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Sample records for antipsychotics zyprexa olanzapine

  1. Temperature behaviour studies on antipsychotic drug Olanzapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicle Erdamar, Işık Yeşim

    2017-12-01

    The antipsychotic drug Olanzapine in powder form was 60Co gamma irradiated to investigate in various temperature value. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrum of the irradiated Olanzapine, characterized by g = 2.0030, exhibits an intensity distribution 1:2:1. The room temperature EPR spectra of gamma irradiated Olanzapine was recorded in DMSO solution at frozen state. Temperature behavior of Olanzapine discussed by means of similarities and differences of EPR parameters. Kinetic decay features of radicals induced by gamma irradiation of Olanzapine were also studied. EPR experiments indicated that Olanzapine contained stable free radical species after irradiation and the intensity of the signal is increasing with the absorbed doses suggesting increasing radical concentration in the system.

  2. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics: focus on olanzapine pamoate

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    JP Lindenmayer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available JP LindenmayerDepartment of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York NY, USAAbstract: Medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia continues to be a significant problem and threatens successful treatment outcomes. Medication non-adherence is often associated with negative consequences, including symptom exacerbation, more frequent emergency room visits, re-hospitalizations and relapse. Long-acting injectable (LAI forms of antipsychotics allow for rapid identification of non-adherence, obviate the need for the patient to take the medication on a daily basis and increase adherence to some significant degree. Eli Lilly has developed a long-acting depot formulation of olanzapine, olanzapine pamoate, which has recently been approved by the FDA for the US market, and which will be reviewed here. Olanzapine LAI appears to be an effective antipsychotic at dosages of 210 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and 405 mg every 4 weeks in patients with acute schizophrenia, and at 150 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and at 405 mg every 4 weeks for the maintenance treatment of stable patients. Oral supplementation appears not to be needed, particularly not at the onset of treatment with the LAI as is necessary with risperidone LAI. Its efficacy is in general comparable to the efficacy seen with oral olanzapine at a corresponding dose. The side effect profile is also comparable to the side effects observed with oral olanzapine, including lower rates of extrapyramidal symptoms, prolactin elevation and cardiovascular side effects, but significant metabolic effects. The latter include significant weight gain, lipid abnormalities and glucose dysregulation. While the injection site adverse events are overall mild, the most significant serious adverse event is the post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS. While rare, this syndrome results from inadvertent intravascular injection of olanzapine LAI and can cause a range of

  3. The antipsychotic olanzapine interacts with the gut microbiome to cause weight gain in mouse.

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    Andrew P Morgan

    Full Text Available The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine is effective in reducing psychotic symptoms but can cause extreme weight gain in human patients. We investigated the role of the gut microbiota in this adverse drug effect using a mouse model. First, we used germ-free C57BL/6J mice to demonstrate that gut bacteria are necessary and sufficient for weight gain caused by oral delivery of olanzapine. Second, we surveyed fecal microbiota before, during, and after treatment and found that olanzapine potentiated a shift towards an "obesogenic" bacterial profile. Finally, we demonstrated that olanzapine has antimicrobial activity in vitro against resident enteric bacterial strains. These results collectively provide strong evidence for a mechanism underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain in mouse and a hypothesis for clinical translation in human patients.

  4. Predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy with olanzapine during a 1-year naturalistic study of schizophrenia patients in Japan

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    Ye W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wenyu Ye1, Haya Ascher-Svanum2, Jennifer A Flynn3, Yuka Tanji3, Michihiro Takahashi3,41Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories Japan, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, 4Terauchi-Takahashi Psychiatric Clinic, Ashiya, JapanPurpose: Although expert guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia recommend antipsychotic monotherapy, the use of antipsychotic polypharmacy is common. This study identified characteristics that differentiate patients with schizophrenia who are treated with olanzapine monotherapy versus polypharmacy in usual care in Japan.Patients and methods: In a large (N = 1850 prospective, observational study, Japanese patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with olanzapine were followed for 1 year. Consistent with past research, antipsychotic polypharmacy was defined as the concurrent use of olanzapine and another antipsychotic for at least 60 days. Switching was defined as discontinuing a prior antipsychotic therapy rather than augmenting the medication regimen. Predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy were based on information available at the time of olanzapine initiation. Baseline characteristics were compared using t-tests and Χ2 tests. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of monotherapy.Results: Patients treated with olanzapine monotherapy (43.2% differed from those treated with antipsychotic polypharmacy (56.8% on demographics, treatment history, baseline symptom levels, functional levels, and treatment-emergent adverse events. Stepwise logistic regression identified multiple variables that significantly predicted monotherapy: older age, shorter duration of schizophrenia, outpatient status, comorbid medical conditions, lower body mass index, no prior anticholinergic use, no prior mood stabilizer use, and switching from a previous antipsychotic (typical or atypical

  5. Olanzapine-high potency antipsychotic drug inducing significant weight gain: A case report

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    Marić Nađa P.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Olanzapine is a second generation antipsychotic (SGA with a high level of therapeutic effectiveness in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Along with the positive therapeutic effects, an increase of the body weight frequently occurs. According to the literature, the average weight gain is about 6-7 kg during several months of treatment. This could be valued as a moderate weight increase. CASE OUTLINE This article presents a case of a young female with schizophrenia, without clinical improvement with several antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, haloperidol and with the occurrence of significant neurological side effects. The treatment started with olanzapine (baseline was associated with good initial response (PANSS reduction 20% in the first two weeks and the improvement was maintained further on (PANSS reduction 50% after 16 weeks. Significant increase (20 kg, 40% in weight appeared during the following 16 weeks (BMI at baseline 17.9 kg/m2; BMI 16 weeks later 25.1 kg/m2. CONCLUSION High effectiveness of olanzapine in schizophrenia symptoms reduction was accompanied by a significant weight gain. However, this drug leads to impaired glucoregulation, dyslipidaemia etc. It also increases the risk of diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases, i.e. the main causes of mortality in schizophrenia after a suicide. Therefore, clinicians are suggested to focus on possible predictors of weight gain during olanzapine therapy, and act accordingly in order to prevent serious health consequences.

  6. Probabilistic classification and gambling in patients with schizophrenia receiving medication: comparison of risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and typical antipsychotics.

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    Wasserman, James I; Barry, Rebecca J; Bradford, Lisa; Delva, Nicholas J; Beninger, Richard J

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that patients with schizophrenia treated with typical antipsychotics were impaired on the weather prediction probabilistic classification learning (PCL) task that relies on striatal function, and that similar patients treated with atypical antipsychotics were impaired on the Iowa gambling task (IGT) that depends on medial prefrontocortical function. We tested the hypothesis that test performance of patients treated with risperidone will be more similar to those treated with typical rather than atypical antipsychotics. Groups of schizophrenia patients treated with risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine or typical antipsychotics did not differ on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale or the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) but scored lower than controls on the MMSE. For the PCL task, patients treated with clozapine improved over trials while those treated with typical antipsychotics, olanzapine, or risperidone did not. For the IGT, patients treated with typical antipsychotics or risperidone improved over trials while those treated with clozapine or olanzapine did not. Results generally supported the hypothesis that patients treated with risperidone perform more like those treated with typical antipsychotics than those treated with other atypical antipsychotics.

  7. Association of metabolic syndrome with atypical antipsychotic drug (olanzapine) short term versus long term use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, H.; Ahmed, T.M.; Hayat, A.; Ullah, Q.I.; Nawaz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of metabolic syndrome with atypical antipsychotic drug (olanzapine) short term versus long term use. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Chemical pathology department Army Medical College Rawalpindi, from Nov 2014 to Oct 2015. Material and Methods: The study was carried out on 240 subjects, 120 cases and 120 controls. For the purpose of the study cases were divided into four groups A, B, C and D according to the duration of drug use. Group A patients included those who the last the drug olanzapine for the last three months. Group B patients included those who were using the drug olanzapine for the last six months. Group C and D included those who were using the drug for last 1 year and more than one year (2-5 years) respectively. By employing non probability convenience sampling technique the data was collected from patients having the diagnosis of psychosis as per DSM IV modified criteria through a proforma and fasting blood samples were drawn. These samples were tested for fasting serum lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 21. For quantitative data Mean and SD were calculated. For qualitative data frequency and percentages were calculated. Qualitative data was compared using chi square test whereas quantitative data was compared using independent sample t-test. Results: There was statistically no significant difference in fasting plasma glucose between group A and B and their controls whereas in group C and D these levels were significantly high as compared to controls. Triglyceride levels were significantly higher and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly lower in all four groups as compared to controls. Comparison of qualitative data which included waist circumference and blood pressure showed statistically no significant rise for group A whereas waist circumference showed insignificant rise and blood pressure showed statistically

  8. Olanzapine induced tardive dyskinesia

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    Rudraprosad Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olanzapine is considered to have significantly less risk of tardive dyskinesia (TD compared to first generation antipsychotics. We describe two patients who developed TD after prolonged use of olanzapine. Both the patients received no medications prior to the treatment with olanzapine. They neither received any other medication along with olanzapine nor any injectible antipsychotics. In one patient, TD improved completely after withdrawal of olanzapine and treatment with clozapine, but recurred after a retrial of olanzapine. In the other patient, reduction of dose of olanzapine was tried without any success. Despite a substantially lower risk than first generation antipsychotics, TD is not entirely absent with olanzapine.

  9. Olanzapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions) in adults and teenagers 13 years of age ... are taking olanzapine: extreme thirst, frequent urination, extreme hunger, blurred vision, or weakness. It is very important ...

  10. Change in level of productivity in the treatment of schizophrenia with olanzapine or other antipsychotics

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    Osuntokun Olawale

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When treating schizophrenia, improving patients' productivity level is a major goal considering schizophrenia is a leading cause of functional disability. Productivity level has been identified as the most preferred treatment outcome by patients with schizophrenia. However, little has been done to systematically investigate productivity levels in schizophrenia. We set out to better understand the change in productivity level among chronically ill patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine compared with other antipsychotic medications. We also assessed the links between productivity level and other clinical outcomes. Methods This post hoc analysis used data from 6 randomized, double-blind clinical trials of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, with each trial being of approximately 6 months duration. Change in productivity level was compared between olanzapine-treated patients (HGBG, n = 172; HGHJ, n = 277; HGJB, n = 171; HGLB, n = 281; HGGN, n = 159; HGDH, n = 131 and patients treated with other antipsychotic medications (separately vs. haloperidol [HGGN, n = 97; HGDH, n = 132], risperidone [HGBG, n = 167; HGGN, n = 158], quetiapine [HGJB, n = 175], ziprasidone [HGHJ, n = 271] and aripiprazole [HGLB, n = 285]. Productivity was defined as functional activities/work including working for pay, studying, housekeeping and volunteer work. Productivity level in the prior 3 months was assessed on a 5-point scale ranging from no useful functioning to functional activity/work 75% to 100% of the time. Results Chronically ill patients treated with olanzapine (OLZ experienced significantly greater improvement in productivity when compared to patients treated with risperidone (RISP (OLZ = 0.22 ± 1.19, RISP = -0.03 ± 1.17, p = 0.033 or ziprasidone (ZIP (OLZ = 0.50 ± 1.38, ZIP = 0.25 ± 1.27, p = 0.026, but did not significantly differ from the quetiapine, aripiprazole or haloperidol treatment groups. Among

  11. Atypical antipsychotics olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone and risk of acute major cardiovascular events in young and middle-aged adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Björn; Svanström, Henrik; Ranthe, Mattis F

    2014-01-01

    risperidone (n = 14,134). The primary outcome was any major cardiovascular event (composite of cardiovascular mortality, acute coronary syndrome, or ischemic stroke) within 1 year following treatment initiation. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) while on current antipsychotic monotherapy...... atypical antipsychotics in young and middle-aged adults. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide register-based cohort study in Denmark, 1997-2011, including adults aged 18-64 years, who started treatment with oral or intramuscular olanzapine (n = 15,774), oral quetiapine (n = 18,717), and oral or intramuscular.......9 to 2.0) events for quetiapine. CONCLUSIONS: Among young and middle-aged outpatients, the risk of acute major cardiovascular events was similar with use of olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Although moderate relative differences cannot be ruled out, any differences are small in absolute terms....

  12. Cost-effectiveness model comparing olanzapine and other oral atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia in the United States

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    Smolen Lee J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is often a persistent and costly illness that requires continued treatment with antipsychotics. Differences among antipsychotics on efficacy, safety, tolerability, adherence, and cost have cost-effectiveness implications for treating schizophrenia. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of oral olanzapine, oral risperidone (at generic cost, primary comparator, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia from the perspective of third-party payers in the U.S. health care system. Methods A 1-year microsimulation economic decision model, with quarterly cycles, was developed to simulate the dynamic nature of usual care of schizophrenia patients who switch, continue, discontinue, and restart their medications. The model captures clinical and cost parameters including adherence levels, relapse with and without hospitalization, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, treatment discontinuation by reason, treatment-emergent adverse events, suicide, health care resource utilization, and direct medical care costs. Published medical literature and a clinical expert panel were used to develop baseline model assumptions. Key model outcomes included mean annual total direct cost per treatment, cost per stable patient, and incremental cost-effectiveness values per QALY gained. Results The results of the microsimulation model indicated that olanzapine had the lowest mean annual direct health care cost ($8,544 followed by generic risperidone ($9,080. In addition, olanzapine resulted in more QALYs than risperidone (0.733 vs. 0.719. The base case and multiple sensitivity analyses found olanzapine to be the dominant choice in terms of incremental cost-effectiveness per QALY gained. Conclusion The utilization of olanzapine is predicted in this model to result in better clinical outcomes and lower total direct health care costs compared to generic risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and

  13. Metabolic side-effects of the novel second-generation antipsychotic drugs asenapine and iloperidone: a comparison with olanzapine.

