this study. Previous exposure to antiretroviral drugs was associated with genotypic resistance to specific drugs, leading to treatment failure in HIV patients.

  17. Drug-transporter mediated interactions between anthelminthic and antiretroviral drugs across the Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigen, Gabriel; Edwards, Geoffrey

    2017-05-04

    Drug interactions between antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) and anthelminthic drugs, ivermectin (IVM) and praziquantel (PZQ) were assessed by investigating their permeation through the Caco-2 cell monolayers in a transwell. The impact of anthelminthics on the transport of ARVs was determined by assessing the apical to basolateral (AP → BL) [passive] and basolateral to apical (BL → AP) [efflux] directions alone, and in presence of an anthelminthic. The reverse was conducted for the assessment of the influence of ARVs on anthelminthics. Samples from the AP and BL compartments were taken at 60, 120, 180 and 240 min and quantified either by HPLC or radiolabeled assay using a liquid scintillating counter for the respective drugs. Transepithelial resistance (TEER) was used to assess the integrity of the monolayers. The amount of compound transported per second (apparent permeability, Papp) was calculated for both AP to BL (Papp AtoB ), and BL to AP (Papp BtoA ) movements. Samples collected after 60 min were used to determine the efflux ratio (ER), quotient of secretory permeability and absorptive permeability (PappBL-AP/PappAP-BL). The reverse, (PappAP-BL/PappBL-AP) constituted the uptake ratio. The impact of SQV, EFV and NVP on the transport of both IVM and PZQ were investigated. The effect of LPV on the transport of IVM was also determined. The influence of IVM on the transport of SQV, NVP, LPV and EFV; as well as the effect PZQ on the transport of SQV of was also investigated, and a two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered significant. IVM significantly inhibited the efflux transport (BL → AP movement) of LPV (ER; 6.7 vs. 0.8, p = 0.0038) and SQV (ER; 3.1 vs. 1.2 p = 0.00328); and increased the efflux transport of EFV (ER; 0.7 vs. 0.9, p = 0.031) suggesting the possibility of drug transporter mediated interactions between the two drugs. NVP increased the efflux transport of IVM (ER; 0.8 vs. 1.8, p = 0.0094). The study provides in vitro

  18. Antiretroviral Drug Interactions: Overview of Interactions Involving New and Investigational Agents and the Role of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chris Rathbun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Antiretrovirals are prone to drug-drug and drug-food interactions that can result in subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic concentrations. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other diseases are common due to shared metabolism through cytochrome P450 (CYP450 and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes and transport by membrane proteins (e.g., p-glycoprotein, organic anion-transporting polypeptide. The clinical significance of antiretroviral drug interactions is reviewed, with a focus on new and investigational agents. An overview of the mechanistic basis for drug interactions and the effect of individual antiretrovirals on CYP450 and UGT isoforms are provided. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other co-morbidities are summarized. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in the detection and management of antiretroviral drug interactions is also briefly discussed.

  19. Adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in pregnant and lactating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-retroviral drugs reduce morbidity and mortality due to HIV and prevent transmission from mother to child. But compliance on anti-retroviral treatment is an essential element for the success of therapeutic goals. Objective: To assess the level of compliance of anti-retroviral treatment in pregnant and lactating ...

  20. Diagnosis, antiretroviral therapy, and emergence of resistance to antiretroviral agents in HIV-2 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Hightower

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and type 2 (HIV-2 are the causative agents of AIDS. HIV-2 is prevalent at moderate to high rates in West African countries, such as Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, and Cape Verde. Diagnosis of HIV-2 is made with a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 ELISA or simple/rapid assay, followed by one or two confirmatory tests specific for HIV-2. Following CD4+ T cell counts, HIV-2 viral burden and clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are beneficial in monitoring HIV-2 disease progression. Although non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are ineffective in treating HIV-2, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can be effective in dual and triple antiretroviral regimens. Their use can decrease HIV-2 viral load, increase CD4+ T cell counts and improve AIDS-related symptoms. HIV-2 resistance to various nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, including zidovudine, lamivudine, ritonavir and indinavir, has been identified in some HIV-2 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The knowledge of HIV-2 peculiarities, when compared to HIV-1, is crucial to helping diagnose and guide the clinician in the choice of the initial antiretroviral regimen and for monitoring therapy success.

  1. Continuous evidence of fast HIV disease progression related to class-wide resistance to antiretroviral drugs: a 6 year follow-up analysis of a large observational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Zaccarelli; Federica, Forbici; Patrizia, Lorenzini; Francesca, Ceccherini-Silberstein; Valerio, Tozzi; Paola, Trotta Maria; Patrizia, Marconi; Pasquale, Narciso; Federico, Perno Carlo; Andrea, Antinori

    2007-08-20

    Class-wide resistance (CWR) was increasingly associated with a higher risk of HIV progression after 72 months of follow-up among 1392 patients genotypic-tested after failure (AIDS risk 13% for no CWR to 34% for three CWR; AIDS/death risk 21-54%). At multivariate analysis, the detection of two and three CWR was significantly associated with a two and threefold increased risk, respectively, of death and AIDS/death, suggesting that extended resistance is a marker of disease progression in long-term observation.

  2. World Health Organization/HIVResNet drug resistance laboratory strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertognolio, Silvio; Derdelinckx, Inge; Parker, Monica; Fitzgibbon, Joseph; Fleury, Herve; Peeters, Martin; Schuurman, Rob; Pillay, Deenan; Morris, Lynn; Tanuri, Amilcar; Gershy-Damet, Guy-Michel; Nkengasong, John; Gilks, Charles F.; Sutherland, Donald; Sandstrom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly increasing access to antiretroviral drugs globally, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) has become a significant public health issue, This requires a coordinated and collaborative response from country level to international level to assess the extent of HIVDR and the establishment of efficient

  3. Drug-resistant tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. (DR-TB) is a public health emergency that threatens to destabilise global TB control. Although TB incidence and mortality are decreasing in several parts of the world, the overall prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is increasing in many high-burden countries, ...

  4. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  5. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-12-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use during pregnancy significantly reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission, delays disease progression in the women and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to HIV-serodiscordant partners. Pregnant women are susceptible to the same adverse reactions to ARVs as nonpregnant adults as well as to specific pregnancy-related reactions. In addition, we should consider adverse pregnancy outcomes and adverse reactions in children exposed to ARVs during intrauterine life. However, studies designed to assess the safety of ARV in pregnant women are rare, usually with few participants and short follow-up periods. In this review, we discuss studies reporting adverse reactions to ARV drugs, including maternal toxicity, adverse pregnancy outcomes and the consequences of exposure to ARV in infants. We included results of observational studies, both prospective and retrospective, as well as randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The benefits of ARV use during pregnancy outweigh the risks of adverse reactions identified to date. More studies are needed to assess the adverse effects in the medium- and long term in children exposed to ARVs during pregnancy, as well as pregnant women using lifelong antiretroviral therapy and more recently available drugs.

  6. Superinfection with drug-resistant HIV is rare and does not contribute substantially to therapy failure in a large European cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartha, I.; Assel, M.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Zazzi, M.; Torti, C.; Schülter, E.; De Luca, A.; Sönnerborg, A.; Abecasis, A.B.; Van Laethem, K.; Rosi, A.; Svärd, J.; Paredes, R.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Vandamme, A.-M.; Müller, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Superinfection with drug resistant HIV strains could potentially contribute to compromised therapy in patients initially infected with drug-sensitive virus and receiving antiretroviral therapy. To investigate the importance of this potential route to drug resistance, we developed a

  7. Cutting the cost of South African antiretroviral therapy using newer, safer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W F Venter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretrovirals are a significant cost driver for HIV programmes. Current first-line regimens have performed well in real-life programmes, but have a low barrier to virological resistance and still carry toxicity that limits adherence. New drug developments may mean that we have access to safer, more robust and cheaper regimens, but only if the appropriate clinical trials are conducted. We briefly discuss these trials, and demonstrate the large cost savings to the South African HIV programme if these are successful.

  8. Possible drug-metabolism interactions of medicinal herbs with antiretroviral agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, C.J.P. van den; Koopmans †, P.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Burger, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Herbal medicines are widely used by HIV patients. Several herbal medicines have been shown to interact with antiretroviral drugs, which might lead to drug failure. We have aimed to provide an overview of the modulating effects of Western and African herbal medicines on antiretroviral

  9. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring: an aid to optimising response to antiretroviral drugs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoutse, R.E.; Schapiro, J.M.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Hekster, Y.A.; Burger, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has been proposed as a means to optimise response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV infection. Protease inhibitors (PIs) and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) efavirenz and nevirapine satisfy many criteria for TDM.

  11. New dolutegravir resistance pattern identified in a patient failing antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carganico, Andreas; Dupke, Stefan; Ehret, Robert; Berg, Thomas; Baumgarten, Axel; Obermeier, Martin; Walter, Hauke

    2014-01-01

    The most recently approved antiretroviral, the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG), is described to be a very potent drug with a unique resistance profile, but a certain degree of cross-resistance to RAL or EVG induced drug resistance, which is mediated mainly by integrase mutations at positions 140 and 148. The impact of a single N155H mutation to DTG resistance is described to be minor. However, there is only rare data available about the impact of N155H in the context of secondary site integrase mutations. Here, we present a case of virological failure in a DTG treated patient based on N155H mutation background. Therapy monitoring of an HIV-HCV co-infected patient harbouring already an omni-drug-class resistant HIV-1 in consequence of more than 20 years ART history. Drug susceptibility testing was performed by RT-PCR from plasma and subsequent Sanger sequencing. Tropism testing was done from proviral DNA with FPR cut-offs according to the German recommendations. In 2013, the patient harbouring a virus with high level resistance to all RTI and PI received a regimen containing FTC, TDF, DRV/r, RPV, T20, and RAL to handle a viral load of 5000 RNA copies/mL, but never achieved fully suppressed viral load. In June 2013, after S119R, N155H and E157Q mutations in viral integrase were detected, the patient received DTG, and RAL was stopped. One month later, when viral load was undetectable for the first time since 2007, ART was de-escalated by removing T20. Since February 2014, low-level viral load was re-detectable. Two new mutations T97A and S147G in the integrase and no other new resistance associated mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase in comparison to the sample analyzed in June 2013 were detected. Highly resistant HIV-1 strains have been a common problem in the past. Their frequencies were pushed back by highly potent ART, but the virus is still able to become resistant against all available antiretrovirals at once. The here documented strain became

  12. Early Warning Indicators for Population-Based Monitoring of HIV Drug Resistance in 6 African Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Hamers, Raph L.; Menke, Jack; Labib, Moheb; Siwale, Margaret; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Kityo, Cissy; Mandaliya, Kishor; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Geskus, Ronald B.; Stevens, Wendy S.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA testing and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing are not routinely available for therapeutic monitoring of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. World Health Organization HIVDR early warning indicators (EWIs) assess ART

  13. Drug resistance in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Parija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial chemotherapy is an important component of all malaria control programmes throughout the world. This is especially so in light of the fact that there are no antimalarial vaccines which are available for clinical use at present. Emergence and spread of malaria parasites which are resistant to many of the available antimalarials today is, therefore, a major cause for concern. Till date, resistance to all groups of antimalarials excluding artemisinin has been reported. In recent years, in vitro resistance to even artemisinin has been described. While resistance to antibacterial agents has come to prominence as a clinical problem in recent years, antiparasitic resistance in general and antimalarial resistance in particular has not received much attention, especially in the Indian scenario. The present review deals with commonly used antimalarial drugs and the mechanisms of resistance to them. Various methods of detecting antimalarial resistance and avoiding the same have also been dealt with. Newer parasite targets which can be used in developing newer antimalarial agents and antimalarials obtained from plants have also been mentioned.

  14. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  15. Drug resistance in cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehta, Kapil, Dr; Siddik, Zahid H

    2009-01-01

    ... from disappointment with the drug resistance reversal strategies that were carried out in the 1990s using pump inhibitors to block drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein, product of the MDR-1 gene. However, if one takes the larger definition - multidrug resistance as simultaneous resistance to multiple structurally unrelated anticancer therapies - its...

  16. HIV subtype and drug resistance patterns among drug naïve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... To determine HIV-1 subtypes and antiretroviral drug resistance mutations for 16 infected, pregnant women in Jos, Nigeria, part of pol (1040 bp) was amplified from patient PBMC DNA, sequenced and analyzed. Eight of the samples were subtype G, three were CRF02_AG and 2 were unique recombinant.

  17. Do national drug policies influence antiretroviral drug prices? Evidence from the Southern African Development community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Galárraga, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of low- and middle-income countries’ (LMIC) national drug policies in managing antiretroviral (ARV) pharmaceutical prices is not well understood. Though ARV drug prices have been declining in LMIC over the past decade, little research has been done on the role of their national drug policies. This study aims to (i) analyse global ARV prices from 2004 to 2013 and (ii) examine the relationship of national drug policies to ARV prices. Analysis of ARV drug prices utilized data from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization (WHO). Ten of the most common ARV drugs (first-line and second-line) were selected. National drug policies were also assessed for 12 countries in the South African Development Community (SADC), which self-reported their policies through WHO surveys. The best predictor of ARV drug price was generic status—the generic versions of 8 out of 10 ARV drugs were priced lower than branded versions. However, other factors such as transaction volume, HIV prevalence, national drug policies and PEPFAR/CHAI involvement were either not associated with ARV drug price or were not consistent predictors of price across different ARV drugs. In the context of emerging international trade agreements, which aim to strengthen patent protections internationally and potentially delay the sale of generic drugs in LMIC, this study shines a spotlight on the importance of generic drugs in controlling ARV prices. Further research is needed to understand the impact of national drug policies on ARV prices.

  18. In-vitro photo-translocation of antiretroviral drug delivery into TZMbl cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malabi, Rudzani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available . Therapeutic targeting of HIV therefore requires further investigation and current therapies need modification in order to address HIV eradication. This deflects research towards investigating potential novel antiretroviral drug delivery systems. The use...

  19. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs | Mweemba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of life is a complex broad ranging multidimensional concept defined in terms of individual's subjective experiences. The definition by the ... Antiretroviral regimens are demanding and difficult, with numerous possible side effects and patients need to take the pills for indefinite periods of time. Efficacy of antiretroviral ...

  20. Of Remedies and Poisons: Recreational Use of Antiretroviral Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. During an ethnographic study of barriers to, and compliance with, antiretroviral (ARv ) treat- ment in the South Africa's West Coast region, our team came across a general sense amongst heath care providers that there was a lively illicit trade in antiretroviral medications. in itself, this is seen to be a barrier to ...

  1. Global patient safety and antiretroviral drug-drug interactions in the resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seden, Kay; Khoo, Saye H; Back, David; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Lamorde, Mohammed; Ryan, Mairin; Merry, Concepta

    2013-01-01

    Scale-up of HIV treatment services may have contributed to an increase in functional health facilities available in resource-limited settings and an increase in patient use of facilities and retention in care. As more patients are reached with medicines, monitoring patient safety is increasingly important. Limited data from resource-limited settings suggest that medication error and antiretroviral drug-drug interactions may pose a significant risk to patient safety. Commonly cited causes of medication error in the developed world include the speed and complexity of the medication use cycle combined with inadequate systems and processes. In resource-limited settings, specific factors may contribute, such as inadequate human resources and high disease burden. Management of drug-drug interactions may be complicated by limited access to alternative medicines or laboratory monitoring. Improving patient safety by addressing the issue of antiretroviral drug-drug interactions has the potential not just to improve healthcare for individuals, but also to strengthen health systems and improve vital communication among healthcare providers and with regulatory agencies.

  2. Automated sequence analysis and editing software for HIV drug resistance testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struck, Daniel; Wallis, Carole L.; Denisov, Gennady; Lambert, Christine; Servais, Jean-Yves; Viana, Raquel V.; Letsoalo, Esrom; Bronze, Michelle; Aitken, Sue C.; Schuurman, Rob; Stevens, Wendy; Schmit, Jean Claude; Rinke de Wit, Tobias; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Background: Access to antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited-settings is inevitably paralleled by the emergence of HIV drug resistance. Monitoring treatment efficacy and HIV drugs resistance testing are therefore of increasing importance in resource-limited settings. Yet low-cost technologies

  3. An analysis of drug resistance among people living with HIV/AIDS in Shanghai, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengdi Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance can facilitate better management of antiretroviral therapy, helping to prevent transmission and decrease the morbidity and mortality of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is little data about transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance for HIV/AIDS patients in Shanghai.A retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients who visited the Department of Infectious Disease from June 2008 to June 2015 was conducted in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze risk factors for drug resistance among HIV-infected people with virological failure. The related collected factors included patient age, gender, marital status, infection route, baseline CD4 count, antiretroviral therapy regimens, time between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy. Factors with p<0.1 in the univariate logistic regression test were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression test.There were 575 subjects selected for this study and 369 participated in this research. For the antiretroviral therapy drugs, the rates of transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance were significantly different. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI had the highest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 10.9%; acquired drug resistance, 53.3% and protease inhibitors (PIs had the lowest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 1.7%; acquired drug resistance, 2.7%. Logistic regression analysis found no factors that were related to drug resistance except marital status (married status for tenofovir: odds ratio = 6.345, 95% confidence interval = 1.553-25.921, P = 0.010 and the time span between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy (≤6M for stavudine: odds ratio = 0.271, 95% confidence interval = 0.086-0.850, P = 0.025; ≤6M for didanosine: odds ratio = 0.284, 95% confidence interval = 0.096-0.842, P = 0.023; ≤6M for

  4. Patients' adherence to antiretroviral therapy at Antiretroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence is the most important factor influencing successful antiretroviral therapy. Long term success with antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires taking 95% of medication. Less than 95% adherence can result in less than optimal therapeutic response and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  5. An evaluation of the emergence of drug resistant virus for HIV/AIDS drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyuk-Jun

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS drug treatment, such as highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), often fails due to the emergence of drug resistant species. In this paper we investigate a new estimation method for the possibility of emergence of drug resistant mutation. To the best knowledge of the author this work is the first study to try to describe quantitatively the possibility of drug resistance emergence for HIV/AIDS drug treatments. In simulation studies we compare HIV/AIDS treatment methods, such as structured treatment interruption (STI) and improved gradual dosage reduction (iGDR), based on the proposed analysis. From the analysis we can explain why STI treatment often fails and also can show that iGDR is desirable rather than STI particularly in terms of the decrease of the possibility of emergence of drug resistant virus.

  6. Fate of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Chapman, Ralph; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Tenofovir (9-(R)-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)-adenine) is an antiretroviral drug widely used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. Tenofovir is extensively and rapidly excreted unchanged in the urine. In the expectation that tenofovir could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in selected agricultural soils. Less than 10% of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir added to soils varying widely in texture (sand, loam, clay loam) was mineralized in a 2-month incubation under laboratory conditions. Tenofovir was less readily extractable from clay soils than from a loam or a sandy loam soil. Radioactive residues of tenofovir were removed from the soil extractable fraction with DT{sub 50}s ranging from 24 {+-} 2 to 67 + 22 days (first order kinetic model) or 44 + 9 to 127 + 55 days (zero order model). No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Tenofovir mineralization in the loam soil increased with temperature (range 4 {sup o}C to 30 {sup o}C), and did not occur in autoclaved soil, suggesting a microbial basis. Mineralization rates increased with soil moisture content, ranging from air-dried to saturated. In summary, tenofovir was relatively persistent in soils, there were no extractable transformation products detected, and the response of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir mineralization to soil temperature and heat sterilization indicated that the molecule was biodegraded by aerobic microorganisms. Sorption isotherms with dewatered biosolids suggested that tenofovir residues could potentially partition into the particulate fraction during sewage treatment.

  7. Low Prevalence of Antiretroviral Resistance Among HIV Type 1-Positive Prisoners in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David; Wohl, David A.; Kiziah, Nichole; Sebastian, Joseph; Eron, Joseph J.; White, Becky

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-resistant HIV complicates management of HIV infection. Although an estimated 14% of all HIV-positive persons pass through a prison or jail in the United States each year, little is known about the overall prevalence of antiretroviral (ARV) resistance in incarcerated persons. All genotypic sequence data on HIV-positive prisoners in the North Carolina (NC) Department of Corrections (DOC) were obtained from LabCorp. Screening for major resistance mutations in protease (PI) and reverse transcriptase (NRTI and NNRTI) was done using Genosure and the Stanford HIV Database. For subjects with multiple genotype reports, each mutation was counted only once and considered present on all subsequent genotypes. Between October 2006 and February 2010, the NC DOC incarcerated 1,911 HIV+ individuals of whom 19.2% (n=367) had at least one genotype performed. The overall prevalence of a major resistance mutation was 28.3% (95% CI 23.7, 33.0). Among prisoners ever exposed to an ARV during incarceration (n=329) prevalence of a major resistance mutation was 29.8% (95% CI 24.9, 34.7); resistance by class was 20.4% (95% CI 16.0, 24.7) for NRTIs, 19.8% (95% CI 15.5, 24.1) for NNRTIs, and 8.8% (95% CI 5.8,11.9) for PIs. Single class drug resistance was most prevalent at 14.2% (10.2,17.7) followed by dual 12.5% (I8.9,16.0) and triple class 3.3% (1.4,5.3) resistance. The three most prevalent mutations were K103N 15.8% (12.0, 20.2), M184V 14.3% (10.7,18.5), and M41L 4.9% (2.8,7.8). In the NC DOC ARV resistance prevalence, dual and triple class drug resistance was moderate over the study period. Resistance to PIs was lower than NNRTIs and NRTIs, likely reflecting higher usage of these two classes or a lower barrier to resistance. PMID:22966822

  8. HIV-1 evolution, drug resistance, and host genetics: The Indian scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Shankarkumar, U.; Pawar,Aruna; Ghosh,Kanjaksha

    2009-01-01

    U Shankarkumar, A Pawar, K GhoshNational Institute of Immunohaematology (ICMR), KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: A regimen with varied side effects and compliance is of paramount importance to prevent viral drug resistance. Most of the drug-resistance studies, as well as interpretation algorithms, are based on sequence data from HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Increased resistance to antiretroviral drugs leads to poor prognosis by restricting treatment optio...

  9. Activity of antiretroviral drugs in human infections by opportunistic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabel Galhardo Demarchi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is used in patients infected with HIV. This treatment has been shown to significantly decrease opportunist infections such as those caused by viruses, fungi and particularly, protozoa. The use of HAART in HIV-positive persons is associated with immune reconstitution as well as decreased prevalence of oral candidiasis and candidal carriage. Antiretroviral therapy benefits patients who are co-infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV, parvovirus B19 and cytomegalovirus (CMV. HAART has also led to a significant reduction in the incidence, and the modification of characteristics, of bacteremia by etiological agents such as Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staphylococcus, non-typhoid species of Salmonella, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HAART can modify the natural history of cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis, and restore mucosal immunity, leading to the eradication of Cryptosporidium parvum. A similar restoration of immune response occurs in infections by Toxoplasma gondii. The decline in the incidence of visceral leishmaniasis/HIV co-infection can be observed after the introduction of protease inhibitor therapy. Current findings are highly relevant for clinical medicine and may serve to reduce the number of prescribed drugs thereby improving the quality of life of patients with opportunistic diseases.A terapia HAART (terapia antirretroviral altamente ativa é usada em pacientes infectados pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV e demonstrou diminuição significativa de infecções oportunistas, tais como as causadas por vírus, fungos, protozoários e bactérias. O uso da HAART está associado com a reconstituição imunológica e diminuição na prevalência de candidíase oral. A terapia antirretroviral beneficia pacientes co-infectados pelo HIV, v

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral drugs in North-Central zone of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study of 110 patients attending State House Clinic, Abuja were assessed for compliance in time and dose of anti-retroviral drugs for one month. One hundred and five of the patients complied to taking the drugs (taking complience >95%) and compliance to the dosage was also good (98.1%). However, the ...

  11. Persistence of Transmitted Drug Resistance among Subjects with Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan J.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Wong, Joseph K.; Smith, Davey M.; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; Ignacio, Caroline C.; Parkin, Neil T.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2008-01-01

    Following interruption of antiretroviral therapy among individuals with acquired drug resistance, preexisting drug-sensitive virus emerges relatively rapidly. In contrast, wild-type virus is not archived in individuals infected with drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and thus cannot emerge rapidly in the absence of selective drug pressure. Fourteen recently HIV-infected patients with transmitted drug-resistant virus were followed for a median of 2.1 years after the estimated date of infection (EDI) without receiving antiretroviral therapy. HIV drug resistance and pol replication capacity (RC) in longitudinal plasma samples were assayed. Resistance mutations were characterized as pure populations or mixtures. The mean time to first detection of a mixture of wild-type and drug-resistant viruses was 96 weeks (1.8 years) (95% confidence interval, 48 to 192 weeks) after the EDI. The median time to loss of detectable drug resistance using population-based assays ranged from 4.1 years (conservative estimate) to longer than the lifetime of the individual (less conservative estimate). The transmission of drug-resistant virus was not associated with virus with reduced RC. Sexual transmission of HIV selects for highly fit drug-resistant variants that persist for years. The prolonged persistence of transmitted drug resistance strongly supports the routine use of HIV resistance genotyping for all newly diagnosed individuals. PMID:18353964

  12. Using drug exposure for predicting drug resistance - A data-driven genotypic interpretation tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Pironti

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral treatment history and past HIV-1 genotypes have been shown to be useful predictors for the success of antiretroviral therapy. However, this information may be unavailable or inaccurate, particularly for patients with multiple treatment lines often attending different clinics. We trained statistical models for predicting drug exposure from current HIV-1 genotype. These models were trained on 63,742 HIV-1 nucleotide sequences derived from patients with known therapeutic history, and on 6,836 genotype-phenotype pairs (GPPs. The mean performance regarding prediction of drug exposure on two test sets was 0.78 and 0.76 (ROC-AUC, respectively. The mean correlation to phenotypic resistance in GPPs was 0.51 (PhenoSense and 0.46 (Antivirogram. Performance on prediction of therapy-success on two test sets based on genetic susceptibility scores was 0.71 and 0.63 (ROC-AUC, respectively. Compared to geno2pheno[resistance], our novel models display a similar or superior performance. Our models are freely available on the internet via www.geno2pheno.org. They can be used for inferring which drug compounds have previously been used by an HIV-1-infected patient, for predicting drug resistance, and for selecting an optimal antiretroviral therapy. Our data-driven models can be periodically retrained without expert intervention as clinical HIV-1 databases are updated and therefore reduce our dependency on hard-to-obtain GPPs.

  13. Vietnamese Women's Struggle to Access Antiretroviral Drugs in a Context of Free Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Nam Thi Thu; Rasch, Vibeke; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore how HIV positive women living in a northern province of Vietnam experience seeking antiretroviral (ARV) treatment in the public health system, and how they address obstacles encountered along the way. Despite the fact that antiretroviral drugs were freely...... provided, they were not always accessible for women in need. A variety of factors at the population and health system level interacted in ways that often made access to ARV drugs a complicated and time-consuming process. We have suggested changes that could be made at the health system level that may help...

  14. Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%–30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST; however, the high turn around time of 2–6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  15. Drug-resistant Spinal Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anil K; Jaggi, Karan Raj; Bhayana, Himanshu; Saha, Rumpa

    2018-01-01

    Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB) is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%-30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT) for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST); however, the high turn around time of 2-6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  16. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) – with a cost of 47,139.91€ – would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets. PMID:26273190

  17. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) - with a cost of 47,139.91 € - would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets.

  18. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes of resistance. Learn more about research and investigations currently underway . Clinical Research Clinical research projects related ... Interest for NIAID’s Small Business Program Division of AIDS High-Priority Areas of Interest Division of Allergy, ...

  19. New antiretroviral drugs: What\\'s on the horizon in 2005? | Wood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the present number of available antiretrovirals (ARVs), there continues to be a need for new medications with improved tolerability, and activity against resistant virus. This article will review three groups of ARVs: those available in North America and. Europe but not yet registered in South Africa; new formulations of ...

  20. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu-Crespo À

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Àngels Andreu-Crespo,1,* Josep M Llibre,2,3,* Glòria Cardona-Peitx,1 Ferran Sala-Piñol,1 Bonaventura Clotet,2,4 Xavier Bonafont-Pujol1 1Pharmacy Department, 2HIV Unit and “Lluita contra la SIDA” Foundation, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, 3Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 4Universitat de Vic-Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC, Vic, Barcelona, Spain *These authors contributed equally to the work Abstract: While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals – with a cost of 47,139.91€ – would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar, should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets. Keywords: antiretroviral treatment, cost efficacy, drug packaging, treatment change

  1. Effect of antiretroviral drug (arved) on hepatic enzymes in albino rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the rush to put as many patients as possible on a potent ART, with very little or no laboratory monitory, limited attention has been given to side effects. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of antiretroviral drugs arved® , on aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and ...

  2. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. DESIGN:: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons...

  3. Mass Spectrometry to Determine Intracellular Concentrations of Antiretroviral Drugs: From chemistry to clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAround 1995 – 1996, treatment options for patients infected with the human immunodefiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) 1, 2, improved dramatically. Therapy with a combination of several classes of antiretroviral drugs resulted in a

  4. [Non-antiretroviral drugs uses among HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy in Senegal: Costs and factors associated with prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, A; Youbong, T J; Maynart, M; Ndoye, M; Diéye, F L; Ndiaye, N A; Koita-Fall, M B; Ndiaye, B; Seydi, M

    2017-08-01

    In addition to antiretroviral therapy, non-antiretroviral drugs are necessary for the appropriate care of people living with HIV. The costs of such drugs are totally or partially supported by the people living with HIV. We aimed to evaluate the overall costs, the costs supported by the people living with HIV and factors associated with the prescription of non-antiretroviral drugs in people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy in Senegal. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 331 people living with HIV who initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2009 and 2011 and followed until March 2012. The costs of non-antiretroviral drugs were those of the national pharmacy for essential drugs; otherwise they were the lowest costs in the private pharmacies. Associated factors were identified through a logistic regression model. The study population was 61 % female. At baseline, 39 % of patients were classified at WHO clinical stage 3 and 40 % at WHO clinical stage 4. Median age, body mass index and CD4 cells count were 41 years, 18kg/m 2  and 93 cells/μL, respectively. After a mean duration of 11.4 months of antiretroviral therapy, 85 % of patients received at least one prescription for a non-antiretroviral drug. Over the entire study period, the most frequently prescribed non-antiretroviral drugs were cotrimoxazole (78.9 % of patients), iron (33.2 %), vitamins (21.1 %) and antibiotics (19.6 %). The mean cost per patient was 34 Euros and the mean cost supported per patient was 14 Euros. The most expensive drugs per treated patient were antihypertensives (168 Euros), anti-ulcer agents (12 Euros), vitamins (8.5 Euros) and antihistamines (7 Euros). The prescription for a non-antiretroviral drug was associated with advanced clinical stage (WHO clinical stage 3/4 versus stage 1/2): OR=2.25; 95 % CI=1.11-4.57 and viral type (HIV-2 versus HIV-1/HIV-1+HIV-2): OR=0.36; 95 % CI=0.14-0.89. Non-antiretroviral drugs are frequently prescribed to

  5. HIV-1 evolution, drug resistance, and host genetics: The Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Shankarkumar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available U Shankarkumar, A Pawar, K GhoshNational Institute of Immunohaematology (ICMR, KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: A regimen with varied side effects and compliance is of paramount importance to prevent viral drug resistance. Most of the drug-resistance studies, as well as interpretation algorithms, are based on sequence data from HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Increased resistance to antiretroviral drugs leads to poor prognosis by restricting treatment options. Due to suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy there is an emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. The other factors responsible for this viral evolution are antiretroviral drug types and host genetics, especially major histocompatibility complex (MHC. Both primary and secondary drug resistances occur due to mutations in specific epitopes of viral protein regions which may influence the T cell recognition by immune system through MHC Class I and class II alleles. Mutations in viral epitopes enable the virus to escape the immune system. New drugs under clinical trials are being added but their exorbitant costs limit their access in developing countries. Thus the environmental consequences and, the impact of both viral and host genetic variations on the therapy in persons infected with HIV-1 clade C from India need to be determined.Keywords: HIV-1 C drug resistance, virus adaptation, HARRT, India

  6. Computational Studies of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, João Miguel

    Drug resistance has been an increasing problem in patient treatment and drug development. Starting in the last century and becoming a major worry in the medical and scienti c communities in the early part of the current millennium, major research must be performed to address the issues of viral...... is of the utmost importance in developing better and less resistance-inducing drugs. A drug's in uence can be characterized in many diff erent ways, however, and the approaches I take in this work re ect those same different in uences. This is what I try to achieve in this work, through seemingly unrelated...... approaches that come together in the study of drug's and their in uence on proteins and vice-versa. In part I, I aim to understand through combined theoretical ensemble analysis and free energy calculations the e ects mutations have over the binding anity and function of the M2 proton channel. This research...