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    Heidi N Boyda

    Full Text Available The second generation antipsychotic (SGA drugs are widely used in psychiatry due to their clinical efficacy and low incidence of neurological side-effects. However, many drugs in this class cause deleterious metabolic side-effects. Animal models accurately predict metabolic side-effects for SGAs with known clinical metabolic liability. We therefore used preclinical models to evaluate the metabolic side-effects of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance with the novel SGAs asenapine and iloperidone for the first time. Olanzapine was used as a comparator.Adults female rats were treated with asenapine (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg, iloperidone (0.03, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0 mg/kg or olanzapine (0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/kg and subjected to the glucose tolerance test (GTT. Separate groups of rats were treated with asenapine (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg, iloperidone (1.0 and 10 mg/kg or olanzapine (1.5 and 15 mg/kg and tested for insulin resistance with the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HIEC.Asenapine showed no metabolic effects at any dose in either test. Iloperidone caused large and significant glucose intolerance with the three highest doses in the GTT, and insulin resistance with both doses in the HIEC. Olanzapine caused significant glucose intolerance with the three highest doses in the GTT, and insulin resistance with the higher dose in the HIEC.In preclinical models, asenapine shows negligible metabolic liability. By contrast, iloperidone exhibits substantial metabolic liability, comparable to olanzapine. These results emphasize the need for appropriate metabolic testing in patients treated with novel SGAs where current clinical data do not exist.

  14. Meta-analysis: the effects of smoking on the disposition of two commonly used antipsychotic agents, olanzapine and clozapine.

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    Tsuda, Yoshiyuki; Saruwatari, Junji; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2014-03-04

    To clarify the effects of smoking on the disposition of two commonly used antipsychotics, olanzapine and clozapine, and to create standards to adjust the doses of these drugs in clinical practice based on the smoking status. A meta-analysis was conducted by searching MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Library for relevant prospective and retrospective studies. We included the studies that investigated the effects of smoking on the concentration to dose (C/D) ratio of olanzapine or clozapine. The weighted mean difference was calculated using a DerSimonian-Laird random effects model, along with 95% CI. Seven association studies, comprising 1094 patients (652 smokers and 442 non-smokers) with schizophrenia or other psychiatric disorders, were included in the meta-analysis of olanzapine. The C/D ratio was significantly lower in smokers than in non-smokers (p<0.00001), and the mean difference was -0.75 (ng/mL)/(mg/day) (95% CI -0.89 to -0.61). Therefore, it was estimated that if 10 and 20 mg/day of olanzapine would be administered to smokers, about 7 and 14 mg/day, respectively, should be administered to non-smokers in order to obtain the equivalent olanzapine concentration. Four association studies of clozapine were included in the meta-analysis of clozapine, comprising 196 patients (120 smokers and 76 non-smokers) with schizophrenia or other psychiatric disorders. The C/D ratio was significantly lower in smokers than in non-smokers (p<0.00001), and the mean difference was -1.11 (ng/mL)/(mg/day) (95% CI -1.53 to -0.70). Therefore, it was estimated that if 200 and 400 mg/day of clozapine would be administered to smokers, about 100 and 200 mg/day, respectively, should be administered to non-smokers. We suggest that the doses of olanzapine and clozapine should be reduced by 30% and 50%, respectively, in non-smokers compared with smokers in order to obtain an equivalent olanzapine or clozapine concentration.

  15. Quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzapine in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia induced by first-generation antipsychotics: a 124-week case report.

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    Sacchetti, E; Valsecchi, P

    2003-11-01

    Our report of a patient with severe tardive dyskinesia (TD) who has been exposed to both typical antipsychotic and clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine during a 124-week follow-up period supports the possible beneficial effect of atypical antipsychotics on pre-existing symptoms of TD. Persistently high AIMS scores during all the periods of treatment with typical antipsychotics contrast strongly with the drop in scores that occurs in strict chronological sequence after switching to both clozapine (45%), olanzapine (27.8%) and quetiapine (85%). Since the reversal to haloperidol from the three atypical agents was systemically associated with a return to high AIMS scores, it seems likely that the improvement noted with clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine represents a temporary symptomatic effect rather than a sustained resolution of the disorder. The olanzapine-clozapine-quetiapine rank order of increasing effectiveness against TD symptoms suggests that this property, although shared by the atypical antipsychotics, is to some degree drug-specific. Patient- and/or drug-dependent mechanisms may be involved in this gradient of effect.

  16. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5......-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine...... of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1....

  17. Design and in vivo evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticulate systems of Olanzapine for acute phase schizophrenia treatment: Investigations on antipsychotic potential and adverse effects.

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    Joseph, Emil; Reddi, Satish; Rinwa, Vibhu; Balwani, Garima; Saha, Ranendra

    2017-06-15

    The present paper discusses the design, characterization and in vivo evaluation of glyceryl monostearate nanoparticles of Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug for acute schizophrenia treatment, during which hospitalization is mandatory and adverse effects are at its peak. The solid lipid nanoparticulate system was obtained by emulsification-ultra sonication technique wherein three factors such as solid lipid content, concentration of surfactant and drug: solid lipid ratio were selected at three different levels in order to study their influence on significant characteristic responses such as particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug content. A Box Behnken design with 17 runs involving whole factors at three levels was employed for the study. The optimized formulation was further coated with Polysorbate 80 in order to enhance its brain targeting potential through endocytosis transport process via blood brain barrier. The designed formulations were pre-clinically tested successfully in Wistar rat model for in vivo antipsychotic efficacy (apomorphine induced psychosis) and adverse effects (weight gain study for 28days). The results obtained indicated that solid lipid nanoparticles had very narrow size distribution (151.29±3.36nm) with very high encapsulation efficiency (74.51±1.75%). Morphological studies by SEM have shown that solid lipid nanoparticles were spherical in shape with smooth surface. Olanzapine-loaded nanoparticles prepared from solid lipid, extended the release of drug for 48h, as found by the in vitro release studies. The formulations also exhibited high redispersibility after freeze-drying and stability study results demonstrated good stability, with no significant change for a period of 6months. In vivo evaluation and adverse effects studies of Olanzapine-loaded nanoparticulate systems in animal model have demonstrated an improved therapeutic efficacy than pure Olanzapine. The antipsychotic effect of drug loaded nanoparticulate systems

  18. Patient and Health Care Provider Perspectives on Long Acting Injectable Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia and the Introduction of Olanzapine Long-Acting Injection

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    Heidi J. Wehring

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Olanzapine long acting injection has joined risperidone and paliperidone as the second generation long acting antipsychotic injection options for treatment of patients with schizophrenia. Long acting injections are important alternatives to oral medications for patients who have difficulty adhering to daily or multiple daily medication administrations, yet may be underutilized or not well understood. Patient perceptions, adherence, and preferences are important issues for health care providers to address when discussing treatment options with their patients. Reviewed here are overall patient and health care provider attitudes and perceptions regarding long acting injections and the details of olanzapine long acting injectable, the newest agent, and how it will fit in the marketplace. In addition, efficacy, safety, dosing and use data regarding this newest long acting agent are reviewed and compared to other available long acting agents.

  19. Pharmaco-epidemiological description of the population of the Marche Region (central Italy treated with the antipsychotic drug olanzapine

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    Fiorenzo Mignini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. In Italy, even though olanzapine has been discouraged for treatment of behaviour disorders in older patients affected by dementia, some physicians chose to prescribe for them. In response to this situation, the Italian Drug Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco, AIFA promulgated a cautionary note. MATERIALS AND METHODS. This study examined epidemiological indices for olanzapine prescriptions between 2004 and 2007 in the Marche Region of central Italy and in its provinces, to assess physician compliance with the AIFA note, and to determine whether there were differences in drug prescription between populations of the same territory, or differences based on gender or age group. RESULTS. Our analyses revealed high olanzapine use among young men and mature women, suggesting that these groups are most prone to psychotic symptoms. Analysis revealed that olanzapine prescription in elderly patients was reduced in some provinces, in line with the AIFA note. CONCLUSIONS. Prudent use of olanzapine prescription, in compliance with the AIFA note, was noted throughout the Region. Furthermore, this work offers details that may be useful in future studies of adverse drug reactions.

  20. Metabolic Side-Effects of the Novel Second-Generation Antipsychotic Drugs Asenapine and Iloperidone: A Comparison with Olanzapine

    OpenAIRE

    Boyda, Heidi N.; Procyshyn, Ric M.; Pang, Catherine C. Y.; Hawkes, Erin; Wong, Daniel; Jin, Chen Helen; Honer, William G.; Barr, Alasdair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The second generation antipsychotic (SGA) drugs are widely used in psychiatry due to their clinical efficacy and low incidence of neurological side-effects. However, many drugs in this class cause deleterious metabolic side-effects. Animal models accurately predict metabolic side-effects for SGAs with known clinical metabolic liability. We therefore used preclinical models to evaluate the metabolic side-effects of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance with the novel SGAs asena...

  1. Olanzapine and sibutramine have opposing effects on the motivation for palatable food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Janhunen, Sanna K.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Baclesanu, Roxana; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.; Adan, Roger A. H.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Both olanzapine and sibutramine target serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission and influence body weight, but in opposite ways. The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine, an antagonist at serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors, frequently induces weight gain as a side-effect, whereas

  2. The influence of chronic exposure to antipsychotic medications on brain size before and after tissue fixation: a comparison of haloperidol and olanzapine in macaque monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Pierri, Joseph N; Perel, James M

    2005-01-01

    exposed to oral haloperidol, olanzapine or sham for a 17-27 month period. The resulting plasma drug levels were comparable to those seen in subjects with schizophrenia treated with these medications. After the exposure, we observed an 8-11% reduction in mean fresh brain weights as well as left cerebrum...

  3. Short-term treatment with olanzapine does not modulate gut hormone secretion: olanzapine disintegrating versus standard tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidarsdottir, Solrun; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Streefland, Trea

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with olanzapine (atypical antipsychotic drug) is frequently associated with various metabolic anomalies, including obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. Recent data suggest that olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets (ODT), which dissolve instantaneously in the mouth......, might cause less weight gain than olanzapine standard oral tablets (OST). DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten healthy men received olanzapine ODT (10 mg o.d., 8 days), olanzapine OST (10 mg o.d., 8 days), or no intervention in a randomized crossover design. At breakfast and dinner, blood samples were taken...

  4. Delirium Associated with Olanzapine Therapy in an Elderly Male with Bipolar Affective Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ravi C.; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are commonly used to treat symptoms of delirium. Olanzapine has been successfully used in the treatment of delirium. However, there have been few case reports of delirium associated with olanzapine. We hereby report a case of delirium associated with olanzapine therapy. Possible risk factors and underlying pathogenesis is discussed.

  5. Olanzapine causes hypothermia, inactivity, a deranged feeding pattern and weight gain in female Wistar rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, S. S.; Calcagnoli, F.; van Dijk, G.; Scheurink, A. J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine is an a-typical antipsychotic drug antagonizing predominantly 5-HT and dopamine but also histamine muscarin and a adrenergic receptors In humans Olanzapine induces weight gain and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes The underlying mechanisms of Olanzapine-induced weight gain are unclear

  6. Melatonin for Reducing Weight Gain Following Administration of Atypical Antipsychotic Olanzapine for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

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    Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Solhi, Mahmoud; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate melatonin effectiveness in weight gain reduction following olanzapine use for 11-17-year-old bipolar disorder patients. Seventy-seven adolescent outpatients, subsequent to their initial diagnosis of bipolar I disorder by a psychiatrist, entered this study. After assessing inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 patients consented to participate. Twenty-four patients were allocated to receive olanzapine, lithium carbonate, and melatonin, and 24 patients were allocated to receive olanzapine, lithium carbonate, and placebo by simple randomization. The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) was performed at baseline. Before treatment and after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure and t-test were used to analyze data. Nineteen patients in each group finished the study and their data were entered for analysis. Mean rise in BMI in the melatonin group compared with placebo (2.45 vs. 3.25 respectively) was marginally significant (t = 1.936; df = 36; p = 0.061). ANOVA with repeated measure also showed a marginally significant difference (F = 3.74; df = 1; p = 0.061) between groups and across time in regard to BMI. Mean body weight rise in the melatonin group compared with the placebo group (5.8 kg vs. 8.2 kg respectively) was marginally significant (t = 1.923; df = 28; p = 0.065). ANOVA with repeated measure also showed a marginally significant difference (F = 3.73; df = 1.1; p = 0.056) between groups and across time for body weight. Coadministration of melatonin with olanzapine and lithium carbonate in adolescents with bipolar disorder could reduce the sharp weight gain side effect of these drugs to near significance.

  7. Olanzapine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Olanzapine injection is used to treat episodes of ... during your treatment: extreme thirst, frequent urination, extreme hunger, blurred vision, or weakness. It is very important ...

  8. Olanzapine affects locomotor activity and meal size in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Evers, Simon S.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine is an antipsychotic drug that frequently induces weight gain accompanied by increased fat deposition as a side effect To investigate how olanzapine affects different aspects of energy balance we used male rats to determine effects on meal patterns food preference locomotor activity and

  9. Olanzapine affects locomotor activity and meal size in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Evers, Simon S.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine is an antipsychotic drug that frequently induces weight gain accompanied by increased fat deposition as a side effect. To investigate how olanzapine affects different aspects of energy balance, we used male rats to determine effects on meal patterns, food preference, locomotor activity

  10. Serum prolactin level in patients taking olanzapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diganta Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Olanzapine is a commonly used antipsychotic. Prolactin elevation is a common adverse effect of anstipsychotics, and serum prolactin elevation is seen in about 30% patients treated with olanzapine. There are confounding results about dose dependency of olanzapine and prolactin elevation, and also the duration of treatment. Method: Fifty six patients, 36 male and 20 female, who were taking olanzapine for any condition for more than a month at a constant dose were enrolled in the study. Patients’ age, weight, body mass index (BMI, serum prolactin levels, and some biochemical values were recorded. Patients were taken from the review outpatient department (OPD after due consent. Results: Five each in male and female groups showed elevation of serum prolactin (estimated to be high if >20 ng/dl for males, and >25 ng/dl for females. In females, the elevation was found at lesser dose of olanzapine (13 mg/day, in males 18 mg/day and early in the treatment (2.4 months vs. 9.7 months in males. Males tended to show raised prolactin with higher doses of olanzapine (mean 18 mg/day. Females (26.31% also showed higher prevalence of prolactin elevation compared to males (13.51%. No other parameter was found to modify the prolactin levels. Conclusion: Olanzapine causes elevation of serum prolactin, though lesser degree than some other antipsychotics. Females are more prone to have raised serum prolactin with olanzapine compared to males. However, the elevation seems to be transient. Higher doses of olanzapine tend to cause elevation of serum prolactin. Serum prolactin estimation in patients taking olanzapine may be undertaken to maintain quality life, particularly in females.

  11. Switching clozapine responders to olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, K H; Johnson, C G; Hilligoss, N M; Peabody, C D; Littrell, S H

    2000-12-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the management of severely ill patients with schizophrenia who have failed to respond adequately to standard drug treatment. The significant risk of agranulocytosis and seizure associated with clozapine has led to the restrictions in its use. Additionally, drug-induced sedation, sialorrhea, enuresis, and weight gain are often cited as problematic consequences of clozapine treatment. Our primary objective was to determine the effectiveness and safety of a method of slow cross-titration from clozapine to olanzapine among patients responsive to clozapine treatment but experiencing medication-induced adverse events. Changes in symptomatology, mood, subjective response, and safety were examined in 20 outpatients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who converted from clozapine to olanzapine. Patients were considered clozapine-responsive as evidenced by improved social function and decreased symptoms with clozapine therapy; however, they were interested in alternative pharmacologic treatment because of clozapine-related side effects. Equivalent efficacy of olanzapine to clozapine was found in 90% of the patients (18/20) in the study group, without rehospitalization or suicidal behavior in any of the patients. Also notable was a reduction in drug-induced side effects and improved subjective response to pharmacotherapy. The successful conversion from clozapine to olanzapine has the potential to provide great benefits for the patient, including reducing drug-induced side effects while maintaining symptom control. These preliminary results suggest that further research on converting clozapine responders to olanzapine is warranted.

  12. Metabolic effects of Olanzapine versus Iloperidone: A 24 weeks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    ABSTRACT: Atypical antipsychotics have become the mainstay of therapy for psychosis. Though extrapyramidal side effects have been reduced with atypical antipsychotics, yet there are increased concerns over metabolic effects. The present study is aimed to comparatively evaluate the metabolic profile of olanzapine and ...

  13. Metabolic effects of Olanzapine versus Iloperidone: A 24 weeks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypical antipsychotics have become the mainstay of therapy for psychosis. Though extrapyramidal side effects have been reduced with atypical antipsychotics, yet there are increased concerns over metabolic effects. The present study is aimed to comparatively evaluate the metabolic profile of olanzapine and iloperidone ...

  14. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics in rats as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain in human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouzet, B; Mow, T; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2003-01-01

    compounds in an animal model of weight gain. With the aim of evaluating whether the rat can be used as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, we have investigated the effect of chronic treatment (3 weeks) with one antipsychotic drug inducing weight gain in clinic (olanzapine) and one antipsychotic...

  15. Olanzapine-Induced Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedhamze Hosseini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening idiosyncratic side effect resulting from neuroleptic drugs. NMS mainly occurs in patients treated with high-potency typical antipsychotics, but rarely caused by atypical antipsychotics. Although NMS is less common with atypical antipsychotic, but it seems that its incidence is rising due to increased administration of such drugs. We present the case of a 27-year-old man with a history of paranoid schizophrenia that showed signs consistent with NMS that occurred after treatment with olanzapine. The patient was adherent to treatment. He had decreased level of consciousness, muscle rigidity, diaphoresis, fever, drooling, urinary incontinence, and high blood pressure. This patient illustrates that NMS can occur due to treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs like olanzapine, particularly in the presence of risk factors. This phenomenon is often unrecognized, underdiagnosed, or not treated properly. Physicians should be aware that NMS with extrapyramidal syndrome could occur with olanzapine at steady state doses without recent dosage adjustments or titration. It is essential that adequate and safe dose of medication is chosen and the patient is monitored by the signs and symptoms of this lethal syndrome.

  16. Olanzapine Overdose in a Pin Point Pupil with Altered Sensorium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Midha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Olanzapine is a highly tolerable and easily affordable atypical antipsychotic drug which has been commonly prescribed in both inpatient and outpatient settings for several mental disorders. Olanzapine overdose is commonly seen in psychiatric patients, who attempt suicide by intoxicating themselves with their own prescribed medications. Increased olanzapine use is associated with increased incidence of overdosing. Case Presentation:We are reporting a case of olanzapine overdosage as a cause of pinpoint pupils and altered sensorium with exclusion of other differentials. The mainstay of managementof olanzapine overdose is general supportive and symptomatic measures. Discussion: Pinpoint pupils with altered sensorium and agitation are always an alarming situation for a clinician, because of differentials like organophosphorus poisoning, pontine hemorrhage and opium overdosing. Due to olanzapine overdosage, similar clinical picture can be confusing in the emergency department and early identification of such cases is helpful to decrease the risk of fatality. Conclusion: This case highlights the significance of olanzapine overdosing as a differential diagnosis for patients presented with altered sensorium and pinpoint pupils in the emergency department. Olanzapine overdosage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although there is no specific antidote for olanzapine overdose, appropriate history, assessment and early diagnosis are very useful for the better outcome.

  17. A patient treated with olanzapine developing diabetes de novo : proposal for hyperglycaemia screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Cohen, D.; van Oven, W.; Nieboer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report a patient with schizophrenia who developed diabetes mellitus during treatment with olanzapine. The case confirms the pattern of atypical antipsychotic-related diabetic emergencies: rapid onset in relatively young patients, often with severe glucose derangements and serious complications.

  18. Pancreatitis following Olanzapine Therapy: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Kerr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Atypical antipsychotic agents (clozapine, olanzapine have been linked to metabolic effects and acute pancreatitis. Case Report: We reviewed the inpatient and outpatient records of three patients who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated with olanzapine. The mean age of the patients was 37.7 years (range 18–54 years, 2 female, 1 male. No alternative cause of acute pancreatitis was found in two of the three patients. In the remaining patient, olanzapine may have contributed to acute pancreatitis in the setting of hypertriglyceridemia. Olanzapine was discontinued in all instances. Over a mean follow-up of 14 months, one patient has had a relapsing course, but the remaining two patients have been symptom free without recurrence of acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our case series adds further support to the potential link between olanzapine use and acute pancreatitis. Close monitoring of metabolic parameters is suggested in patients treated with olanzapine. Alternative antipsychotic agents should be considered in patients at high risk for pancreatitis.

  19. Effect of olanzapine treatment on INR of a patient receiving warfarin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Arslan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug, commonly used in the management of psychotic symptoms in patients with schizoprenia and bipolar affective disorder. Deep venous thrombosis is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism. It is very well known that use of antipsychotic drugs increase the risk of thrombosis in a patient with schizophrenia. It has been reported in many studies the effects of olanzapine on thrombosis but there isn't any report about the effect of olanzapine on international normalized ratio (INR. in the medical literature. In this paper, a patient with schizophrenia and also family history of deep venous thrombosis who emerged deep venous thrombosis after being started on olanzapine treatment and effect of olanzapine treatment on INR has been reported. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 370-373

  20. Risk of extrapyramidal syndromes with haloperidol, risperidone, or olanzapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; de Boer, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Herings, R M; Roos, R A; Jansen, P A; Leufkens, H G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075255049

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) between risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol, taking into account patients' past antipsychotic drug use and past EPS. METHODS: Data were obtained from the PHARMO-database, containing filled prescriptions of 450,000

  1. Modelling olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, E. M.; Janhunen, S. K.; La Fleur, S. E.; Adan, R. A. H.

    2014-01-01

    The second-generation antipsychotic drug olanzapine has become a widely prescribed drug in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Unfortunately, its therapeutic benefits are partly outweighed by significant weight gain and other metabolic side effects, which increase the risk for

  2. naturalistic study of olanzapine in treatment-resistant schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-02-02

    Feb 2, 2000 ... Background: Whereas the Fiji government provides all aspects of mental health care services free of charge to its citizens, many schizophrenics have failed to respond to classical antipsychotic drugs. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of olanzapine among various patients with severe psychiatric ...

  3. Naturalistic study of olanzapine in treatment-resistaant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Naturalistic study of olanzapine in treatment-resistaant schizophrenia and acute mania, depression and obsessional disorder. ... Whereas the Fiji government provides all aspects of mental health care services free of charge to its citizens, many schizophrenics have failed to respond to classical antipsychotic drugs.

  4. Energy metabolism, leptin, and biochemical parameters are altered in rats subjected to the chronic administration of olanzapine

    OpenAIRE

    Zugno,Alexandra I.; Barcelos,Mariely; Oliveira,Larissa de; Canever,Leila; Luca,Renata D. de; Fraga,Daiane B.; Matos,Maria Paula; Rezin,Gislaine T.; Scaini,Giselli; Búrigo,Márcio; Streck,Emilio L.; Quevedo,João

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug with affinities for dopamine, serotonin, and histamine binding sites appears to be associated with substantial weight gain and metabolic alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate weight gain and metabolic alterations in rats treated with olanzapine on a hypercaloric diet. METHODS: We used 40 rats divided into 4 groups: Group 1, standard food and water conditions (control); Group 2, standard diet plus olanzapine; Group 3, cafeteri...

  5. Antipsychotic Drugs on Maternal Behavior in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and amisulpride, all disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior i...

  6. Preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain using betahistine: a study in a rat model with chronic olanzapine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamei Lian

    Full Text Available Olanzapine is the one of first line antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia and other serious mental illness. However, it is associated with troublesome metabolic side-effects, particularly body weight gain and obesity. The antagonistic affinity to histamine H1 receptors (H1R of antipsychotic drugs has been identified as one of the main contributors to weight gain/obesity side-effects. Our previous study showed that a short term (2 weeks combination treatment of betahistine (an H1R agonist and H3R antagonist and olanzapine (O+B reduced (-45% body weight gain induced by olanzapine in drug-naïve rats. A key issue is that clinical patients suffering with schizophrenia, bipolar disease and other mental disorders often face chronic, even life-time, antipsychotic treatment, in which they have often had previous antipsychotic exposure. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic O+B co-treatment in controlling body weight in female rats with chronic and repeated exposure of olanzapine. The results showed that co-administration of olanzapine (3 mg/kg, t.i.d. and betahistine (9.6 mg/kg, t.i.d. significantly reduced (-51.4% weight gain induced by olanzapine. Co-treatment of O+B also led to a decrease in feeding efficiency, liver and fat mass. Consistently, the olanzapine-only treatment increased hypothalamic H1R protein levels, as well as hypothalamic pAMPKα, AMPKα and NPY protein levels, while reducing the hypothalamic POMC, and UCP1 and PGC-1α protein levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT. The olanzapine induced changes in hypothalamic H1R, pAMPKα, BAT UCP1 and PGC-1α could be reversed by co-treatment of O+B. These results supported further clinical trials to test the effectiveness of co-treatment of O+B for controlling weight gain/obesity side-effects in schizophrenia with chronic antipsychotic treatment.

  7. Intramuscular Olanzapine – a UK case series of early cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Mark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials assessing efficacy and safety of Intramuscular (IM Olanzapine in acute schizophrenia and acute mania have previously been undertaken in studies required for drug registration in patients who were required to give informed consent. These patients may have less severe forms of psychosis than patients treated in routine practice. Data derived from naturalistic practice following the launch of IM olanzapine may be helpful for clinicians in assessing efficacy and safety of IM olanzapine. The PANSS-EC scale used in the clinical studies may represent a tool that could be used in routine clinical practice. Case presentation We report on an early unselected case series of 7 patients who received IM olanzapine in routine clinical practice settings in the UK. In this case series, olanzapine IM was generally effective, and no adverse events were reported. Adjunctive benzodiazepines were given concomitantly in 1 of the 7 subjects. This is relevant as concomitant benzodiazepines are not recommended for a minimum of 1 hour post IM olanzapine administration. PANSS-EC data was collected in 2 of the 7 subjects. Conclusion Although patients had greater severity of psychosis than clinical trial patients there were no unexpected findings. In addition the PANSS-EC scale is a scale that may be useful in assessing the efficacy of IM antipsychotics in routine clinical practice.