  7. Serious treatment related adverse drug reactions amongst anti-retroviral naïve MDR-TB patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Van der Walt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally treatment outcomes for multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB remain poor and this is compounded by high drug toxicity. Little is known about the influence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs on treatment outcomes in South Africa. METHODS: We evaluated the impact of severe ADRs among a prospective cohort of MDR-TB patients in South Africa (2000-2004. The HIV-infected study participants were anti-retroviral naïve. RESULTS: Of 2,079 patients enrolled, 1,390 (66.8% were included in this analysis based on known HIV test results (39.1% HIV-infected. At least one severe ADR was reported in 83 (6.9% patients with ototoxicity being the most frequent ADR experienced (38.9%. CONCLUSIONS: We found that being HIV-infected but antiretroviral naïve did not increase occurrence of SADRs in patients on second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. Early screening and proactive management of ADRs in this patient population is essential, especially given the rollout of decentralized care and the potential for overlapping toxicity of concomitant MDR-TB and HIV treatment.

  8. Use of non-antiretroviral drugs among individuals with and without HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2017-01-01

    no injection drug abuse or hepatitis C infection. Population controls were identified from The Danish Civil Registration System and matched on age and gender (5:1). We analyzed the proportion of individuals who redeemed 0-1, 2-4, 5-9, or 10 or more non-antiretroviral drugs. Data were analyzed according...... considerably. Thus, use in the HIV-infected population only differed marginally from that of the background population in recent years. This difference was most pronounced in men who have sex with men (MSM). CONCLUSION: Compared to the background population, HIV infected individuals have increased use of non......-antiretroviral drugs. The excess use is mainly observed in MSM and has decreased with calendar time, why it in recent years only differs marginally from that observed in the background population....

  9. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  10. Initial drug resistance in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Initial drug resistance in India. There is gradual increase in primary MDR all over India : Pondi= Pondicherry 1985; Bangalore =1986; Jaipur = 1991; Jaipur =2000. Overall the MDR is less than 3% (TRC studies).

  11. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in infancy | McIlleron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dosing in infancy is complicated by inadequate characterisation of pharmacokinetics, unpredictable drug concentrations and a lack of suitable dosage forms. Additional challenges are presented by the concomitant administration of interacting drugs (e.g. rifampicin in antituberculosis treatment) and disease conditions that ...

  12. Pros and cons of therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Hugen, P.W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring has the promise to become a part of routine patient care in the treatment of HIV infection. It is known that plasma drug concentrations of protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are better predictors of antiviral response or toxicity than

  13. Drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Rural Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Elizabeth L.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Johnson, James R.; Haddadin, Bassam; Williamson, Jacquelyn; Samore, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Stool carriage of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in home-living residents of a rural community was examined. Carriage of nalidixic acid–resistant E. coli was associated with recent use of antimicrobial agents in the household. Household clustering of drug-resistant E. coli was observed. Most carriers of drug-resistant E. coli lacked conventional risk factors.

  14. Temporal trends of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a multinational seroconversion cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olson, Ashley; Bannert, Norbert; Sönnerborg, Anders; de Mendoza, Carmen; Price, Matthew; Zangerle, Robert; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Prins, Maria; Kran, Anne-Marte Bakken; Gill, John; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Porter, Kholoud

    2018-01-01

    The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) may increase with wider use of antiretroviral therapy and can contribute to therapeutic failure. We analysed time trends in TDR among HIV seroconverters. Using CASCADE data of individuals with well estimated dates of HIV seroconversion, we examined HIV

  15. Declining prevalence of HIV-infected individuals at risk of transmitting drug-resistant HIV in Denmark during 1997-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Obel, Niels; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transmission of drug-resistant HIV is a potential threat to the substantial clinical benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To explore the background for the low rates of drug resistance transmission (2.5%) in our population, we estimated acquisition of HIV drug...

  16. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  17. Of Remedies and Poisons: Recreational Use of Antiretroviral Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In itself, this is seen to be a barrier to adherence for many of their patients whose medication is traded to, or stolen by, drug dealers. Independent anecdotal evidence is emerging about this trade, though there has been little hard data verifying the existence of a recreational market for ARVs. While there are rumours that ...

  18. Drug Resistance in Cancer: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Genevieve; Byler, Shannon; Heerboth, Sarah; Lapinska, Karolina; Longacre, Mckenna; Snyder, Nicole; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2014-01-01

    Cancers have the ability to develop resistance to traditional therapies, and the increasing prevalence of these drug resistant cancers necessitates further research and treatment development. This paper outlines the current knowledge of mechanisms that promote or enable drug resistance, such as drug inactivation, drug target alteration, drug efflux, DNA damage repair, cell death inhibition, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as well as how inherent tumor cell heterogeneity plays a role in drug resistance. It also describes the epigenetic modifications that can induce drug resistance and considers how such epigenetic factors may contribute to the development of cancer progenitor cells, which are not killed by conventional cancer therapies. Lastly, this review concludes with a discussion on the best treatment options for existing drug resistant cancers, ways to prevent the formation of drug resistant cancers and cancer progenitor cells, and future directions of study. PMID:25198391

  19. The financial and service implications of splitting fixed-dose antiretroviral drugs - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R; Carlin, E; Sadique, Z; Ahmed, I; Adams, E J

    2015-02-01

    In 2010/2011, regional commissioners withdrew payment for the fixed-dose combination Combivir, forcing a switch to component drugs. This was deemed clinically acceptable and annual savings of £44 k expected. We estimated the true costs of switching and examined patient outcomes. Information for 46 patients using Combivir was extracted from case notes for each clinical contact in the 12 months pre- and post-switch (clinician seen, tests, antiretrovirals). Post-switch care costs £93/patient more annually versus pre-switch (95% CI £424 to £609), yielding £4278/year more post-switch for all patients. Drug and pathology costs were more expensive post-switch and extra clinical visits required. None of these results were statistically significant. Forty-two per cent of patients switched directly or in the subsequent year to an alternative fixed-dose combination rather than generics. Costs in this group were significantly higher post-switch driven by drug cost. Six patients (13%) reported problems with the switch including confusion around dosing and new side effects. As less-expensive generic antiretroviral drugs become available, it may appear cheaper to switch from fixed-dose combinations to component drugs. However, the additional clinical costs involved may outweigh the initial cost savings of the drugs and switching may cause confusion for some patients, risking loss of adherence. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. In-vitro photo-translocation of antiretroviral drug delivery into TZMbl cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabi, Rudzani; Manoto, Sello; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    The current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment regime possesses the ability to diminish the viral capacity to unnoticeable levels; however complete eradication of the virus cannot be achieved while latent HIV-1 reservoirs go unchallenged. Therapeutic targeting of HIV therefore requires further investigation and current therapies need modification in order to address HIV eradication. This deflects research towards investigating potential novel antiretroviral drug delivery systems. The use of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in promoting targeted optical drug delivery of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) into TZMbl cells revolves around using ultrafast laser pulses that have high peak powers, which precisely disrupt the cell plasma membrane in order to allow immediate transportation and expression of exogenous material into the live mammalian cells. A photo-translocation optical setup was built and validated by characterisation of the accurate parameters such as wavelength (800 nm) and pulse duration (115 fs). Optimisation of drug translocation parameters were done by performing trypan blue translocation studies. Cellular responses were determined via cell viability (Adenosine Triphosphate activity) and cell cytotoxicity (Lactate Dehydrogenase) assays which were done to study the influence of the drugs and laser exposure on the cells. After laser irradiation, high cell viability was observed and low toxicity levels were observed after exposure of the cells to both the ARVs and the laser. Our results confirmed that, with minimal damage and high therapeutic levels of ARVs, the fs laser assisted drug delivery system is efficient with benefits of non-invasive and non-toxic treatment to the cells.

  1. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  2. Drug Resistance in Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena C. Maltezou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis remains a public health problem worldwide. This illness was included by the World Health Organization in the list of neglected tropical diseases targeted for elimination by 2015. The widespread emergence of resistance to pentavalent antimonials in India where half cases occur globally and the unavailability of a vaccine in clinical use constitute major obstacles in achieving this goal. The last decade new antileishmanials became available, including the oral agent miltefosine. However, in poor endemic countries their wide use was curtailed because of the high costs, and also due to concerns of toxicity and emergence of resistance. Various mechanisms of antileishmanial resistance were identified recently in field isolates. Their elucidation will boost the design of new drugs and the molecular surveillance of resistance. Combination regimens should be evaluated in large trials. Overall, the development of antileishmanials has been generally slow; new drugs are needed. In order to control visceral leishmaniasis worldwide, treatment advances should become affordable in the poorest countries, where they are needed most.

  3. Antiretroviral neuropenetration scores better correlate with cognitive performance of HIV-infected patients after accounting for drug susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Grima, Pierfrancesco; Milanini, Benedetta; Mondi, Annalisa; Baldonero, Eleonora; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Cauda, Roberto; Silveri, Maria C; De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how viral resistance and antiretroviral central nervous system (CNS) penetration could impact on cognitive performance of HIV-infected patients. We performed a multicentre cross-sectional study enrolling HIV-infected patients undergoing neuropsychological testing, with a previous genotypic resistance test on plasma samples. CNS penetration-effectiveness (CPE) scores and genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS) were calculated for each regimen. A composite score (CPE-GSS) was then constructed. Factors associated with cognitive impairment were investigated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 215 patients were included. Mean CPE was 7.1 (95% CI 6.9, 7.3) with 206 (95.8%) patients showing a CPE≥6. GSS correction decreased the CPE value in 21.4% (mean 6.5, 95% CI 6.3, 6.7), 26.5% (mean 6.4, 95% CI 6.1, 6.6) and 24.2% (mean 6.4, 95% CI 6.2, 6.6) of subjects using ANRS, HIVDB and REGA rules, respectively. Overall, 66 (30.7%) patients were considered cognitively impaired. No significant association could be demonstrated between CPE and cognitive impairment. However, higher GSS-CPE was associated with a lower risk of cognitive impairment (CPE-GSSANRS odds ratio 0.75, P=0.022; CPE-GSSHIVDB odds ratio 0.77, P=0.038; CPE-GSSREGA odds ratio 0.78, P=0.038). Overall, a cutoff of CPE-GSS≥5 seemed the most discriminatory according to each different interpretation system. GSS-corrected CPE score showed a better correlation with neurocognitive performance than the standard CPE score. These results suggest that antiretroviral drug susceptibility, besides drug CNS penetration, can play a role in the control of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  4. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen

    Full Text Available Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI.

  5. Analysis of clinical drug-drug interaction data to predict uncharacterized interaction magnitudes between antiretroviral drugs and co-medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, Felix; Kinvig, Hannah; Battegay, Manuel; Khoo, Saye; Owen, Andrew; Siccardi, Marco; Marzolini, Catia

    2018-04-23

    Despite their high potential for drug-drug-interactions (DDI), clinical DDI studies of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are often lacking, because the full range of potential interactions cannot feasibly or pragmatically be studied, with some high-risk DDI studies also ethically difficult to undertake. Thus, a robust method to screen and to predict the likelihood of DDIs is required.We developed a method to predict DDIs based on two parameters: the degree of metabolism by specific enzymes such as CYP3A and the strength of an inhibitor or inducer. These parameters were derived from existing studies utilizing paradigm substrates, inducers and inhibitors of CYP3A, to assess the predictive performance of this method by verifying predicted magnitudes of changes in drug exposure against clinical DDI studies involving ARVs.The derived parameters were consistent with the FDA classification of sensitive CYP3A substrates and the strength of CYP3A inhibitors and inducers. Characterized DDI magnitudes (n = 68) between ARVs and co-medications were successfully quantified meaning 53%, 85% and 98% of the predictions were within 1.25-fold (0.80 - 1.25), 1.5-fold (0.66 - 1.48) and 2-fold (0.66 - 1.94) of the observed clinical data. In addition, the method identifies CYP3A substrates likely to be highly or conversely minimally impacted by CYP3A inhibitors or inducers, thus categorizing the magnitude of DDIs.The developed effective and robust method has the potential to support a more rational identification of dose adjustment to overcome DDIs being particularly relevant in a HIV-setting giving the treatments complexity, high DDI risk and limited guidance on the management of DDIs. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Predictors of having a resistance test following confirmed virological failure of combination antiretroviral therapy: data from EuroSIDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe V; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Background: Guidelines suggest that patients on continuous antiretroviral therapy for >4 months with current viral load (VL)>1,000 copies/ml should be tested for resistance. There are limited data showing the frequency of resistance testing in routine clinical practice following these recommendat......Background: Guidelines suggest that patients on continuous antiretroviral therapy for >4 months with current viral load (VL)>1,000 copies/ml should be tested for resistance. There are limited data showing the frequency of resistance testing in routine clinical practice following...

  7. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-fan; Liu, Shi-yin; Liang, Zhi-bin; Lv, Ming-fa; Zhou, Jia-nuan; Zhang, Lian-hui

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  8. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  9. Transmission of HIV Drug Resistance and the Predicted Effect on Current First-line Regimens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstra, L Marije; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Albert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Numerous studies have shown that baseline drug resistance patterns may influence the outcome of antiretroviral therapy. Therefore, guidelines recommend drug resistance testing to guide the choice of initial regimen. In addition to optimizing individual patient management......, these baseline resistance data enable transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to be surveyed for public health purposes. The SPREAD program systematically collects data to gain insight into TDR occurring in Europe since 2001. METHODS:  Demographic, clinical, and virological data from 4140 antiretroviral-naive human...... immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals from 26 countries who were newly diagnosed between 2008 and 2010 were analyzed. Evidence of TDR was defined using the WHO list for surveillance of drug resistance mutations. Prevalence of TDR was assessed over time by comparing the results to SPREAD data from 2002...

  10. HIV drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA from a community treatment program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derache

    Full Text Available Drug resistance mutations archived in resting memory CD4+ cells may persist despite suppression of HIV RNA to <50 copies/ml. We sequenced pol gene from proviral DNA among viremic and suppressed patients to identify drug resistance mutations.The Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort study enrolled and followed over 2 years 120 HIV infected patients from San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. HIV-1 pol genotyping by bulk sequencing was performed on 38 DNA and RNA from viremic patients and DNA only among 82 suppressed patients at baseline. Antiretroviral susceptibility was predicted by HIVDB.stanford.edu.Among 120 subjects, 81% were on antiretroviral therapy and had been treated for a median time of 7 years. Thirty-two viremic patients showed concordant RNA and DNA genotypes (84%; the discordant profiles were mainly observed in patients with low-level viremia. Among suppressed patients, 21 had drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA (26% with potential resistance to one, two or three ARV classes in 16, 4 and 1 samples respectively.The high level of genotype concordance between DNA and RNA in viremic patients suggested that DNA genotyping might be used to assess drug resistance in resource-limited settings, and further investigation of extracted DNA from dried blood spots is needed. Drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA in 26% of subjects with less than 50 copies/ml pose a risk for the transmission of drug resistant virus with virologic failure, treatment interruption or decreased adherence.

  11. Increased incidence of antiretroviral drug discontinuation among patients with viremic hepatitis C virus coinfection and high hyaluronic acid, a marker of liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, Daniel; Peters, Lars; Rockstroh, Juergen K

    2014-01-01

    Most antiretroviral drugs are metabolized by the liver; hepatic disease or liver damage as a result of hepatitis C virus (HCV) could impair this metabolism leading to an increased risk of drug toxicity. This study aimed to determine the risk of antiretroviral drug discontinuation among HCV/HIV co...

  12. Different origin of adipogenic stem cells influences the response to antiretroviral drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pisciotta, Alessandra; Bianchini, Elena; Bartolomeo, Regina [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Polo, Miriam [Department of Pharmacology, University of Valencia, Av.da Blasco Ibáñez 15, Valencia (Spain); FISABIO–Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Av.da Gaspar Aguilar 90, Valencia (Spain); De Pol, Anto [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento Sperimentale Interaziendale, Campus San Lazzaro, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pinti, Marcello [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Cossarizza, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.cossarizza@unimore.it [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento Sperimentale Interaziendale, Campus San Lazzaro, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a main side effect of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection, and can be provoked by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs). LD exists in different forms, characterized by fat loss, accumulation, or both, but its pathogenesis is still unclear. In particular, few data exist concerning the effects of antiretroviral drugs on adipocyte differentiation. Adipose tissue can arise either from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), that include bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs), or from ectodermal stem cells, that include dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To analyze whether the embryonal origin of adipocytes might impact the occurrence of different phenotypes in LD, we quantified the effects of several antiretroviral drugs on the adipogenic differentiation of hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs. hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs were isolated from healthy donors. Cells were treated with 10 and 50 μM stavudine (d4T), efavirenz (EFV), atazanavir (ATV), ritonavir (RTV), and ATV-boosted RTV. Viability and adipogenesis were evaluated by staining with propidium iodide, oil red, and adipoRed; mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, i.e. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and in adipocyte functions, i.e. fatty acid synthase (FASN), fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4), perilipin-1 (PLIN1) and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase-2 (AGPAT2), were quantified by real time PCR. We found that ATV, RTV, EFV, and ATV-boosted RTV, but not d4T, caused massive cell death in both cell types. EFV and d4T affected the accumulation of lipid droplets and induced changes in mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte functions in hBM-MSCs, while RTV and ATV had little effects. All drugs stimulated the accumulation of lipid droplets in hDPSCs. Thus, the adipogenic differentiation of human stem cells can be influenced by antiretroviral drugs, and depends, at least in

  13. Different origin of adipogenic stem cells influences the response to antiretroviral drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pisciotta, Alessandra; Bianchini, Elena; Bartolomeo, Regina; Polo, Miriam; De Pol, Anto; Pinti, Marcello; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a main side effect of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection, and can be provoked by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs). LD exists in different forms, characterized by fat loss, accumulation, or both, but its pathogenesis is still unclear. In particular, few data exist concerning the effects of antiretroviral drugs on adipocyte differentiation. Adipose tissue can arise either from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), that include bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs), or from ectodermal stem cells, that include dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To analyze whether the embryonal origin of adipocytes might impact the occurrence of different phenotypes in LD, we quantified the effects of several antiretroviral drugs on the adipogenic differentiation of hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs. hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs were isolated from healthy donors. Cells were treated with 10 and 50 μM stavudine (d4T), efavirenz (EFV), atazanavir (ATV), ritonavir (RTV), and ATV-boosted RTV. Viability and adipogenesis were evaluated by staining with propidium iodide, oil red, and adipoRed; mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, i.e. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and in adipocyte functions, i.e. fatty acid synthase (FASN), fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4), perilipin-1 (PLIN1) and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase-2 (AGPAT2), were quantified by real time PCR. We found that ATV, RTV, EFV, and ATV-boosted RTV, but not d4T, caused massive cell death in both cell types. EFV and d4T affected the accumulation of lipid droplets and induced changes in mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte functions in hBM-MSCs, while RTV and ATV had little effects. All drugs stimulated the accumulation of lipid droplets in hDPSCs. Thus, the adipogenic differentiation of human stem cells can be influenced by antiretroviral drugs, and depends, at least in

  14. Analyses of nanoformulated antiretroviral drug charge, size, shape and content for uptake, drug release and antiviral activities in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacek, Ari S; Balkundi, Shantanu; McMillan, JoEllyn; Roy, Upal; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; Mosley, R Lee; Kanmogne, Georgette; Kabanov, Alexander V; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-03-10

    Long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection shows limitations in pharmacokinetics and biodistribution while inducing metabolic and cytotoxic aberrations. In turn, ART commonly requires complex dosing schedules and leads to the emergence of viral resistance and treatment failures. We posit that the development of nanoformulated ART could preclude such limitations and affect improved clinical outcomes. To this end, we wet-milled 20 nanoparticle formulations of crystalline indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, and efavirenz, collectively referred to as "nanoART," then assessed their performance using a range of physicochemical and biological tests. These tests were based on cell-nanoparticle interactions using monocyte-derived macrophages and their abilities to uptake and release nanoformulated drugs and affect viral replication. We demonstrate that physical characteristics such as particle size, surfactant coating, surface charge, and most importantly shape are predictors of cell uptake and antiretroviral efficacy. These studies bring this line of research a step closer to developing nanoART that can be used in the clinic to affect the course of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dollfus Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%: drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8 suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10 and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8 suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%, drug

  16. Astrocyte Senescence and Metabolic Changes in Response to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART survival rates among patients infected by HIV have increased. However, even though survival has increased HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND still persist, suggesting that HAART-drugs may play a role in the neurocognitive impairment observed in HIV-infected patients. Given previous data demonstrating that astrocyte senescence plays a role in neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we examined the role of HAART on markers of senescence in primary cultures of human astrocytes (HAs. Our results indicate HAART treatment induces cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment is also associated with the induction of reactive oxygen species and upregulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These changes in mitochondria correlate with increased glycolysis in HAART drug treated astrocytes. Taken together these results indicate that HAART drugs induce the senescence program in HAs, which is associated with oxidative and metabolic changes that could play a role in the development of HAND.

  17. Alternation of antiretroviral drug regimens for HIV infection. Efficacy, safety and tolerability at week 96 of the Swatch Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negredo, Eugenia; Paredes, Roger; Peraire, Joaquim; Pedrol, Enric; Côté, Helene; Gel, Silvia; Fumoz, Carmina R; Ruiz, Lidia; Abril, Vicente; Rodriguez de Castro, Eduardo; Ochoa, Claudia; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Montaner, Julio; Rey-Joly, Celestino; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2004-12-01

    Alternation of antiretroviral drug regimens has been proposed as a novel treatment strategy for HIV infection. However, some concerns persist regarding antiviral efficacy, adherence, toxicity and resistance evolution in the long term. A total of 161 antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients were randomized to receive stavudine/didanosine/efavirenz (group A) or zidovudine/lamivudine/ nelfinavir (group B) or to alternate between the two regimens every 3 months starting with regimen A (group C). Antiviral efficacy, adherence, safety and tolerability were analysed every 12 weeks. After 96 weeks, time to virological failure was significantly delayed in the alternating regimen compared with the standards of care regimens. Virological suppression was seen in 46%, 48% and 58% of patients in groups A, B and C, respectively, in the intention-to-treat analysis and in 75%, 76% and 97% in the on-treatment analysis (A vs C: P=0.014; B vs C: P=0.016; A vs B: P=0.849). At the end of the study, 94% of patients in group A and 92% in groups B and C reported an adherence greater than 95%. Alternating therapy was associated with a similar impact on CD4+ counts in comparison with the standards of care regimens, as well as a lower mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA (mtDNA/nDNA) ratio decrease in the mitochondrial substudy performed on 37 patients. The frequency and intensity of adverse events in the alternating group decreased during subsequent cycles. Our results favour the hypothesis that proactive therapy switching may delay the accumulation of resistance mutations. Moreover, the alternating regimen was well tolerated and adherence remained comparably high in all treatment groups. The lower mtDNA/nDNA ratio decrease observed in this group may imply a lower impact on mitochondrial toxicity than in standard regimens.

  18. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Sarmah

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Malaria is a major public health concern in Northeast India with a preponderance of drug-resistant strains. Until recently the partner drug for artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (SP). Antifolate drug resistance has been associated with the mutations at dihydropteroate ...

  19. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  20. HIV Drug-Resistant Patient Information Management, Analysis, and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yashik; Mars, Maurice

    2012-06-07

    The science of information systems, management, and interpretation plays an important part in the continuity of care of patients. This is becoming more evident in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa. The high replication rates, selective pressure, and initial infection by resistant strains of HIV infer that drug resistance will inevitably become an important health care concern. This paper describes proposed research with the aim of developing a physician-administered, artificial intelligence-based decision support system tool to facilitate the management of patients on antiretroviral therapy. This tool will consist of (1) an artificial intelligence computer program that will determine HIV drug resistance information from genomic analysis; (2) a machine-learning algorithm that can predict future CD4 count information given a genomic sequence; and (3) the integration of these tools into an electronic medical record for storage and management. The aim of the project is to create an electronic tool that assists clinicians in managing and interpreting patient information in order to determine the optimal therapy for drug-resistant HIV patients.

  1. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  2. Leading Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supporting research on several organisms that have developed resistance to antimicrobial drug treatment. The institute manages a research portfolio of grants aimed at the problem of antimicrobial resistance and hospital-acquired infections. Here is a list ...

  3. Free software to analyse the clinical relevance of drug interactions with antiretroviral agents (SIMARV®) in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, N A; Amariles, P; Monsalve, M; Faus, M J

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has extended the expected lifespan of patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the therapeutic benefits of some drugs used simultaneously with highly active antiretroviral therapy may be adversely affected by drug interactions. The goal was to design and develop a free software to facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive Medline/PubMed database search of drug interactions was performed. Articles that recognized any drug interactions in HIV disease were selected. The publications accessed were limited to human studies in English or Spanish, with full texts retrieved. Drug interactions were analyzed, assessed, and grouped into four levels of clinical relevance according to gravity and probability. Software to systematize the information regarding drug interactions and their clinical relevance was designed and developed. Overall, 952 different references were retrieved and 446 selected; in addition, 67 articles were selected from the citation lists of identified articles. A total of 2119 pairs of drug interactions were identified; of this group, 2006 (94.7%) were drug-drug interactions, 1982 (93.5%) had an identified pharmacokinetic mechanism, and 1409 (66.5%) were mediated by enzyme inhibition. In terms of clinical relevance, 1285 (60.6%) drug interactions were clinically significant in patients with HIV (levels 1 and 2). With this information, a software program that facilitates identification and assessment of the clinical relevance of antiretroviral drug interactions (SIMARV ® ) was developed. A free software package with information on 2119 pairs of antiretroviral drug interactions was designed and developed that could facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almani, S.A.; Memon, N.M.; Qureshi, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of primary and secondary drug resistance amongst the clinical isolates of M.tuberculosis, to identify risk factors and how to overcome this problem. Design: A case series of 50 indoor patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Place and duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Jamshoro, Sindh, (Pakistan) from January 1999 to December 2000. Patients and methods: Four first line anti-tuberculous drugs rifampicine, ethambutol and streptomycin were tested for sensitivity pattern. Results: Twelve (26.66%) were sensitive to all four drugs, 12(26.66%) were resistant to one drug, 14 (31.11%) were resistant to two drugs, 2 (4.44%) were resistant to three drugs, and 5(11.11%) were resistant to all four drugs. Resistance to isoniazid was the most common in 27 cases (60%) with primary resistance in 6(13.33%) and secondary resistance in 21(46.66%), followed by resistance to streptomycin in 17 cases (37.77%) with primary resistance in 5(11.11%) and secondary resistance in 12 (26.66%). Resistance to ethambutol in 10 cases (22.22%) and rifampicine in 11 (24.44%) and all cases were secondary. Similarly multi-drugs resistance (MRD) TB was found in 11(24.44%) isolates. Conclusion: This study showed high prevalence of drug resistance among clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Their is a need to establish centers at number of places with adequate facilities for susceptibility testing so that the resistant pattern could be ascertained and treatment regimens tailored accordingly. (author)

  5. Future technologies for monitoring HIV drug resistance and cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Urvi M; McCormick, Kevin; van Zyl, Gert; Mellors, John W

    2017-03-01

    Sensitive, scalable and affordable assays are critically needed for monitoring the success of interventions for preventing, treating and attempting to cure HIV infection. This review evaluates current and emerging technologies that are applicable for both surveillance of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and characterization of HIV reservoirs that persist despite antiretroviral therapy and are obstacles to curing HIV infection. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the potential to be adapted into high-throughput, cost-efficient approaches for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring during continued scale-up of antiretroviral therapy and rollout of preexposure prophylaxis. Similarly, improvements in PCR and NGS are resulting in higher throughput single genome sequencing to detect intact proviruses and to characterize HIV integration sites and clonal expansions of infected cells. Current population genotyping methods for resistance monitoring are high cost and low throughput. NGS, combined with simpler sample collection and storage matrices (e.g. dried blood spots), has considerable potential to broaden global surveillance and patient monitoring for HIVDR. Recent adaptions of NGS to identify integration sites of HIV in the human genome and to characterize the integrated HIV proviruses are likely to facilitate investigations of the impact of experimental 'curative' interventions on HIV reservoirs.

  6. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    major anti tuberculosis drugs; Isoniazid and Rifampicin with or without resistance to other anti-TB drugs has been termed. MDR-TB. MDR-TB is more difficult to treat than drug- susceptible TB, requiring the use of less effective second line anti tubercular drugs (SLDs) which are often associated with major side effects. 2.

  7. Role of HIV Subtype Diversity in the Development of Resistance to Antiviral Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluma G. Brenner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that over 90% of HIV-1 infected people worldwide harbor non‑subtype B variants of HIV-1, knowledge of resistance mutations in non-B HIV-1 and their clinical relevance is limited. Due to historical delays in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART on a worldwide basis, the vast majority of reports on drug resistance deal with subtype B infections in developed countries. However, both enzymatic and virological data support the concept that naturally occurring polymorphisms among different nonB subtypes can affect HIV-1 susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs, the magnitude of resistance conferred by major mutations, and the propensity to acquire some resistance mutations. Tools need to be optimized to assure accurate measurements of drug susceptibility of non-B subtypes. Furthermore, there is a need to recognize that each subtype may have a distinct resistance profile and that differences in resistance pathways may also impact on cross-resistance and the selection of second-line regimens. It will be essential to pay attention to newer drug combinations in well designed long-term longitudinal studies involving patients infected by viruses of different subtypes.

  8. Stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs and coping strategies used to prevent changes in treatment regimens in Kinondoni District, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Amani Thomas; Owenya, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the government of Tanzania has been rolling out antiretroviral treatment programs all over the country. However, the capacity of the health system to cope with the rapid scale-up of these programs is a major concern, and problems may result in drug stock-outs that force changes in treatment regimens. This study aims to explore stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs and further determine the coping strategies employed to prevent changes in treatment regimens in HIV/AIDS care and treatment clinics in Kinondoni District, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 HIV/AIDS care and treatment clinics. Interviews were conducted with the person in charge and a member of the pharmacy staff from each clinic using a pre-tested semi-structured interview guide. Verbal responses were transcribed, coded and analysed by thematic approach. Quantitative data were analysed using Excel spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel®, Microsoft Corporation). The total number of clients enrolled in the visited clinics was 32,147, of whom 20,831 (64.8%) had already been initiated onto antiretroviral therapies (ART). Stock-out of antiretroviral drugs was reported in 16 out of the 20 clinics, causing 210 patients to change their ART regimens, during the 12 months preceding the survey. Inefficient supply systems, quantification problems and short expiry duration were cited as the main causes of stock-outs. The coping strategies utilised to prevent changes in ART regimens were: shortening of the refill period, borrowing and moving patients to other clinics. Changes in ART regimens due to stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs occurred in a small but significant number of patients. This increases the risk of the emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains. Healthcare workers use various coping strategies to prevent changes in ART regimens but, unfortunately, some of these strategies are likely to increase patient-borne costs, which may discourage them from attending their routine

  9. Hidden costs of HIV treatment in Spain: inefficiency of the antiretroviral drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre-Codina, Josep M; Andreu-Crespo, Angels; Cardona-Peitx, Gloria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet-Sala, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs in Spain are delivered by law only in hospital pharmacies. Commercial packages meet variable quality standards when dispensed drugs are returned due to treatment changes or adherence problems Nearly 20-25% of the initial regimens will be changed at 48 weeks for different reasons. We evaluated the economic impact on public health system of the inability of using returned drugs due to inefficient packaging. We defined socially efficient packaging as the best adapted one to being delivered in unit dose to outpatients and classified: Class A - Drug packed in unit doses with complete info (name of drug, dosage in mg, lot, and expiring date) in each unit, maintaining complete information of the drug if returned when the external package is opened. Class B - packed in blisters with complete info in the blister, but not in unit doses, without special conservation conditions (should be re-packed in unit doses in the pharmacy before its dispensation to assure a class A excellence). Class C - packed in plastic containers with complete info written only on a label over the container, would allow repackaging only before its initial delivery, but not when returned. Class D - drug packed in plastic containers with manufacturer's warning that the product cannot be placed outside of the original package due to special conditions of conservation (fridge, humidity) that doesn't allow a unit dose repackaging or reusing an opened container. We analysed a 12-month period (July 2011-June 2012) in a hospital-based HIV outpatient pharmacy that serves 2413 treated individuals. Patients generated 23,574 visits to pharmacy, and received 48,325 drug packages, with 2.529.137 pills delivered. The patients suffered 1051 treatment changes for any reason. A total amount of 122.945€ in treatment were returned to pharmacy in opened packages during the study period. 47.139.91€ would be totally lost, mainly due to being packaged in class C and D boxes, the equivalent of

  10. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  11. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    Abstract. Background: Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought ...

  12. genetic diversity and prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROGMANAGER

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Owiti P.4, Isa S. E1,2, Otecko N.4, Okwori A. E. J5, Musa J.1,6, Oguche S.1,7, Sagay A. S.1,6,. Idoko J. A1,2, Nimzing L.1,8, .... unidirectional flow, the HIV viral RNA was extracted from plasma using the QIAamp Viral ... each sample's band to that of the DNA mass ladder's bands of. *Corresponding author.

  13. Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: In Burkina Faso, there is no recent data about the level of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains among newly diagnosed tuberculosis cases. OBJECTIVE: To provide an update of the primary drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis among patients in Burkina faso. METHODS: ...

  14. Tuberculosis drug resistance in the Western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Drug resistance is a serious problem in the treatment of tuberculosis and a threat to successful tuberculosis control programmes. Local health workers have expressed concern that the increasing tuberculosis epidemic in the Western Cape is partly attributable to drug resistance. The aim of this study was to ...

  15. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  16. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Saleri, Nuccia; Badoum, Gisèle; Ouedraogo, Martial; Dembélé, Sary M.; Nacanabo, Rachel; Bonkoungou, Victor; Cirillo, Daniela; Pinsi, Gabriele; Matteelli, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Because data from countries in Africa are limited, we measured the proportion of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) cases among TB patients in Burkina Faso for whom retreatment was failing. Of 34 patients with multidrug-resistant TB, 2 had an XDR TB strain. Second-line TB drugs should be strictly controlled to prevent further XDR TB increase.

  17. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the extent of HIV-1 drug resistance among drug naïve Kenyan individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute HIV laboratory Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of seventy eight HIV-1 positive drug naïve subjects randomised from five Kenyan provincial hospitals ...

  18. Interaction between pharmaceutical companies and physicians who prescribe antiretroviral drugs for treating AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Mário César

    2014-01-01

    Given that Brazil has a universal public policy for supplying medications to treat HIV and AIDS, the aim here was to describe the forms of relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical companies that produce antiretrovirals (ARVs). Cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted in the state of São Paulo. Secondary database linkage was used, with structured interviews conducted by telephone among a sample group of 300 physicians representing 2,361 professionals who care for patients with HIV and AIDS. Around two thirds (64%) of the physicians prescribing ARVs for HIV and AIDS treatment in the state of São Paulo who were interviewed declared that they had some form of relationship with pharmaceutical companies, of which the most frequent were receipt of publications (54%), visits by sales promoters (51%) and receipt of small-value objects (47%). Two forms of relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and physicians who deal with HIV and AIDS can be highlighted: facilitation of professionals' access to continuing education; and antiretroviral drug brand name promotion.

  19. Interaction between pharmaceutical companies and physicians who prescribe antiretroviral drugs for treating AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cesar Scheffer

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Given that Brazil has a universal public policy for supplying medications to treat HIV and AIDS, the aim here was to describe the forms of relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical companies that produce antiretrovirals (ARVs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted in the state of São Paulo. METHODS : Secondary database linkage was used, with structured interviews conducted by telephone among a sample group of 300 physicians representing 2,361 professionals who care for patients with HIV and AIDS. RESULTS : Around two thirds (64% of the physicians prescribing ARVs for HIV and AIDS treatment in the state of São Paulo who were interviewed declared that they had some form of relationship with pharmaceutical companies, of which the most frequent were receipt of publications (54%, visits by sales promoters (51% and receipt of small-value objects (47%. CONCLUSIONS: Two forms of relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and physicians who deal with HIV and AIDS can be highlighted: facilitation of professionals' access to continuing education; and antiretroviral drug brand name promotion.

  20. In vitro assessment of the adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on the human male gamete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, G; Moinard, N; Jouanolou, V; Daudin, M; Gandia, P; Bujan, L

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro effects of didanosine, zidovudine, saquinavir and indinavir, commonly used in highly active antiretroviral therapy, on human sperm fertility parameters. Thirty semen samples from healthy men were collected and prepared by gradient density method. Aliquots of 90% fractions with >80% motile spermatozoa were incubated for 1, 3, and 6h with different concentrations of the antiretroviral drugs (20, 40, and 80 μg/ml). Sperm motility was evaluated by computer assisted sperm analysis system. Sperm mitochondrial potential was evaluated using 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DIOC(6)) and the acrosome reaction was examined using pisum sativum agglutinin method. A dose-dependent decrease in sperm motility was observed with saquinavir. Saquinavir also induced a significant time and dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial potential and an increase in spontaneous acrosome reaction. These findings indicate that, in vitro, higher doses of saquinavir have adverse effects on sperm motility, mitochondrial potential and acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coumarins as Potential Inhibitors of DNA Polymerases and Reverse Transcriptases. Searching New Antiretroviral and Antitumoral Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garro, Hugo A; Pungitore, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the viral agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and at present, there is no effective vaccine against HIV. Reverse Transcriptase (RT) is an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, such as HIV as well as for other RNA infectious viruses like Human T lymphocyte virus. Polymerases act in DNA metabolism, modulating different processes like mitosis, damage repair, transcription and replication. It has been widely documented that DNA Polymerases and Reverse Transcriptases serve as molecular targets for antiviral and antitumoral chemotherapy. Coumarins are oxygen heterocycles that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Natural coumarins have attraction due to their bioactive properties such as tumor promotion inhibitory effects, and anti-HIV activity. Coumarins and derivates exhibit potent inhibitory effects on HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes and compounds isolated from Calophyllum inophyllum or DCK derivates showed inhibitory activity against human RT. Furthermore, natural isocoumarins isolated from cultures of fungi or hydroxycoumarins were able to inhibit human DNA polymerase. In view of their importance as drugs and biologically active natural products, and their medicinally useful properties, extensive studies have been carried out on the synthesis of coumarin compounds in recent years. Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs), a class of antiretroviral chemotherapeutic agents, act by binding to an allosteric pocket showing, generally, low toxicity. This work tries to summarize the investigation about natural and synthetic coumarins with the ability to inhibit key enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism and their possible application as antiretroviral and antitumoral agents.

  2. When prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission fails: preventing pretreatment drug resistance in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Calis, Job; Boerma, Ragna; Sigaloff, Kim; Zeh, Clement; Mugyenyi, Peter; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2018-01-01

    : The scale-up of antiretroviral prophylaxis to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV has significantly reduced new pediatric infections in sub-Saharan Africa. However, among infants who become HIV-infected despite prevent mother-to-child transmission, more than 50% have drug-resistant HIV.

  3. Evolution of primary HIV drug resistance in a subtype C dominated epidemic in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Celina Adolfo Bila

    Full Text Available In Mozambique, highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART was introduced in 2004 followed by decentralization and expansion, resulting in a more than 20-fold increase in coverage by 2009. Implementation of HIV drug resistance threshold surveys (HIVDR-TS is crucial in order to monitor the emergence of transmitted viral resistance, and to produce evidence-based recommendations to support antiretroviral (ARV policy in Mozambique.World Health Organization (WHO methodology was used to evaluate transmitted drug resistance (TDR in newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Maputo and Beira to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and protease inhibitors (PI. Subtypes were assigned using REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool and phylogenetic trees constructed using MEGA version 5.Although mutations associated with resistance to all three drug were detected in these surveys, transmitted resistance was analyzed and classified as <5% in Maputo in both surveys for all three drug classes. Transmitted resistance to NNRTI in Beira in 2009 was classified between 5-15%, an increase from 2007 when no NNRTI mutations were found. All sequences clustered with subtype C.Our results show that the epidemic is dominated by subtype C, where the first-line option based on two NRTI and one NNRTI is still effective for treatment of HIV infection, but intermediate levels of TDR found in Beira reinforce the need for constant evaluation with continuing treatment expansion in Mozambique.

  4. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  5. Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve pregnant women in selected HIV-care centres in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Odoom, Alexander; Adiku, Theophilus; Delgado, Elena; Lartey, Margaret; Ampofo, William K

    2017-03-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy in Ghana has been scaled up across the country over the last decade. This study sought to determine the occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in pregnant HIV-1 positive women yet to initiate antiretroviral therapy at selected HIV Care Centres in Ghana. Plasma specimens from twenty-six (26) HIV seropositive pregnant women who were less than 28weeks pregnant with their first pregnancy and ART naïve were collected from selected HIV care centres in three (3) regions in Ghana. Genotypic testing was done for the reverse transcriptase gene and the sequences generated were analyzed for HIV-1 drug resistance mutations using the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Resistance mutations associated with the reverse transcriptase gene were detected in 4 (15.4%) of the participants. At least one major drug resistance mutation in the reverse transcriptase gene was found in 3 (11.5%) of the women. The detection of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in this drug-naïve group in two regional HIV care sites is an indication of the need for renewed action in monitoring the emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Ghana. None declared.

  6. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  7. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria João; Neves, José das; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS) is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood–brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood–brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS. PMID:24741312

  8. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  9. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  10. Expression of Genes for Drug Transporters in the Human Female Genital Tract and Modulatory Effect of Antiretroviral Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Hijazi

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral (ARV -based microbicides are one of the strategies pursued to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Delivery of ARV drugs to subepithelial CD4+ T cells at concentrations for protection is likely determined by drug transporters expressed in the cervicovaginal epithelium. To define the role of drug transporters in mucosal disposition of topically applied ARV-based microbicides, these must be tested in epithelial cell line-based biopharmaceutical assays factoring the effect of relevant drug transporters. We have characterised gene expression of influx and efflux drug transporters in a panel of cervicovaginal cell lines and compared this to expression in cervicovaginal tissue. We also investigated the effect of dapivirine, darunavir and tenofovir, currently at advanced stages of microbicides development, on expression of drug transporters in cell lines. Expression of efflux ABC transporters in cervical tissue was best represented in HeLa, Ect1/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cell lines. Expression of influx OCT and ENT transporters in ectocervix matched expression in Hela while expression of influx SLCO transporters in vagina was best reflected in VK2/E6E7 cell line. Stimulation with darunavir and dapivirine upregulated MRP transporters, including MRP5 involved in transport of tenofovir. Dapivirine also significantly downregulated tenofovir substrate MRP4 in cervical cell lines. Treatment with darunavir and dapivirine showed no significant effect on expression of BCRP, MRP2 and P-glycoprotein implicated in efflux of different ARV drugs. Darunavir strongly induced expression in most cell lines of CNT3 involved in cell uptake of nucleotide/nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors and SLCO drug transporters involved in cell uptake of protease inhibitors. This study provides insight into the suitability of cervicovaginal cell lines for assessment of ARV drugs in transport kinetics studies. The modulatory effect of darunavir and dapivirine on

  11. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  12. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yon Rhee

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  13. Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Mechanisms of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance: An Individual-Patient- and Sequence-Level Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y. Rhee (Soo Yoon); J.L. Blanco (Jose Luis); M.R. Jordan (Michael); J. Taylor (Jonathan); P. Lemey (Philippe); V. Varghese (Vici); R.L. Hamers (Raph); S. Bertagnolio (Silvia); M. De Wit (Meike); A.F. Aghokeng (Avelin); J. Albert (Jan); R. Avi (Radko); S. Avila-Rios (Santiago); P.O. Bessong (Pascal O.); J.I. Brooks (James I.); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); Z.L. Brumme (Zabrina L.); M.P. Busch (Michael P.); H. Bussmann (Hermann); M.L. Chaix (Marie Laure); B.S. Chin (Bum Sik); T.T. D’Aquin (Toni T.); C. de Gascun (Cillian); A. Derache (Anne); D. Descamps (Diane); A.K. Deshpande (Alaka K.); C.F. Djoko (Cyrille F.); S.H. Eshleman (Susan H.); H. Fleury (Hervé); P. Frange (Pierre); S. Fujisaki (Seiichiro); P. Harrigan (Pr); J. Hattori (Junko); A. Holguin (Africa); G.M. Hunt (Gillian M.); H. Ichimura (Hiroshi); P. Kaleebu (Pontiano); D. Katzenstein (David); S. Kiertiburanakul (Sasisopin); J.H. Kim (Jerome H.); S.S. Kim (Sung Soon); Y. Li (Yanpeng); I. Lutsar (Irja); L. Morris (L.); N. Ndembi (Nicaise); K.P. NG (Kee Peng); R.S. Paranjape (Ramesh S.); M.C. Peeters (Marian); M. Poljak (Mario); M.A. Price (Matt A.); M.L. Ragonnet-Cronin (Manon L.); G. Reyes-Terán (Gustavo); M. Rolland (Morgane); S. Sirivichayakul (Sunee); D.M. Smith (Davey M.); M.A. Soares (Marcelo A.); V. Soriano (Virtudes); D. Ssemwanga (Deogratius); M. Stanojevic (Maja); M.A. Stefani (Mariane A.); W. Sugiura (Wataru); S. Sungkanuparph (Somnuek); A. Tanuri (Amilcar); K.K. Tee (Kok Keng); H.-H.M. Truong (Hong-Ha M.); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); N. Vidal (Nicole); C. Yang (Chunfu); R. Yang (Rongge); G. Yebra (Gonzalo); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); R.W. Shafer (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractRegional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We

  14. Geographic and temporal trends in the molecular epidemiology and genetic mechanisms of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance: an individual-patient- and sequence-level meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Blanco, Jose Luis; Jordan, Michael R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Lemey, Philippe; Varghese, Vici; Hamers, Raph L.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; Albert, Jan; Avi, Radko; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Bessong, Pascal O.; Brooks, James I.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Busch, Michael P.; Bussmann, Hermann; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Chin, Bum Sik; D'Aquin, Toni T.; de Gascun, Cillian F.; Derache, Anne; Descamps, Diane; Deshpande, Alaka K.; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fleury, Herve; Frange, Pierre; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hattori, Junko; Holguin, Africa; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Katzenstein, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kim, Jerome H.; Kim, Sung Soon; Li, Yanpeng; Lutsar, Irja; Morris, Lynn; Ndembi, Nicaise; Ng, Kee Peng; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Peeters, Martine; Poljak, Mario; Price, Matt A.; Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Rolland, Morgane; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soriano, Vincent V.; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Stanojevic, Maja; Stefani, Mariane A.; Sugiura, Wataru; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Tanuri, Amilcar; tee, Kok Keng; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Vidal, Nicole; Yang, Chunfu; Yang, Rongge; Yebra, Gonzalo; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to

  15. Can voluntary pooled procurement reduce the price of antiretroviral drugs? a case study of Efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2017-05-01

    : A number of strategies have aimed to assist countries in procuring antiretroviral therapy (ARV) at lower prices. In 2009, as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) commenced a voluntary pooled procurement scheme, however, the impact of the scheme on ARV prices remains uncertain. This study aims to estimate the effect of VPP on drug prices using Efavirenz as a case study. This analysis uses WHO Global price report mechanism (GPRM) data from 2004 to 2013. Due to the highly skewed distribution of drug Prices, a generalized linear model (GLM) was used to conduct a difference-in-difference estimation of drug price changes over time. These analyses found that voluntary pooled procurement reduced both the ex-works price of generic Efavirenz and the incoterms price by 16.2 and 19.1%, respectively ( P <  0.001) in both cases). The year dummies were also statistically significant from 2006 to 2013 ( P <  0.001), indicating a strong decreasing trend in the price of Efavirenz over that period. Voluntary pooled procurement significantly reduced the price of 600 mg generic Efavirenz between 2009 and 2013. Voluntary pooled procurement therefore offers a potentially effective strategy for the reduction in HIV drug prices and the improvement of technical efficiency in HIV programming. Further work is required to establish if these findings hold also for other drugs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. HIV type 1 coreceptor tropism, CCR5 genotype, and integrase inhibitor resistance profiles in Vietnam: implications for the introduction of new antiretroviral regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Quynh Phuong; Dean, Jonathan; Do, Trinh Thi Diem; Carr, Michael J; Dunford, Linda; Coughlan, Suzie; Connell, Jeff; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W; Nguyen Thi, Lan Anh

    2012-10-01

    In Vietnam, where an estimated 280,000 people will be HIV-positive by 2012, recommended antiretroviral regimens do not include more recently developed therapeutics, such as Integrase inhibitors (INI) and coreceptor antagonists. This study examined HIV-1 coreceptor tropism and INI drug resistance profiles, in parallel with CCR5 genotypes, in a cohort of 60 HIV-positive individuals from different regions of Vietnam. No evidence of INI resistance was detected. Some 40% of individuals had X4-tropic HIV-1, making them unsuitable for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. We identified a novel CCR5 variant-S272P-along with other, previously reported variants: G106R, C178R, W153C, R223Q, and S336I. Interestingly, CCR5 variants known to affect HIV-1 infectivity were observed only in individuals harboring X4-tropic virus. Together, this study presents valuable baseline information on HIV-1 INI resistance, coreceptor tropism, and CCR5 variants in HIV-positive individuals in Vietnam. This should help inform policy on the future use of novel antiretrovirals in Vietnam.

  17. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A; Ledergerber, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods.  Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without ...... a consistent association between tenofovir and cLEE emerging within the first 2 years after drug initiation. This novel tenofovir-cLEE signal should be further investigated.......Background.  Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods.  Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without...

  18. mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 12 December 2011. MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS GENETIC DIVERSITY AND DRUG RESISTANCE CONFERRING MUTATIONS. IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO. L. Fenner, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland, S.

  19. Antiretroviral drug supply challenges in the era of scaling up ART in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Erik J; Jahn, Andreas; Ben-Smith, Anne; Makombe, Simon D; Harries, Anthony D; Aboagye-Nyame, Francis; Chimbwandira, Frank

    2011-07-06

    The number of people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) has increased considerably in recent years and is expected to continue to grow in the coming years. A major challenge is to maintain uninterrupted supplies of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and prevent stock outs. This article discusses issues around the management of ARVs and prevention of stock outs in Malawi, a low-income country with a high HIV/AIDS burden, and a weak procurement and supply chain management system. This system for ARVs, paid for by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and bypassing the government Central Medical Stores, is in place, using the United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) procurement services. The system, managed by a handful of people who spend limited time on supply management, is characterized by a centrally coordinated quantification based on verified data from all national ART clinics, parallel procurement through UNICEF, and direct distribution to ART clinics. The model worked well in the first years of the ART programme with a single first-line ARV regimen, but with more regimens becoming available (e.g., alternative first-line, second-line and paediatric regimens), it has become more difficult to administer. Managing supplies through a parallel system has the advantage that weaknesses in the national system have limited influence on the ARV procurement and supply chain management system. However, as the current system operates without a central warehouse and national buffer stock capacity, it diminishes the ability to prevent ARV stock outs. The process of ordering ARVs, from the time that estimates are made to the arrival of supplies in health facilities, takes approximately one year. Addressing the challenges involved in maintaining ARVs through an efficient procurement and supply chain management system that prevents ARV stock outs through the establishment of a dedicated procurement team, a central warehouse and/or national buffer stock is a

  20. A Mathematical Model of Antiretroviral Therapy Evaluation for HIV Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio; Mo Yang, Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Treating HIV-infected patients with a combination of several antiretroviral drugs can lead to emergence of the drug-resistant strain. This work proposes a mathematical model to evaluate the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistant during antiretroviral therapy. The model assumes that all susceptible individuals who can be infected by the wildtype strain (sensible to the treatment) or by drug-resistant virus receive antiretroviral therapy. Patients on treatment regimen can evolve to a state of success or failure and for the individuals in therapeutic fail the therapeutic schema is changed. The analysis of system is performed. The existence and stability of the steady states are considered. We address an analytical expression for the reproductive number in a community where antiretroviral therapy are widely used to treat HIV and where both drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are co-circulating.

  1. Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.  Created: 3/1/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/26/2007.

  2. Emergence of Lamivudine-Resistant HBV during Antiretroviral Therapy Including Lamivudine for Patients Coinfected with HIV and HBV in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijia; Zhu, Ting; Song, Xiaojing; Huang, Ying; Yang, Feifei; Guan, Shuo; Xie, Jing; Gohda, Jin; Hosoya, Noriaki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Liu, Wenjun; Gao, George Fu; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Ishida, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    In China, HIV-1-infected patients typically receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) that includes lamivudine (3TC) as a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) (ART-3TC). Previous studies from certain developed countries have shown that, in ART-3TC, 3TC-resistant HBV progressively emerges at an annual rate of 15–20% in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. This scenario in China warrants investigation because >10% of all HIV-infected patients in China are HBV carriers. We measured the occurrence of 3TC-resistant HBV during ART-3TC for HIV-HBV coinfection and also tested the effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) used as an additional RTI (ART-3TC/TDF) in a cohort study in China. We obtained 200 plasma samples collected from 50 Chinese patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen) and examined them for the prevalence of 3TC-resistant HBV by directly sequencing PCR products that covered the HBV reverse-transcriptase gene. We divided the patients into ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups and compared the efficacy of treatment and incidence of drug-resistance mutation between the groups. HIV RNA and HBV DNA loads drastically decreased in both ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups. In the ART-3TC group, HBV breakthrough or insufficient suppression of HBV DNA loads was observed in 20% (10/50) of the patients after 96-week treatment, and 8 of these patients harbored 3TC-resistant mutants. By contrast, neither HBV breakthrough nor treatment failure was recorded in the ART-3TC/TDF group. All of the 3TC-resistant HBV mutants emerged from the cases in which HBV DNA loads were high at baseline. Our results clearly demonstrated that ART-3TC is associated with the emergence of 3TC-resistant HBV in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and that ART-3TC/TDF reduces HBV DNA loads to an undetectable level. These findings support the use of TDF-based treatment regimens for patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. PMID:26288093

  3. Emergence of Lamivudine-Resistant HBV during Antiretroviral Therapy Including Lamivudine for Patients Coinfected with HIV and HBV in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Gu

    Full Text Available In China, HIV-1-infected patients typically receive antiretroviral therapy (ART that includes lamivudine (3TC as a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (RTI (ART-3TC. Previous studies from certain developed countries have shown that, in ART-3TC, 3TC-resistant HBV progressively emerges at an annual rate of 15-20% in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. This scenario in China warrants investigation because >10% of all HIV-infected patients in China are HBV carriers. We measured the occurrence of 3TC-resistant HBV during ART-3TC for HIV-HBV coinfection and also tested the effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF used as an additional RTI (ART-3TC/TDF in a cohort study in China. We obtained 200 plasma samples collected from 50 Chinese patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and examined them for the prevalence of 3TC-resistant HBV by directly sequencing PCR products that covered the HBV reverse-transcriptase gene. We divided the patients into ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups and compared the efficacy of treatment and incidence of drug-resistance mutation between the groups. HIV RNA and HBV DNA loads drastically decreased in both ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups. In the ART-3TC group, HBV breakthrough or insufficient suppression of HBV DNA loads was observed in 20% (10/50 of the patients after 96-week treatment, and 8 of these patients harbored 3TC-resistant mutants. By contrast, neither HBV breakthrough nor treatment failure was recorded in the ART-3TC/TDF group. All of the 3TC-resistant HBV mutants emerged from the cases in which HBV DNA loads were high at baseline. Our results clearly demonstrated that ART-3TC is associated with the emergence of 3TC-resistant HBV in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and that ART-3TC/TDF reduces HBV DNA loads to an undetectable level. These findings support the use of TDF-based treatment regimens for patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV.

  4. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Saheed Lawal,2 Olufunsho Awodele,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Idowu O Senbanjo,3 Sunday O Olayemi,2 Veronica C Ezeaka,4,5 Edamisan O Temiye,4,5 Titilope A Adeyemo,4,6 Oluranti Opanuga,4,7 Olufunmilayo A Lesi,4,8 Sulaimon A Akanmu4,6 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 4APIN Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 5Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 6Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 7Department of Pharmacy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba Lagos, Nigeria; 8Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Multi-therapy is common in HIV-infected children, and the risk for clinically significant drug interactions (CSDIs is high. We investigated the prevalence of CSDIs between antiretroviral (ARV and co-prescribed drugs for children attending a large HIV clinic in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: The case files of pediatric patients receiving treatment at the HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Idi-Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010 were reviewed. The ARV and co-prescribed drug pairs were evaluated for potential interactions using the Liverpool HIV Pharmacology Group website. The potential interactions were rated as A (no known interaction, B (minor/no action needed, C (moderate/monitor therapy, D (major/therapy modification, and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: Of the 310 cases reviewed, 208 (67.1% patients were at risk of CSDIs. Artemisinin-based combination therapy was prescribed for over one

  5. Pattern and Determinants of Antiretroviral Drug Adherence among Nigerian Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Ekama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for a high level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs has remained a major hurdle to achieving maximal benefit from its use in pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the level of adherence and identify factors that influence adherence during pregnancy. Method. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a semistructured questionnaire. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine factors independently associated with good drug adherence during pregnancy. Result. 137 (80.6% of the interviewed 170 women achieved adherence level of ≥95% using 3 day recall. The desire to protect the unborn child was the greatest motivation (51.8% for good adherence. Fear of being identified as HIV positive (63.6% was the most common reason for nonadherence. Marital status, disclosure of HIV status, good knowledge of ART, and having a treatment supporter were found to be significantly associated with good adherence at bivariate analysis. However, after controlling for confounders, only HIV status disclosure and having a treatment partner retained their association with good adherence. Conclusion. Disclosure of HIV status and having treatment support are associated with good adherence. Maternal desire to protect the child was the greatest motivator for adherence.

  6. Drug resistance in the mouse cancer clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottenberg, Sven; Borst, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the most pressing problems in treating cancer patients today. Local and regional disease can usually be adequately treated, but patients eventually die from distant metastases that have become resistant to all available chemotherapy. Although work on cultured tumor cell

  7. Campylobacter Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Humans in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Though Campylobacter enteritis is a self-limiting disease, antimicrobial agents are recommended for extraintestinal infections and for treating immunocompromised persons. Erythromycin and ciprofloxacin are drugs of choice. The rate of resistance to these drugs is increasing in both developed and developing ...

  8. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane E Bennett

    Full Text Available Programs that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions and times, the World Health Organization has recommended the adoption of a consensus genotypic definition of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance. In January 2007, we outlined criteria for developing a list of mutations for drug-resistance surveillance and compiled a list of 80 RT and protease mutations meeting these criteria (surveillance drug resistance mutations; SDRMs. Since January 2007, several new drugs have been approved and several new drug-resistance mutations have been identified. In this paper, we follow the same procedures described previously to develop an updated list of SDRMs that are likely to be useful for ongoing and future studies of transmitted drug resistance. The updated SDRM list has 93 mutations including 34 NRTI-resistance mutations at 15 RT positions, 19 NNRTI-resistance mutations at 10 RT positions, and 40 PI-resistance mutations at 18 protease positions.

  9. Profiling evolutionary landscapes underlying drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, Rachel

    bacterial communities i.e. biofilms or dormant metabolic states. Antibiotic drugs are currently our best medicine to treat (against) bacterial pathogens due to antibiotics unique properties of being small molecules that are soluble and act systemically. These qualities allow for many modern medical......, the work involved in this PhD thesis, examines the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. Two main studies were performed: the first to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of collateral sensitive drug pairs and collateral resistance drug pairs in adaptation of Escherichia coli...

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  11. Is There Anything Left to Learn? A Report on the Fifth Interanational Workshop on HIV Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Zala

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Although insight into the viral dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has increased dramatically over the past year, there remains much to learn in the field of antiretroviral drug resistance. Transmission of isolates with primary drug resistance is increasingly recognized. With respect to reverse transcriptase inhibitors, it appears that the use of drugs in combination may forestall the development of resistance once therapy has been initiated. Further, certain findings, particularly with respect to zidovudine and lamivudine, suggest that emergence of resistance to one agent may lead to increased susceptibility to another. These data may allow evaluation of innovative treatment strategies to avoid the development of multidrug resistance, which has now been reported in a number of settings. Protease inhibitors (PIs are, on an individual basis, the most potent antiretroviral compounds available today. A number of studies have shown that resistance to these agents develops after the accumulation of several mutations in the protease gene of HIV. As with reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the use of PIs in the context of regimens designed to suppress viral replication as much as possible appears to forestall, perhaps indefinitely, the development of drug resistance. Although different patterns of resistance mutations have been described for the different PIs available, the issue of cross-resistance remains unresolved. For the time being, it may be best to consider all PIs as a single agent that must always be used in a regimen designed to maximally suppress viral load. In conclusion, research in the field of antiretroviral drug resistance has never been more active and productive. It is hoped that such research will lead to the development of an integrated model of the clinical and laboratory management of HIV-infected individuals.

  12. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembruff, Stacey L; Laberge, Monique L; Villeneuve, David J; Guo, Baoqing; Veitch, Zachary; Cecchetto, Melanie; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2008-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7 DOX-2 ), epirubicin (MCF-7 EPI ), paclitaxel (MCF-7 TAX-2 ), or docetaxel (MCF-7 TXT ). During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does occur at the threshold dose, the magnitude of

  13. Role of drug transporters and drug accumulation in the temporal acquisition of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veitch Zachary

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthracyclines and taxanes are commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer. However, tumor resistance to these drugs often develops, possibly due to overexpression of drug transporters. It remains unclear whether drug resistance in vitro occurs at clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy drugs and whether both the onset and magnitude of drug resistance can be temporally and causally correlated with the enhanced expression and activity of specific drug transporters. To address these issues, MCF-7 cells were selected for survival in increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (MCF-7DOX-2, epirubicin (MCF-7EPI, paclitaxel (MCF-7TAX-2, or docetaxel (MCF-7TXT. During selection cells were assessed for drug sensitivity, drug uptake, and the expression of various drug transporters. Results In all cases, resistance was only achieved when selection reached a specific threshold dose, which was well within the clinical range. A reduction in drug uptake was temporally correlated with the acquisition of drug resistance for all cell lines, but further increases in drug resistance at doses above threshold were unrelated to changes in cellular drug uptake. Elevated expression of one or more drug transporters was seen at or above the threshold dose, but the identity, number, and temporal pattern of drug transporter induction varied with the drug used as selection agent. The pan drug transporter inhibitor cyclosporin A was able to partially or completely restore drug accumulation in the drug-resistant cell lines, but had only partial to no effect on drug sensitivity. The inability of cyclosporin A to restore drug sensitivity suggests the presence of additional mechanisms of drug resistance. Conclusion This study indicates that drug resistance is achieved in breast tumour cells only upon exposure to concentrations of drug at or above a specific selection dose. While changes in drug accumulation and the expression of drug transporters does

  14. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV positive patients in Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, Frank A; Grint, Daniel; Efsen, Anne Marie Werlinrud

    2014-01-01

    Observational data from Eastern Europe on the management and outcome of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in HIV positive populations remain sparse in the English-language literature.We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of 55 patients who were diagnosed with HIV and MDR TB...... in Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2006 to 89 patients whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to isoniazid and rifampicin.Patients with HIV and MDR TB were young and predominantly male with high rates of intravenous drug use, imprisonment and hepatitis C co-infection. Eighty-four per cent...... of patients with MDR TB had no history of previous TB drug exposure suggesting that the majority of MDR TB resulted from transmission of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The use of non-standardized tuberculosis treatment was common, and the use of antiretroviral therapy infrequent. Compared to those...

  15. Maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug strategies that preserve breastfeeding by HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kuhn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The South African Department of Health is justified in withdrawing support for free infant formula. By so doing, it recognises that any intervention that might detract from breast feeding poses a serious threat to infant survival. Since evidence is now strong that antiretroviral drugs used during lactation prevent transmission of infection from a seropositive mother, strategies that promote breastfeeding can now be recommended for enhancing the health of mothers and infants.

  16. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Gonorrhea

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-12-26

    Dr. Robert Kirkcaldy, a medical officer at CDC, discusses his article on antimicrobial resistance and gonorrhea.  Created: 12/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/26/2017.

  17. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era.

  18. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE. Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P=0.05. Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P=0.010 as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P<0.001. Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%, and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%, but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs.

  19. Characterizing the emergence and persistence of drug resistant mutations in HIV-1 subtype C infections using 454 ultra deep pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansode Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of HIV-1 RNA in the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral therapies (ARTs is well documented while less is known about the role of historical viruses stored in the proviral DNA. The primary focus of this work was to characterize the genetic diversity and evolution of HIV drug resistant variants in an individual’s provirus during antiretroviral therapy using next generation sequencing. Methods Blood samples were collected prior to antiretroviral therapy exposure and during the course of treatment from five patients in whom drug resistance mutations had previously been identified using consensus sequencing. The spectrum of viral variants present in the provirus at each sampling time-point were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing from multiple combined PCR products. The prevalence of viral variants containing drug resistant mutations (DRMs was characterized at each time-point. Results Low abundance drug resistant viruses were identified in 14 of 15 sampling time-points from the five patients. In all individuals DRMs against current therapy were identified at one or more of the sampling time-points. In two of the five individuals studied these DRMs were present prior to treatment exposure and were present at high prevalence within the amplified and sequenced viral population. DRMs to drugs other than those being currently used were identified in four of the five individuals. Conclusion The presence of DRMs in the provirus, regardless of their observed prevalence did not appear to have an effect on clinical outcomes in the short term suggesting that the drug resistant viral variants present in the proviral DNA do not appear to play a role in the short term in facilitating the emergence of drug resistance.

  20. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eMatsunaga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-Free Drug Susceptibility Assay (CFDSA, for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR. The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs. CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of various protease inhibitors (PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1.

  1. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Bennett (Diane); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); D. Otelea (Dan); D.R. Kuritzkes (Daniel); H. Fleury (Hervé); M. Kiuchi (Mark); W. Heneine (Walid); R. Kantor (Rami); M.R. Jordan (Michael); J.M. Schapiro (Jonathan); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); P. Sandstrom (Paul); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S.Y. Rhee (Soo Yoon); T.F. Liu (Tommy); D. Pillay (Deenan); R.W. Shafer (Robert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPrograms that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions

  2. Effectiveness of second-line antiretroviral therapy: the impact of drug switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Letícia Penna; Mendicino, Cássia Cristina Pinto; Reis, Edna Afonso; Carmo, Ricardo Andrade; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane Aparecida

    2017-12-01

    Including antiretroviral drug switches as a measure of ART failure could be more suitable than conventional measures to evaluate health outcomes in "real-world" settings. This is part of a historical cohort of HIV-infected adults who initiated ART from 2001-2005, and were followed up for a maximum of five years in three HIV/AIDS centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Follow-up information included data from 2001-2010. All patients switched from first-line ART were included. Second-line ART effectiveness was measured as the time-to-ART failure. Failure was defined simulating two scenarios: (1) Clinical, immunological and virological failure (scenario 1); and scenario 1 plus ART switches (scenario 2). Descriptive analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards model were performed. We identified 119 eligible patients; most had protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimens prescribed as second-line. The incidence of failure was different for the two scenarios (29.4% vs. 54.6% for scenario 1 and 2, respectively; p impact of ART switches in representing lack of ART effectiveness.