  8. Clozapine Treatment of Olanzapine-induced Tardive Dyskinesia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangroula, Dinesh; Virk, Inderpreet; Mohammad, Wali; Kahn, David A

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesias (TD) are serious, often irreversible side effects of dopamine blocking agents, most commonly first-generation antipsychotics. No definitive treatment exists, with different interventions showing inconsistent results. We report a case of TD presenting after 12 years of olanzapine therapy in a 66-year-old Hispanic male with paranoid schizophrenia. The TD symptoms were successfully treated within a few weeks by switching to clozapine. Two cases of olanzapine-induced TD treated with clozapine have previously been reported, but in those cases, the symptom onset was quicker, ranging from a few months to a few years after initiation of olanzapine therapy, and the treatment response was relatively slower. Clinicians should carefully monitor for symptoms of TD after prolonged treatment with olanzapine and other antipsychotics. If otherwise indicated for psychiatric treatment, clozapine can be considered a good choice for patients with TD in preventing or reversing the debilitating consequences of this condition.

  9. Olanzapine-induced weight gain: lessons learned from developing rat models

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwaal, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an effective and commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug, used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Unfortunately significant weight gain is a common side effect. In order to effectively address this side effect, it is crucial to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, this thesis describes the development of a number of rat models that were designed to determine the effects of olanzapine on different aspects of energy balance. In both short- a...

  10. Atypical antipsychotic drugs selectively increase neurotensin efflux in dopamine terminal regions

    OpenAIRE

    Radke, James M.; Owens, Michael J.; Ritchie, James C.; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    1998-01-01

    Typical antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine, increase synthesis of the neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) in both the striatum and the nucleus accumbens, whereas atypical antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and olanzapine, do so only in the nucleus accumbens. By using in vivo microdialysis, we now report that acute administration of haloperidol, clozapine, or olanzapine failed to alter the release of NT in either the striatum or nucleus accumbens. In contrast, chronic ad...

  11. Olanzapine monotherapy and olanzapine combination therapy in the treatment of mania: 12-week results from the European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Panicali, Francesco; Goetz, Iris; Reed, Catherine; Comes, Merce; Tohen, Mauricio

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the 12-week outcomes (effectiveness, tolerability, and patterns of medication use) of olanzapine (either in antimanic monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and/or lithium) in patients with bipolar mania or mixed mania. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 24-month prospective observational study of in- and outpatients with acute mania/mixed mania conducted in 14 European countries. Primary outcome measures included Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Disorder scale (overall, mania, and depression); 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; and Young Mania Rating Scale. Tolerability measures included a questionnaire to assess patients' symptomatic complaints. Overall, 2004 patients received olanzapine (olanzapine monotherapy, n=673; olanzapine combination, n=1331). Concomitant therapy with antidepressants and/or anxiolytics was possible in both groups. The countries significantly differed in the use of olanzapine monotherapy versus olanzapine combination (pEMBLEM results suggest that in naturalistic settings, olanzapine (both as monotherapy and combination) may be effective in treating patients with bipolar mania. The use of olanzapine monotherapy or combination varies significantly across countries, but combination is generally the rule, rather than the exception.

  12. Weight change after an atypical antipsychotic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas; Renner, Bernard T; Bengtson, Michael A; Wilcox, Brian M; Acholonu, Wilfred W

    2003-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotics successfully treat schizophrenia and other conditions, with a lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects than other agents used in treatment of these disorders. However, some atypical antipsychotics are associated with weight gain. To quantify the impact on weight and identify atypical antipsychotics causing the least amount of weight gain among patients switched from risperidone to olanzapine and olanzapine to risperidone. Patients included in the study (n = 86) were > or =18 years and had received > or =2 prescriptions for risperidone or olanzapine for > or =60 days, switched to the other atypical antipsychotic, and were dispensed > or =2 prescriptions for at least 60 days after the index date. Age, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were retrospectively abstracted from automated databases containing patient-specific prescription and vital sign information. At the time of their switch, the average patient age was 53.2 years (range 25-83). The average weight change in patients switched to olanzapine (n = 47) was +2.3 kg (p = 0.01) and the BMI change was +0.8 kg/m(2) (p = 0.02). The average percent body weight change was +2.8% and the BMI change was +3.0%. The average weight change after patients switched to risperidone (n = 39) was -0.45 kg (p = 0.69) and BMI change was -0.2 kg/m2 (p = 0.64). The average percentage weight change was -0.4% and BMI change was -0.5%. Practitioners' concern regarding weight changes after switching atypical antipsychotics seems warranted and patients should be provided consistent, ongoing weight monitoring. Further investigations should examine whether weight changes associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment further jeopardize this already at-risk population for severe comorbid conditions such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes.

  13. Olanzapine-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a patient with bipolar affective disorder: Does quetiapine holds the solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a rare, severe and life threatening condition induced by antipsychotic medications. It is commonly encountered with the use of first generation antipsychotics, however cases of NMS have been reported with the use of second generation antipsychotics like Olanzapine, Risperidone, Paliperidone, Aripiprazole, Ziprasidone, Amisulpride, Quetiapine and Clozapine, though the incidence of such reports is rare. Due to decreased use of first generation antipsychotics, NMS is reported less frequently now a days. In this case report- we highlight the management issues of a patient suffering from bipolar affective disorder, who had developed NMS following intramuscular injection of haloperidol, which was withdrawn and olanzapine was given later on. The patient had again developed NMS with olanzapine. Finally the patient was managed with modified electroconvulsive therapy and discharged on Lithium carbonate and Quetiapine.

  14. 5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Protein as a Modulator of Olanzapine-Induced Lipid Accumulation in Adipocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Dzitoyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiated in vitro into adipocytes. Cells were treated with olanzapine and a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX activating protein (FLAP inhibitor MK-886. Lipid content was measured using an Oil Red O assay; 5-LOX and FLAP mRNA content was measured using quantitative real-time PCR; the corresponding protein contents were measured using quantitative Western blot assay. Olanzapine did not affect the cell content of 5-LOX mRNA and protein; it decreased FLAP mRNA and protein content at day five but not 24 hours after olanzapine addition. In the absence of MK-886, low concentrations of olanzapine increased lipid content only slightly, whereas a 56% increase was induced by 50 μM olanzapine. A 5-day cotreatment with 10 μM MK-886 potentiated the lipid increasing action of low concentrations of olanzapine. In contrast, in the presence of 50 μM olanzapine nanomolar and low micromolar concentrations of MK-886 reduced lipid content. These data suggest that FLAP system in adipocytes is affected by olanzapine and that it may modify how these cells respond to the second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGADs. Clinical studies could evaluate whether the FLAP/5-LOX system could play a role in setting a variable individual susceptibility to the metabolic side effects of SGADs.

  15. A comparative study of olanzapine versus asenapine in acute treatment of manic episode: A 3-week prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Sidana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of bipolar disorders has evolved over the years from conventional mood stabilizers to second-generation antipsychotics. Among the atypical antipsychotics, few have been approved by Food and Drug Administration as treatment of bipolar disorders. Aim: To study the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine and asenapine in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder-manic episode in a 3-week randomized prospective study. Materials and Methods: A 3-week randomized, prospective, comparative, flexible doses of olanzapine (5-30 mg/day and asenapine (10-20 mg/day for acute treatment of bipolar disorder-current manic episode with or without psychotic symptoms in hospitalized patients. Results: The end-point reduction in mean score of Young Mania rating scale in the olanzapine group was 15.82 in comparison to 6.88 in the asenapine group. Mean score on clinical global impression for bipolar disorder and positive and negative syndrome scale was significantly less in the olanzapine group at the end of the study. 81.81% patients in olanzapine group and 17.60% patients in asenapine group had clinical response. There was significant average weight gain in the olanzapine group - 1.9 kg in comparison to 0.87 kg in asenapine group. Conclusion: The clinical response with olanzapine is significantly higher than the asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder-manic episode with or without psychotic symptoms. However, there is significant weight gain in olanzapine-treated patients.

  16. Antipsychotic medication in children and adolescents: a descriptive review of the effects on prolactin level and associated side effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roke, Y.; Harten, P.N. van; Boot, A.M.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This review reports the incidence of hyperprolactinemia, its relationship with genotype, and prolactin-related side effects in children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. METHOD: Data on prolactin levels were available for haloperidol, pimozide, risperidone, olanzapine,

  17. Antipsychotic Medication in Children and Adolescents : A Descriptive Review of the Effects on Prolactin Level and Associated Side Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roke, Yvette; van Harten, Peter N.; Boot, Annemieke M.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    Objective: This review reports the incidence of hyperprolactinemia, its relationship with genotype, and prolactin-related side effects in children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. Method: Data on prolactin levels were available for haloperidol, pimozide, risperidone, olanzapine,

  18. Antipsychotic monotherapy and polypharmacy in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correll Christoph

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic monotherapy is recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with schizophrenia. Simultaneous treatment with multiple antipsychotics (polypharmacy is suggested by some expert consensus guidelines as the last resort after exhausting monotherapy alternatives. This study assessed the annual rate and duration of antipsychotic monotherapy and its inverse, antipsychotic polypharmacy, among schizophrenia patients initiated on commonly used atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods Data were drawn from a large prospective naturalistic study of patients treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, conducted 7/1997–9/2003. Analyses focused on patients (N = 796 who were initiated during the study on olanzapine (N = 405, quetiapine (N = 115, or risperidone (N = 276. The percentage of patients with monotherapy on the index antipsychotic over the 1-year post initiation, and the cumulative number of days on monotherapy were calculated for all patients and for each of the 3 atypical antipsychotic treatment groups. Analyses employed repeated measures generalized linear models and non-parametric bootstrap re-sampling, controlling for patient characteristics. Results During the 1-year period, only a third (35.7% of the patients were treated predominately with monotherapy (>300 days. Most patients (57.7% had at least one prolonged period of antipsychotic polypharmacy (>60 consecutive days. Patients averaged 195.5 days on monotherapy, 155.7 days on polypharmacy, and 13.9 days without antipsychotic therapy. Olanzapine-initiated patients were significantly more likely to be on monotherapy with the initiating antipsychotic during the 1-year post initiation compared to risperidone (p = .043 or quetiapine (p = .002. The number of monotherapy days was significantly greater for olanzapine than quetiapine (p Conclusion Despite guidelines recommending the use of polypharmacy only as a last resort, the use of antipsychotic

  19. Olanzapine-induced weight gain: lessons learned from developing rat models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an effective and commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug, used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Unfortunately significant weight gain is a common side effect. In order to effectively address this side effect, it is crucial to gain insight into the underlying

  20. The role of hypothalamic pathways in the metabolic side effects of Olanzapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girault, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine (Ola) induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these undesired side effects are currently unknown. In this thesis, we showed that both acute and chronic administration of Ola

  1. Dopamine D2 receptor occupancy by olanzapine or risperidone in young patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavalaye, J.; Linszen, D. H.; Booij, J.; Reneman, L.; Gersons, B. P.; van Royen, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    A crucial characteristic of antipsychotic medication is the occupancy of the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor. We assessed striatal DA D2 receptor occupancy by olanzapine and risperidone in 36 young patients [31 males, 5 females; mean age 21.1 years (16-28)] with first episode schizophrenia, using

  2. The antipsychotic story: changes in prescriptions and overdose without better safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Nicholas A.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Morbidity and mortality from drug overdose has decreased over three decades. This is credited to safer drugs and therefore better outcomes in overdose. We aimed to investigate changing prescriptions of antipsychotic medications and associated changes in antipsychotic overdoses over a 26‐year period. Methods All antipsychotic poisoning presentations to a tertiary referral toxicology unit between 1987 and 2012 were reviewed. Data were collected prospectively on demographics, ingestion information, clinical effects, complications and treatment. Rates of antipsychotic drug use in Australia were obtained from Australian government publications for 1990–2011 and linked to overdose admissions by postcode. Results There were 3180 antipsychotic overdoses: 1235 first generation antipsychotics, 1695 ‘atypical’ second generation antipsychotics and 250 lithium overdoses. Over 26 years, antipsychotic overdoses increased 1.8‐fold, with first generation antipsychotics decreasing to one‐fifth of their peak (≈80/year to 16) and second generation antipsychotics increasing to double this (≈160/year), olanzapine and quetiapine accounting for 78%. All antipsychotic overdoses had a median length of stay of 18.6 h, 15.7% admitted to intensive care unit, 10.4% ventilated and 0.13% died in hospital, which was the same for first generation compared to second generation antipsychotics. There was a 2.3‐fold increase in antipsychotic prescriptions over the same period; first generation antipsychotics declined whereas there was a dramatic rise in second generation antipsychotics, mainly olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone (79%). Conclusion Over 26 years there was an increase in antipsychotic prescribing associated with an increase in antipsychotic overdoses. Although the type of antipsychotics changed, the morbidity and mortality remained the same, so that antipsychotics are an increasing proportion of overdose admissions. PMID:26945707

  3. Long-term functional improvements in the 2-year treatment of schizophrenia outpatients with olanzapine long-acting injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascher-Svanum H

    2014-06-01

    olanzapine-LAI and oral olanzapine. Conclusion: In this 2-year, open-label, randomized study of olanzapine-LAI, outpatients with schizophrenia maintained or improved their favorable baseline level of functioning over time. Results did not significantly differ between olanzapine-LAI and oral olanzapine. Keywords: antipsychotics, functioning, olanzapine long-acting injection, quality of life, schizophrenia

  4. Does a GLP-1 receptor agonist change glucose tolerance in patients treated with antipsychotic medications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Rask; Vedtofte, Louise; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic disturbances, obesity and life-shortening cardiovascular morbidity are major clinical problems among patients with antipsychotic treatment. Especially two of the most efficacious antipsychotics, clozapine and olanzapine, cause weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Addition......BACKGROUND: Metabolic disturbances, obesity and life-shortening cardiovascular morbidity are major clinical problems among patients with antipsychotic treatment. Especially two of the most efficacious antipsychotics, clozapine and olanzapine, cause weight gain and metabolic disturbances...... treatment with either clozapine or olanzapine. Outcomes: The primary endpoint is the change in glucose tolerance from baseline (measured by area under the curve for the plasma glucose excursion following a 4 h 75 g oral glucose tolerance test) to follow-up at week 16. The secondary endpoints include changes...