  3. Coconut Oil Extract Mitigates Testicular Injury Following Adjuvant Treatment with Antiretroviral Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedengbe, Oluwatosin O; Jegede, Ayoola I; Onanuga, Ismail O; Offor, Ugochukwu; Naidu, Edwin Cs; Peter, Aniekan I; Azu, Onyemaechi O

    2016-10-01

    Increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made the management of drug toxicities an increasingly crucial component of HIV. This study investigated the effects of adjuvant use of coconut oil and HAART on testicular morphology and seminal parameters in Sprague- Dawley rats. Twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 153~169 g were distributed into four groups (A-D) and treated as follows: A served as control (distilled water); B (HAART cocktail- Zidovudine, Lamivudine and Nevirapine); C (HAART + Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg) and D (Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg). After 56 days of treatment, animals were killed and laparotomy to exercise the epididymis for seminal fluid analyses done whilst testicular tissues were processed for histomorphometric studies. Result showed a significant decline in sperm motility ( P coconut oil + HAART resulted in significant decrease in seminiferous tubular diameter ( P coconut oil alone (which showed normal histoarchitecture levels). While derangements in testicular and seminal fluid parameters occurred following HAART, adjuvant treatment with Virgin coconut oil restored the distortions emanating thereof.

  4. Changes in drug resistance patterns following the introduction of HIV type 1 non-B subtypes in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mendoza, Carmen; Garrido, Carolina; Poveda, Eva; Corral, Angélica; Zahonero, Natalia; Treviño, Ana; Anta, Lourdes; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    Natural genetic variability at the pol gene may account for differences in drug susceptibility and selection of resistance patterns across HIV-1 clades. Spread of non-B subtypes along with changes in antiretroviral drug use may have modified drug resistance patterns in recent years. All HIV-1 clinical samples sent to a reference laboratory located in Madrid for drug resistance testing since January 2000 were analyzed. The pol gene was sequenced and HIV-1 subtypes were assigned using the Stanford algorithm and phylogenetic analyses for non-B subtypes. Drug resistance mutations were recorded using the IAS-USA mutation list (April 2008). A total of 3034 specimens from 730 antiretroviral-naive individuals (92 with non-B subtypes) and 1569 antiretroviral-experienced patients (97 with non-B subtypes) were examined. The prevalence of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in the study period increased from 4.4% (2000-2003) to 10.1% (2004-2007) (p 41.8%) and G (17.5%). Thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) were more prevalent in B than non-B subtypes, in both drug-naive (6.2% vs. 1%; p < 0.01) and treatment-experienced patients (49% vs. 30%, p < 0.01). K103N was most frequent in B than non-B subtypes (34% vs. 21%; p < 0.01); conversely, 106A/M was more prevalent in non-B than B clades (11% vs. 5%). Codon 179 mutations associated with etravirine resistance were more frequent in non-B than B subtypes. Finally, secondary protease resistance mutations were more common in non-B than B clades, with a potentially significant impact at least on tipranavir. The prevalence of HIV-1 non-B subtypes has increased since the year 2000 in a large drug resistance database in Spain, determining changes in drug resistance patterns that may influence the susceptibility to new antiretroviral drugs and have an impact on genotypic drug resistance interpretation algorithms.

  5. Minority Variants of Drug-Resistant HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Sara; Richman, Douglas D.

    2010-01-01

    Minor drug-resistant variants exist in every HIV-infected patient. Since these minority variants are usually present at very low levels, they cannot be detected and quantified using conventional genotypic and phenotypic tests. Recently, several assays have been developed to characterize these low-abundance drug-resistant variants in the large genetically complex population present in every HIV-infected individual. The most important issue is, what results generated by these assays can predict clinical or treatment outcomes and might guide patient management in clinical practice. Cutoff-values for the detection of these low-abundance viral variants that predict increased risk of treatment failure should be determined. These thresholds may be specific for each mutation and treatment regimen. In this review we summarize the attributes and limitations of the currently available detection assays and review the existing information about both acquired and transmitted drug resistant minority variants. PMID:20649427

  6. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  7. Perinatal genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of anti-retroviral nucleoside analog drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, Miriam C.; Olivero, Ofelia A.; Walker, Dale M.; Walker, Vernon E.

    2004-01-01

    The current worldwide spread of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) to the heterosexual population has resulted in approximately 800 000 children born yearly to HIV-1-infected mothers. In the absence of anti-retroviral intervention, about 25% of the approximately 7000 children born yearly to HIV-1-infected women in the United States are HIV-1 infected. Administration of zidovudine (AZT) prophylaxis during pregnancy reduces the rate of infant HIV-1 infection to approximately 7%, and further reductions are achieved with the addition of lamivudine (3TC) in the clinical formulation Combivir. Whereas clinically this is a remarkable achievement, AZT and 3TC are DNA replication chain terminators known to induce various types of genotoxicity. Studies in rodents have demonstrated AZT-DNA incorporation, HPRT mutagenesis, telomere shortening, and tumorigenicity in organs of fetal mice exposed transplacentally to AZT. In monkeys, both AZT and 3TC become incorporated into the DNA from multiple fetal organs taken at birth after administration of human-equivalent protocols to pregnant dams during gestation, and telomere shortening has been found in monkey fetuses exposed to both drugs. In human infants, AZT-DNA and 3TC-DNA incorporation as well as HPRT and GPA mutagenesis have been documented in cord blood from infants exposed in utero to Combivir. In infants of mice, monkeys, and humans, levels of AZT-DNA incorporation were remarkably similar, and in newborn mice and humans, mutation frequencies were also very similar. Given the risk-benefit ratio, these highly successful drugs will continue to be used for prevention of vertical viral transmission, however evidence of genotoxicity in mouse and monkey models and in the infants themselves would suggest that exposed children should be followed well past adolescence for early detection of potential cancer hazard

  8. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical implications of antiretroviral drug interactions with warfarin: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterly, John S; Darin, Kristin M; Gerzenshtein, Lana; Othman, Fidah; Postelnick, Michael J; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2013-06-01

    Warfarin, a frequently prescribed anticoagulant with a narrow therapeutic index, is susceptible to drug-drug interactions with antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study compared the warfarin maintenance dose (WMD) between patients receiving and not receiving ART and evaluated predictors of warfarin dosage among those on ART. This was a case-control (1:2) study. Cases were HIV-infected patients receiving warfarin and protease inhibitor (PI)- and/or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based ART. Controls were randomly selected HIV-uninfected patients receiving warfarin. The WMD was compared between cases and controls and between cases on varying ART regimens. Bivariate comparisons were performed and a linear regression model was developed to identify predictors of WMD. We identified 18 case and 36 control patients eligible for inclusion. Cases were younger than controls (mean age: 45.8 versus 63.1 years, P African American (50.0% versus 22.2%, P=0.04). ART was classified as PI-based (n=9), NNRTI-based (n=7) and PI + NNRTI-based (n=2). The WMD (mean ± SD) differed between cases and controls (8.6  ±  3.4 mg versus 5.1 ± 1.5 mg, P ART regimens (PI: 8.8  ±  4.5 mg; NNRTI: 8.6   ± 1.8 mg; PI + NNRTI: 7.3  ±  3.3 mg; P = 0.86). Race and ritonavir dose were independent predictors of WMD, predicting an increase of 3.9 mg (95% CI: 0.88-6.98, P = 0.02) if a patient was African American or 3.7 mg (95% CI: 0.53-6.89, P = 0.03) if the total daily ritonavir dose was 200 mg. The required WMD was significantly higher in patients receiving ART. Prompt dose titration to achieve a higher WMD with vigilant monitoring may be required due to these drug-drug interactions.

  10. Solubility and Dissolution Rate Determination of Different Antiretroviral Drugs in Different pH Media Using UV Visible Spectrophotometer

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, K.; Narayana Raju, P.; Shanta Kumari, K.; Lakshmi Narasu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Solubility and dissolution rate of three antiretroviral drugs such as lamivudine, zidovudine and stavudine was studied in four media having different pH. The samples were analyzed by using UV Visible spectrophotometer. lamivudine shows more solubility that is 276.08 mg/mL in 0.01 N HCl. Stavudine showing highest solubility that is 101.23 mg/mL in pH 4.5 acetate buffer. Zidovudine showing highest solubility that is 28.90 mg/mL in both water and 0.01 N HCl. All three drugs showing lower solubi...

  11. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  12. reverse transcriptase inhibitors drug resistance mutations in drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... through put drug resistance testing for the increasing number of infected individuals in order to effectively manage those initiating ART. ACKNoWLEdGEMENTs. To the patient who participated in the study, the Kenya. Medical Research Institute, Centre for Virus HIV. Laboratory division staff for their support.

  13. Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELMI RENI PUTRI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014 Yelmi Reni Putri, AdrianiProgram Studi Ilmu Keperawatan STIKes Fort De Kock BukittinggiEmail : Yelmi.reni@gmail.com ABSTRACT1st of of December is the day each year is celebrated as a day of HIV / AIDS this year themed "prevent HIV / AIDS, protect workers, families and the nation", this is when the right moment for us health workers give a good contribution to overcome or provide suggestions for improving services to patients with HIV / AIDS. The increasing number of patients with HIV / AIDS today is not only to make our health care workers need to be vigilant, even patients and families also need to work together to overcome this proble.The purpose of this study was to identify the level of compliance of patients taking antiretroviral drugs and HIV-positive people do with the success of antiretroviral therapy, the study sample taken in accident sampling with the number of respondents 40 patients idODHA of the month from May to October 2014. The study design using qualitative and quantitative method Mix , measuring instrument used in this research is a questionnaire that contains the characteristics of patients living with HIV, guided interviews to assess the role of the KPA, manager of HIV RSAM, and people living with HIV patients themselves.The result showed 57.5% of patients did not obey, and as much as 52.5% of patients successfully in HIV treatment, but there is no relationship between adherence with therapy success with value value 0.583 and 0.677 OR it is associated with the patient's anxiety and fear to know the results of which he repeated CD4 CD4 is one measure of the success of therapy. The conclusion of this study is important to know the patients' adherence PLWHA still low this will impact on the occurrence of resistance will even increase mortality, it is recommended

  14. Virologic failure of protease inhibitor-based second-line antiretroviral therapy without resistance in a large HIV treatment program in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie H Levison

    Full Text Available We investigated the prevalence of wild-type virus (no major drug resistance and drug resistance mutations at second-line antiretroviral treatment (ART failure in a large HIV treatment program in South Africa.HIV-infected patients ≥ 15 years of age who had failed protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line ART (2 consecutive HIV RNA tests >1000 copies/ml on lopinavir/ritonavir, didanosine, and zidovudine were identified retrospectively. Patients with virologic failure were continued on second-line ART. Genotypic testing for drug resistance was performed on frozen plasma samples obtained closest to and after the date of laboratory confirmed second-line ART failure. Of 322 HIV-infected patients on second-line ART, 43 were adults with confirmed virologic failure, and 33 had available plasma for viral sequencing. HIV-1 RNA subtype C predominated (n = 32, 97%. Mean duration on ART (SD prior to initiation of second-line ART was 23 (17 months, and time from second-line ART initiation to failure was 10 (9 months. Plasma samples were obtained 7(9 months from confirmed failure. At second-line failure, 22 patients (67% had wild-type virus. There was no major resistance to PIs found. Eleven of 33 patients had a second plasma sample taken 8 (5.5 months after the first. Median HIV-1 RNA and the genotypic resistance profile were unchanged.Most patients who failed second-line ART had wild-type virus. We did not observe evolution of resistance despite continuation of PI-based ART after failure. Interventions that successfully improve adherence could allow patients to continue to benefit from second-line ART therapy even after initial failure.

  15. Drug resistance patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoharo, H.K.; Shaikh, I.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the resistance patterns of mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates among category I and II patients of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Jamshoro, from November 2008 to September 2009. Patients were divided into category I and II. The sputa were collected, stained with Ziehl-Nielsen (Z-N) staining and ultimately inoculated on Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) media for six weeks. Out of 890 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients, the growth was obtained in 285 cases. The Drug sensitivity testing (DST) for Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RIF), Ethambutol (EMB) Pyrazinamide (PZA) and Streptomycin (SM) were performed. The data was analyzed on SPSS 10.0. A p-value of <0.05 was taken as significant. Result: Out of 285 cases, 176 (61.75%) were male and 109 (38.24%) female. The mean age was 37 +- 19.90 years. The DST showed drug sensitive and drug resistant isolates in 80 (28.05%) and 205 (71.92%) cases respectively (p=0.001). The drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) rates for individual drugs; INH, RIF, EMB, PZA and SM were 51,22%, 15.4%, 13.33%, 9%12, and 3.85% respectively (p=0.03). The MDR-TB isolates were detected in 120 (42.10%) cases, including 5 (5.88%) in category I and 115 (57.50%) in category II patients (p=0.0001). Conclusion: Drug resistant and multidrug resistant tuberculosis was observed mainly in category II patients. However, primary MDR was also observed in category I patients and reflects dissemination of MDR cases within the community. (author)

  16. HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance profiles in a cohort of heterosexual patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Muammer Osman; Beka, Hayati; Lübke, Nadine; Verheyen, Jens; Eraksoy, Haluk; Cagatay, Atahan; Kaiser, Rolf; Akgül, Baki; Agacfidan, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Turkey is seeing a steady rise in rates of HIV infection in the country. The number of individuals with HIV/AIDS was greater than 7000 in 2014 according to data released by the Ministry of Health, and heterosexual contacts were reported to be the main transmission routes. Istanbul has the highest number of reported cases of HIV infection. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in 50 heterosexual patients from Istanbul. The most prevalent subtype was found to be subtype B (56.2 %). Resistance-associated mutations were found in 14 patients with 6/14 patients being therapy-experienced and 8/14 therapy naive at the time point of analysis. With increasing number of patients who require treatment and the rapid up-scaling of the antiretroviral therapy in Turkey, HIV-1 drug resistance testing is recommended before starting treatment in order to achieve better clinical outcomes.

  17. Low prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balode, Dace; Westman, Maj; Kolupajeva, Tatjana; Rozentale, Baiba; Albert, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is a concern because it may reduce the efficacy of antiretroviral treatment. Plasma samples of 119 HIV-1-infected patients who were newly diagnosed at the Infectology Center of Latvia in 2005 and 2006 were analyzed by an in-house genotypic resistance assay to determine the prevalence of TDR in Latvia. TDR was identified using the WHO 2009 list of mutations for surveillance of TDR as implemented in the Stanford Calibrated Population Resistance tool. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic analyses were used to determine genetic subtype and investigate the relatedness of the sequences. Resistance testing was successful in 117 of 119 patients. The study population represented ∼20% of all patients that were diagnosed in Latvia in 2005 and 2006 and was well distributed between gender, transmission routes, and areas of residence. Four patients showed evidence of TDR, which represents a prevalence of TDR of 3.4% (95% CI: 0.9-8.5%). All four patients displayed single, but different resistance mutations (M46I, F53L, M41L, and G190A). All patients, except one, were predicted to respond well to standard first-line therapy in Latvia. The prevalence of TDR in Latvia was low, which partly may be due to the low proportion of HIV-1 patients who receive antiretroviral therapy. The results indicate that routine resistance testing in Latvia currently should be focused on patients who display treatment failure, rather than treatment naive patients.

  18. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  19. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan Rajamuthiah

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC: 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs. The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively, but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  20. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  1. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    reported figure, because the annual risk of tuberculosis and prevalence of acquired multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and tuberculosis with HIV is increasing in India (Narain and Lo 2004). One case of XDR- TB is recently reported from Tuberculosis Research Center, Chennai (Thomas et al. 2007). 7. XDR-TB with HIV/AIDS.

  2. Short communication: high prevalence of drug resistance in HIV type 1-infected children born in Honduras and Belize 2001 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Leda; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Murillo, Wendy; Naver, Lars; Largaespada, Natalia; Albert, Jan; Karlsson, Annika C

    2011-10-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has had a great impact on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1. However, development of drug resistance, which could be subsequently transmitted to the child, is a major concern. In Honduras and Belize the prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1-infected children remains unknown. A total of 95 dried blood spot samples was obtained from HIV-1-infected, untreated children in Honduras and Belize born during 2001 to 2004, when preventive antiretroviral therapy was often suboptimal and consisted of monotherapy with nevirapine or zidovudine. Partial HIV-1 pol gene sequences were successfully obtained from 66 children (Honduras n=55; Belize n=11). Mutations associated with drug resistance were detected in 13% of the Honduran and 27% of the Belizean children. Most of the mutations detected in Honduras (43%) and all mutations detected in Belize were associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which was expected from the wide use of nevirapine to prevent MTCT during the study period. In addition, although several mothers reported that they had not received antiretroviral therapy, mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were found in Honduras. This suggests prior and unreported use of these drugs, or that these women had been infected with resistant virus. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, the presence of drug resistance-associated mutations in HIV-1-infected Honduran and Belizean children.

  3. HIV-1 subtypes and response to combination antiretroviral therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, WP; Ruiz, L; Loveday, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may vary in ability to suppress viral load and increase CD4+ T-cell count in people infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, possibly due to differences in resistance development. Antiretroviral drugs have predominantly been developed in Western...

  4. Characterization of drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lizards as well as some other reptiles have been known to carry pathogenic bacteria organisms as well as drug resistant pathogens. Despite the fact that they remain asymptomatic in many cases, they nevertheless play significant roles in the epidemiology of these pathogens through their dissemination to the public, ...

  5. An interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program combining motivational interviewing and electronic antiretroviral drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummenacher, Isabelle; Cavassini, Matthias; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie P

    2011-05-01

    To ensure successful treatment, HIV patients must maintain a high degree of medication adherence over time. Since August 2004, patients who are (or are at risk of) experiencing problems with their HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) have been referred by their physicians to an interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program. The program consists of a multifactorial intervention along with electronic drug monitoring (MEMS(TM)). The pharmacists organize individualized semi-structured motivational interviews based on cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social issues. At the end of each session, the patient brings an adherence report to the physician. This enables the physician to use the adherence results to evaluate the treatment plan. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze this on-going interdisciplinary HIV-adherence program. All patients who were included between August 2004 and the end of April 2008 were analyzed. One hundred and four patients were included (59% women, median age 39 (31.0, 46.0) years, 42% black ethnicity). Eighty (77%) patients were ART-experienced patients and 59% had a protease inhibitor-based treatment. The retention rate was high (92%) in the program. Patient inclusion in this HIV-adherence program was determined by patient issues for naive patients and by nonadherence or suboptimal clinical outcomes for ART-experienced patients. The median time spent by a subject at the pharmacy was 35 (25.0, 48.0) minutes, half for the medication handling and half for the interview. The adherence results showed a persistence of 87% and an execution of 88%. Proportion of undetectable subjects increased during study. In conclusion, retention and persistence rates were high in this highly selected problematic population.

  6. Prediction of response to antiretroviral therapy by human experts and by the EuResist data-driven expert system (the EVE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, M; Kaiser, R; Sönnerborg, A; Struck, D; Altmann, A; Prosperi, M; Rosen-Zvi, M; Petroczi, A; Peres, Y; Schülter, E; Boucher, C A; Brun-Vezinet, F; Harrigan, P R; Morris, L; Obermeier, M; Perno, C-F; Phanuphak, P; Pillay, D; Shafer, R W; Vandamme, A-M; van Laethem, K; Wensing, A M J; Lengauer, T; Incardona, F

    2011-04-01

    The EuResist expert system is a novel data-driven online system for computing the probability of 8-week success for any given pair of HIV-1 genotype and combination antiretroviral therapy regimen plus optional patient information. The objective of this study was to compare the EuResist system vs. human experts (EVE) for the ability to predict response to treatment. The EuResist system was compared with 10 HIV-1 drug resistance experts for the ability to predict 8-week response to 25 treatment cases derived from the EuResist database validation data set. All current and past patient data were made available to simulate clinical practice. The experts were asked to provide a qualitative and quantitative estimate of the probability of treatment success. There were 15 treatment successes and 10 treatment failures. In the classification task, the number of mislabelled cases was six for EuResist and 6-13 for the human experts [mean±standard deviation (SD) 9.1±1.9]. The accuracy of EuResist was higher than the average for the experts (0.76 vs. 0.64, respectively). The quantitative estimates computed by EuResist were significantly correlated (Pearson r=0.695, Pexperts. However, the agreement among experts was only moderate (for the classification task, inter-rater κ=0.355; for the quantitative estimation, mean±SD coefficient of variation=55.9±22.4%). With this limited data set, the EuResist engine performed comparably to or better than human experts. The system warrants further investigation as a treatment-decision support tool in clinical practice. © 2010 British HIV Association.

  7. Population mobility, globalization, and antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Douglas W; Gushulak, Brian D; Baine, William B; Bala, Shukal; Gubbins, Paul O; Holtom, Paul; Segarra-Newnham, Marisel

    2009-11-01

    Population mobility is a main factor in globalization of public health threats and risks, specifically distribution of antimicrobial drug-resistant organisms. Drug resistance is a major risk in healthcare settings and is emerging as a problem in community-acquired infections. Traditional health policy approaches have focused on diseases of global public health significance such as tuberculosis, yellow fever, and cholera; however, new diseases and resistant organisms challenge existing approaches. Clinical implications and health policy challenges associated with movement of persons across barriers permeable to products, pathogens, and toxins (e.g., geopolitical borders, patient care environments) are complex. Outcomes are complicated by high numbers of persons who move across disparate and diverse settings of disease threat and risk. Existing policies and processes lack design and capacity to prevent or mitigate adverse health outcomes. We propose an approach to global public health risk management that integrates population factors with effective and timely application of policies and processes.

  8. Death receptor ligands, in particular TRAIL, to overcome drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S; Timmer, T; Heijenbrok, FJ; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is hampered by the occurrence of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. A variety of mechanisms cause drug-resistance. A final common factor, however, is the reduced capacity of drug resistant cells to go into apoptosis following treatment with DNA damaging

  9. Distinctive Drug-resistant Mutation Profiles and Interpretations of HIV-1 Proviral DNA Revealed by Deep Sequencing in Reverse Transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian Qian; Li, Zhen Peng; Zhao, Hai; Pan, Dong; Wang, Yan; Xu, Wei Si; Xing, Hui; Feng, Yi; Jiang, Shi Bo; Shao, Yi Ming; Ma, Li Ying

    2016-04-01

    To investigate distinctive features in drug-resistant mutations (DRMs) and interpretations for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA in HIV-1-infected patients. Forty-three HIV-1-infected individuals receiving first-line antiretroviral therapy were recruited to participate in a multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Anhui and Henan Provinces in China in 2004. Drug resistance genotyping was performed by bulk sequencing and deep sequencing on the plasma and whole blood of 77 samples, respectively. Drug-resistance interpretation was compared between viral RNA and paired proviral DNA. Compared with bulk sequencing, deep sequencing could detect more DRMs and samples with DRMs in both viral RNA and proviral DNA. The mutations M184I and M230I were more prevalent in proviral DNA than in viral RNA (Fisher's exact test, PDNA, and 5 of these samples with different DRMs between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA showed a higher level of drug resistance to the first-line drugs. Considering 'minority resistant variants', 22 samples (28.57%) were associated with a higher level of drug resistance to the tested RTIs for proviral DNA when compared with paired viral RNA. Compared with viral RNA, the distinctive information of DRMs and drug resistance interpretations for proviral DNA could be obtained by deep sequencing, which could provide more detailed and precise information for drug resistance monitoring and the rational design of optimal antiretroviral therapy regimens. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  10. Increasing the use of second-line therapy is a cost-effective approach to prevent the spread of drug-resistant HIV: a mathematical modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, Brooke E.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Kityo, Cissy; Hamers, Raph L.; Baltussen, Rob; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R.; Hallett, Timothy B.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation reduces HIV-1 incidence. This benefit may be offset by increased transmitted drug resistance (TDR), which could limit future HIV treatment options. We analyze the epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of strategies to reduce TDR. We develop a

  11. The association between detected drug resistance mutations and CD4(+) T-cell decline in HIV-positive individuals maintained on a failing treatment regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the effect of drug resistance mutations (DRM) on CD4 cell trends in HIV-positive people maintained on virologically failing antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Individuals from two large cohorts experiencing virological failure (VF) while maintained on ART with >1 CD4 co...

  12. Utilization Patterns and Projected Demand of Antiretroviral Drugs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Renaud-Théry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings has greatly increased demand for antiretroviral medicines and raised the importance of good forward planning, especially in the context of the new 2010 WHO treatment guidelines. Methods. Forecasting of the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy from 2010 to 2012 was produced using three approaches: linear projection, country-set targets, and a restricted scenario. Two additional scenarios were then used to project the demand for various antiretroviral medicines under a fast and slower phase-out of stavudine. Results. We projected that between 7.1 million and 8.4 million people would be receiving ART by the end of 2012. Of these, 6.6% will be on second-line therapy. High variation in forecast includes reductions in the demand for d4T and d4T increases in the demand for tenofovir, emtricitabine followed by efavirenz, ritonavir, zidovudine and lopinavir; lamivudine, atazanavir, and nevirapine. Conclusion. Despite the global economic crisis and in response to the revised treatment guidelines, our model forecasts an increasing and shifting demand for antiretrovirals in resource-limited settings not only to provide treatment to new patients, but also to those switching to less toxic regimens.

  13. Prevention of perinatal HIV I transmission by protease inhibitor based triple drug antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine as single dose at the time of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Meenakshi; Bajpai, Smrati; Choudhary, Ashwini; Pazare, Amar

    2012-12-01

    In India, parent to child transmission is the most important source of HIV infection in children below fifteen years of age. Transmission of HIV from mother to child can occur even at low or undetectable HIV virus levels. CD4 count or HIV RNA levels should not be the determining factor when deciding whether to use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. Use of single dose nevirapine during labour, in prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT) programme for pregnant females with CD4 count > 250 cells/cumm has less efficacy in reducing perinatal transmission. And there are high chances of development of nevirapine resistance to both mother and baby after single dose nevirapine exposure. Short course Protease inhibitor(PI) based triple drug combination ART from 28 weeks till delivery for perinatal prophylaxis is effective in reducing perinatal HIV transmission. PI's are safe in pregnancy and also have less chances of development of resistance when used for perinatal prophylaxis and stopped post delivery.Hence, it is opined that PI based combination ART should be offered to pregnant females in PPTCT programme, thereby preventing occurrence of paediatric HIV infection in India. This can have significant impact on the society at large.

  14. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  15. Adverse Drug Reactions to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients at the Largest Public Hospital in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorío, Marco; Colasanti, Jonathan; Moreira, Sumaya; Gutierrez, Gamaliel; Quant, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are an important cause of hospitalization, treatment discontinuation, and regimen changes in both developed and developing countries. This study is the first to examine and understand ADRs in HIV-infected patients in Nicaragua. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted from May 2010 to March 2011, in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving ART at the largest public hospital in Managua, Nicaragua. Patients were identified based on ADRs reporting on a standardized antiretroviral pharmacotherapy form. Subsequently, chart reviews of these patients were performed in order to document the specific ADRs. Six hundred ninety-two patients on ART were included. The incidence of ADRs was 6.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.5-8.2). Females demonstrated a higher incidence, that is, 10.2% (95% CI 5.3-15.1, P = .020). Patients treated with combinations of zidovudine (ZDV)/lamivudine (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir (TDF) had fewer ADRs (P reactions. Adverse drug reactions were classified as "likely ADRs" (25 of 44) and "possible ADRs" (19 of 44). No ADRs were preventable. Adverse drug reactions most frequently affected the central nervous system. No ADR was life threatening. The frequency of ADRs in this Nicaraguan patient population was less than that reported from other studies in resource-limited settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea.

  17. Antituberculosis drug resistance patterns in adults with tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senbayrak, Seniha; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Erdem, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to antituberculosis drugs is an increasingly common clinical problem. This study aimed to evaluate drug resistance profiles of TBM isolates in adult patients in nine European countries involving 32 centers to ...

  18. Alarming levels of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in metropolitan Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B B; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali; Rebello, Lorraine; Saranchuk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST) against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT) were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4%) were smear-positive and 202 (12%) had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%-40%) TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114) and 44% (39/88) among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable), 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug). Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing ongoing transmission in the community and

  19. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cross-Sectional Population Survey in Africa: NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M; Clarke, William; Kulich, Michal; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Breaud, Autumn; Olson, Matthew T; Marzinke, Mark A; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fiamma, Agnès; Donnell, Deborah; Mbwambo, Jessie K K; Richter, Linda; Gray, Glenda; Sweat, Michael; Coates, Thomas J; Eshleman, Susan H

    2017-02-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug treatment benefits the treated individual and can prevent HIV transmission. We assessed ARV drug use in a community-randomized trial that evaluated the impact of behavioral interventions on HIV incidence. Samples were collected in a cross-sectional survey after a 3-year intervention period. ARV drug testing was performed using samples from HIV-infected adults at 4 study sites (Zimbabwe; Tanzania; KwaZulu-Natal and Soweto, South Africa; survey period 2009-2011) using an assay that detects 20 ARV drugs (6 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 3 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 9 protease inhibitors; maraviroc; raltegravir). ARV drugs were detected in 2011 (27.4%) of 7347 samples; 88.1% had 1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± 1-2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. ARV drug detection was associated with sex (women>men), pregnancy, older age (>24 years), and study site (P < 0.0001 for all 4 variables). ARV drugs were also more frequently detected in adults who were widowed (P = 0.006) or unemployed (P = 0.02). ARV drug use was more frequent in intervention versus control communities early in the survey (P = 0.01), with a significant increase in control (P = 0.004) but not in intervention communities during the survey period. In KwaZulu-Natal, a 1% increase in ARV drug use was associated with a 0.14% absolute decrease in HIV incidence (P = 0.018). This study used an objective, biomedical approach to assess ARV drug use on a population level. This analysis identified factors associated with ARV drug use and provided information on ARV drug use over time. ARV drug use was associated with lower HIV incidence at 1 study site.

  20. HIV Drug Resistance Profiles and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Viremia Maintained at Very Low Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Michael R; Winsett, Julie; Tiro, Aileen; Bau, Vuth; Berbara, Rony S; Rowley, Christopher; Bellosillo, Nobel; Wanke, Christine; Coakley, Eoin P

    2014-01-01

    We describe an observational study of clinical, virologic and drug resistance profiles in HIV-positive antiretroviral adherent subjects with stable low level viremia (LLV) 50–1,000 copies/mL for more than 12 months. Subjects were followed from time of first detectable viral load (VL). In total, 102 episodes of LLV were detected among 80 individuals. The median (mean, range) HIV copy number at genotyping was 250 (486, 1000 copies/mL (p=0.03). Our data suggest that DR present in patients with LLV is likely to impact long term clinical outcomes, highlighting the importance of optimizing techniques to detect the presence of drug resistant HIV in the setting of LLV and the need for larger prospective studies to assess the emergence of DR in the setting of sustained LLV and the impact of this DR on treatment outcomes. PMID:25664219

  1. Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with HIV infection exposed to specific individual antiretroviral drugs from the 3 major drug classes: the data collection on adverse events of anti-HIV drugs (D:A:D) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe Westring; Sabin, Caroline; Weber, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been assessed in 13 anti-HIV drugs in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study. METHODS. Poisson regression models were adjusted for cardiovascular risk...... factors, cohort, calendar year, and use of other antiretroviral drugs and assessed the association between MI risk and cumulative (per year) or recent (current or in the past 6 months) use of antiretroviral drugs, with >30,000 person-years of exposure. RESULTS. Over 178,835 person-years, 580 patients......% CI, 1.01-1.17], respectively) after adjustment for lipids but were not altered further after adjustment for other metabolic parameters. CONCLUSIONS. Of the drugs considered, only indinavir, lopinavir-ritonavir, didanosine, and abacavir were associated with a significantly increased risk of MI...

  2. Antiretroviral Drug as a Cause of Bilateral Avascular Necrosis of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Avascular necrosis (AVN) is one of the most dreadful disease conditions of the hip which may be very difficult to treat if not detected early. Protease inhibitor is useful in combined antiretroviral therapy but now being reported as one of the causes of AVN. In this case report, we present a case of bilateral ...

  3. An appeal for large scale production of antiretroviral drugs in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities, including the supply of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART), highlights the concern of sustainability. So far, solutions that have been proposed are mainly symptomatic, claiming more budget commitment from government. Without rejecting this view, we call for the implementation of sustainable solutions to deal with the ...

  4. The impact of anticoccidial drug resistance on poultry production - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review, using coccidiosis and anticoccidial drug resistance highlighted the economic impact of drug resistance on livestock industry but also suggested ways of preventing or minimizing drug resistance on the farm. This way, economic loss will be minimized and more protein from animal origin will be made available to ...

  5. Characterization of drug resistance mutations in ART-naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Thi Bich Phung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the profile of drug resistance-associated mutations in pol gene of antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1 infected children enrolled in National Hospital Pediatrics in Northern Vietnam. Methods: Genotyping was performed on 134 antiretroviral therapy-naïve plasma samples from HIV-1 infected children. HIV-1 pol gene was amplified using primers for protease and reverse transcriptase and sequenced using the BigDye chemistry. The mutations were analyzed based on the Stanford University HIV-1 Drug Resistance Database and ISA-USA list. Results: All the children were infected with HIV-1 CRF01_AE subtype. Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 2 children (2.3% and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 5 children (7.7%. The protease inhibitor mutations were observed M46L and L90M and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor mutations were M184I, K65R, Q151M, T69N, L210W, Y181C, M230L and K101E. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting the prevalence of drug resistance-associated mutation in naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam. These data also emphasize the importance of genotypic resistance testing of HIV-1 infected children before initiating treatment in order to achieve better clinical outcome.

  6. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  7. Multidrug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant Bacteria: A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silpi Basak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Antimicrobial resistance is now a major challenge to clinicians for treating patients. Hence, this short term study was undertaken to detect the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR, extensively drug-resistant (XDR, and pandrug-resistant (PDR bacterial isolates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods. The clinical samples were cultured and bacterial strains were identified in the department of microbiology. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of different bacterial isolates was studied to detect MDR, XDR, and PDR bacteria. Results. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of 1060 bacterial strains was studied. 393 (37.1% bacterial strains were MDR, 146 (13.8% strains were XDR, and no PDR was isolated. All (100% Gram negative bacterial strains were sensitive to colistin whereas all (100% Gram positive bacterial strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Close monitoring of MDR, XDR, or even PDR must be done by all clinical microbiology laboratories to implement effective measures to reduce the menace of antimicrobial resistance.

  8. Estimating trends in the proportion of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance in a long term observational cohort in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schmidt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We assessed trends in the proportion of transmitted (TDR and acquired (ADR HIV drug resistance and associated mutations between 2001 and 2011 in the German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study. METHOD: The German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study is a subset of the German ClinSurv-HIV Cohort. For the ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study all available sequences isolated from patients in five study centres of the long term observational ClinSurv-HIV Cohort were included. TDR was estimated using the first viral sequence of antiretroviral treatment (ART naïve patients. One HIV sequence/patient/year of ART experienced patients was considered to estimate the proportion of ADR. Trends in the proportion of HIV drug resistance were calculated by logistic regression. RESULTS: 9,528 patients were included into the analysis. HIV-sequences of antiretroviral naïve and treatment experienced patients were available from 34% (3,267/9,528 of patients. The proportion of TDR over time was stable at 10.4% (95% CI 9.1-11.8; p for trend = 0.6; 2001-2011. The proportion of ADR among all treated patients was 16%, whereas it was high among those with available HIV genotypic resistance test (64%; 1,310/2,049 sequences; 95% CI 62-66 but declined significantly over time (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.77-0.83; p for trend<0.001; 2001-2011. Viral load monitoring subsequent to resistance testing was performed in the majority of treated patients (96% and most of them (67% were treated successfully. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of TDR was stable in this study population. ADR declined significantly over time. This decline might have been influenced by broader resistance testing, resistance test guided therapy and the availability of more therapeutic options and not by a decline in the proportion of TDR within the study population.

  9. Simultaneous determination of antiretroviral drugs in human hair with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Yang, Jin; Duan, Cailing; Chu, Liuxi; Chen, Shenghuo; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Deng, Huihua

    2018-04-15

    The determination of the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in hair is believed to be an important means for the assessment of the long-term adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. At present, the combination of tenofovir, lamivudine and nevirapine is widely used in China. However, there was no research reporting simultaneous determination of the three drugs in hair. The present study aimed to develop a sensitive method for simultaneous determination of the three drugs in 2-mg and 10-mg natural hair (Method 1 and Method 2). Hair samples were incubated in methanol at 37 °C for 16 h after being rinsed with methanol twice. The analysis was performed on high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with electronic spray ionization in positive mode and multiple reactions monitoring. Method 1 and Method 2 showed the limits of detection at 160 and 30 pg/mg for tenofovir, at 5 and 6 pg/mg for lamivudine and at 15 and 3 pg/mg for nevirapine. The two methods showed good linearity with the square of correlation coefficient >0.99 at the ranges of 416-5000 and 77-5000 pg/mg for tenofovir, 12-5000 and 15-5000 pg/mg for lamivudine and 39-50,000 and 6-50,000 pg/mg for nevirapine. They gave intra-day and inter-day coefficient of variation <15% and the recoveries ranging from 80.6 to 122.3% and from 83.1 to 114.4%. Method 2 showed LOD and LOQ better than Method 1 for tenofovir and nevirapine and matched Method 1 for lamivudine, but there was high consistency between them in the determination of the three drugs in hair. The population analysis with Method 2 revealed that the concentrations in hair were decreased with the distance of hair segment away from the scalp for the three antiretroviral drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary resistance of HIV to antiretrovirals among individuals recently diagnosed at voluntary counselling and testing centres in the metropolitan region of Recife, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Salustiano Cavalcanti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining the prevalence and type of antiretroviral (ARV resistance among ARV-naïve individuals is important to assess the potential responses of these individuals to first-line regimens. The prevalence of primary resistance and the occurrence of recent infections among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS were identified among recently diagnosed patients at five sexually transmitted disease/AIDS testing and counselling centres in the metropolitan region of Recife (RMR, Pernambuco, Brazil, between 2007-2009. One-hundred and eight samples were analysed using the Calypte® BED assay. Males predominated (56%, as did patients aged 31-50 years. Twenty-three percent presented evidence of a recent HIV infection. The median CD4+ T lymphocyte count was 408 cells/mm³ and the median viral load was 3.683 copies/mL. The prevalence of primary resistance was 4.6% (confidence interval 95% = 1-8.2% based on criteria that excluded common polymorphisms in accordance with the surveillance drug resistance mutation criteria. The prevalence of resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors were 3.8%, 1.5% and 0.8%, respectively. Fifty-seven percent of strains were from clade B, 37.7% were clade F and 3.1% were clade C; there were no statistically significant differences with respect to resistance between clades. Recent infection tended to be more common in men (p = 0.06 and in municipalities in the south of the RMR (Jaboatão dos Guararapes and Cabo de Santo Agostinho (p = 0.046. The high prevalence of recent infection and the high prevalence of non-B strains in this poor Brazilian region merit further attention.

  11. Primary resistance of HIV to antiretrovirals among individuals recently diagnosed at voluntary counselling and testing centres in the metropolitan region of Recife, Pernambuco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Ana Maria Salustiano; Brito, Ana Maria de; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Lima, Kledoaldo Oliveira de; Silva, Sirleide Pereira da; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie; Lacerda, Heloisa Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Determining the prevalence and type of antiretroviral (ARV) resistance among ARV-naïve individuals is important to assess the potential responses of these individuals to first-line regimens. The prevalence of primary resistance and the occurrence of recent infections among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were identified among recently diagnosed patients at five sexually transmitted disease/AIDS testing and counselling centres in the metropolitan region of Recife (RMR), Pernambuco, Brazil, between 2007-2009. One-hundred and eight samples were analysed using the Calypte® BED assay. Males predominated (56%), as did patients aged 31-50 years. Twenty-three percent presented evidence of a recent HIV infection. The median CD4+ T lymphocyte count was 408 cells/mm³ and the median viral load was 3.683 copies/mL. The prevalence of primary resistance was 4.6% (confidence interval 95% = 1-8.2%) based on criteria that excluded common polymorphisms in accordance with the surveillance drug resistance mutation criteria. The prevalence of resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors were 3.8%, 1.5% and 0.8%, respectively. Fifty-seven percent of strains were from clade B, 37.7% were clade F and 3.1% were clade C; there were no statistically significant differences with respect to resistance between clades. Recent infection tended to be more common in men (p = 0.06) and in municipalities in the south of the RMR (Jaboatão dos Guararapes and Cabo de Santo Agostinho) (p = 0.046). The high prevalence of recent infection and the high prevalence of non-B strains in this poor Brazilian region merit further attention.

  12. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  13. Is infant exposure to antiretroviral drugs during breastfeeding quantitatively important? A systematic review and meta-analysis of pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Catriona John; Garner, Paul; Bonnett, Laura Jayne; Khoo, Saye Hock; Else, Laura Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to summarize antiretroviral drug concentrations in breast milk (BM) and exposure of breast-fed infants. Methods This was a systematic review of pharmacokinetic studies of HIV-positive women taking antiretrovirals that measured drugs in BM. The quality of pharmacokinetic and laboratory methods was assessed using pre-defined criteria. Pooled ratios and 95% CIs were calculated using the generalized inverse variance method and heterogeneity was estimated by the I2 statistic. PubMed Central, SCOPUS and LactMed databases were searched. No date or language restrictions were applied. Searches were conducted up to 10 November 2014. Clinical relevance was estimated by comparing ingested dose with the recommended therapeutic dose for each drug. Results Twenty-four studies were included. There was substantial variability in the clinical and laboratory methods used and in reported results. Relative to maternal plasma (MP), NRTIs accumulate in BM, with BM : MP ratios (95% CI estimates) from 0.89 to 1.21 (14 studies, 1159 paired BM and MP samples). NNRTI estimates were from 0.71 to 0.94 (17 studies, 965 paired samples) and PI estimates were from 0.17 to 0.21 (8 studies, 477 paired samples). Relative to the recommended paediatric doses, a breast-fed infant may ingest 8.4% (95% CI 1.9–15.0), 12.5% (95% CI 2.6–22.3) and 1.1% (95% CI 0–3.6) of lamivudine, nevirapine and efavirenz, respectively, via BM. Conclusions Transfer to untreated infants appears quantitatively important for some NRTIs and NNRTIs. The pharmacokinetic methods varied widely and we propose standards for the design, analysis and reporting of future pharmacokinetic studies of drug transfer during breastfeeding. PMID:25858354

  14. Exploiting nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Kalscheuer, Stephen M; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-11-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. © 2013.

  15. Gag drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype C patients, failing a protease inhibitor inclusive treatment regimen, with detectable lopinavir levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Pillay, Sameshnee; Singh, Urisha; Singh, Avashna; Gordon, Michelle; Ndungu, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and their use in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has led to the effective control of HIV replication in infected patients. However the emergence of resistant HIV-1 strains still remains a problem. Literature has shown that mutations may accumulate in the protease (PR) and gag regions of HIV-1 patients who fail therapy with protease inhibitor (PI) drugs (1, 2). Gag mutations have also been found to play an important role in the evolutio...

  16. Trends and predictors of HIV-1 acquired drug resistance in Minas Gerais, Brazil: 2002–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Duani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show that the prevalence of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 virus is declining over time. A retrospective cohort study was carried out to evaluate the trends of drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in a state of a middle-income country, Minas Gerais, southeast region of Brazil. We analyzed 2115 HIV-1 sequences from 2002 up to 2012, from 52 cities of Minas Gerais. The groups were analyzed according to the definitions: “IAS – 3 class mutations”, if ≥1 drug resistance mutation from IAS 2015 list (DRM was present in each class; “No fully susceptible drugs” as the absence of any fully susceptible drug in Stanford algorithm; and “GSS ≥ 2″, when a maximum calculated GSS (genotypic susceptibility score was ≥2 or ≥3, counting only drugs available in Brazil and USA at given calendar years. Time trends of resistance were analyzed by Cochran–Armitage test. We observed a decrease in the rate resistance mutations for PI, NRTI, “IAS – 3 class mutations”, and “No fully susceptible drugs” over these 11 years, from 69.2% to 20.7%, 92.3% to 90.2%, 46.2% to 22.5%, and 12.8% to 5.7%, respectively (p < 0.05. Resistance to NNRTI increased from 74.4% to 81.6%, mainly because of K103N mutation. The GSS score ≥2 increased during the years from 35.9% to 87.3% (p < 0.001. We demonstrate that resistance to PI and to the three main classes simultaneously are declining, although the number of patients on of antiretroviral therapy has doubled in the last ten years in Brazil (125,000 in 2002 to 400,000 in 2014. Broader resistance testing and the availability of more therapeutic options might have influenced this decline. The increase in NNRTI resistance can limit this class as first line treatment in Brazil in the future.

  17. Trends of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV type 1 isolates from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohd; Malik, Abida; Rizvi, Meher; Rai, Arvind

    2014-04-01

    A major cause of failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the presence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the polymerase gene of HIV-1. The paucity of data regarding potential drug resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) prompted us to carry out this study. This information will shed light on the extent of drug resistance already present in HIV strains and will give future directions in patient treatment and in drug design. Drug resistance genotyping of a partial reverse transcriptase gene was done in 103 HIV-1-infected patients, including the ART-naive and ART-experienced population. The drug resistance pattern was analyzed using the Stanford HIV-DR database, the IAS-USA mutation list and the REGA algorithm-v8.0. Subtyping was done using the REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool-v2.01. The majority of our sequences (96 %) were found to be subtype C, and four (3.8 %) were subtype A1. Significant prevalence of DR mutations (28 %) was observed in the RT gene. Major amino acid substitutions were seen at positions 41, 90, 98, 103, 106, 108, 138, 181, 184, 190, 215, and 219, which confer high/intermediate levels of resistance to most RTIs, independently or together. Our results show that there is an urgent need to tailor ART drug regimens to the individual to achieve optimum therapeutic outcome in North India.

  18. Prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in treated patients with viral load >50 copies/mL: a 2014 French nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumou, L; Charpentier, C; Recordon-Pinson, P; Grudé, M; Pallier, C; Morand-Joubert, L; Fafi-Kremer, S; Krivine, A; Montes, B; Ferré, V; Bouvier-Alias, M; Plantier, J-C; Izopet, J; Trabaud, M-A; Yerly, S; Dufayard, J; Alloui, C; Courdavault, L; Le Guillou-Guillemette, H; Maillard, A; Amiel, C; Vabret, A; Roussel, C; Vallet, S; Guinard, J; Mirand, A; Beby-Defaux, A; Barin, F; Allardet-Servent, A; Ait-Namane, R; Wirden, M; Delaugerre, C; Calvez, V; Chaix, M-L; Descamps, D; Reigadas, S

    2017-06-01

    Surveillance of HIV-1 resistance in treated patients with a detectable viral load (VL) is important to monitor, in order to assess the risk of spread of resistant viruses and to determine the proportion of patients who need new antiretroviral drugs with minimal cross-resistance. The HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase genes were sequenced in plasma samples from 782 consecutive patients on failing antiretroviral regimens, seen in 37 specialized centres in 2014. The genotyping results were interpreted using the ANRS v24 algorithm. Prevalence rates were compared with those obtained during a similar survey conducted in 2009. The protease and RT sequences were obtained in 566 patients, and the integrase sequence in 382 patients. Sequencing was successful in 60%, 78%, 78% and 87% of patients with VLs of 51-200, 201-500, 501-1000 and >1000 copies/mL, respectively. Resistance to at least one antiretroviral drug was detected in 56.3% of samples. Respectively, 3.9%, 8.7%, 1.5% and 3.4% of patients harboured viruses that were resistant to any NRTI, NNRTI, PI and integrase inhibitor (INI). Resistance rates were lower in 2014 than in 2009. Resistance was detected in 48.5% of samples from patients with a VL between 51 and 200 copies/mL. In France in 2014, 90.0% of patients in AIDS care centres were receiving antiretroviral drugs and 12.0% of them had VLs >50 copies/mL. Therefore, this study suggests that 6.7% of treated patients in France might transmit resistant strains. Resistance testing may be warranted in all treated patients with VL > 50 copies/mL. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika

    2014-01-01

    the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during...... adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance...

  20. Scientific rationale for antiretroviral therapy in 2005: viral reservoirs and resistance evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliciano, Robert F

    2005-01-01

    Hope for a cure for HIV-1 infection was dampened by the discovery of a latent form of the virus that persists in resting CD4+ cells. This reservoir of latently HIV-infected resting memory T cells represents an archive of viral genotypes produced in an individual from the onset of infection. Entry into the reservoir is stopped with suppressive antiretroviral therapy, but the archived viruses are capable of re-initiating active infections, are released continuously from this reservoir, and can cause viral rebound if antiretroviral therapy is stopped. Studies of residual low-level viremia (Robert F. Siliciano, MD, PhD, at the International AIDS Society-USA course in New York in March 2005.

  1. My Cousin, My Enemy: quasispecies suppression of drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Karla; van Buuren, Nicholas J; Mateo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    If a freshly minted genome contains a mutation that confers drug resistance, will it be selected in the presence of the drug? Not necessarily. During viral infections, newly synthesized viral genomes occupy the same cells as parent and other progeny genomes. If the antiviral target is chosen so that the drug-resistant progeny’s growth is dominantly inhibited by the drug-susceptible members of its intracellular family, its outgrowth can be suppressed. Precedent for ‘dominant drug targeting’ as a deliberate approach to suppress the outgrowth of inhibitor-resistant viruses has been established for envelope variants of vesicular stomatitis virus and for capsid variants of poliovirus and dengue virus. Small molecules that stabilize oligomeric assemblages are a promising means to an unfit family to destroy the effectiveness of a newborn drug-resistant relative due to the co-assembly of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant monomers. PMID:27764731

  2. mtct regimen choice, drug resistance and the treatment of hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perinauzl HW Unit, University ofcJu WilWalmTand. MTCT REGIMEN CHOICE, DRUG. RESISTANCE AND THE TREATMENT OF. HIV-I-INFECTED CHILDREN assessing ARV drug resistance. Genotypic assays detect specific point mutations in the HIV genome that are associated with phenotypic resistance. These are most.

  3. Change in the Prevalence of HIV-1 and the Rate of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hung Viet; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Cuong Hung; Saina, Matilda Chelimo; Hoang, Huyen Thi Thanh; Tran, Vuong Thi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Pham, Thuc Van; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported a significant decrease in HIV-1 prevalence, with no increase in drug-resistant HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDU), female sex workers (FSW), and blood donors (BD), in Haiphong, Vietnam, from 2007 to 2009. In 2012, 388 IDU, 51 FSW, and 200 BD were recruited for further analysis. None had a history of antiretroviral treatment. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-1 prevalence was reduced from 35.9% to 18.6% (pE138K. The prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong increased slightly from 1.8% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2012 (p=0.06).

  4. Prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis in Arsi Zone, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wide spread of occurrence of multi-drug resistance tuberculosis is becoming a major challenge to effective tuberculosis control. Thus, it is imperative to monitor the sensitivity of anti-TB drugs regularly. Objective: To determine the prevalence resistance to anti-TB drugs in a well established control program area ...

  5. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among HIV-infected drug users: a prospective cohort study of sexual risk and injecting behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Colette; Lindenburg, Karen; Geskus, Ronald B.; Brinkman, Kees; Coutinho, Roel A.; Prins, Maria

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To study sexual risk and injecting behaviour among HIV-infected drug users (DU) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). DESIGN AND SETTING: As part of an ongoing prospective cohort study, HIV-infected DU who commenced HAART (n=67) were matched with those not starting HAART

  6. Payment for antiretroviral drugs is associated with a higher rate of patients lost to follow-up than those offered free-of-charge therapy in Nairobi, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachariah, R.; van Engelgem, I.; Massaquoi, M.; Kocholla, L.; Manzi, M.; Suleh, A.; Phillips, M.; Borgdorff, M.

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective analysis of routine programme data from Mbagathi District Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya shows the difference in rates of loss to follow-up between a cohort that paid 500 shillings/month (approximately US$7) for antiretroviral drugs (ART) and one that received medication free of charge.

  7. Genital tract, cord blood, and amniotic fluid exposures of seven antiretroviral drugs during and after pregnancy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Rosa F; Rezk, Naser L; Kashuba, Angela D M; Dumond, Julie B; Tappouni, Hiba L; Tien, Hsiao-Chuan; Chen, Ya-Chi; Vourvahis, Manoli; Horton, Amanda L; Fiscus, Susan A; Patterson, Kristine B

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the study was to measure antiretroviral exposures in four physiological compartments during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum. This prospective, open-label, longitudinal study collected paired blood plasma (BP) and genital tract (GT) aspirates antepartum, at delivery, and up to 12 weeks postpartum. Antiretroviral cord BP and amniotic fluid concentrations were also measured. Drug concentrations were analyzed by validated high-performance liquid chromatography/UV and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods, with secondary compartment concentrations presented as the percentage of BP. Fourteen women taking lamivudine plus zidovudine and either lopinavir-ritonavir (n = 7), nelfinavir (n = 6), or nevirapine (n = 1) were enrolled; four also received tenofovir. GT penetration relative to BP was highest for the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors compared to the protease inhibitors and nevirapine. Only antepartum nelfinavir GT penetration was significantly higher than in the second trimester (geometric mean ratio [GMR], 179.3) or third trimester (GMR, 41.9). Compared to nonpregnant historical controls, antepartum GT penetration was significantly lower (P or = 100%), with cord BP levels of the remaining drugs ranging from 49 to 86% of that of the respective BP level. Amniotic exposures for lamivudine, zidovudine, tenofovir, and nelfinavir were > or = 100%, nevirapine exposure was 53%, and lopinavir and ritonavir exposures were amniotic fluid exposures vary within and between antiretroviral drug classes and biologic sites. Measurement of antiretroviral exposure in maternal genital secretions, cord BP, and amniotic fluid may be needed to identify signals of subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug exposure.

  8. Prevalence and patterns of HIV transmitted drug resistance in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ríos, Santiago; Mejía-Villatoro, Carlos R; García-Morales, Claudia; Soto-Nava, Maribel; Escobar, Ingrid; Mendizabal, Ricardo; Girón, Amalia; García, Leticia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2011-12-01

    To assess human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diversity and the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in Guatemala. One hundred forty-five antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients referred to the Roosevelt Hospital in Guatemala City were enrolled from October 2010 to March 2011. Plasma HIV pol sequences were obtained and TDR was assessed with the Stanford algorithm and the World Health Organization (WHO) TDR surveillance mutation list. HIV subtype B was highly prevalent in Guatemala (96.6%, 140/145), and a 2.8% (4/145) prevalence of BF1 recombinants and 0.7% (1/145) prevalence of subtype C viruses were found. TDR prevalence for the study period was 8.3% (12/145) with the Stanford database algorithm (score > 15) and the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. Most TDR cases were associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) (83.3%, 10/12); a low prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors was observed in the cohort (E138K showed higher frequencies than expected in ART-naïve populations. Higher literacy was associated with a greater risk of TDR (odds ratio 4.14, P = 0.0264). This study represents one of the first efforts to describe HIV diversity and TDR prevalence and trends in Guatemala. TDR prevalence in Guatemala was at the intermediate level. Most TDR cases were associated with NNRTIs. Further and continuous TDR surveillance is necessary to gain more indepth knowledge about TDR spread and trends in Guatemala and to optimize treatment outcomes in the country.

  9. Humanized mice recapitulate key features of HIV-1 infection: a novel concept using long-acting anti-retroviral drugs for treating HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Nischang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humanized mice generate a lymphoid system of human origin subsequent to transplantation of human CD34+ cells and thus are highly susceptible to HIV infection. Here we examined the efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART when added to food pellets, and of long-acting (LA antiretroviral compounds, either as monotherapy or in combination. These studies shall be inspiring for establishing a gold standard of ART, which is easy to administer and well supported by the mice, and for subsequent studies such as latency. Furthermore, they should disclose whether viral breakthrough and emergence of resistance occurs similar as in HIV-infected patients when ART is insufficient. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NOD/shi-scid/γ(cnull (NOG mice were used in all experimentations. We first performed pharmacokinetic studies of the drugs used, either added to food pellets (AZT, TDF, 3TC, RTV or in a LA formulation that permitted once weekly subcutaneous administration (TMC278: non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, TMC181: protease inhibitor. A combination of 3TC, TDF and TMC278-LA or 3TC, TDF, TMC278-LA and TMC181-LA suppressed the viral load to undetectable levels in 15/19 (79% and 14/14 (100% mice, respectively. In successfully treated mice, subsequent monotherapy with TMC278-LA resulted in viral breakthrough; in contrast, the two LA compounds together prevented viral breakthrough. Resistance mutations matched the mutations most commonly observed in HIV patients failing therapy. Importantly, viral rebound after interruption of ART, presence of HIV DNA in successfully treated mice and in vitro reactivation of early HIV transcripts point to an existing latent HIV reservoir. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report is a unique description of multiple aspects of HIV infection in humanized mice that comprised efficacy testing of various treatment regimens, including LA compounds, resistance mutation analysis as well as viral rebound after treatment

  10. Predicted levels of HIV drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambiano, Valentina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    -term effects. METHODS: The previously validated HIV Synthesis model was calibrated to South Africa. Resistance was modeled at the level of single mutations, transmission potential, persistence, and effect on drug activity. RESULTS: We estimate 652 000 people (90% uncertainty range: 543 000-744 000) are living...... are maintained, in 20 years' time HIV incidence is projected to have declined by 22% (95% confidence interval, CI -23 to -21%), and the number of people carrying NNRTI resistance to be 2.9-fold higher. If enhancements in diagnosis and retention in care occur, and ART is initiated at CD4 cell count less than 500......  cells/μl, HIV incidence is projected to decline by 36% (95% CI: -37 to -36%) and the number of people with NNRTI resistance to be 4.1-fold higher than currently. Prevalence of people with viral load more than 500  copies/ml carrying NRMV is not projected to differ markedly according to future ART...

  11. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  12. Antiretroviral therapy adherence and self-efficacy among people living with HIV and a history of drug use in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Lee, Sung-Jae; Tuan, Le Anh; Feng, Nan; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2017-10-01

    People living with HIV with a history of drug use face additional psychosocial challenges that could compromise their adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study examined ART treatment adherence and adherence self-efficacy among people living with HIV with a history of drug use in Vietnam. We used cross-sectional baseline data collected between October 2014 and February 2015 from a randomized controlled trial in Vietnam. Of the 900 persons with a history of drug use in the trial, a sample of 109 people living with HIV currently on ART were included in the study. The vast majority (92%) of the participants reported not missing any medications in the past 30 days. Multiple regression results indicated that social support was positively associated with adherence self-efficacy (β = 0.420, P social challenges facing people living with HIV with a history of drug use to promote ART treatment adherence. Clinical management of HIV should identify and address concurrent substance use behaviors to maximize adherence and treatment outcomes.

  13. Brazilian network for HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance (HIV-BresNet): a survey of treatment-naive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Monica B; Boullosa, Lídia T; Cardoso, Cynthia C; da Costa, Carolina M; Alves, Carlos Rb; de Lima, Shirlene Ts; Kaminski, Helena T; Aleixo, Agdemir W; Esposito, Ana Op; Cavalcanti, Ana Ms; Riedel, Maristela; Couto-Fernandez, José C; Ferreira, Selma B; de Oliveira, Ivi Cm; Portal, Loreci E; Wolf, Hilda Hc; Fernandes, Sandra B; de M C Pardini, Maria I; Feiteiro, Manoel Vc; Tolentino, Fernanda M; Diaz, Ricardo S; Lopes, Giselle Isl; Francisco, Roberta Bl; Véras, Nazle Mc; Pires, Ana F; Franchini, Miriam; Mesquita, Fábio; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2018-03-01

    In Brazil, more than 487,450 individuals are currently undergoing antiretroviral treatment. In order to monitor the transmission of drug-resistant strains and HIV subtype distribution in the country, this work aimed to estimate its prevalence and to characterize the nationwide pretreatment drug resistance in individuals recently diagnosed with HIV between 2013 and 2015. The HIV threshold survey methodology (HIV-THS, WHO) targeting antiretroviral-naive individuals with recent HIV diagnosis was utilized, and subjects were selected from 51 highly populated cities in all five Brazilian macroregions. The HIV pol genotypic test was performed by genomic sequencing. We analysed samples from 1568 antiretroviral-naive individuals recently diagnosed with HIV, and the overall transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence was 9.5% (150 sequences). The regional prevalence of resistance according to Brazilian geographical regions was 9.4% in the northeast, 11.2% in the southeast, 6.8% in the central region, 10.2% in the north and 8.8% in the south. The inhibitor-specific TDR prevalence was 3.6% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 5.8% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and 1.6% for protease inhibitors (PIs); 1.0% of individuals presented resistance to more than one class of inhibitors. Overall, subtype B was more prevalent in every region except for the southern, where subtype C prevails. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first TDR study conducted in Brazil with nationwide representative sampling. The TDR prevalence revealed a moderate rate in the five Brazilian geographical regions, although some cities presented higher TDR prevalence rates, reaching 14% in São Paulo, for example. These results further illustrate the importance of surveillance studies for designing future strategies in primary antiretroviral therapy, aiming to mitigate TDR, as well as for predicting future trends in other regions of the globe where mass

  14. Antiretroviral-treated HIV-1 patients can harbour resistant viruses in CSF despite an undetectable viral load in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulie, Cathia; Grudé, Maxime; Descamps, Diane; Amiel, Corinne; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Raymond, Stéphanie; Pallier, Coralie; Bellecave, Pantxika; Reigadas, Sandrine; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Delaugerre, Constance; Montes, Brigitte; Barin, Francis; Ferré, Virginie; Jeulin, Hélène; Alloui, Chakib; Yerly, Sabine; Signori-Schmuck, Anne; Guigon, Aurélie; Fafi-Kremer, Samira; Haïm-Boukobza, Stéphanie; Mirand, Audrey; Maillard, Anne; Vallet, Sophie; Roussel, Catherine; Assoumou, Lambert; Calvez, Vincent; Flandre, Philippe; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève

    2017-08-01

    HIV therapy reduces the CSF HIV RNA viral load (VL) and prevents disorders related to HIV encephalitis. However, these brain disorders may persist in some cases. A large population of antiretroviral-treated patients who had a VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL in CSF with detectable or undetectable VL in plasma associated with cognitive impairment was studied, in order to characterize discriminatory factors of these two patient populations. Blood and CSF samples were collected at the time of neurological disorders for 227 patients in 22 centres in France and 1 centre in Switzerland. Genotypic HIV resistance tests were performed on CSF. The genotypic susceptibility score was calculated according to the last Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida et les hépatites virales Action Coordonnée 11 (ANRS AC11) genotype interpretation algorithm. Among the 227 studied patients with VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL in CSF, 195 had VL detectable in plasma [median (IQR) HIV RNA was 3.7 (2.7-4.7) log 10 copies/mL] and 32 had discordant VL in plasma (VL plasma compared with patients with plasma VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL. Resistance to antiretrovirals was observed in CSF for the two groups of patients. Fourteen percent of this population of patients with cognitive impairment and detectable VL in CSF had well controlled VL in plasma. Thus, it is important to explore CSF HIV (VL and genotype) even if the HIV VL is controlled in plasma because HIV resistance may be observed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Enfuvirtide antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Christina MR; Nuño, Miriam; Kitchen, Scott G; Krogstad, Paul

    2008-01-01

    It has been over 25 years since the first diagnosis of what would be known as AIDS. Although great strides in anti-HIV therapeutics have been made, there is still a great need for antiretrovirals that are effective against drug-resistant HIV. Enfuvirtide (ENF) is the first of a new class of fusion inhibitors to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in combination with other antiretroviral agents among HIV-1 infected patients with previous treatment experience. The inclusion of enfuvirtide in an optimized antiretroviral background regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infected (treatment-experienced) patients followed the success of two critical clinical trials (TORO: T20 vs Optimized Regimen Only I and II). Even though injection-site reactions persisted in these trials, improved virological and immunological responses were observed among patients. Challenges associated with ENF treatment include the high cost of the drug, injection-site reactions, determining the optimal time to initiate treatment, and the potential for the selection of drug resistant mutants and viral evolution. ENF is a promising novel treatment for HIV infected individuals whose choices for effective treatment are limited by previous treatment and resistance. Understanding the implications of viral fitness and evolution in the presence of ENF treatment is crucial in determining effective and safe treatment regimens, particularly among treatment-experienced patients. PMID:18728846

  16. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission: potential role for people who inject drugs in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairy, Margaret L; Deryabina, Anna; Hoos, David; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2013-11-01

    Interest in the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention stems from mounting evidence from research studies demonstrating that ART is associated with a decrease in sexual HIV transmission among serodiscordant couples and, perhaps, in other populations at risk. There is paucity of data on the efficacy of ART for prevention in key populations, including persons who inject drugs (PWID). In this paper, we examine the current status of HIV services for PWID in Central Asia, the use of ART by this population and explore ART for prevention for PWID in this context. We also discuss research and implementation questions with relevance to such a strategy in the region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Demand for Antiretroviral Drugs in the Illicit Marketplace: Implications for HIV Disease Management Among Vulnerable Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Surratt, Hilary L; Levi-Minzi, Maria A; O'Grady, Catherine L; Kurtz, Steven P

    2015-05-01

    The diversion of antiretroviral medications (ARVs) has implications for the integrity and success of HIV care, however little is known about the ARV illicit market. This paper aimed to identify the motivations for buying illicit ARVs and to describe market dynamics. Semi-structured interviews (n = 44) were conducted with substance-involved individuals living with HIV who have a history of purchasing ARVs on the street. Grounded theory was used to code and analyze interviews. Motivations for buying ARVs on the illicit market were: to repurchase ARVs after having diverted them for money or drugs; having limited access or low quality health care; to replace lost or ruined ARVs; and to buy a back-up stock of ARVs. This study identified various structural barriers to HIV treatment and ARV adherence that incentivized ARV diversion. Findings highlight the need to improve patient-provider relationships, ensure continuity of care, and integrate services to engage and retain high-needs populations.