  5. Determination of olanzapine in whole blood using simple protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the quantification of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine in whole blood using dibenzepine as internal standard (IS). After acidic methanol-induced protein precipitation......, and stability. The absolute recovery obtained was 103% for olanzapine and 68% for IS. An LOQ of 0.005 mg/kg olanzapine in whole blood was achieved. Inter- and intraday precision were less than 11% within concentrations from 0.01 to 0.50 mg/kg, and the accuracy ranged from 85 to 115%. The method was subsequently...

  6. A computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Zhao-Yuan; Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Qi, Ke-Ke; Wang, Kai

    2018-03-01

    Currently, numerous antipsychotic agents have been developed in the area of pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism underlying multi targets of antipsychotics were yet to be explored. In this study we performed a computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents. We retrieved a total of 96 targets from 56 antipsychotic agents. By expression enrichment analysis, we identified that the expressions of antipsychotic target genes were significantly enriched in liver, brain, blood and corpus striatum. By protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, a PPI network with 77 significantly interconnected target genes was generated. By historeceptomics analysis, significant brain region specific target-drug interactions were identified in targets of dopamine receptors (DRD1-Olanzapine in caudate nucleus and pons (P-valueantipsychotic targets and insights for molecular mechanism of antipsychotic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of different dosing regimens of risperidone and olanzapine in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Lee, Jimmy; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of once- versus twice-daily dosing of risperidone and olanzapine on clinical outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Data from phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia study were used. Patients with schizophrenia were randomly allocated to treatment with risperidone and olanzapine, and were also randomly assigned to once-daily (N=173 and 169, respectively) or twice-daily (N=168 and 167, respectively) dosing and followed for up to 18 months. Discontinuation rate and time to discontinuation were used as primary outcome measures to compare the two groups. The following outcome measures were also analyzed: efficacy, safety, medication adherence, adverse events, and concomitant psychotropic medications. No significant differences in discontinuation rates and time to discontinuation were observed between the once- and twice-daily dosing groups (P>0.05) in patients receiving risperidone or olanzapine. The once-daily dosing group demonstrated significantly lower mean daily doses of risperidone and olanzapine across phase 1, and lower rates of hospitalization for exacerbation of schizophrenia, sleepiness, and orthostatic faintness in patients receiving olanzapine (Prisperidone and olanzapine were not significantly different. However, in view of the lower mean dose and better side effect profile, it is advisable to adhere to a once-daily dosing regimen, especially in the case of olanzapine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. Olanzapine versus typical neuroleptics for schizophrenia: evaluation of social and economic costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Mariani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available An important number of publications is reporting results from health outcomes studies comparing atypical antipsychotics (AA with typical neuroleptics (TN over 1 year of observation. Our study has prolonged the period observation of the economical and social outcomes to 4 years: 31 patients with schizophrenia were observed retrospectively during two years of TN treatment and then followed during 2 more years of olanzapine treatment after naturalistic switch. The results show a general reduction of health care interventions (territory and hospital during the olanzapine treatment period. Global costs during olanzapine treatment were lower than during TN treatment (10506 euros with TN vs 6193 euros with olanzapine over 2 years. The social outcome, measured through the registration of the number of working days in the two periods of the study (retrospective with TN and prospective with olanzapine, was better during olanzapine treatment, probably due to increased patient compliance to the rehabilitative activities offered by the Department of Mental Health. In our experience, olanzapine appeared to dominate TN treatment, as its higher acquisition costs were offset by the reduction of territorial and nosocomial health care interventions over two years of observation, and associated with higher involvement in rehabilitative and social activities.

  9. Corrected QT changes during antipsychotic treatment of children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Gjessing; Juul, Klaus; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    covering 9 antipsychotics and including 5,423 patients with QTc data (mean age = 12.8 ± 3.6 years, female = 32.1%). Treatments included aripiprazole: studies = 14; n = 814; haloperidol: studies = 1; n = 15; molindone: studies = 3; n = 125; olanzapine: studies = 5; n = 212; paliperidone: studies = 3; n...

  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with antipsychotic drugs: case reports and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Antonia; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Baretic, Maja; Osvatic, Martina Matovinovic

    2017-06-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation linked to the use of SGAs. The aims of this article are to present patients with a history of psychotic disorders and of severe metabolic diabetic ketoacidosis, possibly associated with the use of antipsychotics, and to review the current literature on the topic of antipsychotic-induced DKA. PubMed/Medline and EBSCO databases were searched using the keywords: diabetic ketoacidosis, antipsychotics, atypical antipsychotics, second generation antipsychotics, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride and haloperidol. Case reports, case series and reviews of case series were included in the review. The majority of patients who developed DKA following treatment with antipsychotics were treated with olanzapine and clozapine in monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics. DKA mostly occurred in the first six months of antipsychotic treatment. Other risk factors included insulin resistance prior to antipsychotic treatment, male gender and middle age. Clinicians should consider the risk of DKA when starting treatment with SGAs. Preventive measures for patients with psychotic disorders using antipsychotics should include regular assessment of risk factors and screening for diabetes before and after administering antipsychotics, especially in the first months of treatment. Whenever possible, polypharmacy should be avoided.

  11. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics in rats as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain in human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouzet, B; Mow, T; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2003-01-01

    not inducing weight gain in clinic (haloperidol), on food and water intake and body weight gain in rats. We included both female and male rats in this study. To reduce spontaneous high food intake in rats, and to be able to evaluate the treatment effect on a potential increase of food intake or metabolic......Several clinical reports have demonstrated that most antipsychotics of the new generation, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol, induce weight gain in schizophrenic patients. Since weight gain induces serious health complications in humans, it is crucial to test upcoming antipsychotic...... compounds in an animal model of weight gain. With the aim of evaluating whether the rat can be used as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, we have investigated the effect of chronic treatment (3 weeks) with one antipsychotic drug inducing weight gain in clinic (olanzapine) and one antipsychotic...

  12. Olanzapine modulates the default-mode network homogeneity in recurrent drug-free schizophrenia at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Li, Lehua; Zhang, Zhikun; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies on brain function alterations associated with antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia have produced conflicting results because they used short treatment periods and different designs. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained from 17 drug-free patients with recurrent schizophrenia and 24 healthy controls. The patients were treated with olanzapine for 6 months and were scanned at three time points (baseline, 6 weeks of treatment and 6 months of treatment). Network homogeneity was used to analyze the imaging data to examine default-mode network homogeneity alterations associated with antipsychotic treatment. Compared with the controls, the patients at baseline showed increased network homogeneity in the bilateral precuneus and decreased network homogeneity in the bilateral middle temporal gyrus. Network homogeneity values in the bilateral precuneus decreased, and network homogeneity values in the left superior medial prefrontal cortex and the right middle temporal gyrus increased in patients administered olanzapine as antipsychotic treatment. By contrast, network homogeneity values in the left middle temporal gyrus remained unchanged in patients after treatment. This study provides evidence that antipsychotic treatment with olanzapine modulates the default-mode network homogeneity in schizophrenia. These findings contribute to the understanding of antipsychotic treatment effects on brain functions.

  13. Olanzapine-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with Rhabdomyolysis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Kyoung Sa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics have replaced conventional antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia because they have less of a propensity to cause undesirable neurologic adverse events including extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. However, atypical antipsychotics have been known to result in various metabolic complications such as impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes and even diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. In addition, a number of NMS cases have been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics, although the absolute incidence of neurologic side effects is currently significantly low. Here, we report a patient who simultaneously developed DKA, acute renal failure and NMS with rhabdomyolysis after olanzapine treatment. Olanzapine-induced metabolic complications and NMS were dramatically improved with cessation of the olanzapine treatment and initiation of supportive management including fluid therapy, hemodialysis, and intensive glycemic control using insulin. At short-term follow-up, insulin secretion was markedly recovered as evidenced by a restoration of serum C-peptide level, and the patient no longer required any hypoglycemic medications. Despite the dramatic increase in the use of atypical antipsychotics treatment, individualized treatments along with careful monitoring may be prudent for high risk or vulnerable patients in order to avoid the development of metabolic side effects.

  14. Effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs against hostility in patients with schizophrenia in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volavka, Jan; Czobor, Pál; Citrome, Leslie; Van Dorn, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behavior can be a dangerous complication of schizophrenia. Hostility is related to aggression. This study aimed to compare the effects of olanzapine, perphenazine, risperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on hostility in schizophrenia. We used the data that were acquired in the 18-month Phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study. We analyzed the scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) hostility item in a subset of 614 patients who showed at least minimal hostility (a score ≥ 2) at baseline. The primary analysis of hostility indicated an effect of difference between treatments (F(4,1487) = 7.78, P schizophrenia enrolled in the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) trial, where olanzapine demonstrated advantages compared with haloperidol, quetiapine, and amisulpride. Olanzapine demonstrated advantages in terms of a specific antihostility effect over the other antipsychotics tested in Phase 1 of the CATIE trial.

  15. [Prescription of olanzapine in children and adolescent psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémaux, T; Reymann, J-M; Chevreuil, C; Bentué-Ferrer, D

    2007-01-01

    A review of the literature from 1996-2004 on the indications and adverse reactions concerning the use of olanzapine, a second generation antipsychotic agent, in children and adolescents with psychiatric illness is made in this article. Studies lasted for 2 to 3 months and a few had a follow up period up to a year. Olanzapine, dosed from 2.5 to 20 mg/day, is shown to be a useful drug in the treatment of child and adolescent onset schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anorexia nervosa with delusions, pervasive developmental disorder, tic disorders, and aggression. OPEN AND DOUBLE-BLIND STUDIES: In 4 open labeled studies (26, 34, 39, 43) and 2 case reports (25), 53 patients, aged from 6-18 years old, afflicted by child onset schizophrenia, were treated with olanzapine for 1 1/2 weeks to one year; 19 had treatment resistant childhood schizophrenia and 34 a first episode. In the first group 13/19 showed improvement whereas, in the second group 27/34 were considered responders. Four patients in the first group who had responded to clozapine (stopped because of adverse events) did less well on olanzapine. In 5 studies, 4 open labeled (15, 20, 44) and 1 double blind (27), 59 adolescent onset schizophrenic patients were treated by olanzapine from 8 to 26 weeks; 50/59 patients were considered responders. In the open label study (20) comparing 43 adolescents treated by olanzapine (19 patients), risperidone (17 patients), or haloperidol (7 patients), improvement was significant in the three groups after 4 weeks of treatment and continued after 8 weeks. It is most interesting to mention that 2 months after the end of the study 71% (12/17) of the olanzapine group that had completed the study, 10/15 (67%) of the risperidone group, and 43% (3/7) of the haloperidol group had continued their treatment. Dropouts were for inefficacy and non-compliance in the olanzapine and risperidone groups whereas they were also for adverse events in the haloperidol group (2/4). A final double blind

  16. Olanzapine-induced early cardiovascular effects are mediated by the biological clock and prevented by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Nava, Francisco; Buijs, Frederik N; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Benítez-King, Gloria; Basualdo, MariCarmen; Perusquía, Mercedes; Heinze, Gerhard; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2017-05-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGA) are associated with adverse cardiometabolic side effects contributing to premature mortality in patients. While mechanisms mediating these cardiometabolic side effects remain poorly understood, three independent studies recently demonstrated that melatonin was protective against cardiometabolic risk in SGA-treated patients. As one of the main target areas of circulating melatonin in the brain is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), we hypothesized that the SCN is involved in SGA-induced early cardiovascular effects in Wistar rats. We evaluated the acute effects of olanzapine and melatonin in the biological clock, paraventricular nucleus and autonomic nervous system using immunohistochemistry, invasive cardiovascular measurements, and Western blot. Olanzapine induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the SCN followed by the paraventricular nucleus and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus indicating a potent induction of parasympathetic tone. The involvement of a SCN-parasympathetic neuronal pathway after olanzapine administration was further documented using cholera toxin-B retrograde tracing and vasoactive intestinal peptide immunohistochemistry. Olanzapine-induced decrease in blood pressure and heart rate confirmed this. Melatonin abolished olanzapine-induced SCN c-Fos immunoreactivity, including the parasympathetic pathway and cardiovascular effects while brain areas associated with olanzapine beneficial effects including the striatum, ventral tegmental area, and nucleus accumbens remained activated. In the SCN, olanzapine phosphorylated the GSK-3β, a regulator of clock activity, which melatonin prevented. Bilateral lesions of the SCN prevented the effects of olanzapine on parasympathetic activity. Collectively, results demonstrate the SCN as a key region mediating the early effects of olanzapine on cardiovascular function and show melatonin has opposing and potentially protective effects warranting additional investigation. © 2017

  17. Safety and effectiveness of olanzapine in monotherapy: a multivariate analysis of a naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Miguel; Cañas, Fernando; Gibert, Juan; Gascón, Josep; Carrasco, José-Luis; Bobes, Julio; Gómez, Juan-Carlos; Alvarez, Enrique

    2005-07-01

    This study investigated safety and effectiveness of olanzapine in monotherapy compared with conventional antipsychotics in treatment of acute inpatients with schizophrenia. This was a prospective, comparative, nonrandomized, open-label, multisite, observational study of Spanish inpatients with an acute episode of schizophrenia. Data included safety assessments with an extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) questionnaire and the report of spontaneous adverse events, plus clinical assessments with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S). A multivariate methodology was used to more adequately determine which factors can influence safety and effectiveness of olanzapine in monotherapy. 339 patients treated with olanzapine in monotherapy (OGm) and 385 patients treated with conventional antipsychotics (CG) were included in the analysis. Treatment-emergent EPS were significantly higher in the CG (pOGm (p=0.005). Logistic regression analyses revealed that the only variable significantly correlated with treatment-emergent EPS and clinical response was treatment strategy, with patients in OGm having 1.5 times the probability of obtaining a clinical response and patients in CG having 5 times the risk of developing EPS. In this naturalistic study olanzapine in monotherapy was better-tolerated and at least as effective as conventional antipsychotics.