  18. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  19. Sentinel surveillance of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance, acute infection and recent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ha M Truong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection.A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868 were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA. HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36. Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%. Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001, unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001, sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02, and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03.New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first-line antiretroviral therapy in San Francisco as well as worldwide. The integration of HIV-1 drug

  20. Study on drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by drug resistance gene detecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Li Hongmin; Wu Xueqiong; Wang Ansheng; Ye Yixiu; Wang Zhongyuan; Liu Jinwei; Chen Hongbing; Lin Minggui; Wang Jinhe; Li Sumei; Jiang Ping; Feng Bai; Chen Dongjing

    2004-01-01

    To investigate drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in different age group, compare detecting effect of two methods and evaluate their the clinical application value, all of the strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis were tested for resistance to RFP, INH SM PZA and EMB by the absolute concentration method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and the mutation of the rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB resistance genes in M. tuberculosis was tested by PCR-SSCP. In youth, middle and old age group, the rate of acquired drug resistance was 89.2%, 85.3% and 67.6% respectively, the gene mutation rate was 76.2%, 81.3% and 63.2% respectively. The rate of acquired drug resistance and multiple drug resistance in youth group was much higher than those in other groups. The gene mutation was correlated with drug resistance level of mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene mutation rate was higher in strains isolated from high concentration resistance than those in strains isolated from low concentration resistance. The more irregular treatment was longer, the rate of drug resistance was higher. Acquired drug resistance varies in different age group. It suggested that surveillance of drug resistence in different age group should be taken seriously, especially in youth group. PCR - SSCP is a sensitive and specific method for rapid detecting rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB genes mutations of MTB. (authors)

  1. Emergent drug resistance with integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepik, Katherine J; Harrigan, P Richard; Yip, Benita; Wang, Lu; Robbins, Marjorie A; Zhang, Wendy W; Toy, Junine; Akagi, Linda; Lima, Viviane D; Guillemi, Silvia; Montaner, Julio S G; Barrios, Rolando

    2017-06-19

    To estimate the incidence of and risk factors for emergent resistance to integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) and nucleoside(-tide) reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) in HIV-1-infected adults receiving an INSTI and two NRTIs. Retrospective cohort study. Persons aged at least 19 years were included if they received their first prescription for raltegravir, elvitegravir or dolutegravir in British Columbia, Canada in 2012-2014 and were followed to 31 December 2015. Emergent resistance was defined as new mutations conferring intermediate-high level NRTI or INSTI resistance (score ≥30, Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Algorithm v.7.0.1). First-year resistance rates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for 'any' (INSTI or NRTI) resistance using Poisson regression. The relationship between any emergent resistance and explanatory variables was modeled by Cox proportional hazards. There were 270 raltegravir, 323 elvitegravir and 392 dolutegravir-treated persons who were predominantly male (77%), antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced (81%), with low prevalence of preexisting drug resistance (16%). INSTI and NRTI resistance emerged in both ART-experienced and ART-naive persons (including dolutegravir-treated ART-naive), with no statistically significant differences in 'any' resistance rates (95% CI) between INSTIs: raltegravir 3.80 (1.90, 7.60), elvitegravir 2.37 (1.06, 5.27) and dolutegravir 1.48 (0.62, 3.55)/100 person-years. The strongest factors associated with emergent resistance were CD4 less than 200 cells/μl, adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) 10.46 (4.67, 23.41) and less than 80% adherence to the INSTI regimen hazard ratio 2.52 (1.11, 5.71). Incident drug resistance rates were low with 'real-world' use of INSTI-based regimens. However, incomplete ART adherence and low CD4 cell count were associated with increased resistance rates regardless of which INSTI was prescribed. Provide adherence support and monitor for drug resistance.

  2. Simple strategy to assess linezolid exposure in patients with multi-drug-resistant and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Jasper; Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Tiberi, Simon; Akkerman, Onno W.; Centis, Rosella; de lange, Wiel C.; Kosterink, Jos G.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Migliori, Giovanni B.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    Linezolid is used increasingly for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). However, linezolid can cause severe adverse events, such as peripheral and optical neuropathy or thrombocytopenia related to higher drug exposure. This study aimed

  3. Antituberculous drug resistance in Manitoba from 1980 to 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R; Manfreda, J; Mendella, L; Wolfe, J; Parker, S; Hershfield, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the magnitude of antituberculous drug resistance and identify the risk factors for its development in tuberculosis patients in Manitoba over a 10-year period. As well, to examine the clinical course of the patients whose initial or subsequent isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were resistant to one or more drugs. DESIGN: Comparison of drug-resistant and non-drug-resistant cases of tuberculosis. SETTING: Manitoba. PATIENTS: All people with tuberculosis reported to the Central Tuberculosis Registry of Manitoba between Jan. 1, 1980, and Dec. 31, 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Of 1478 cases of active tuberculosis 1086 were culture positive, and drug susceptibility testing was performed in these cases. The clinical course, including outcome of treatment, of all drug-resistant cases was described. RESULTS: Of 1086 culture-positive cases of tuberculosis 77 (7.1%) were drug resistant. Odds ratios suggested that the risk of drug resistance was significantly higher among the immigrants than among the other Canadians. Compared with the other Canadians the risk of drug resistance was 9.9 times greater among the immigrants in whom tuberculosis developed within the first year after arrival in Canada and 5.4 times greater among the immigrants in whom it developed 2 to 5 years after arrival in Canada. Of the 71 patients with drug-resistant disease whose type of resistance was known 62% had never taken antituberculous drugs before and 38% had. Most (91%) of the 77 cases of drug-resistant disease were resistant to first-line drugs, especially isoniazid and streptomycin. Thirty-two (42%) of the 77 cases were resistant to two or more first-line drugs. Of patients with drug-resistant disease a subgroup of 10 had disease that became resistant to several drugs over the 10-year period. The outcome of treatment in these individuals was poor, and they presented a particular public health problem. CONCLUSION: Resistance to one or more first-line antituberculous

  4. Pharmacokinetic interaction between bedaquiline and clofazimine in patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartens, G; Brill, M J E; Pandie, M; Svensson, E M

    2018-01-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ) and clofazimine (CFZ) are both recommended for treating drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). As CFZ is an inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4) in vitro, and BDQ a substrate of CYP3A4, there is a potential for pharmacokinetic (PK) drug-drug interaction that may result in increased BDQ exposure when co-administered with CFZ, which could increase the toxicity of BDQ. We assessed the effect of co-administered CFZ on BDQ bioavailability, or on clearance of BDQ and its N-monodesmethyl metabolite (M2), in patients with DR-TB using a population PK model developed from data of patients with DR-TB. This was a secondary analysis of a study designed to explore drug-drug interactions between BDQ and antiretrovirals. Of 46 participants, 30 were on concomitant CFZ when intensive PK sampling of BDQ was done. CFZ did not have a statistically significant effect on BDQ bioavailability (-9.1%, 90%CI -22.8 to +7.1; P = 0.19) or on BDQ and M2 clearance (+12.2%, 90%CI -13.7 to +38; P = 0.32). We did not find a statistically significant PK drug-drug interaction between BDQ and CFZ, but cannot exclude a potentially clinically relevant interaction due to the wide confidence intervals of the estimated interaction effects.

  5. Susceptibility of Selected Multi-Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    . ... multi-drug resistance. INTRODUCTION. Antimicrobials are great resorts in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases (1). However, over the past few decades, these ..... of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from.

  6. Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of carbapenem-resistant isolates were resistant to at least three other antibiotic classes. The emergence of postsurgical multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter meningitis highlights the importance of implementing preventative strategies towards nosocomial infections. Key words: Acinetobacter baumannii, resistance ...

  7. Multi-drug resistance and molecular pattern of erythromycin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appearance and dissemination of penicillin resistant and macrolide resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains has caused increasing concern worldwide. The aim of this study was to survey drug resistance and genetic characteristics of macrolide and penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. This is a cross-sectional ...

  8. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Alvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009-2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011-2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009-2010 and 2011-2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  9. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A.; Chung, Michael H.; Kiarie, James N.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR) variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1) lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2) amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3) ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4) analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD). The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A) in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories. PMID:26751207

  10. Simplified Paper Format for Detecting HIV Drug Resistance in Clinical Specimens by Oligonucleotide Ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttada Panpradist

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a chronic infection that can be managed by antiretroviral treatment (ART. However, periods of suboptimal viral suppression during lifelong ART can select for HIV drug resistant (DR variants. Transmission of drug resistant virus can lessen or abrogate ART efficacy. Therefore, testing of individuals for drug resistance prior to initiation of treatment is recommended to ensure effective ART. Sensitive and inexpensive HIV genotyping methods are needed in low-resource settings where most HIV infections occur. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA is a sensitive point mutation assay for detection of drug resistance mutations in HIV pol. The current OLA involves four main steps from sample to analysis: (1 lysis and/or nucleic acid extraction, (2 amplification of HIV RNA or DNA, (3 ligation of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect single nucleotide mutations that confer HIV drug resistance, and (4 analysis via oligonucleotide surface capture, denaturation, and detection (CDD. The relative complexity of these steps has limited its adoption in resource-limited laboratories. Here we describe a simplification of the 2.5-hour plate-format CDD to a 45-minute paper-format CDD that eliminates the need for a plate reader. Analysis of mutations at four HIV-1 DR codons (K103N, Y181C, M184V, and G190A in 26 blood specimens showed a strong correlation of the ratios of mutant signal to total signal between the paper CDD and the plate CDD. The assay described makes the OLA easier to perform in low resource laboratories.

  11. [Genotyping and drug resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Guan, Lifeng; Jia, Wei; Wang, Linlin; Li, Gang; Wu, Xuejun; Sun, Tao

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the genotype of staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from burn wards and its current status of drug resistance. One hundred and seventy-nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from wound excretion, blood, and sputum samples of patients that were admitted to ICU or public wards of our Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery from September 2012 to September 2013. Among them, 68 strains were from ICU and 111 strains from public wards. The MRSA phenotype of Staphylococcus aureus was detected with cefoxitin K-B disk diffusion method, and the isolation rates of MRSA in ICU and public wards were compared. Genotyping of SCCmec was performed by PCR in strains of MRSA. In the meantime, the identification result of MRSA by K-B method was verified through detecting methicillin-resistant determinant mecA. The antimicrobial resistance of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to 23 kinds of commonly used antibiotics in clinic were detected by K-B disk diffusion method. Except for the antibiotics to which the resistant rates of MRSA were 100.0% or 0, the resistant rates of SCCmecIII MRSA and non-SCCmec III MRSA to the rest of antibiotics were compared. Data were processed with Pearson chi-square test or corrected chi-square test. One hundred and forty-eight strains out of the 179 Staphylococcus aureus were identified as MRSA (accounting for 82.7%), among which 62 were originated from ICU and 86 from public wards. The rest 31 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were MSSA, accounting for 17.3%. The percentage of MRSA in the isolated Staphylococcus aureus was 91.2% (62/68) in ICU, which was significantly higher than that in the public wards [77.5% (86/111), χ2 = 5.526, P = 0.019]. PCR detection showed that the 148 strains of MRSA harbored the mecA gene, out of which 106 strains were SCCmec III positive, accounting for 71.6%. The percentages of SCCmec III type MRSA

  12. Effect of an Empowerment Intervention on Antiretroviral Drug Adherence in Thai Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihin, Ratchaneekorn; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Chitreechuer, Jittaporn; Grimes, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine effects of an empowerment intervention on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among Thai youth living with HIV/AIDS. It compared two groups of 23 young persons (15-24 years) who receive ART from AIDS clinics at two community hospitals. One hospital's patients served as the experimental group, and the other as a control group. The experimental groups attended five sessions that empowered them to take control of their own health. The control group received the standard of care. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square statistics. Before the empowerment, no one from the experimental group or the control group had ART adherence ≥ 95%. After the intervention, the 82.6% of the experimental group had ≥ 95% adherence compared to the control group, which had 21.7% adherence (p < .0001). The empowerment intervention resulted in a significant increase in ART adherence among Thai youth.

  13. Prevalence of drug-resistant mutation among drug-treated HIV/AIDS inpatient in Airlangga University teaching hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, B. E.; Khairunisa, S. Q.; Witaningrum, A. M.; Yunifiar, M. Q.; Widiyanti, P.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    Increased use of antiretroviral therapy did not completely reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDShospitalization. Various factors can be involved. The aim of this study is to examine HIV-1 drug resistance mutations profile in drug-treated HIV/AIDS patients who underwent hospitalization. HIV/AIDS patients who are admitted to hospital who had received ART are included in the study and then examined for the presence of drug resistance-associated mutations. A total of 17 samples were included in the study, but only 11 samples that could be sequence analyzed. On the mutation examination of drug resistance in reverse transcriptase gene, it werefound a major mutation in K103N (9%) and G190A (9%). Most minor mutations were found in A98S (18.1%), followed by M41L, M184V, L210W, T215Y, V108l, Y181C and H221Y at 9% each. Whereas, on examination of drug resistance mutations in protease genes, there is a major mutation in I84V of 9%. Most minor mutations on M36I (45.4%), followed by L10I (36.3%), H69K (36.3%), I93L (27.2%), G16E, L89M, K20R 18.1%, L64V and V771I 9% respectively.A large number of mutated samples pose a challenge in long-term antiretroviral treatment, so a breakthrough policy is needed to minimize the impact.

  14. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  15. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  16. Drug Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsu, Osamu; Hangauer, Matthew J.; Phuchareon, Janyaporn; Eisele, David W.; McCormick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has dramatically changed the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)—the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. EGFR-targeted therapies show considerable promise, but drug resistance has become a substantial issue. Methods We reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the drug resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC. Results The mechanisms causing primary, acquired, and persistent drug resistance to TKIs vary. Researchers and clinicians, who have used study findings to develop more effective therapeutic approaches, have found that the sequential use of single agents presents a formidable challenge, suggesting that multi-drug combinations must be considered. Conclusions In the era of precision medicine, oncologists should promptly obtain an accurate diagnosis of drug resistance in each patient to design the most relevant combination therapy to overcome patient-specific drug resistance. PMID:26910730

  17. Detection and management of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in lower-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballif, M; Nhandu, V; Wood, R

    2014-01-01

    SETTING: Drug resistance threatens tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. OBJECTIVE: To describe practices in the prevention and management of drug-resistant TB under antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs in lower-income countries. DESIGN......: We used online questionnaires to collect program-level data on 47 ART programs in Southern Africa (n = 14), East Africa (n = 8), West Africa (n = 7), Central Africa (n = 5), Latin America (n = 7) and the Asia-Pacific (n = 6 programs) in 2012. Patient-level data were collected on 1002 adult TB...... patients seen at 40 of the participating ART programs. RESULTS: Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) was available in 36 (77%) ART programs, but was only used for 22% of all TB patients. Molecular DST was available in 33 (70%) programs and was used in 23% of all TB patients. Twenty ART programs (43...

  18. Effect of radiation decontamination on drug-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    More than 80% of food poisoning bacteria such as Salmonella are reported as antibiotic-resistant to at least one type antibiotic, and more than 50% as resistant to two or more. For the decontamination of food poisoning bacteria in foods, radiation resistibility on drug-resistant bacteria were investigated compared with drug-sensitive bacteria. Possibility on induction of drug-resistant mutation by radiation treatment was also investigated. For these studies, type strains of Escherichia coli S2, Salmonella enteritidis YK-2 and Staphylococcus aureus H12 were used to induce drug-resistant strains with penicillin G. From the study of radiation sensitivity on the drug-resistant strain induced from E. coli S2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.20 kGy compared with 0.25 kGy at parent strain. On S. enteritidis YK-2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.14 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.16 kGy at parent strain. D 10 value was also obtained to be 0.15 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.21 kGy at parent strain of St. aureus H12. Many isolates of E. coli 157:H7 or other type of E. coli from meats such as beef were resistant to penicillin G, and looked to be no relationship on radiation resistivities between drug-resistant strains and sensitive strains. On the study of radiation sensitivity on E. coli S2 at plate agars containing antibiotics, higher survival fractions were obtained at higher doses compared with normal plate agar. The reason of higher survival fractions at higher doses on plate agar containing antibiotics should be recovery of high rate of injured cells by the relay of cell division, and drug-resistant strains by mutation are hardly induced by irradiation. (author)

  19. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea: 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alvarez

    Full Text Available This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ, a country with high (6.2% and increasing HIV prevalence.Dried blood spots (DBS were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR or acquired (ADR antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses.A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79% belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI or one protease inhibitor (PI. The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%. The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4% infections, mainly (78.9% recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%, CRF22_A101 (10.5%, subtype C (10.5%, unique recombinants (5.3%, and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each.The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present.

  20. Trends in Prevalence of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in a Public Clinic in Maputo, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Celina Adolfo Bila

    Full Text Available An observational study was conducted in Maputo, Mozambique, to investigate trends in prevalence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR in antiretroviral (ART naïve subjects initiating highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART.To evaluate the pattern of drug resistance mutations (DRMs found in adults on ART failing first-line HAART [patients with detectable viral load (VL]. Untreated subjects [Group 1 (G1; n=99] and 274 treated subjects with variable length of exposure to ARV´s [6-12 months, Group 2 (G2;n=93; 12-24 months, Group 3 (G3;n=81; >24 months (G4;n=100] were enrolled. Virological and immunological failure (VF and IF were measured based on viral load (VL and T lymphocyte CD4+ cells (TCD4+ count and genotypic resistance was also performed. Major subtype found was C (untreated: n=66, 97,06%; treated: n=36, 91.7%. Maximum virological suppression was observed in G3, and significant differences intragroup were observed between VF and IF in G4 (p=0.022. Intergroup differences were observed between G3 and G4 for VF (p=0.023 and IF between G2 and G4 (p=0.0018. Viral suppression (5000 copies/ml identified 50% of subjects carrying DRM compared to 100% when lower VL cut-off was used (<50 copies/ml. Length of exposure to ARVs was directly proportional to the complexity of DRM patterns. In Mozambique, VL suppression was achieved in 76% of individuals after 24 months on HAART. This is in agreement with WHO target for HIVDR prevention target (70%.We demonstrated that the best way to determine therapeutic failure is VL compared to CD4 counts. The rationalized use of VL testing is needed to ensure timely detection of treatment failures preventing the occurrence of TDR and new infections.

  1. National Prevalence and Trends of HIV Transmitted Drug Resistance in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Garrido-Rodríguez, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; González-Hernández, Luz A.; Torres-Escobar, Indiana; Navarro-Álvarez, Samuel; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) remains an important concern for the management of HIV infection, especially in countries that have recently scaled-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) access. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a study to assess HIV diversity and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence and trends in Mexico. 1655 ART-naïve patients from 12 Mexican states were enrolled from 2005 to 2010. TDR was assessed from plasma HIV pol sequences using Stanford scores and the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. TDR prevalence fluctuations over back-projected dates of infection were tested. HIV subtype B was highly prevalent in Mexico (99.9%). TDR prevalence (Stanford score>15) in the country for the study period was 7.4% (95% CI, 6.2∶8.8) and 6.8% (95% CI, 5.7∶8.2) based on the WHO TDR surveillance mutation list. NRTI TDR was the highest (4.2%), followed by NNRTI (2.5%) and PI (1.7%) TDR. Increasing trends for NNRTI (p = 0.0456) and PI (p = 0.0061) major TDR mutations were observed at the national level. Clustering of viruses containing minor TDR mutations was observed with some apparent transmission pairs and geographical effects. Conclusions TDR prevalence in Mexico remains at the intermediate level and is slightly lower than that observed in industrialized countries. Whether regional variations in TDR trends are associated with differences in antiretroviral drug usage/ART efficacy or with local features of viral evolution remains to be further addressed. PMID:22110765

  2. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N.; Paredes, Roger; Battegay, Manuel; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.; Machala, Ladislav; Tomazic, Janez; Girard, Pierre M.; Januskevica, Inga; Gronborg-Laut, Kamilla; Lundgren, Jens D.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Losso, M.; Kundro, M.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Paduto, D.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Florence, E.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Pedersen, C.; Møller, N. F.; Ostergaard, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Nielsen, L. N.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Duvivier, C.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stefan, C.; Bogner, J.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Chkhartishvili, N.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Gottfredsson, M.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Shahar, E.; Hassoun, G.; Elinav, H.; Haouzi, M.; Sthoeger, Z. M.; d'Arminio, A.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Zaccarelli, M.; Reiss, P.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Inglot, M.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Parczewski, M.; Pynka, M.; Maciejewska, K.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Smiatacz, T.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Mozer-Lisewska, I.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Radoi, R.; Oprea, C.; Babes, Victor; Rakhmanova, A.; Trofimora, T.; Khromova, I.; Kuzovatova, E.; Jevtovic, D.; Shunnar, A.; Stanekova, D.; Tomazic, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miro, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Laporte, J. M.; Blaxhult, A.; Flamholc, L.; Thalme, A.; Sonnerborg, A.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Cavassini, M.; Calmy, A.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Schmid, P.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Baskakov, I.; Kuznetsova, A.; Kyselyova, G.; Gazzard, B.; Johnson, A. M.; Simons, E.; Edwards, S.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Mocroft, A.; Orkin, C.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Lundgren, J.; DeWit, S.; Kirk, O.; Grarup, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Thiebaut, R.; Burger, D.; Peters, L.; Podlekareva, D.; Nielsen, J. E.; Matthews, C.; Fischer, A. H.; Bojesen, A.; Raben, D.; Kristensen, D.; Laut, K. Grønborg; Larsen, J. F.; Grint, D.; Shepherd, L.; Schultze, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. Design: Multinational cohort

  3. Distribution of red blood cell antigens in drug-resistant and drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency distribution of ABO, Rh-Hr, MN, Kell blood group system antigens were studied in 277 TB patients (151-drug-sensitive and 126 drug-resistant) of pulmonary tuberculosis to know whether there was any association between them, and also between drug resistance and sensitiveness. They were compared with 485 ...

  4. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  5. Prevalence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis among children in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wei-wei; Liu, Zhi-guang; Han, Rui; Zhao, Xiu-qin; Dong, Fang; Dong, Hai-yan; Huang, Hai-rong; Li, Qin-jing; Lin, Nan; Song, Wen-qi; Wan, Kang-lin; Shen, A-dong

    2015-05-01

    The available data on the epidemic of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) among children in China is limited. This study attempted to clarify the drug resistance profiles of clinical strains isolated from children and estimate risk factors related to acquisition of drug resistance. All Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from children (age children, 159 from adolescents, and 191 from adults) from all over China. Drug susceptibility testing was performed by a proportion method. As a result, the drug resistance and multi-drug resistance (MDR) rates in children were 55% (55/100) and 22% (22/100), respectively. In children with MDR-TB, new cases accounted for 40.9% (9/22). Compared with adults, the drug resistance rates were similar in all subgroups (new cases, previously treated cases and all cases) of children (P > 0.05), except for the lower resistance rate to isoniazid in total cases of children (P = 0.011). Patient related information was included in the MDR-TB association analysis. The treatment history was found to be strongly associated with MDR-TB in all three age groups (P children in China is alarmingly high and similar to that seen in adults. In contrast, in adolescents, the drug resistance rate to most tested drugs was lower than in adults. Primary transmission and inadequate treatment are two equally important factors for the high MDR-TB rate in children. Thus, major efforts in the TB control in children should focus on decreasing the transmission of drug resistant TB and early testing of drug resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Sanatoria of North Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jihee; Jegal, Yangjin; Ki, Moran; Shin, Young Jeon; Kim, Cheon Tae; Shim, Tae Sun; Sung, Nackmoon

    2017-07-01

    Although several reports about drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in North Korea have been published, a nationwide surveillance on this disease remains to be performed. This study aims to analyze the drug resistance patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among the patients in the sanatoria of North Korea, especially during the period when second-line drugs (SLDs) had not yet been officially supplied to this country. The Eugene Bell Foundation (EBF) transferred 947 sputum specimens obtained from 667 patients from 2007 to 2009 to the Clinical Research Center, Masan National Tuberculosis Hospital (MNTH), South Korea. Four hundred ninety-two patients were culture positive for TB (73.8%). Drug susceptibility test (DST) was performed for the bacilli isolated from 489 patients. Over 3 quarters of the cases (76.9%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Additionally, 2 patients had extremely drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. Very high resistance to first-line drugs and low resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and injectable drugs (IDs) except for streptomycin (S) were detected. A small but significant regional variation in resistance pattern was observed. Big city regions had higher rate of MDR-TB, higher resistance to FQs and IDs than relatively isolated regions. In conclusion, significant number of drug-resistant TB was detected in North Korean sanatoria, and small but significant regional variations in resistance pattern were noticeable. However, the data in this study do not represent the nationwide drug resistance pattern in North Korea. Further large-scale evaluations are necessary to estimate the resistance pattern of TB in North Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  7. Drug-resistance in chronic tuberculosis cases in Southern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria has a high burden of tuberculosis but the drug resistant situationwas previously unknown. This report evaluates the firstline drug resistance and associated factors among chronic tuberculosis cases from the tuberculosis control programme in South south and South east zones ofNigeria. Descriptive study of chronic ...

  8. Tuberculosis drug resistance in the Western Cape | Weyer | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Drug resistance is a serious problem in the treatment of tuberculosis and a threat to successful tuberculosis control programmes. Local health workers have expressed concern that the increasing tuberculosis epidemic in the Western Cape is partly attributable to drug resistance. The aim of this study was to ...

  9. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Tanzania: Initial description of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug resistant Tuberculosis is well documented worldwide and is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality complicating Tuberculosis control with increasing costs of managing the disease. Broad. Objective: To describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis ...

  10. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis: a challenge in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) will not usually respond to short course chemotherapy. Unless the individual infected with this bug is treated appropriately, they can continue spreading resistant strains in the community and further fuel the tuberculosis epidemic. Diagnosis requires drug sensitivity testing and the ...

  11. Adaptation and evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergval, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on drug resistance and the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Notwithstanding, many molecular mechanisms facilitating the emergence, adaptation and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis have yet to be discovered. This thesis reports studies of the adaptive

  12. Conventional versus newer methods for detection of drug resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Conventional versus newer methods for detection of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Classical microbiological methods are well established but are cumbersome and time consuming. Newer rapid methods for rapid detection of drug resistance - microbiological, ...

  13. Drug resistance prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected pediatric populations in Honduras and El Salvador during 1989-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín, Africa; Erazo, Karen; Escobar, Gustavo; de Mulder, Miguel; Yebra, Gonzalo; Martín, Leticia; Jovel, Luis Enrique; Castaneda, Luis; Pérez, Elsy

    2011-05-01

    Emergence of viral resistance is a major obstacle for antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) variants and drug-resistance mutations were identified in naive and antiretroviral drug-experienced children with virologic failure, in Honduras and El Salvador. Dried blood spots (DBS) from 80 individuals (54 from Honduras, 26 from El Salvador) infected during their childhood between 1989 and 2009 were collected in 2009. The HIV pol region was amplified and sequenced to identify antiretroviral-resistant mutations according to the 2009 International AIDS Society. The genotypic drug resistance interpretation was performed using the Stanford algorithm. HIV-1 variants were characterized by phylogenetic analysis and subtyping tools. HIV-1 protease and reverse transcription sequences were obtained from DBS specimens in 71 and 66 patients, respectively, of the 80 patients. All children were native Central Americans carrying subtype B, with a mean age of 9 years, most were male (65%), perinatally infected (96%), with moderate/severe AIDS symptoms (70%), and receiving first line ART at the time of sequencing (65%). Diagnostic delay was frequently observed. Infected children from Honduras presented longer ART experience and clinical outcomes, and more frequent severe symptoms. Resistant variants infected 1 of 11 naive children from El Salvador but none of the perinatally infected naive children from Honduras. Resistance was higher among ART-exposed individuals in both countries and similar for protease inhibitors (16%), nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitors (44%-52%), and nonnucleoside reverse-transcription inhibitors (66.7%). One in 10 pretreated children in each country was infected with resistant viruses to the 3 drug families. Our data support the need for continued surveillance of resistance patterns using DBS at national levels among naive and pretreated children to optimize the ART regimens.

  14. Dominant drug targets suppress the emergence of antiviral resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hong-mei; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark; Collett, Marc S; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Treating a viral infection with a drug sometimes has an unwanted side effect?the virus quickly becomes resistant to the drug. Viruses whose genetic information is encoded in molecules of RNA mutate faster than DNA viruses and are particularly good at developing resistance to drugs. This is because the process of copying the RNA is prone to errors, and by chance some of these errors, or mutations, may allow the virus to resist the drug's effects. Treating viral infections with mos...

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, José A; Cayla, Joan A; García-García, José-María; García-Pérez, Francisco J; Palacios, Juan J; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2017-09-01

    In the last 2 decades, drug-resistant tuberculosis has become a threat and a challenge to worldwide public health. The diagnosis and treatment of these forms of tuberculosis are much more complex and prognosis clearly worsens as the resistance pattern intensifies. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that with the appropriatesystematic clinical management, most of these patients can be cured. These guidelines itemize the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of all tuberculosis patients, from those infected by strains that are sensitive to all drugs, to those who are extensively drug-resistant. Specific recommendations are given forall cases. The current and future role of new molecular methods for detecting resistance, shorter multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis regimens, and new drugs with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also addressed. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. An appeal for large scale production of antiretroviral drugs in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martial, Nkamedjie Pete Patrick; Sieleunou, Isidore

    2016-01-01

    The Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) remains a major global public health challenge especially in Africa. The deadline set for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) has elapsed, meanwhile most low and middle income countries did not reach the targets. With regards to the fight against HIV / AIDS, many African countries show slow progress in implementing efficient and effective strategies to counter this pandemic. The fact that most HIV/AIDS programs in Sub-Saharan African countries are still very dependent on external funding to carry out their activities, including the supply of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART), highlights the concern of sustainability. So far, solutions that have been proposed are mainly symptomatic, claiming more budget commitment from government. Without rejecting this view, we call for the implementation of sustainable solutions to deal with the long term ART challenges. A way forward is to promote the establishment of an effective machinery for the manufacturing and large scale distribution of ART. In addition to the health gains, we argue that such an initiative would have a three-dimensional impact: (i) political, (ii) economic and (iii) social.

  17. Ergotism in Thailand caused by increased access to antiretroviral drugs: a global warning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avihingsanon, A.; Ramautarsing, R.A.; Suwanpimolkul, G.; Chetchotisakd, P.; Bowonwatanuwong, C.; Jirajariyavej, S.; Kantipong, P.; Tantipong, H.; Ohata, J.P.; Suankratay, C.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Burger, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Ergotism is a toxic condition resulting from overexposure to the ergot compounds produced by various fungi of the genus Claviceps. Traditionally, such exposure was due to ingestion of infected grains, but long-term or excessive use of medications containing ergot derivatives or drug-drug

  18. Brazilian Network for HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance: a survey of individuals recently diagnosed with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Use of antiretrovirals is widespread in Brazil, where more than 200,000 individuals are under treatment. Although general prevalence of primary antiretroviral resistance in Brazil is low, systematic sampling in large metropolitan areas has not being performed. The HIV Threshold Survey methodology (HIV-THS, WHO) was utilized, targeting Brazil's four major regions and selecting the six most populated state capitals: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Porto Alegre, Brasilia and Belem. We were able to sequence samples from 210 individuals with recent HIV diagnosis, 17 of them (8.1%) carrying HIV isolates with primary antiretroviral resistance mutations. Five, nine and four isolates showed mutations related to resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs), respectively. Using HIV-THS, we could find an intermediate level of transmitted resistance (5% to 15%) in Belem/Brasilia, Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Lower level of transmitted resistance (<5%) were observed in the other areas. Despite the extensive antiretroviral exposure and high rates of virologic antiretroviral failure in Brazil, the general prevalence of primary resistance is still low. However, an intermediate level of primary resistance was found in the four major Brazilian cities, confirming the critical need to start larger sampling surveys to better define the risk factors associated with transmission of resistant HIV. PMID:19765271

  19. Repurposing and Revival of the Drugs: A New Approach to Combat the Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis like multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and totally drug resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB has created a new challenge to fight against these bad bugs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Repurposing and revival of the drugs are the new trends/options to combat these worsen situations of tuberculosis in the antibiotics resistance era or in the situation of global emergency. Bactericidal and synergistic effect of repurposed/revived drugs along with the latest drugs bedaquiline and delamanid used in the treatment of MDR-TB, XDR-TB, and TDR-TB might be the choice for future promising combinatorial chemotherapy against these bad bugs.

  20. Multi drug resistance tuberculosis: pattern seen in last 13 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, R.; Shabbir, I.; Munir, K.; Tabassum, M.N.; Khan, S.U.; Khan, M.Z.U.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance in tuberculosis is a serious problem throughout the world especially, after the emergence of multi drug resistant TB strains. Objectives: To estimate drug resistance in TB patients and compare it with previous studies to see the changing trends. Materials and Methods: The PMRC Research Centre receives sputum samples from all the leading hospitals of Lahore. This retrospective analysis was done from 1996 to 2008 on the multi drug resistant TB strains that were seen during these years. Five first lines anti tuberculosis drugs were tested on Lowenstein Jensen medium using standard proportion method. Results: A total of 2661 confirmed isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were seen over the past 13 years. Of the total, 2182 were pulmonary and 479 were extra pulmonary specimens. The patients comprised of those with and without history of previous treatment. These specimens were subjected to drug susceptibility testing. Almost half of the patient had some resistance; multiple drug resistance was seen in 12.3% and 23.0% cases without and with history of previous treatment respectively. Overall resistance to rifampicin was 26.4%, isoniazid 24.1% streptomycin 21.6% ethambutol 13.4% and pyrazinamide 28.4% respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen between primary and acquired resistance. When compared with the reports from previous studies from the same area, there was a trend of gradual increase of drug resistance. Conclusions Resistance to anti tuberculosis drugs is high. Policy message. TB Control Program should start 'DOTS Plus' schemes for which drug susceptibility testing facilities should be available for correctly managing the patients. (author)

  1. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Chevereau

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the "morbidostat", a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations-an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation

  2. Shigella Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Mechanisms, 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Heini, Nicole; Zurfluh, Katrin; Althaus, Denise; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2016-06-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance mechanisms of Shigella spp., we analyzed 344 isolates collected in Switzerland during 2004-2014. Overall, 78.5% of isolates were multidrug resistant; 10.5% were ciprofloxacin resistant; and 2% harbored mph(A), a plasmid-mediated gene that confers reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, a last-resort antimicrobial agent for shigellosis.

  3. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    more the copy number of resistance plasmid present in a bacterial cell, the higher the resistant ability of ... amoxicillin, as well as other semi synthetic penicillins, many cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, ... drugs resistant E. coli to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ceftriaxone were also carried out (Hadley, 2002;.

  4. Cytochromes P450 and drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doehmer, J.; Goeptar, A R; Vermeulen, N P

    1993-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 are the key enzymes for activating and inactivating many drugs, in particular anticancer drugs. Therefore, individual expression levels of cytochromes P450 may play a crucial role in drug safety and drug efficacy. Overexpression of cytochrome P450 may yield rapid turnover and

  5. Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve pregnant women in selected HIV-care centres in Ghana. Alexander Martin-Odoom, Theophilus Adiku, Elena Delgado, Margaret Lartey, William K. Ampofo ...

  6. Impact of injecting drug use on response to highly active antiretroviral treatment in HIV-1-infected patients: a nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vang; Omland, Lars Haukali Hvass; Gerstoft, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients infected through injecting drug use (injecting drug users, IDUs) compared to patients infected via other routes (non-IDUs). We conducted...... for non-IDUs, and IDUs initiated HAART later than non-IDUs. In conclusion, more than half of the HIV-infected patients in Denmark infected through injecting drug use gained full viral suppression after initiating HAART. Absolute CD4(+) cell count was lower and mortality higher among IDUs than non-IDUs....

  7. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  8. Expansion of Viral Load Testing and the Potential Impact on HIV Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizes, Elliot; Hader, Shannon; Birx, Deborah

    2017-12-01

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) supports aggressive scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in high-burden countries and across all genders and populations at risk toward global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic control. PEPFAR recognizes the risk of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) as a consequence of aggressive ART scale-up and is actively promoting 3 key steps to mitigate the impact of HIVDR: (1) routine access to routine viral load monitoring in all settings; (2) optimization of ART regimens; and (3) routine collection and analysis of HIVDR data to monitor the success of mitigation strategies. The transition to dolutegravir-based regimens in PEPFAR-supported countries and the continuous evolution of HIVDR surveillance strategies are essential elements of PEPFAR implementation. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Alternate efflux pump mechanism may contribute to drug resistance in extensively drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data show an nsSNP in the drrA efflux pump gene that may result in upregulation of drug efflux mechanisms in MTB strains. It is therefore imperative to understand the mechanism of efflux and its role in drug resistance, which will enable the identification of new drug targets and development of new drug regimens to counteract the drug efflux mechanism of MTB.

  10. in vitro surveillance of drug resistant falciparum malaria in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Background: drug resistant malaria is spreading inexorably to areas with drug sensitive malaria parasites. This study compared the in vitro sensitivities of Plasmodium falciparum fresh parasite isolates, to some standard antimalarial drugs, in Makurdi and Masaka located over 300 km apart, in north central.

  11. High Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance in HIV-infected Prepubertal African Children on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Steve; Abdullah, Kameelah L; Haubrich, Richard; Cotton, Mark F; Browne, Sara H

    2016-01-01

    Data describing the true extent of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in perinatally infected children on ART in Africa are sparse. Fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, insulin and glucose were performed on the first 100 of 190 pediatric ART clinic attendees. Diet assessment was performed by a trained dietician. Lipoatrophy was formally graded by consensus between 2 expert HIV pediatricians. Durations of previous ART exposures, clinical stage, pre-ART viral load, nadir and current CD4 were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed on a subset of 42 patients selected semi-randomly. Prevalences of insulin resistance, abnormal total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were 10%, 13%, 12%, 13% and 9%, respectively. Overall, 40% had at least 1 lipid abnormality or insulin resistance. Adjusted mean LDL cholesterol increased by 0.24 mmol/L for each additional year of cumulative lopinavir/r exposure (P = 0.03) after correcting for age, gender, body mass index, previous stavudine exposure, age at ART initiation, dietary fat and refined carbohydrate, whereas adjusted mean LDL cholesterol was 0.9 mmol/L higher in children exposed to efavirenz within the previous 6 months (P = 0.02). Adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that greater trunk fat and lower peripheral subcutaneous fat were associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL or homeostatic model assessment. Similarly, the presence of visually obvious lipoatrophy was associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, homeostatic model assessment or lactate. Prevalences of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia were high. Cumulative lopinavir is an independent risk factor for dyslipidemia, with efavirenz exposure having only transitory effect.

  12. Drug resistant tuberculosis in prisons in Azerbaijan: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coninx, R; Pfyffer, G E; Mathieu, C; Savina, D; Debacker, M; Jafarov, F; Jabrailov, I; Ismailov, A; Mirzoev, F; de Haller, R; Portaels, F

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To document the existence of drug resistance in a tuberculosis treatment programme that adheres strictly to the DOTS principles (directly observed treatment, short course) and to determine the extent of drug resistance in a prison setting in one of the republics of the former Soviet Union. Design: Case study. Setting: Central Penitentiary Hospital in Baku, the referral centre for tuberculosis patients from all prisons in Azerbaijan. Subjects: Prisoners with tuberculosis: 28 selected patients not responding clinically or bacteriologically to the standard treatment (group 1) and 38 consecutive patients at admission to the programme (group 2). Main outcome measures: Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains grown from sputum. Results: All the non-responding patients (group 1) had strains resistant to at least one drug. 25 (89%) of the non-responding patients and nine (24%) of the consecutive patients had M tuberculosis strains resistant to both rifampicin and isoniazid. A further 17 patients in group 2 had strains resistant to one or more first line drugs. Conclusions: Drug resistant M tuberculosis strains are common in prisons in Azerbaijan. Tuberculosis problems tend to be worse in prisons, but prisoners and former prisoners may have an important role in the transmission of tuberculosis, particularly of drug resistant forms, in the community. National programmes to control tuberculosis will have to take into account and address the problems in prisons to ensure their success. Key messages Tuberculosis is an important problem in prisons in Azerbaijan Multidrug resistant tuberculosis was common and an important cause of non-response to standard treatment National tuberculosis control programmes must include prisons and take account of drug resistance Unless WHO recommended treatment protocols are followed the problem of multidrug resistant tuberculosis may result in untreatable tuberculosis which will spread to the general community PMID

  13. Progress of implementation of the World Health Organization strategy for HIV drug resistance control in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasi, Giovanni; Jack, Noreen; Alonso Gonzalez, Mónica; Sued, Omar; Pérez-Rosales, María Dolores; Gomez, Bertha; Vila, Marcelo; Riego, Amalia del; Ghidinelli, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    By the end of 2010, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) achieved 63% antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage. Measures to control HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at the country level are recommended to maximize the efficacy and sustainability of ART programs. Since 2006, the Pan American Health Organization has supported implementation of the World Health Organization (WHO) strategy for HIVDR prevention and assessment through regional capacity-building activities and direct technical cooperation in 30 LAC countries. By 2010, 85 sites in 19 countries reported early warning indicators, providing information about the extent of potential drivers of drug resistance at the ART site. In 2009, 41.9% of sites did not achieve the WHO target of 100% appropriate first-line prescriptions; 6.3% still experienced high rates (> 20%) of loss to follow-up, and 16.2% had low retention of patients (< 70%) on first-line prescriptions in the first year of treatment. Stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs occurred at 22.7% of sites. Haiti, Guyana, and the Mesoamerican region are planning and implementing WHO HIVDR monitoring surveys or threshold surveys. New HIVDR surveillance tools for concentrated epidemics would promote further scale-up. Extending the WHO HIVDR lab network in Latin America is key to strengthening regional lab capacity to support quality assured HIVDR surveillance. The WHO HIVDR control strategy is feasible and can be rolled out in LAC. Integrating HIVDR activities in national HIV care and treatment plans is key to ensuring the sustainability of this strategy.

  14. Formulation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles for an anti-retroviral drug darunavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, Mangesh; Upadhaya, Prashant; Madgulkar, Ashwini

    2017-02-01

    Darunavir, an anti-HIV drug having poor solubility in aqueous and lipid medium, illustrates degradation above its melting point, i.e. 74 °C, thus, posing a challenge to dosage formulation. Despite, the drug suffers from poor oral bioavailability (37%) owing to less permeability and being poly-glycoprotein and cyp3A metabolism substrate. The study aimed formulating a SLN system to overcome the formulation and bioavailability associated problems of the drug. Based on the drug solubility and stable dispersion findings, lipid and surfactant were chosen and nanoparticles were prepared using hot-homogenization technique. Optimization of variables such as lipid concentration, oil-surfactant and homogenization cycle was carried and their effect on particle size and entrapment efficiency was studied. Freeze-dried SLN further characterized using SEM, DSC and PXRD analysis revealed complete entrapment of the drug and amorphous nature of the SLN. In vitro pH release studies in 0.1 N HCl and 6.8 pH buffer demonstrated 84 and 80% release at the end of 12th h. The apparent permeability of the SLN across rat intestine was found to be 24 × 10-6 at 37 °C at the end of 30 min while at 4 °C the same was found to be 5.6 × 10-6 prompting involvement of endocytic processes in the uptake of SLN. Accelerated stability studies revealed no prominent changes upon storage.

  15. Diversity and evolution of drug resistance mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Saeedi M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mashael Al-Saeedi, Sahal Al-Hajoj Department of Infection and Immunity, Mycobacteriology Research Section, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Despite the efficacy of antibiotics to protect humankind against many deadly pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nothing can prevent the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Several mechanisms facilitate drug resistance in M. tuberculosis including compensatory evolution, epistasis, clonal interference, cell wall integrity, efflux pumps, and target mimicry. In this study, we present recent findings relevant to these mechanisms, which can enable the discovery of new drug targets and subsequent development of novel drugs for treatment of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, compensatory evolution, epistasis, efflux pumps, fitness cost

  16. Long Non-coding RNAs and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing-Jing; Xie, Xiao-Juan; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key players in gene expression that govern cell developmental processes, and thus contributing to diseases, especially cancers. Many studies have suggested that aberrant expression of lncRNAs is responsible for drug resistance, a substantial obstacle for cancer therapy. Drug resistance not only results from individual variations in patients, but also from genetic and epigenetic differences in tumors. It is reported that drug resistance is tightly modulated by lncRNAs which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, and drug metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in research on lncRNAs associated with drug resistance and underlying molecular or cellular mechanisms, which may contribute helpful approaches for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure.

  17. Is selection relevant in the evolutionary emergence of drug resistance?

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Troy; Huijben, Silvie; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is often considered a canonical case of evolution by ‘natural’ selection. Here we argue that the strength of selection can be a poor predictor of the rate of resistance emergence. It is possible for a resistant strain to be under negative selection and still emerge in an infection or spread in a population. Measuring the right parameters is a necessary first step towards the development of evidence-based resistance management strategies. We argue that...

  18. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-22

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results.

  19. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. DESIGN: Multinational cohort...... study. METHODS: Individuals in EuroSIDA with virological failure (>1 RNA measurement >500 on ART after >6 months on ART) after 1997 were included. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for resistance testing following virological failure and aORs for the detection of resistance among those who had a test were...... calculated using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Compared to 74.2% of ART-experienced individuals in 1997, only 5.1% showed evidence of virological failure in 2012. The odds of resistance testing declined after 2004 (global P Resistance was detected in 77...

  20. Combination of anti-retroviral drugs and radioimmunotherapy specifically kills infected cells from HIV infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Tsukrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT, a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infect-ed cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely down-regulated in patients on an-tiretroviral therapy (ART, we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells us-ing both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal anti-body to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. conjugated to the human monoclonal antibody 2556, which binds to HIV gp41. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: ten on ART and five ART-naive. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART, and supports continued development of 213Bi

  1. The PHACS SMARTT Study: Assessment of the Safety of In Utero Exposure to Antiretroviral Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Barrett Van Dyke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Surveillance Monitoring for ART Toxicities (SMARTT cohort of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS includes over 3500 HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU infants and children at 22 sites in the U.S. including Puerto Rico. The goal of the study is to determine the safety of in utero exposure to antiretrovirals (ARV and to estimate the incidence of adverse events. Domains being assessed include metabolic, growth and development, cardiac, neurological, neurodevelopmental, behavior, language, and hearing. SMARTT employs an innovative trigger-based design as an efficient means to identify and evaluate adverse events. Participants who met a predefined clinical or laboratory threshold (trigger undergo additional evaluations to define their case status. After adjusting for birth cohort and other factors, there was no significant increase in the likelihood of meeting overall case status (case in any domain with exposure to combination ARVs (cARV, any ARV class, or any specific ARV. However, several individual ARVs were significantly associated with case status in individual domains, including zidovudine for a metabolic case, first trimester stavudine for a language case, and didanosine plus stavudine for a neurodevelopmental case. We found an increased rate of preterm birth with first trimester exposure to protease inhibitor-based cARV. Although there was no overall increase in congenital anomalies with first trimester cARV, a significant increase was seen with exposure to atazanavir, ritonavir, and didanosine plus stavudine. Tenofovir exposure was associated with significantly lower mean whole-body bone mineral content in the newborn period and a lower length and head circumference at 1 year of age. With neurodevelopmental testing at 1 year of age, specific ARVs (atazanavir, ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, nelfinavir, and tenofovir were associated with lower performance, although all groups were within the normal range. No ARVs or classes were

  2. HIV antiretroviral drug combination induces endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production, but not apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Li, Yuchi; Mathis, J. Michael; Alexander, J. Steven; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous reports now indicate that HIV patients administered long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at a greater risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction is an initiating event in atherogenesis and may contribute to HIV-associated atherosclerosis. We previously reported that ART induces direct endothelial dysfunction in rodents. In vitro treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with ART indicated endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we determined whether ART-induced endothelial dysfunction is mediated via mitochondria-derived ROS and whether this mitochondrial injury culminates in endothelial cell apoptosis. Two major components of ART combination therapy, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor, were tested, using AZT and indinavir as representatives for each. Microscopy utilizing fluorescent indicators of ROS and mitochondria demonstrated the mitochondrial localization of ART-induced ROS. MnTBAP, a cell-permeable metalloporphyrin antioxidant, abolished ART-induced ROS production. As a final step in confirming the mitochondrial origin of the ART-induced ROS, HUVEC were transduced with a cytosolic- compared to a mitochondria-targeted catalase. Transduction with the mitochondria-targeted catalase was more effective than cytoplasmic catalase in inhibiting the ROS and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF 2α ) produced after treatment with either AZT or indinavir. However, both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic catalase attenuated ROS and 8-iso-PGF 2α production induced by the combination treatment, suggesting that in this case, the formation of cytoplasmic ROS may also occur, and thus, that the mechanism of toxicity in the combination treatment group may be different compared to treatment with AZT or indinavir alone. Finally, to determine whether ART-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS production

  3. Impact of opioid substitution therapy on the HIV prevention benefit of antiretroviral therapy for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukandavire, Christinah; Low, Andrea; Mburu, Gitau; Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T; Davies, Charlotte F; French, Clare E; Looker, Katharine J; Rhodes, Tim; Platt, Lucy; Guise, Andy; Hickman, Matthew; Vickerman, Peter

    2017-05-15

    A recent meta-analysis suggested that opioid substitution therapy (OST) increased uptake of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral suppression. We modelled whether OST could improve the HIV prevention benefit achieved by ART among people who inject drugs (PWID). We modelled how introducing OST could improve the coverage of ART across a PWID population for different baseline ART coverage levels. Using existing data on how yearly HIV-transmission risk is related to HIV plasma viral load, changes in the level of viral suppression across the population were used to project the relative reduction in yearly HIV-transmission risk achieved by ART, with or without OST, compared with if there was no ART - defined here as the prevention effectiveness of ART. Owing to OST use increasing the chance of being on ART and achieving viral suppression if on ART, the prevention effectiveness of ART for PWID on OST (compared with PWID not on OST) increases by 44, 31, or 20% for a low (20%), moderate (40%), or high (60%) baseline ART coverage, respectively. Improvements in the population-level prevention effectiveness of ART are also achieved across all PWID, compared with if OST was not introduced. For instance, if OST is introduced at 40% coverage, the population-level prevention effectiveness of ART could increase by 27, 20, or 13% for a low (20%), moderate (40%), or high (60%) baseline ART coverage, respectively. OST could improve the HIV prevention benefit of ART; supporting strategies that aim to concurrently scale-up OST with ART.

  4. High Prevalence of HIV Low Abundance Drug-Resistant Variants in a Treatment-Naive Population in North Rift Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriro, Winfrida; Kiptoo, Michael; Kikuvi, Gideon; Mining, Simeon; Emonyi, Wilfred; Songok, Elijah

    2015-12-01

    The advent of antiretroviral treatment (ART) has resulted in a dramatic reduction in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. However, the emergence and spread of antiretroviral drug resistance (DR) threaten to negatively impact treatment regimens and compromise efforts to control the epidemic. It is recommended that surveillance of drug resistance occur in conjunction with scale-up efforts to ensure that appropriate first-line therapy is offered relative to the resistance that exists. However, standard resistance testing methods used in Sub-Saharan Africa rely on techniques that do not include low abundance DR variants (LADRVs) that have been documented to contribute to treatment failure. The use of next generation sequencing (NGS) has been shown to be more sensitive to LADRVS. We have carried out a preliminary investigation using NGS to determine the prevalence of LDRVS among a drug-naive population in North Rift Kenya. Antiretroviral-naive patients attending a care clinic in North Rift Kenya were requested to provide and with consent provided blood samples for DR analysis. DNA was extracted and amplified and nested PCR was conducted on the pol RT region using primers tagged with multiplex identifiers (MID). Resulting PCR amplicons were purified, quantified, and pyrosequenced using a GS FLX Titanium PicoTiterPlate (Roche). Valid pyrosequencing reads were aligned with HXB-2 and the frequency and distribution of nucleotide and amino acid changes were determined using an in-house Perl script. DR mutations were identified using the IAS-USA HIV DR mutation database. Sixty samples were successfully sequenced of which 26 were subtype A, 9 were subtype D, 2 were subtype C, and the remaining were recombinants. Forty-six (76.6%) had at least one drug resistance mutation, with 25 (41.6%) indicated as major and the remaining 21 (35%) indicated as minor. The most prevalent mutation was NRTI position K219Q/R (11/46, 24%) followed by NRTI M184V (5/46, 11%) and NNRTI K103N (4/46, 9

  5. Drug-Resistant Bacteria: On the Edge of a Crisis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug-resistant bacteria research program. Why are certain bacteria becoming more resistant to drugs? There is a ... a national, even global crisis of drug-resistant bacteria. Why is that? The more we see this ...

  6. DNA origami as a carrier for circumvention of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiao; Song, Chen; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Xiaowei; Lin, Lin; Qiu, Dengli; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xingjie; Yan, Hao; Ding, Baoquan

    2012-08-15

    Although a multitude of promising anti-cancer drugs have been developed over the past 50 years, effective delivery of the drugs to diseased cells remains a challenge. Recently, nanoparticles have been used as drug delivery vehicles due to their high delivery efficiencies and the possibility to circumvent cellular drug resistance. However, the lack of biocompatibility and inability to engineer spatially addressable surfaces for multi-functional activity remains an obstacle to their widespread use. Here we present a novel drug carrier system based on self-assembled, spatially addressable DNA origami nanostructures that confronts these limitations. Doxorubicin, a well-known anti-cancer drug, was non-covalently attached to DNA origami nanostructures through intercalation. A high level of drug loading efficiency was achieved, and the complex exhibited prominent cytotoxicity not only to regular human breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells (MCF 7), but more importantly to doxorubicin-resistant cancer cells, inducing a remarkable reversal of phenotype resistance. With the DNA origami drug delivery vehicles, the cellular internalization of doxorubicin was increased, which contributed to the significant enhancement of cell-killing activity to doxorubicin-resistant MCF 7 cells. Presumably, the activity of doxorubicin-loaded DNA origami inhibits lysosomal acidification, resulting in cellular redistribution of the drug to action sites. Our results suggest that DNA origami has immense potential as an efficient, biocompatible drug carrier and delivery vehicle in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Molecular basis of antifungal drug resistance in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morio, Florent; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Besides inherent differences in in vitro susceptibilities, clinically-relevant yeast species may acquire resistance upon exposure to most antifungal drugs used in the clinic. In recent years, major fundamental research studies have been conducted to improve our understanding of the molecular basis......., in the context of antifungal drug resistance. Also included are the methods currently available for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing and for molecular detection of mutations associated with resistance. Finally, the genetic drivers of antifungal resistance are discussed in light of the spectra...

  8. An assessment of the relationship between the World Health Organization HIV drug resistance early warning indicators and HIV drug resistance acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, M; Harrigan, P R; Sereda, P; Montaner, Jsg; Lima, V D

    2017-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO)'s HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) early warning indicators (EWIs) measure antiretroviral therapy (ART)-site factors associated with HIVDR prevention, without HIVDR laboratory testing. We assessed the relationship between EWIs and HIVDR acquisition using data from British Columbia, Canada. Eligible patients were ART-naïve, were ≥ 19 years old, had initiated ART between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012, had ≥ 15 months of follow-up, and were without transmitted HIVDR. Patients were followed for acquired HIVDR until 31 March 2014, the last contact date, or death. We built logistic regression models to assess the associations and predictive ability of individual indicators and of the EWI Score (the number of indicators for which a patient did not meet the criteria) on HIVDR acquisition (to any class of HIVDR, lamivudine (3TC)/emtricitabine (FTC), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs)]). All explored EWIs were associated with at least one class of HIVDR, with the exception of 'ART prescribing practices'. We observed a dose-response relationship between acquiring HIVDR to any antiretroviral class and an increasing EWI score in our predictive logistic regression model. The area under the curve was 0.848 (excellent discrimination). The adjusted odds ratios for acquiring any class of HIVDR for an EWI score of 1, 2 and ≥ 3 versus 0 were 2.30 [95% confidence Interval (CI) 1.21-4.38], 3.35 (95% CI: 1.86-6.03) and 7.26 (95% CI: 4.18-12.61), respectively. Several EWIs were associated with and predictive of HIVDR, supporting the WHO EWIs as a component of the HIVDR prevention method in settings where HIVDR testing is not routinely or widely available. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  9. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  10. Sub-therapeutic nevirapine concentration during antiretroviral treatment initiation among children living with HIV: Implications for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Parachalil Gopalan

    Full Text Available Nevirapine, a component of antiretroviral therapy (ART in resource-limited settings, known for auto-induction of metabolism, is initiated at half therapeutic dose until day 14 ('lead-in period', and subsequently escalated to full dose. However, studies have shown that this dosing strategy based on adult studies may not be appropriate in children, given that younger children have higher drug clearance rates. In this prospective cohort study, we studied trough plasma nevirapine levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC at days 7, 14 (lead-in period and 28 (full dose period after ART initiation amongst HIV-1 infected children initiating nevirapine-based ART in southern India. Among the 20 children (50% male, median age 9 years included in the study, sub-therapeutic trough plasma nevirapine concentration (<4μg/ml was seen in 65% (13/20 of children during the lead-in period within two weeks of ART initiation and among 10% of children at 4 weeks during full-dose nevirapine. Adherence was documented as ≥95% in all children by both caregiver self-report and pill count. Median nevirapine concentrations achieved at week 1 was 4.8 μg/ml, significantly lower than 8 μg/ml, the concentration achieved at week 4 (p = 0.034. Virological failure at one year of ART was observed in six children, and was not associated with median nevirapine concentration achieved during week 1, 2 or 4. We conclude that the dose escalation strategy currently practiced among young children living with HIV-1 resulted in significant subtherapeutic nevirapine concentration (≤4μg/ml during the lead-in period. We call for a closer look at pediatric-focused dosing strategies for nevirapine initiation in young children. Further studies to establish age-appropriate threshold nevirapine concentration are warranted in young children to corroborate the role of therapeutic drug monitoring in predicting virological outcome.

  11. Mathematical modeling and computational prediction of cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Bin

    2017-06-23

    Diverse forms of resistance to anticancer drugs can lead to the failure of chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most intractable issues for successfully treating cancer in current clinical practice. Effective clinical approaches that could counter drug resistance by restoring the sensitivity of tumors to the targeted agents are urgently needed. As numerous experimental results on resistance mechanisms have been obtained and a mass of high-throughput data has been accumulated, mathematical modeling and computational predictions using systematic and quantitative approaches have become increasingly important, as they can potentially provide deeper insights into resistance mechanisms, generate novel hypotheses or suggest promising treatment strategies for future testing. In this review, we first briefly summarize the current progress of experimentally revealed resistance mechanisms of targeted therapy, including genetic mechanisms, epigenetic mechanisms, posttranslational mechanisms, cellular mechanisms, microenvironmental mechanisms and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Subsequently, we list several currently available databases and Web-based tools related to drug sensitivity and resistance. Then, we focus primarily on introducing some state-of-the-art computational methods used in drug resistance studies, including mechanism-based mathematical modeling approaches (e.g. molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic model of molecular networks, ordinary differential equation model of cellular dynamics, stochastic model, partial differential equation model, agent-based model, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model, etc.) and data-driven prediction methods (e.g. omics data-based conventional screening approach for node biomarkers, static network approach for edge biomarkers and module biomarkers, dynamic network approach for dynamic network biomarkers and dynamic module network biomarkers, etc.). Finally, we discuss several further questions and future directions for the use of

  12. Identification of drug-resistant subpopulations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammanivong, A; Gorden, B H; Frantz, A M; Graef, A J; Dickerson, E B

    2016-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma is a rapidly progressive disease that is poorly responsive to conventional chemotherapy. Despite numerous attempts to advance treatment options and improve outcomes, drug resistance remains a hurdle to successful therapy. To address this problem, we used recently characterized progenitor cell populations derived from canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and grown as non-adherent spheres to identify potential drug resistance mechanisms as well as drug-resistant cell populations. Cells from sphere-forming cultures displayed enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs, expansion of dye-excluding side populations and altered ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression. Invasion studies demonstrated variability between cell lines as well as between sphere and monolayer cell populations. Collectively, our results suggest that sphere cell populations contain distinct subpopulations of drug-resistant cells that utilize multiple mechanisms to evade cytotoxic drugs. Our approach represents a new tool for the study of drug resistance in hemangiosarcoma, which could alter approaches for treating this disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular Phylogenetics of Transmitted Drug Resistance in Newly Diagnosed HIV Type 1 Individuals in Denmark, a Nation-Wide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    was analyzed for TDR, and molecular-epidemiological links and progression of the infection were described based on data from standardized questionnaires, the prospective Danish HIV Cohort Study, and by phylogenetic analysis. Eighty-five individuals were found to be infected with virus harboring mutations......Abstract Highly active antiretroviral treatment is compromised by viral resistance mutations. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is therefore monitored closely, but follow-up studies of these patients are limited. Virus from 1405 individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 in Denmark between 2001 and 2009....... Phylogenetic analysis confirmed 12 transmission chains involving 37 TDR individuals. Of these 21 were also documented epidemiologically. The virus included in the transmission chain carried similar resistance mutations to the TDR index case, whereas controls chains from index cases without TDR were generally...

  14. Ergotism in Thailand caused by increased access to antiretroviral drugs: a global warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ramautarsing, Reshmie A; Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Bowonwatanuwong, Chureeratana; Jirajariyavej, Supunnee; Kantipong, Patcharee; Tantipong, Hutsaya; Ohata, June Pirapon; Suankratay, Chusana; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Burger, David M

    2014-01-01

    Ergotism is a toxic condition resulting from overexposure to the ergot compounds produced by various fungi of the genus Claviceps. Traditionally, such exposure was due to ingestion of infected grains, but long-term or excessive use of medications containing ergot derivatives or drug-drug interactions between these medications can result in ergotism. Ergotamine, typically used to treat migraine, has less than 5% bioavailability due to extensive first-pass metabolism by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). Concurrent intake of ergotamine and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as the HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), can lead to clinical ergotism. A total of 13 cases of clinical ergotism in HIV-infected patients has been published since 1997 (most recently reviewed by Frohlich et al).

  15. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV infected patients remaining on a virologically failing cART regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Phillips, AN; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    (t0 and t1) when viral load was > 400 copies/ml. METHODS: Accumulation of resistance between t0 and t1 was measured using genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS) obtained by counting the total number of active drugs (according to the Rega system v6.4.1) among all licensed antiretrovirals as of 1...... to the failing regimen were still receiving benefit from treatment. An overall 6-monthly increase of 1.96 (SD, 2.23) International Aids Society-mutations and an average loss of 1.25 (SD, 1.81) active drugs were estimated. In comparison with patients with GSS_f-t0 = 0, the number of active drugs lost was -1...

  16. Compulsory drug detention exposure is associated with not receiving antiretroviral treatment among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S G; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-05-06

    Thailand has experienced a longstanding epidemic of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage among HIV-positive PWID has historically remained low. While ongoing drug law enforcement involving periodic police crackdowns is known to increase the risk of HIV transmission among Thai PWID, the impact of such drug policy approaches on the ART uptake has been understudied. Therefore, we sought to identify factors associated with not receiving ART among HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok, Thailand, with a focus on factors pertaining to drug law enforcement. Data were collected from a community-recruited sample of HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok who participated in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between June 2009 and October 2011. We identified factors associated with not receiving ART at the time of interview using multivariate logistic regression. In total, 128 HIV-positive PWID participated in this study, with 58 (45.3%) reporting not receiving ART at the time of interview. In multivariate analyses, completing less than secondary education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.32 ; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48 - 7.45), daily midazolam injection (AOR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.45 - 7.15) and exposure to compulsory drug detention (AOR: 3.36, 95% CI: 1.01 - 11.21) were independently and positively associated with not receiving ART. Accessing peer-based healthcare information or support services was independently and positively associated with receiving ART (AOR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.84). Approximately half of our study group of HIV-positive PWID reported not receiving ART at the time of interview. Daily midazolam injectors, those with lower education attainment, and individuals who had been in compulsory drug detention were more likely to be non-recipients of ART whereas those who accessed peer-based healthcare-related services were more likely to receive ART. These findings suggest a potentially adverse impact of compulsory drug

  17. Aggressive chemotherapy and the selection of drug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijben, Silvie; Bell, Andrew S; Sim, Derek G; Tomasello, Danielle; Mideo, Nicole; Day, Troy; Read, Andrew F

    2013-09-01

    Drug resistant pathogens are one of the key public health challenges of the 21st century. There is a widespread belief that resistance is best managed by using drugs to rapidly eliminate target pathogens from patients so as to minimize the probability that pathogens acquire resistance de novo. Yet strong drug pressure imposes intense selection in favor of resistance through alleviation of competition with wild-type populations. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug resistance emergence. Identifying treatment regimens which best retard resistance evolution while maximizing health gains and minimizing disease transmission requires empirical analysis of resistance evolution in vivo in conjunction with measures of clinical outcomes and infectiousness. Using rodent malaria in laboratory mice, we found that less aggressive chemotherapeutic regimens substantially reduced the probability of onward transmission of resistance (by >150-fold), without compromising health outcomes. Our experiments suggest that there may be cases where resistance evolution can be managed more effectively with treatment regimens other than those which reduce pathogen burdens as fast as possible.

  18. Aggressive chemotherapy and the selection of drug resistant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Huijben

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant pathogens are one of the key public health challenges of the 21st century. There is a widespread belief that resistance is best managed by using drugs to rapidly eliminate target pathogens from patients so as to minimize the probability that pathogens acquire resistance de novo. Yet strong drug pressure imposes intense selection in favor of resistance through alleviation of competition with wild-type populations. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug resistance emergence. Identifying treatment regimens which best retard resistance evolution while maximizing health gains and minimizing disease transmission requires empirical analysis of resistance evolution in vivo in conjunction with measures of clinical outcomes and infectiousness. Using rodent malaria in laboratory mice, we found that less aggressive chemotherapeutic regimens substantially reduced the probability of onward transmission of resistance (by >150-fold, without compromising health outcomes. Our experiments suggest that there may be cases where resistance evolution can be managed more effectively with treatment regimens other than those which reduce pathogen burdens as fast as possible.

  19. ESBL determination and antibacterial drug resistance pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESBL determination and antibacterial drug resistance pattern of Klebsiella Pneumoniae amongst patients at PIMS Islamabad. Jafar Khan, Noor Naz, Naser M AbdEl-Salam, Nayab Nayab, Anum Tabassum, H Hussain, Riaz Ullah ...