  18. Antipsychotic efficacy in psychosis with co-morbid cannabis misuse: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin P; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of cannabis use in patients with psychotic mental illness is known to be high and is suspected to exacerbate symptoms and worsen prognosis. We aimed to evaluate evidence of antipsychotic efficacy in reducing the burden of psychotic symptoms and cannabis use in individuals with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. A systematic review was conducted of antipsychotic treatment in those with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. Quality of evidence for each study and outcomes were rated using the 'GRADE' approach. Twenty-two studies were identified: 13 experimental and 9 observational, including a total sample of 1543 patients, 761 of whom had a diagnosed cannabis use disorder. The most frequent antipsychotics compared were risperidone, olanzapine and clozapine with olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol. No clear differences between antipsychotics were demonstrated. Future studies are needed to confirm whether clozapine is superior to other antipsychotics in reducing cannabis use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Olanzapine and sibutramine have opposing effects on the motivation for palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; Janhunen, Sanna K; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Baclesanu, Roxana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H; La Fleur, Susanne E

    2012-04-01

    Both olanzapine and sibutramine target serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission and influence body weight, but in opposite ways. The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine, an antagonist at serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors, frequently induces weight gain as a side-effect, whereas sibutramine, a noradrenaline/serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is known as a weight-reducing agent. To investigate whether altered motivation for palatable food influences the effect of these drugs on body weight, we determined their effects on responding for sucrose pellets under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement in rats. We found that a low dose of olanzapine selectively increased responding to sucrose, without affecting free-feeding intake of sucrose. In contrast, sibutramine dose-dependently reduced responding to sucrose and similarly reduced free-feeding intake. Furthermore, coadministration of a dose of sibutramine that failed to affect responding to sucrose when administered alone prevented the increase in motivation by the effective dose of olanzapine. These data show that increased motivation for palatable food is likely to be a significant contributor to olanzapine-induced weight gain. Moreover, the ability of sibutramine to reduce this motivation for palatable food may play an important role in the efficacy of sibutramine as an add-on treatment to counteract olanzapine-induced weight gain.

  20. Amisulpride versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; da Mota Neto, Joaquim I Silveira; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of amisulpride compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We updated this search in July 2012 and added 47 new trials to the awaiting classification section. Selection criteria We included randomised, at least single-blind, trials comparing oral amisulpride with oral forms of aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For continuous data we calculated weighted mean differences (MD), for dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results The review currently includes ten short to medium term trials with 1549 participants on three comparisons: amisulpride versus olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. The overall attrition rate was considerable (34.7%) with no significant difference between groups. Amisulpride was similarly effective as olanzapine and risperidone and more effective than ziprasidone (leaving the study early due to inefficacy: n=123, 1 RCT, RR 0.21 CI 0.05 to 0.94, NNT 8 CI 5 to 50

  1. Determination of olanzapine in whole blood using simple protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the quantification of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine in whole blood using dibenzepine as internal standard (IS). After acidic methanol-induced protein precipitation...

  2. Central administration of an orexin receptor 1 antagonist prevents the stimulatory effect of Olanzapine on endogenous glucose production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girault, Elodie M.; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine (Olan) induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these undesired side-effects are currently unknown. It has been shown that peripheral injections of Olan activate neurons in

  3. Chronic treatment with olanzapine increases adiposity by changing fuel substrate and causes desensitization of the acute metabolic side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girault, Elodie M.; Guigas, Bruno; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2014-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these metabolic side-effects are unknown at the moment. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes induced by a chronic

  4. Chronic treatment with olanzapine increases adiposity by changing fuel substrate and causes desensitization of the acute metabolic side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girault, Elodie M; Guigas, Bruno; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these metabolic side-effects are unknown at the moment. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes induced by a chronic

  5. Assessment of anti-arrhythmic activity of antipsychotic drugs in an animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mow, Tomas; Frederiksen, Kristen; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2015-01-01

    limited experimental information exists about the effects of α1-adrenergic receptor activity of antipsychotic drugs in pro-arrhythmic models, we have decided to investigate this. In this study we show that four antipsychotic drugs all have high affinity for α1-adrenergic receptor (sertindole>risperidone>haloperidol>olanzapine......) and all block IKr (sertindole>haloperidol>risperidone>olanzapine). In canine Purkinje fibres, α1-adrenergic stimulation prolonged action potential duration; however, the stimulation does not cause afterdepolarizations, even in the presence of dofetilide-induced delayed repolarization. We showed...

  6. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; El-Sayeh, Hany George G; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (March 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral aripiprazole with oral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes four trials with 1404 participants on two out of eight possible comparisons - aripiprazole versus olanzapine and aripiprazole versus risperidone. The overall number of participants leaving the studies early was considerable (38.5%), limiting the validity of the findings, but with no significant differences between groups. Aripiprazole was less efficacious than olanzapine in terms of the general mental state (PANSS total score: n=794, 2 RCTs, MD 4.96 CI 1.85 to 8.06), but it was associated with fewer side

  7. [Functional status and quality of life in Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia treated with atypical or typical antipsychotics: outcomes of the 12 months schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes (IC-SOHO) Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Jorge; Assunção, Sheila; Gargoloff, Pedro; Ibarra, Hernan Silva; Gasca, Jaime Aguilar; Fournais, Erick Landa; Adan, Pablo; Andrades, Nestor J; Dyachkova, Yulia

    2005-01-01

    Functional status and quality of life outcomes in Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia were compared after 12 months of monotherapy treatment with olanzapine, risperidone or typical antipsychotics. Both outcomes were assessed as part of a prospective, large (N= 7658), international (27 countries), observational study. from the Latin American subpopulation (N= 2671; 11 countries) are presented. Compared to typical antipsychotics, olanzapine and risperidone were associated with significantly (p < 0.05) greater odds of employment and social activity, and significantly greater improvements in quality of life. Olanzapine was also associated with significantly greater odds of living independently, compared to typical antipsychotics. This study indicates that functional status and quality of life outcomes are likely to be more favorable when Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia are treated with olanzapine or risperidone monotherapy, rather than typical antipsychotics.

  8. Antipsychotic agents in the treatment of anorexia nervosa: neuropsychopharmacologic rationale and evidence from controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewerton, Timothy D

    2012-08-01

    The search for an effective psychopharmacologic strategy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) has been elusive for decades and has run the gamut from reserpine to typical antipsychotics, to lithium, to tetrahydrocannabinol, to growth hormone, to anticonvulsants, to antidepressants, to atypical antipsychotics. Only recently has there arisen a potential "diamond in the rough" in the form of the atypical antipsychotic agent, olanzapine, which, in four randomized clinical trials, has shown superiority to placebo (two studies), chlorpromazine (one study), and aripiprazole (one study) in terms of weight gain and/or reduction in obsessional symptoms. The pharmacologic profile of olanzapine and other antipsychotic medications is discussed in light of the known pathophysiology of AN involving serotonin and dopamine systems, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  9. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  10. Acute camptocormia induced by olanzapine: a case report

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    Boyer Stéphane

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Camptocormia refers to an abnormal posture with flexion of the thoraco-lumbar spine which increases during walking and resolves in supine position. This symptom is an increasingly recognized feature of parkinsonian and dystonic disorders, but may also be caused by neuromuscular diseases. There is recent evidence that both central and peripheral mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of camptocormia. We report a case of acute onset of camptocormia, a rare side effect induced by olanzapine, a second-generation atypical anti-psychotic drug with fewer extra-pyramidal side-effects, increasingly used as first line therapy for schizophrenia, delusional disorders and bipolar disorder. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman with no history of neuromuscular disorder, treated for chronic delusional disorder for the last ten years, received two injections of long-acting haloperidol. She was then referred for fatigue. Physical examination showed a frank parkinsonism without other abnormalities. Routine laboratory tests showed normal results, notably concerning creatine kinase level. Fatigue was attributed to haloperidol which was substituted for olanzapine. Our patient left the hospital after five days without complaint. She was admitted again three days later with acute back pain. Examination showed camptocormia and tenderness in paraspinal muscles. Creatine kinase level was elevated (2986 UI/L. Magnetic resonance imaging showed necrosis and edema in paraspinal muscles. Olanzapine was discontinued. Pain resolved quickly and muscle enzymes were normalized within ten days. Risperidone was later introduced without significant side-effect. The camptocormic posture had disappeared when the patient was seen as an out-patient one year later. Conclusions Camptocormia is a heterogeneous syndrome of various causes. We believe that our case illustrates the need to search for paraspinal muscle damage, including drug

  11. Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Somnolence: Incidence, Mechanisms, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Sun, Hongwei; Wang, Zuowei; Ren, Ming; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2016-09-01

    Somnolence is a common side effect of antipsychotics. To assess the incidence of this side effect, we performed a MEDLINE search for randomized, double-blinded, placebo- or active-controlled studies of adult patients treated with antipsychotics for schizophrenia, mania, bipolar depression, or bipolar disorder. We extracted rates of somnolence from original publications and pooled them based on the dose of each antipsychotic in the same psychiatric condition, then estimated the absolute risk increase (ARI) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of an antipsychotic relative to placebo or an active comparator in the same psychiatric condition. According to the ARI in acute schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and bipolar depression, antipsychotics can be classified as high somnolence (clozapine), moderate somnolence (olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone), and low somnolence (aripiprazole, asenapine, haloperidol, lurasidone, paliperidone, cariprazine). The risk of somnolence with blonanserin, brexpiprazole, chlorpromazine, iloperidone, sertindole, and zotepine needs further investigation. The rates of somnolence were positively correlated to dose and duration for some antipsychotics, but not for others. Many factors, including antipsychotic per se, the method used to measure somnolence, patient population, study design, and dosing schedule, might affect the incidence of antipsychotic-induced somnolence. The mechanisms of antipsychotic-induced somnolence are likely multifactorial, although the blockade of histamine 1 receptors and α1 receptors may play a major role. The management of antipsychotic-induced somnolence should include sleep hygiene education, choosing an antipsychotic with a lower risk for somnolence, starting at a lower dose with a slower titration based on psychiatric diagnoses, adjusting doses when necessary, and minimizing concurrent somnolence-prone agents. Since most cases of somnolence were mild to moderate, allowing tolerance to

  12. Time to discontinuation of atypical versus typical antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia

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    Swartz Marvin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate over whether atypical antipsychotics are more effective than typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. This naturalistic study compares atypical and typical antipsychotics on time to all-cause medication discontinuation, a recognized index of medication effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods We used data from a large, 3-year, observational, non-randomized, multisite study of schizophrenia, conducted in the U.S. between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Patients who were initiated on oral atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, or ziprasidone or oral typical antipsychotics (low, medium, or high potency were compared on time to all-cause medication discontinuation for 1 year following initiation. Treatment group comparisons were based on treatment episodes using 3 statistical approaches (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox Proportional Hazards regression model, and propensity score-adjusted bootstrap resampling methods. To further assess the robustness of the findings, sensitivity analyses were performed, including the use of (a only 1 medication episode for each patient, the one with which the patient was treated first, and (b all medication episodes, including those simultaneously initiated on more than 1 antipsychotic. Results Mean time to all-cause medication discontinuation was longer on atypical (N = 1132, 256.3 days compared to typical antipsychotics (N = 534, 197.2 days; p Conclusion In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, time to medication discontinuation for any cause appears significantly longer for atypical than typical antipsychotics regardless of the typical antipsychotic potency level. Findings were primarily driven by clozapine and olanzapine, and to a lesser extent by risperidone. Furthermore, only clozapine and olanzapine therapy showed consistently and significantly longer treatment duration compared to perphenazine, a medium