  20. Life cycle synchronization is a viral drug resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia A Neagu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are one of the major causes of death worldwide, with HIV infection alone resulting in over 1.2 million casualties per year. Antiviral drugs are now being administered for a variety of viral infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and C, and influenza. These therapies target a specific phase of the virus's life cycle, yet their ultimate success depends on a variety of factors, such as adherence to a prescribed regimen and the emergence of viral drug resistance. The epidemiology and evolution of drug resistance have been extensively characterized, and it is generally assumed that drug resistance arises from mutations that alter the virus's susceptibility to the direct action of the drug. In this paper, we consider the possibility that a virus population can evolve towards synchronizing its life cycle with the pattern of drug therapy. The periodicity of the drug treatment could then allow for a virus strain whose life cycle length is a multiple of the dosing interval to replicate only when the concentration of the drug is lowest. This process, referred to as "drug tolerance by synchronization", could allow the virus population to maximize its overall fitness without having to alter drug binding or complete its life cycle in the drug's presence. We use mathematical models and stochastic simulations to show that life cycle synchronization can indeed be a mechanism of viral drug tolerance. We show that this effect is more likely to occur when the variability in both viral life cycle and drug dose timing are low. More generally, we find that in the presence of periodic drug levels, time-averaged calculations of viral fitness do not accurately predict drug levels needed to eradicate infection, even if there is no synchronization. We derive an analytical expression for viral fitness that is sufficient to explain the drug-pattern-dependent survival of strains with any life cycle length. We discuss the implications of these findings for

  1. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis among Children, China, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ning-Ning; He, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Xian-Xin; Liu, Yao; Yu, Chun-Bao; Li, Huai-Chen

    2017-11-01

    Microbial drug resistance has become a major public health concern worldwide. To acquire epidemiologic data on drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) among children, a major cause of illness and death for this population, we conducted a retrospective study of 2006-2015 data from 36 TB prevention and control institutions in Shandong Province, China. A total of 14,223 new TB cases, among which children (tuberculosis. Among children with TB, 18.9% had DR TB and 6.9% had multidrug-resistant TB. Over the past decade, the percentage of DR TB; multidrug-resistant TB; and overall first-line drug resistance for isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and streptomycin among children increased significantly (at least 12%). Understanding the long-term trends of DR TB among children can shed light on the performance of TB control programs, thereby contributing to global TB control.

  2. Treatment of tuberculosis in a region with high drug resistance: outcomes, drug resistance amplification and re-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Maryline; Pardini, Manuela; Meacci, Francesca; Orrù, Germano; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Jarosz, Thierry; Andrew, Peter W; Barer, Mike; Checchi, Francesco; Rinder, Heinz; Orefici, Graziella; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo; Melzer, Juliet; Niemann, Stefan; Varaine, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Emerging antituberculosis drug resistance is a serious threat for tuberculosis (TB) control, especially in Eastern European countries. We combined drug susceptibility results and molecular strain typing data with treatment outcome reports to assess the influence of drug resistance on TB treatment outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients from Abkhazia (Georgia). Patients received individualized treatment regimens based on drug susceptibility testing (DST) results. Definitions for antituberculosis drug resistance and treatment outcomes were in line with current WHO recommendations. First and second line DST, and molecular typing were performed in a supranational laboratory for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains from consecutive sputum smear-positive TB patients at baseline and during treatment. At baseline, MTB strains were fully drug-susceptible in 189/326 (58.0%) of patients. Resistance to at least H or R (PDR-TB) and multidrug-resistance (MDR-TB) were found in 69/326 (21.2%) and 68/326 (20.9%) of strains, respectively. Three MDR-TB strains were also extensively resistant (XDR-TB). During treatment, 3/189 (1.6%) fully susceptible patients at baseline were re-infected with a MDR-TB strain and 2/58 (3.4%) PDR-TB patients became MDR-TB due to resistance amplification. 5/47 (10.6%) MDR- patients became XDR-TB during treatment. Treatment success was observed in 161/189 (85.2%), 54/69 (78.3%) and 22/68 (32.3%) of patients with fully drug susceptible, PDR- and MDR-TB, respectively. Development of ofloxacin resistance was significantly associated with a negative treatment outcome. In Abkhazia, a region with high prevalence of drug resistant TB, the use of individualized MDR-TB treatment regimens resulted in poor treatment outcomes and XDR-TB amplification. Nosocomial transmission of MDR-TB emphasizes the importance of infection control in hospitals.

  3. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (NIH)

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  4. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roge, BT; Barfod, TS; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...

  5. Towards an understanding of drug resistance in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemcke, T; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1999-01-01

    and structural differences. Based on this analysis the molecular consequences of point mutations known to be involved in drug resistance were discussed. The significance of the most important point mutation causing resistance, S108N, could be explained by the model, whereas the point mutations associated...

  6. Molecular Analysis of Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become an area of great concern. This occurs as a result of inadequate treatment management of tuberculosis which provides a selective pressure that favours the emergence of resistant mutants with enhanced infectiousness.

  7. Scabies in the age of increasing drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samar; Abbas, Ossama; Kibbi, Abdul Ghani; Kurban, Mazen

    2017-11-01

    Scabies is an infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. It manifests with pruritic erythematous papules and excoriations, in addition to the pathognomonic burrows. Multiple drugs can be used for treatment, but resistance to conventional therapy is increasing throughout the years. This paper will review the mechanisms of resistance proposed in the literature and some of the potential solutions to this problem.

  8. Scabies in the age of increasing drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Samar; Abbas, Ossama; Kibbi, Abdul Ghani; Kurban, Mazen

    2017-01-01

    Scabies is an infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. It manifests with pruritic erythematous papules and excoriations, in addition to the pathognomonic burrows. Multiple drugs can be used for treatment, but resistance to conventional therapy is increasing throughout the years. This paper will review the mechanisms of resistance proposed in the literature and some of the potential solutions to this problem.

  9. Drug resistant Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris are pathogens often associated with drug resistance traits. They are of public health importance with zoonotic status. They have been globally associated with humans and poultry infections. Multidrug resistant strains of these organisms are routinely isolated from organs samples from ...

  10. Options for modulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, HJG; Van der Zee, AGJ; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an update of mechanisms responsible for drug resistance in ovarian cancer and the possible therapeutic options to modulate this resistance using literature review with emphasis on data acquired in studies comprising ovarian tumor samples. The classic

  11. Characterization of drug resistant Enterobacter species isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter species are emerging clinical pathogens and they play important roles in the dissemination of drug resistant traits within the food chain due to their intrinsic abilities for resistance to commonly used antibiotics such as cephalosporins. Two Enterobacter cloacae and one Enterobacter hormaechei characterized in ...

  12. Tenofovir treatment augments anti-viral immunity against drug-resistant SIV challenge in chronically infected rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Preston

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of drug-resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a major obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected patients. Whether antiviral immunity can augment ART by suppressing replication of drug-resistant HIV-1 in humans is not well understood, but can be explored in non-human primates infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV. Rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIV develop robust SIV-specific immune responses but remain viremic, often at low levels, for periods of months to years, thus providing a model in which to evaluate the contribution of antiviral immunity to drug efficacy. To investigate the extent to which SIV-specific immune responses augment suppression of drug-resistant SIV, rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIVmac239Δnef were treated with the reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitor tenofovir, and then challenged with pathogenic SIVmac055, which has a five-fold reduced sensitivity to tenofovir. Results Replication of SIVmac055 was detected in untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef, and in tenofovir-treated, naïve control macaques. The majority of macaques infected with SIVmac055 experienced high levels of plasma viremia, rapid CD4+ T cell loss and clinical disease progression. By comparison, macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef and treated with tenofovir showed no evidence of replicating SIVmac055 in plasma using allele-specific real-time PCR assays with a limit of sensitivity of 50 SIV RNA copies/ml plasma. These animals remained clinically healthy with stable CD4+ T cell counts during three years of follow-up. Both the tenofovir-treated and untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef had antibody responses to SIV gp130 and p27 antigens and SIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses prior to SIVmac055 challenge, but only those animals receiving concurrent treatment with tenofovir resisted infection with SIVmac055. Conclusion

  13. 2017 update of the drug resistance mutations in HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    The 2017 edition of the IAS–USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key

  14. mtct regimen choice, drug resistance and the treatment of hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drug-resistant variants may become selected as long as the drug is administered. There has been some concern that the use of ARV monotherapy for the prevention of MTCT, including ... potential implications for perinatal transmission, the choice of ... transmission rate using this regimen, short-term treatment with dual ...

  15. Incidence microbiological profile and drug resistance pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Klebsiella was the most commonest uropathogen found in our study followed by Enterococcus , E.coli and Pseudomonas. E.coli and Pseudomonas showed high rates of drug resistance. Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin was the most effective drugs for majority of the isolates. Hence routine monitoring and screening for ASB in ...

  16. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Davies

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gerald F Davies1, Bernhard HJ Juurlink2, Troy AA Harkness11Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1 and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX. The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1, and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. Keywords: chemotherapy, doxorubicin, breast cancer resistance protein-1, multiple drug resistance, multiple drug resistance protein 1

  17. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    resistant phenotype. Because cisplatin is highly mutagenic, it has an ability to quickly induce genetic changes in cancer cells usually resulting in... Mendelian selection and generation of cells that acquire a permanent resistant phenotype (8). We initially exposed both KLN205 and LLC1 to increasing...multiple epigenetic and genetic changes. Pharmacological reviews 64:706-721. 9. Siegel, R., D. Naishadham, and A. Jemal. 2013. Cancer statistics, 2013

  18. Electrochemical evaluation and determination of antiretroviral drug fosamprenavir using boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumustas, Mehmet; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2010-05-01

    Fosamprenavir is a pro-drug of the antiretroviral protease inhibitor amprenavir and is oxidizable at solid electrodes. The anodic oxidation behavior of fosamprenavir was investigated using cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry at boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes. In cyclic voltammetry, depending on pH values, fosamprenavir showed one sharp irreversible oxidation peak or wave depending on the working electrode. The mechanism of the oxidation process was discussed. The voltammetric study of some model compounds allowed elucidation of the possible oxidation mechanism of fosamprenavir. The aim of this study was to determine fosamprenavir levels in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples by means of electrochemical methods. Using the sharp oxidation response, two voltammetric methods were described for the determination of fosamprenavir by differential pulse and square-wave voltammetry at the boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes. These two voltammetric techniques are 0.1 M H(2)SO(4) and phosphate buffer at pH 2.0 which allow quantitation over a 4 x 10(-6) to 8 x 10(-5) M range using boron-doped diamond and a 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-4) M range using glassy carbon electrodes, respectively, in supporting electrolyte. All necessary validation parameters were investigated and calculated. These methods were successfully applied for the analysis of fosamprenavir pharmaceutical dosage forms, human serum and urine samples. The standard addition method was used in biological media using boron-doped diamond electrode. No electroactive interferences from the tablet excipients or endogenous substances from biological material were found. The results were statistically compared with those obtained through an established HPLC-UV technique; no significant differences were found between the voltammetric and HPLC methods.

  19. Factors contributing to antiretroviral drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS in a Kenyan rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Kioko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral (ARV adherence of ≥ 95% is recommended for suppressing HIV. However, studies have shown that the ≥ 95% recommended level is rarely achieved.Objective: This cross-sectional community-based study sought to assess factors contributing to ARV drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS.Setting: The study was conducted in a rural community in Machakos County, Kenya.Methods: The questions used for the study were adapted from the Patient Medicine Adherence Questionnaire (PMAQ, a tool grounded in the Health Belief Model. Adherence to ARV was measured using self-reports and pill counts. The perception social support was measured with a 5-point Likert scale, whereas the type and the number of side effects experienced were recorded using ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions. We used the chi-square test to test associations and binary logistic regression to assess factors explaining dose adherence to ARV.Results: The levels of adherence of 86% using self-reports were significantly higher (p < 0.001 than the pill count of 58.6%. The immediate family was rated high in providing social support (3.7 ± 0.6 followed by social support groups (3.1 ± 0.8. A binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict ARV adherence (adherent, non-adherent using social support, side effects and marital status as explanatory variables. The Wald criterion demonstrated that marital status (p = 0.019 and burden of side effects (p ≤ 0.001 made a significant contribution to the prediction of ARV adherence.Conclusion: The burden of side effects and being a divorcee are primary predictors of ARV adherence.

  20. Occurrence of intestinal parasites amongst persons on highly active antiretroviral drug therapy in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Inyang-Etoh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic and intestinal parasite infections are common health problem among HIV/AIDS patients. Early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of this category of patients. The occurrence of intestinal parasites among 400 patients on highly active anti-retroviral drug therapy (HAART aged 11-60 years was investigated. Standard parasitological techniques like direct microscopy, formol ether concentration and modified Ziehl- Neelsen staining techniques were used to analyze the stool samples. Intestinal parasite infections were positive in 116 (29% of the subjects on HAART while control subjects had 12 (12% and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Subjects in the age group 21-30 years had the highest infection rate 54 (35.1%. There was no statistically significant difference in infection according to age (P>0.05. Females 76 (32.5% had a higher prevalence rate than males 40 (24.1%. But there was no statistically significant difference in infection according to gender (P<0.05. Patients with CD4 count of less than 200 cells/mm3 were observed to be more infected than those with CD4 count of more than 200 cells/mm3. There was a strong positive correlation (r=0.94 between CD4 count and the occurrence of intestinal parasite infection. Protozoan parasites 84 (21.0% accounted for a higher prevalence rate than helminthic parasites 32 (8.0%. These findings has revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasite infection among patients on HAART thus the routine screening of stool samples from these category of patients for intestinal parasites is advocated for effective management of the disease.

  1. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Israel; Rojas, Patricia; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance of drug-resistance

  2. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pagán

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance

  3. Research Highlights: Helping Adolescents Resist Drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    Project ALERT departs boldly from prevention models of the 196Os and 197Os, which emphasized informing adolescents about the long-term consequences of drug use or building their decisionmaking skills...

  4. A study on Prevalence of Drug Resistance in Drug Default ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), and particularly multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), has become a significant public health problem in a number of countries and an obstacle to effective global TB control. Method: This is a prospective randomized cross sectional study to ...

  5. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  6. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Automated sequence analysis and editing software for HIV drug resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Daniel; Wallis, Carole L; Denisov, Gennady; Lambert, Christine; Servais, Jean-Yves; Viana, Raquel V; Letsoalo, Esrom; Bronze, Michelle; Aitken, Sue C; Schuurman, Rob; Stevens, Wendy; Schmit, Jean Claude; Rinke de Wit, Tobias; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2012-05-01

    Access to antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited-settings is inevitably paralleled by the emergence of HIV drug resistance. Monitoring treatment efficacy and HIV drugs resistance testing are therefore of increasing importance in resource-limited settings. Yet low-cost technologies and procedures suited to the particular context and constraints of such settings are still lacking. The ART-A (Affordable Resistance Testing for Africa) consortium brought together public and private partners to address this issue. To develop an automated sequence analysis and editing software to support high throughput automated sequencing. The ART-A Software was designed to automatically process and edit ABI chromatograms or FASTA files from HIV-1 isolates. The ART-A Software performs the basecalling, assigns quality values, aligns query sequences against a set reference, infers a consensus sequence, identifies the HIV type and subtype, translates the nucleotide sequence to amino acids and reports insertions/deletions, premature stop codons, ambiguities and mixed calls. The results can be automatically exported to Excel to identify mutations. Automated analysis was compared to manual analysis using a panel of 1624 PR-RT sequences generated in 3 different laboratories. Discrepancies between manual and automated sequence analysis were 0.69% at the nucleotide level and 0.57% at the amino acid level (668,047 AA analyzed), and discordances at major resistance mutations were recorded in 62 cases (4.83% of differences, 0.04% of all AA) for PR and 171 (6.18% of differences, 0.03% of all AA) cases for RT. The ART-A Software is a time-sparing tool for pre-analyzing HIV and viral quasispecies sequences in high throughput laboratories and highlighting positions requiring attention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  9. EVALUATION OF THE ADVERSE REACTIONS OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUG REGIMENS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KOLKATA: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Banerjea

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART has led to a significant decrease in AIDS-related mortality and morbidity. However, adverse reactions to these drugs, being inevitable, have led to major obstacles in its success, especially in developing nations like India. Moreover, the latest changes made by W.H.O. in the treatment guidelines of ART naive patients would expectedly lead to changes in the Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR patterns as well. Hence, this study aimed at evaluating the ADRs of currently prescribed ART regimens in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata (WB. METHODOLOGY 168 ART naive patients enrolled initially were studied prospectively over a period of 1 year; each patient being followed up individually for 6 months. All patients were asked to visit the ART centre once a month or whenever they developed any symptom. They were screened clinically and investigated suitably by the physician according to the latest NACO guidelines. RESULTS Majority were males (56% with an M:F ratio of 1:0.774; 93.3% patients belonging to the 15-49 yrs. age group. TDF+3TC+EFV (56% was the commonest 1st line regimen prescribed. 76.6% patients experienced ADRs. Total 184 ADRs were noted, of which, GIT contributed the most (27.17%. Majority (66.67% of neurological ADRs was contributed by neuropsychiatric manifestations. Rash (10.3% was the commonest cutaneous ADR. Anaemia (13.6% was the commonest haematological ADR with a statistically significant female preponderance. Most ADRs were grade 1 (63.04%. Majority ADRs were “possible” (65.76% while 34.24% were “probable” by Naranjo scale. Maximal ADRs (48.37% were noted from patients under AZT+3TC+NVP regime. IRIS was observed as a paradoxical reaction to ART in 10% cases. CONCLUSION It should not be forgotten that ADRs are the inevitable consequence of pharmacotherapy. Hence, proper implementation of current protocols designed for screening of patients especially during

  10. Association between U.S. State AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) Features and HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation, 2001–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Collier, Ann; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Althoff, Keri N.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Gange, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) are federally funded to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) as the payer of last resort to eligible persons with HIV infection. States differ regarding their financial contributions to and ways of implementing these programs, and it remains unclear how this interstate variability affects HIV treatment outcomes. Methods We analyzed data from HIV-infected individuals who were clinically-eligible for ART between 2001 and 2009 (i.e., a first reported CD4+ <350 cells/uL or AIDS-defining illness) from 14 U.S. cohorts of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD). Using propensity score matching and Cox regression, we assessed ART initiation (within 6 months following eligibility) and virologic suppression (within 1 year) based on differences in two state ADAP features: the amount of state funding in annual ADAP budgets and the implementation of waiting lists. We performed an a priori subgroup analysis in persons with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Results Among 8,874 persons, 56% initiated ART within six months following eligibility. Persons living in states with no additional state contribution to the ADAP budget initiated ART on a less timely basis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73, 95% CI 0.60–0.88). Living in a state with an ADAP waiting list was not associated with less timely initiation (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.87–1.45). Neither additional state contributions nor waiting lists were significantly associated with virologic suppression. Persons with an IDU history initiated ART on a less timely basis (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47–0.95). Conclusions We found that living in states that did not contribute additionally to the ADAP budget was associated with delayed ART initiation when treatment was clinically indicated. Given the changing healthcare environment, continued assessment of the role of ADAPs and their features that facilitate prompt treatment is needed. PMID:24260137

  11. The role of drug susceptibility testing in controlling drug resistant tuberculosis: Challenges and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hoffner

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Reliable and timely detection of drug-resistant TB is needed, which is best achieved with molecular assays. In this author's opinion, rapid detection of resistance to isoniazid should be included with rifampicin resistance examination. In MDR, timely detection of the XDR defining agents and PZA is urgently needed. Development and validation of such tests should be a priority, as well as establishing QMS for the implementation and routine use of molecular rapid diagnostics. Each country should develop national diagnostic algorithms for how, when and where rapid molecular assays should be used for early detection of drug-resistant TB.

  12. ‘A‘ole Drugs! Cultural Practices and Drug Resistance of Rural Hawaiian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    PO‘A-KEKUAWELA, KA‘OHINANI; OKAMOTO, SCOTT K.; NEBRE, LA RISA H.; HELM, SUSANA; CHIN, CORALEE I. H.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how Native Hawaiian youth from rural communities utilized cultural practices to promote drug resistance and/or abstinence. Forty-seven students from 5 different middle schools participated in gender specific focus groups that focused on the cultural and environmental contexts of drug use for Native Hawaiian youth. The findings described culturally specific activities that participants used in drug related problem situations. The findings also suggested that those youth with higher levels of enculturation were able to resist drugs more effectively than those youth who were disconnected from their culture. The implications of these findings for social work practice are discussed. PMID:20352019

  13. Trends in antiretroviral therapy prescription, durability and modification: new drugs, more changes, but less failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Ellen F; Tamhane, Ashutosh; Davy-Mendez, Thibaut; Mathews, William C; Moore, Richard D; Saag, Michael S; Mugavero, Michael J

    2018-01-28

    To evaluate the real world durability of contemporary ART for treatment-naïve people living with HIV (PLWH). A retrospective follow-up study in a multisite cohort. This study of the CNICS (CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems) cohort integrates data from eight Center for AIDS Research (CFARs). PLWH initiating ART between 2007 and 2014 were included. Durability was defined as time from the initiation until discontinuation/modification using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Cox Proportional Hazards measured associations with various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Among 5373 PLWH, the initial regimen was modified in 2285 (43%) patients. Efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir (n = 2173, 40%) was the most commonly prescribed initial ART regimen; elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir became more common after 2012. Median durability for all regimens was 48.6 months. There were statistically significant differences in median durability for NNRTI, InSTI, and protease inhibitor-based regimens, which lasted 61, 44, and 32 months, respectively. Female sex (aHR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.6), intravenous drug use (aHR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-1.9), and CD4 cell count less than 200 cells/μl (aHR = 1.2; 95% CI 1.1-1.3) were significantly associated with regimen modification. Compared with InSTI, those receiving an InSTI/protease inhibitor (aHR = 2.7; 95% CI 2.0-3.7) or protease inhibitor-based ART (aHR = 1.9; 95% CI 1.6-2.2) were significantly more likely to be modified; but those receiving NNRTI (aHR = 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-1.3) were not. In treatment-naive PLWH, NNRTI and InSTI-based ART were most durable, relative to protease inhibitor and InSTI/protease inhibitor-based ART, and were least likely to be modified/discontinued. A greater understanding of reasons for regimen modification/discontinuation is needed to analyze contemporary regimen durability.

  14. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  15. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  16. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  17. characterization of drug resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their dissemination to the public, sometimes through the food chain. Four multidrug resistant Gram negative pathogens including: 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 Proteus mirabilis characterized in this study were isolated from lizards captured from some poultry houses in Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria. The four isolates were ...

  18. Genetic diversity and drug resistance profiles in HIV type 1- and HIV type 2-infected patients from Cape Verde Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vânia; Bártolo, Inês; Borrego, Pedro; Rocha, Cheila; Valadas, Emília; Barreto, Jorge; Almeida, Elsa; Antunes, Francisco; Taveira, Nuno

    2012-05-01

    Our aim was to characterize for the first time the genetic diversity of HIV in Cape Verde Islands as well as the drug resistance profiles in treated and untreated patients. Blood specimens were collected from 41 HIV-1 and 14 HIV-2 patients living in Santiago Island. Half of the patients were on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Pol and env gene sequences were obtained using in-house methods. Phylogenetic analysis was used for viral subtyping and the Stanford Algorithm was used for resistance genotyping. For HIV-1, the amplification of pol and env was possible in 27 patients (66%). HIV-1 patients were infected with subtypes G (13, 48%), B (2, 7%), F1 (2, 7%), and CRF02_AG (2, 7%), and complex recombinant forms including a new C/G variant (n=8, 30%). Drug resistance mutations were detected in the PR and RT of three (10%) treated patients. M41L and K103N transmitted drug resistance mutations were found in 2 of 17 (12%) untreated patients. All 14 HIV-2 isolates belonged to group A. The origin of 12 strains was impossible to determine whereas two strains were closely related to the historic ROD strain. In conclusion, in Cape Verde there is a long-standing HIV-2 epidemic rooted in ROD-like strains and a more recent epidemic of unknown origin. The HIV-1 epidemic is caused by multiple subtypes and complex recombinant forms. Drug resistance HIV-1 strains are present at moderate levels in both treated and untreated patients. Close surveillance in these two populations is crucial to prevent further transmission of drug-resistant strains.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pharmacogenomics in clinical practice: relevance of HIV-1 drug resistance testing (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarca, Roberto; Isava, Alejandro; Campo, Rafael; Rodriguez, Nelson J; Nunez, Enriqueta; Alter, Michael; Marchette, Margaret; Sanabia, Mirtha M; Mitchell, Charles; Rivera, Delia; Scott, Gwendolyn; Jayaweera, Dushyantha; Moreno, Jose; Boulanger, Catherine; Kolber, Michael; Mask, Cindy W; Sierra, Eduardo Meneses; Vallejo, Ricardo; Page, J Brian; Klimas, Nancy G; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    Throughout most of the past century, physicians could offer patients no treatments for infections caused by viruses. The experience with treatment of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has changed the way healthcare workers deal with viral infections and has triggered a growing rate of discovery and use of antiviral agents, the first fruits of the expanding genomics revolution. HIV treatment also provides an informative paradigm for pharmacogenomics because control of infection and its consequences is limited by the development of viral drug resistance and by host factors. This report summarizes studies published to date on the significance of testing of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The only Food and Drug Administration-approved kit for HIV drug resistance testing by genotypic sequencing is commercially available through Visible Genetics, Inc. Genotyping sequencing alone is most likely an adequate test to assist in the therapeutic decision-making process for previous regimen failure, for treatment-naïve patients in areas of high prevalence of transmitted resistant virus, and for pregnant women. However, in exceptional cases of highly complex mutation patterns and extensive cross-resistance, it may be useful to obtain a phenotype test, because that result may more easily identify drugs to which virus is least resistant. There are no published clinical trials results on the usefulness of the so-called virtual phenotype over genotypic sequencing alone. Not only has the paradigm of viral pharmacogenomics in the form of HIV genotypic sequencing been useful in treating other viral diseases, but it is also important to the real-life implementation of the growing discipline ofgenomics or molecular medicine. The application of this paradigm to the thousands of potential therapeutic targets that have become available through the various human genome projects will certainly gradually change the landscape of diagnosis and management of many diseases

  20. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  1. Antiretroviral therapy-induced insulin resistance and oxidative deoxy nucleic acid damage in human immunodeficiency virus-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kolgiri Honnapurmath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Insulin resistance (IR is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and may be related to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Increased oxidative stress parameters and carbonyl protein are linked to insulin sensitivity. The present study is aimed to determine IR, its association with oxidative deoxy nucleic acid (DNA damage in HIV-1-infected patients with different ART status. Materials and Methods: In this case–control study, a total 600 subjects were included. We used plasma levels of the oxidized base, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, as our biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. 8-OHdG was measured with the highly sensitive 8-OHdG check enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. IR was determined using homeostasis model assessment. Results: All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group (n = 300, HIV-positive without ART (n = 100, HIV-positive with ART first line (n = 100, and HIV-positive with ART second line (n = 100. IR and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher in HIV-positive patients with second-line ART and HIV-positive patients with first-line ART than ART-naive patients. In a linear regression analysis, increased IR was positively associated with the increased DNA damage (odds ratio: 3.052, 95% confidence interval: 2.595–3.509 P < 0.001. Interpretation and Conclusions: In this study, we observed that ART plays a significant role in the development of IR and oxidative DNA damage in HIV-positive patients taking ART. Awareness and knowledge of these biomarkers may prove helpful to clinicians while prescribing ART to HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to determine the exact role of ART in the induction of IR and DNA damage.

  2. Partner-Drug Resistance and Population Substructuring of Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Christian M; Parr, Jonathan B; Brazeau, Nicholas F; Lon, Chanthap; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Gosi, Panita; Barnett, Eric J; Norris, Lauren D; Meshnick, Steven R; Spring, Michele D; Lanteri, Charlotte A; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Saunders, David L; Lin, Jessica T; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2017-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum in western Cambodia has developed resistance to artemisinin and its partner drugs, causing frequent treatment failure. Understanding this evolution can inform the deployment of new therapies. We investigated the genetic architecture of 78 falciparum isolates using whole-genome sequencing, correlating results to in vivo and ex vivo drug resistance and exploring the relationship between population structure, demographic history, and partner drug resistance. Principle component analysis, network analysis and demographic inference identified a diverse central population with three clusters of clonally expanding parasite populations, each associated with specific K13 artemisinin resistance alleles and partner drug resistance profiles which were consistent with the sequential deployment of artemisinin combination therapies in the region. One cluster displayed ex vivo piperaquine resistance and mefloquine sensitivity with a high rate of in vivo failure of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. Another cluster displayed ex vivo mefloquine resistance and piperaquine sensitivity with high in vivo efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The final cluster was clonal and displayed intermediate sensitivity to both drugs. Variations in recently described piperaquine resistance markers did not explain the difference in mean IC90 or clinical failures between the high and intermediate piperaquine resistance groups, suggesting additional loci may be involved in resistance. The results highlight an important role for partner drug resistance in shaping the P. falciparum genetic landscape in Southeast Asia and suggest that further work is needed to evaluate for other mutations that drive piperaquine resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Preventing antiretroviral anarchy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, A D; Nyangulu, D S; Hargreaves, N J; Kaluwa, O; Salaniponi, F M

    2001-08-04

    Combination antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the survival of patients living with HIV and AIDS in industrialised countries of the world. Despite this enormous benefit, there are some major problems and obstacles to be overcome.(1) Treatment of HIV-infection is likely to be lifelong.(2) Unfortunately, many HIV-infected individuals cannot tolerate the toxic effects of the drugs, or have difficulty complying with treatment which involves large numbers of pills and complicated dosing schedules. Poor adherence to treatment leads to the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains that need new combinations of drugs or new drugs altogether.

  4. mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... (17) at the TB reference laboratory in Kinshasa. Standard phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. (DST) for isoniazid and rifampicin were performed by proportion method according to international guidelines (17). Molecular investigations: DNA was extracted from subcultures according to standard laboratory.

  5. Nationwide surveillance of drug-resistant tuberculosis in The Netherlands: rates, risk factors and treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambregts-van Weezenbeek, C. S.; Jansen, H. M.; Nagelkerke, N. J.; van Klingeren, B.; Veen, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Netherlands, 1993 and 1994. To determine 1) rates of drug resistance in relation to nationality and country of birth, 2) risk factors for drug resistance, 3) treatment outcome of drug-resistant cases, and 4) rates of primary and acquired drug resistance. Retrospective study of all cases notified

  6. A significant reduction in the frequency of HIV-1 drug resistance in Québec from 2001 to 2011 is associated with a decrease in the monitored viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Charest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV drug resistance represents a major threat for effective treatment. We assessed the trends in the frequency of drug resistance mutations and the monitored viral load (VL in treatment-naïve (TN and treatment-experienced (TE individuals infected with HIV-1 in Québec, Canada, between 2001 and 2011. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Resistance data were obtained from 4,105 and 5,086 genotypic tests performed on TN and TE patients, respectively. Concomitantly, 274,161 VL tests were carried out in the Province. Changes over time in drug resistance frequency and in different categories of VL were assessed using univariate logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between the rates of certain mutations and antiretroviral prescriptions. From 2001 to 2011, the proportion of undetectable VL test results continually increased, from 42.1% to 75.9%, while a significant decrease in the frequency of resistance mutations associated with protease inhibitors [PI (from 54% to 16%], nucleoside [NRTI (from 78% to 37% and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTI (from 44% to 31%] was observed in TE patients. In TN individuals, the overall frequency of transmitted drug resistance was 13.1%. A multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the introduction of co-formulated emtricitabine/tenofovir or emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz was positively associated with the decrease of the frequency of the M184I/V mutations observed overtime (p = 0.0004. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a significant decrease in the frequency of drug resistance mutations in TE patients, concomitant with a decrease in the proportion of patients with detectable viremia. These findings may be related to both the increased potencies and adherence to therapy associated with newer antiretroviral regimens. Nevertheless, our data demonstrate that broad use of antiretrovirals does not increase the level of circulating drug resistant

  7. In Silico and in Vitro Screening for P-Glycoprotein Interaction with Tenofovir, Darunavir, and Dapivirine: An Antiretroviral Drug Combination for Topical Prevention of Colorectal HIV Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedrowska, Magda; Jamshidi, Shirin; Kumar, Abhinav; Kelly, Charles; Rahman, Khondaker Miraz; Forbes, Ben

    2017-08-07

    The aim of the study was to use in silico and in vitro techniques to evaluate whether a triple formulation of antiretroviral drugs (tenofovir, darunavir, and dapivirine) interacted with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or exhibited any other permeability-altering drug-drug interactions in the colorectal mucosa. Potential drug interactions with P-gp were screened initially using molecular docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the identified drug-transporter interaction more mechanistically. The transport of tenofovir, darunavir, and dapivirine was investigated in the Caco-2 cell models and colorectal tissue, and their apparent permeability coefficient (P app ), efflux ratio (ER), and the effect of transporter inhibitors were evaluated. In silico, dapivirine and darunavir showed strong affinity for P-gp with similar free energy of binding; dapivirine exhibiting a ΔG PB value -38.24 kcal/mol, darunavir a ΔG PB value -36.84 kcal/mol. The rank order of permeability of the compounds in vitro was tenofovir s