  13. Metabolic Signature of Antipsychotics Used in the Treatment of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) are prescribed to patients with autism spectrum disorders with symptoms of aggression or agitation, stereotypic behavior...human preadipocytes which were induced to differentiate in culture. Cells were incubated with the drugs for 72 hrs, and after media replacement...conditioned media were collected for 4 hrs and analyzed for glycerol by a colorimetric assay. As evident in Fig 4, Olanzapine caused dose-dependent

  14. Haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine and aripiprazole in the management of delirium: A comparison of efficacy, safety, and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Soenke; Jenewein, Josef; Breitbart, William

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and side-effect profile of the typical antipsychotic haloperidol with that of the atypical antipsychotics risperidone, olanzapine, and aripiprazole in the management of delirium. The Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS), the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scale, and a side-effect rating were recorded at baseline (T1), after 2-3 days (T2), and after 4-7 days (T3). Some 21 cases were case-matched by age, preexisting dementia, and baseline MDAS scores, and subsequently analyzed. The baseline characteristics of the medication groups were not different: The mean age of the patients ranged from 64.0 to 69.6 years, dementia was present in between 23.8 and 28.6%, and baseline MDAS scores were 19.9 (haloperidol), 18.6 (risperidone), 19.4 (olanzapine), and 18.0 (aripiprazole). The doses of medication at T3 were 5.5 mg haloperidol, 1.3 mg risperidone, 7.1 mg olanzapine, and 18.3 mg aripiprazole. Over one week, the decline in MDAS scores between medications was equal, and no differences between individual MDAS scores existed at T2 or T3. After one week, the MDAS scores were 6.8 (haloperidol), 7.1 (risperidone), 11.7 (olanzapine), and 8.3 (aripiprazole). At T2, delirium resolution occurred in 42.9-52.4% of cases and at T3 in 61.9-85.7%; no differences in assessments between medications existed. Recorded side effects were extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs) in haloperidol- and risperidone-managed patients (19 and 4.8%, respectively) and sedation with olanzapine (28.6%). Haloperidol, risperidone, aripiprazole, and olanzapine were equally effective in the management of delirium; however, they differed in terms of their side-effect profile. Extrapyramidal symptoms were most frequently recorded with haloperidol, and sedation occurred most frequently with olanzapine.

  15. Reasons for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine in the treatment of schizophrenia from the perspectives of patients and clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jian Chen1, Haya Ascher-Svanum1, Allen W Nyhuis1, Michael G Case1, Glenn A Phillips1, Kory J Schuh1, Vicki Poole Hoffmann2 1Eli Lilly and Company, 2Lilly USA, LLC, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: The aim of this study was to assess the reasons for discontinuing or continuing olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia, from the perspectives of the patients and their clinicians. Methods: The Reasons for Antipsychotic Discontinuation/Continuation (RAD is a pair of questionnaires assessing these reasons from the perspectives of patients and their clinicians. Outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 199 who were not acutely ill participated in a 22-week open-label study of olanzapine from November 2006 to September 2008. Reasons for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine (on a five-point scale, along with the single most important reason and the top primary reasons, were identified. Concordance between reasons given by patients and clinicians was assessed. Results: The top primary reasons for continuing olanzapine were patients' perceptions of improvement, improvement of positive symptoms, and improved functioning. The study discontinuation rate was low (30.2%, and only a subset of patients who discontinued reported reasons for medication discontinuation. The top primary reasons for discontinuing olanzapine were insufficient improvement or worsening of positive symptoms, adverse events, and insufficient improvement or worsening of negative symptoms. Ratings given by patients and clinicians were highly concordant. Conclusion: The main reason for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine appears to be medication efficacy, especially for positive symptoms. Reasons for medication discontinuation differ somewhat from reasons for continuation, with a high level of concordance between patient and clinician responses. Keywords: antipsychotic agents, schizophrenia, olanzapine, questionnaires

  16. Neural Basis for the Ability of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Higuchi, Yuko; Uehara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT) receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs), e.g., clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone...

  17. Formulation and Evaluation of Olanzapine Matrix Pellets for Controlled Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammed Khan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Olanzapine is an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia. This research was carried out to design oral controlled release matrix pellets of water insoluble drug Olanzapine (OZ, using blend of Sodium Alginate (SA and Glyceryl Palmito-Stearate (GPS as matrix polymers, micro crystalline cellulose (MCC as spheronizer enhancer and Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS as pore forming agent. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic used in treatment of   schizophrenia. This research was carried out to design oral controlled release matrix pellets of water insoluble drug Olanzapine (OZ, using blend of Sodium Alginate (SA and Glyceryl Palmito-Stearate (GPS as matrix polymers, micro crystalline cellulose (MCC as spheronizer enhancer and Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS as pore forming agent. "nMethods: OZ formulations were developed by the pelletization technique by drug loaded pellets and characterized with regard to the drug content, size distribution, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray Diffraction study (XRD. Stability studies were carried out on the optimized formulation for a period of 90 days at 40 ± 2 °C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity. Results and major conclusion: The drug content was in the range of 93.34-98.12 %. The mean particle size of the drug loaded pellets was in the range 1024 to 1087μm. SEM photographs and calculated sphericity factor confirmed that the prepared formulations were spherical in nature. The compatibility between drug and polymers in the drug loaded pellets was confirmed by DSC and FTIR studies. Stability studies indicated that pellets are stable. XRD patterns revealed the crystalline nature of the pure OZ. Loose surface crystal study indicated that crystalline OZ is present in all formulations and more clear in formulation F5. Drug release was controlled for more than 24 hrs and mechanism of the

  18. Reasons for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine in the treatment of schizophrenia from the perspectives of patients and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Nyhuis, Allen W; Case, Michael G; Phillips, Glenn A; Schuh, Kory J; Hoffmann, Vicki Poole

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reasons for discontinuing or continuing olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia, from the perspectives of the patients and their clinicians. The Reasons for Antipsychotic Discontinuation/Continuation (RAD) is a pair of questionnaires assessing these reasons from the perspectives of patients and their clinicians. Outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 199) who were not acutely ill participated in a 22-week open-label study of olanzapine from November 2006 to September 2008. Reasons for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine (on a five-point scale), along with the single most important reason and the top primary reasons, were identified. Concordance between reasons given by patients and clinicians was assessed. The top primary reasons for continuing olanzapine were patients' perceptions of improvement, improvement of positive symptoms, and improved functioning. The study discontinuation rate was low (30.2%), and only a subset of patients who discontinued reported reasons for medication discontinuation. The top primary reasons for discontinuing olanzapine were insufficient improvement or worsening of positive symptoms, adverse events, and insufficient improvement or worsening of negative symptoms. Ratings given by patients and clinicians were highly concordant. The main reason for continuing or discontinuing olanzapine appears to be medication efficacy, especially for positive symptoms. Reasons for medication discontinuation differ somewhat from reasons for continuation, with a high level of concordance between patient and clinician responses.

  19. Efficacy of olanzapine long-acting injection in patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia: an insight from effect size comparison with historical oral data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detke Holland C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To treat acute schizophrenia, a long-acting injectable antipsychotic needs a rapid onset of action and therapeutic profile similar to that of oral agents. The present post-hoc analyses compared results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI for acute schizophrenia with those observed in similarly designed trials of oral olanzapine. Methods Six-week results from the olanzapine LAI study (N = 404 were compared with those of 3 oral studies (study 1: olanzapine vs. haloperidol vs. placebo [N = 335]; study 2: olanzapine vs. haloperidol vs. low-dose olanzapine [N = 431]; study 3: olanzapine vs. placebo vs. low-dose olanzapine [N = 152]. All patients had baseline Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS scores ≥24 (0–6 scale. Six-week effect sizes were calculated. Efficacy onset, pharmacokinetics, discontinuations, weight gain, and extrapyramidal symptoms were also assessed. Results At 6 weeks, mean BPRS scores decreased by 14 to 15 points for olanzapine LAI (405 mg/4 weeks, 210 or 300 mg/2 weeks, by 8 to 16 for oral olanzapine (10 ± 2.5 or 15 ± 2.5 mg/day, and by 12 to 13 for haloperidol (15 ± 5 mg/day. For those same dose groups, effect sizes vs. placebo for the BPRS were 0.7 to 0.8 for olanzapine LAI, 0.5 to 0.7 for oral olanzapine, and 0.6 for haloperidol. The first statistically significant separation from placebo on the BPRS occurred at 3 days for the olanzapine LAI groups and at 1 week for oral olanzapine and haloperidol (15 ± 5 mg/day in oral study 1 although as late as week 6 for the 10-mg/day olanzapine dose in oral study 3. Olanzapine concentrations were similar across studies. Weight gain ≥7% of baseline occurred in up to 35% of olanzapine LAI and oral patients versus up to 12% of haloperidol and placebo patients. Extrapyramidal symptoms were lowest in the olanzapine LAI groups and significantly greater

  20. Efficacy of amisulpride and olanzapine for negative symptoms and cognitive impairments: An open-label clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Negative symptoms and diminished cognitive ability are also considered as core features of schizophrenia. There are many studies in which negative symptoms and cognitive impairments are individually treated with atypical antipsychotic in comparison with either a placebo or a typical antipsychotic. There is paucity of studies comparing the efficacy of olanzapine and amisulpride on improvement of negative symptoms and cognitive impairments. Aim: To examine the effectiveness of amisulpride and olanzapine in treatment of negative symptoms and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: Total 40 adult inpatients diagnosed as schizophrenia fulfilling inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the study with their informed consent. These patients were recruited consecutively to one of the two drug regimen group, i.e. tab Amisulpride (100-300 mg/day and tab Olanzapine (10-20 mg. Patients were evaluated on day 0 and day 60 with various rating scales like Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS, Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS, Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS, and three different scales to measure drug side effects. Results: The mean SANS score in amisulpride and olanzapine group at day 0 and day 60 were 83.89 (±12.67 and 21.00 (±11.82 and 84.40 (±13.22 and 26.75 (±12.41, respectively. The mean rank of SCoRS global in amisulpride and olanzapine group at day 0 and day 60 were 4.78 (±1.13 and 2.78 (±0.63 and 4.85 (±1.18 and 3.30 (±1.12, respectively. The percentage improvement in SANS, SAPS, SCoRS interviewer, and SCoRS global in amisulpride group are 74.96%, 13.36%, 54.14%, and 42.00%, respectively. Similarly in olanzapine group percentage improvement in SANS, SAPS, SCoRS interviewer, and SCoRS global are 68.30%, 30.28%, 35.22%, and 31.95%, respectively. There is significant

  1. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms during treatment with olanzapine and risperidone: A prospective study of 113 patients with recent-onset schizophrenia or related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Lieuwe; Beuk, Nico; Hoogenboom, Britt; Dingemans, Peter; Linszen, Don

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) differs during treatment with olanzapine or risperidone and to establish whether duration of antipsychotic treatment is related to severity of OCS. Method: We conducted a prospective study of consecutively hospitalized

  2. Switching from risperidone to olanzapine in a one-year, randomized, open-label effectiveness study of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faries, Douglas E; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Nyhuis, Allen W; Kinon, Bruce J

    2008-05-01

    Switching medications is common in the treatment of schizophrenia. This study examines the effectiveness of olanzapine therapy following a clinically warranted switch from risperidone during treatment of patients with schizophrenia. This post-hoc analysis used data from the risperidone arm of a randomized, open-label, 1-year study of patients with schizophrenia. Study protocol permitted antipsychotic switching when clinically warranted, and outcomes were assessed with standard psychiatric measures. Statistical analyses assessed changes from pre- to post-medication switch and endpoint comparisons between patients switched from risperidone to olanzapine and patients continued on risperidone. Most patients who switched from risperidone switched to olanzapine (43/60; 71.7%). Average duration of risperidone treatment prior to switching was 86 days (mean modal dose 4.0 mg/day). Most switchers (86%) completed the 1-year study on olanzapine (average duration 241 days; mean modal dose 12.0 mg/day). Following switch to olanzapine, patients experienced significant improvements on clinical (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) and social (Quality of Life Inventory) parameters, with similar proportions of patients achieving remission status at endpoint compared with risperidone patients not requiring medication switch (41.9 vs. 35.5%). Mean weight gain for switchers was approximately 0.4 kg while on risperidone (average treatment duration < 3 months) and 2.4 kg on olanzapine (average treatment duration approximately 8 months). This study suggests that olanzapine is an effective treatment option for schizophrenia patients requiring a switch from risperidone. Given the small sample size and lack of a comparative group, one cannot determine if other medication options would have been as effective as the switch to olanzapine. Thus, further research is warranted.

  3. RNA sequencing reveals a slow to fast muscle fiber type transition after olanzapine infusion in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lynch

    Full Text Available Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs, like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1, while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions.

  4. Disruption of conditioned reward association by typical and atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, C L; Elmer, G I

    2010-07-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are broadly classified into typical and atypical compounds; they vary in their pharmacological profile however a common component is their antagonist effects at the D2 dopamine receptors (DRD2). Unfortunately, diminished DRD2 activation is generally thought to be associated with the severity of neuroleptic-induced anhedonia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and typical antipsychotic haloperidol in a paradigm that reflects the learned transfer of incentive motivational properties to previously neutral stimuli, namely autoshaping. In order to provide a dosing comparison to a therapeutically relevant endpoint, both drugs were tested against amphetamine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition as well. In the autoshaping task, rats were exposed to repeated pairings of stimuli that were differentially predictive of reward delivery. Conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue (sign-tracking) and to the reward (goal-tracking) increased during repeated pairings in the vehicle treated rats. Haloperidol and olanzapine completely abolished this behavior at relatively low doses (100microg/kg). This same dose was the threshold dose for each drug to antagonize the sensorimotor gating deficits produced by amphetamine. At lower doses (3-30microg/kg) both drugs produced a dose-dependent decrease in conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue. There was no difference between drugs at this dose range which indicates that olanzapine disrupts autoshaping at a significantly lower proposed DRD2 receptor occupancy. Interestingly, neither drug disrupted conditioned approach to the reward at the same dose range that disrupted conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue. Thus, haloperidol and olanzapine, at doses well below what is considered therapeutically relevant, disrupts the attribution of incentive motivational value to previously neutral cues. Drug effects on this dimension of reward

  5. Ziprasidone versus olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine in patients with chronic schizophrenia: a 12-week open-label, multicentre clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lublin, Henrik; Haug, Hans-Joachim; Koponen, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy, safety and tolerability of ziprasidone versus the comparators olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine were investigated in adult patients with chronic schizophrenia, schizoaffective and schizophreniform disorders, with lack of efficacy or intolerance to their previous antipsychotic...... treatment based on clinical judgement of the investigator. A total of 293 patients were randomized to 12 weeks treatment with either ziprasidone 80-160 mg/day (n=147) or with one of the comparator drugs (n=146). In the latter group the investigator could choose between olanzapine 10-20 mg/day (n=24...... to the disadvantage of ziprasidone) to the composite group (olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine) on the total PANSS score as well as on all subscores (P

  6. Determination of olanzapine in whole blood using simple protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the quantification of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine in whole blood using dibenzepine as internal standard (IS). After acidic methanol-induced protein precipitation...... of the whole blood samples, olanzapine and IS were chromatographed on a reversed-phase Zorbax Extend-C(18)-column at pH 9.0. Quantification was performed on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer employing electrospray ionization technique operating in multiple reaction monitoring and positive ion mode. Total...... chromatographic run time was 15 min, and calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 0.005 to 0.50 mg/kg olanzapine in whole blood. The method was validated for selectivity, matrix interference, recovery, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation (LOQ), accuracy, precision...

  7. Olanzapine approved for the acute treatment of schizophrenia or manic/mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Maloney

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ann E Maloney1,2, Linmarie Sikich31Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Severe and persistent mental illnesses in children and adolescents, such as early-onset schizophrenia spectrum (EOSS disorders and pediatric bipolar disorder (pedBP, are increasingly recognized. Few treatments have demonstrated efficacy in rigorous clinical trials. Enduring response to current medications appears limited. Recently, olanzapine was approved for the treatment of adolescents with schizophrenia or acute manic/mixed episodes in pedBP.Methods: PubMed searches were conducted for olanzapine combined with pharmacology, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. Searches related to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were limited to children and adolescents. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles were hand-checked for additional relevant studies. The epidemiology, phenomenology, and treatment of EOSS and pedBP, and olanzapine’s pharmacology are reviewed. Studies of olanzapine treatment in youth with EOSS and pedBP are examined.Results: Olanzapine is efficacious for EOSS and pedBP. However, olanzapine is not more efficacious than risperidone, molindone, or haloperidol in EOSS and is less efficacious than clozapine in treatment-resistant EOSS. No comparative trials have been done in pedBP. Olanzapine is associated with weight gain, dyslipidemia, and transaminase elevations in youth. Extrapyramidal symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and blood dyscrasias have also been reported but appear rare.Conclusions: The authors conclude that olanzapine should be considered a second-line agent in EOSS and pedBP due to its risks for significant weight gain and lipid dysregulation. Awareness of the consistent weight and metabolic changes observed in olanzapine

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Generation Antipsychotic Medications in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; Gerhard, Tobias; Huang, Cecilia; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Bobo, William V.; Crystal, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Scant information exists to guide pharmacological treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. We examine variation across commonly prescribed second-generation antipsychotic medications in medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission among children and adolescents clinically diagnosed with schizophrenia. A 45-state Medicaid claims file (2001–2005) was analyzed focusing on outpatients, aged 6–17 years, diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder prior to starting a new episode of antipsychotic monotherapy with risperidone (n = 805), olanzapine (n = 382), quetiapine (n = 260), aripiprazole (n = 173), or ziprasidone (n = 125). Cox proportional hazard regressions estimated adjusted hazard ratios of 180-day antipsychotic medication discontinuation and 180-day psychiatric hospitalization for patients treated with each medication. During the first 180 days following antipsychotic initiation, most youth treated with quetiapine (70.7%), ziprasidone (73.3%), olanzapine (73.7%), risperidone (74.7%), and aripirazole (76.5%) discontinued their medication (χ2 = 1.69, df = 4, P = .79). Compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazards of antipsychotic discontinuation did not significantly differ for any of the 4-comparator medications. The percentages of youth receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment while receiving their initial antipsychotic medication ranged from 7.19% (aripiprazole) to 9.89% (quetiapine) (χ2 = 0.79, df = 4, P = .94). As compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazard ratio of psychiatric hospital admission was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.57–1.61) for olanzapine, 1.03 (95% CI: 0.59–1.81) for quetiapine, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.43–1.70) for aripiprazole, and 1.22 (95% CI: 0.60–2.51) for ziprasidone. The results suggest that rapid antipsychotic medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission are common in the community treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. No significant differences were detected in risk of either adverse outcome

  9. Risperidone versus olanzapine in the acute treatment of Persistent Delusional Disorder: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Karishma; Arasappa, Rashmi; Prasad M, Krishna; Zutshi, Amit; Chand, Prabhat K; Murthy, Pratima; Philip, Mariamma; Muralidharan, Kesavan

    2017-07-01

    There is a dearth of prospective trials studying treatment response in Persistent Delusional Disorder (PDD) to guide clinical practice. Available retrospective data indicate good response to second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We selected the data of patients prescribed either olanzapine or risperidone from a retrospective chart review of PDD (n=455) at our centre. We compared the two groups olanzapine (n =86) versus risperidone (n =280) on dose, drug adherence, response and adverse effects. The two groups were comparable on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of PDD. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups on adherence (>80%) and response to treatment (>52% good response). Olanzapine was effective at lower mean chlorpromazine equivalents than risperidone. Logistic regression analysis identified shorter mean duration of illness, good adherence and absence of substance dependence as predictors of good response to both drugs. Our study indicates that acute PDD responds well to treatment with both risperidone and olanzapine, provided adherence can be ensured. In the absence of specific treatment guidelines and randomized controlled trials for PDD, our analysis reaffirms the efficacy of SGAs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Batch and flow-injection methods for the spectrophotometric determination of olanzapine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinska, A.; Nalewajko, E

    2004-04-22

    An indirect batch spectrophotometric and direct flow-injection (FI) visible spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of the novel anti-psychotic drug olanzapine (OLA). The batch method is based on the oxidation of olanzapine by a known excess of potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) in the presence of the mixture of sulphuric and phosphoric acids (1:1 (v/v)). The absorbance of unreacted oxidant is measured at 425 nm. The absorbance decreases linearly with increasing concentration of the assayed drug. The FI method with detection at 540 nm is based on the direct oxidation of olanzapine one of two oxidants, cerium(IV) sulphate or potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) in acidic medium. The calibration graph were linear over the range of 2.5-40 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the batch method and 0.05-300 and 0.5-250 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the FI methods, used cerium (IV) sulphate and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) respectively. Both FI methods gave similar results in terms of precision and accuracy. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), was <1%. The accuracy, obtained from recovery experiments, was 97.9-99.4%. The batch method gave slightly higher R.S.D. values (up to 2.3%) and lower values of accuracy (the recovery was between 96.5 and 96.6%). The methods developed were applied to the determination of olanzapine in a pharmaceutical product.

  11. Comparison between risperidone, olanzapine, and clozapine in the management of chronic schizophrenia: a naturalistic prospective 12-week observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Kupchik, Marina; Roitman, Suzana; Schwartz, Sima; Gonen, Noach; Mester, Roberto; Weizman, Abraham; Spivak, Baruch

    2006-06-01

    Risperidone, olanzapine, and clozapine are three atypical antipsychotic medications commonly used in the management of chronic schizophrenia. While they offer advantages with regard to clinical efficacy and side-effect profile, few studies have compared them in a naturalistic prospective observational manner. This study therefore investigated their comparative efficacy over 12 weeks including illness characteristics and adverse effects. One hundred thirty-one patients (76 M, 55 F) with DSMI-V schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were treated with risperidone (n = 38), olanzapine (n = 38), or clozapine (n = 55). All patients showed a significant decrease of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-positive scores. Decreases in tardive dyskinesia and impulsivity scores were noted with clozapine and olanzapine, respectively. No differences between the medications were noted on depression, anxiety, EPS, or overt aggression scores. Olanzapine and clozapine appeared to be more effective in females. Males showed a decreased sexual performance irrespective of the medication and those treated with risperidone and clozapine showed greater proportional reduction of overt aggression. Clozapine-treated patients showed significant increased weight, increased glucose levels, and lowered sexual performance. Risperidone patients tended to exhibit reduced cholesterol levels. Higher creatine kinase (CK) levels were noted in risperidone-treated patients. While cautious given the nature of the study design, results suggest differences in the response to various atypical antipsychotic medications regarding efficacy and side-effect susceptibility. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Antipsychotic treatment in child and adolescent first-episode psychosis: a longitudinal naturalistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Parellada, Mara; Soutullo, César A; Baeza, Immaculada; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Graell, Montserrat; Paya, Beatriz; Moreno, Dolores; de la Serna, Elena; Arango, Celso

    2008-08-01

    The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a naturalistic longitudinal study of early-onset first psychotic episodes. This report describes the antipsychotic treatment during the first year and compares the most frequently used agents after 6 months. Participants were 110 patients, aged 9-17 years, with a first psychotic episode attended consecutively at six different centers. The Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI), Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS), and Global Assessment of Function (GAF) scales were administered at baseline and at 6 months and the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effects Rating Scale only at 6 months. Diagnoses at baseline were 38.2% psychotic disorder not otherwise specified, 39.1% schizophrenia-type disorder, 11.8% depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms, and 10.9% bipolar disorder, manic episode with psychotic symptoms. The most frequently used antipsychotic agents were risperidone (n = 50), quetiapine (n = 18), and olanzapine (n = 16). Patients who were prescribed olanzapine or quetiapine had more negative and general symptoms. Using the baseline score as covariate, no significant differences were found in the reductions on any scale in patients treated with risperidone, quetiapine, or olanzapine for 6 months. Weight increase was greater with olanzapine than with risperidone (p = 0.020) or quetiapine (p = 0.040). More neurological side effects appeared with risperidone than with olanzapine (p = 0.022). All side effects were mild or moderate. Second-generation antipsychotics, especially risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine, are the most used in our context in first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. These three obtain similar clinical improvement, but differ in their side effects.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of olanzapine as first-line treatment for schizophrenia: results from a randomized, open-label, 1-year trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunis, Sandra L; Faries, Douglas E; Nyhuis, Allen W; Kinon, Bruce J; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Aquila, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    This randomized, open-label trial was designed to help inform antipsychotic treatment policies. It compared the 1-year cost-effectiveness of initial treatment with olanzapine (OLZ) (n = 229) versus a "fail-first" algorithm on conventional antipsychotics (then olanzapine if indicated) (CON) (n = 214); and versus initial treatment with risperidone (RIS) (n = 221). Individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from May 1998 to September 2001. Clinical, functioning, and resource utilization data were collected at baseline and five postbaseline visits. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores defined "clinical effectiveness;" Lehman Quality of Life Scale social relations scores defined "social effectiveness." Requiring failure on less expensive antipsychotics before use of olanzapine did not result in total cost savings, despite significantly higher antipsychotic costs with OLZ. Total 1-year mean costs were 21,283 dollars for CON; 20,891 dollars for OLZ; and 21,347 dollars for RIS (pair-wise comparisons nonsignificant). Intent-to-treat effectiveness comparisons (nonsignificant) were augmented by analyses that adjusted for duration on initial antipsychotic treatment, and by comparisons of patients remaining on initial antipsychotic treatment versus those who required switching. When accounting for differential switching rates (OLZ 0.14 vs. CON 0.53, P < 0.0001; vs. RIS 0.31, P < 0.0001), OLZ was significantly more effective than CON on clinical (P = 0.025) and social (P = 0.043) measures, and significantly more effective than RIS on the social (P = 0.002) measure. Further, patients initiated on an antipsychotic from which they needed to switch required additional resources for hospitalization (P = 0.036) and crisis services (P = 0.029). Approaches that integrate costs, effectiveness, and treatment patterns are important for providing optimal information regarding the value of first-line antipsychotic options for schizophrenia.

  14. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial of tapering antipsychotic co-treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Tiihonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable disparity between clinical practice and recommendations based on meta-analyses of antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia. For this reason, we investigated the clinical response to reducing the use olanzapine that had been previously added on clozapine treatment among seriously ill hospitalized patients. In a randomized controlled trial with crossover design, we studied volunteer patients (N = 15 who had olanzapine added on to clozapine in a state mental hospital. Clozapine monotherapy was just as effective as clozapine-olanzapine therapy, according to results from Clinical Global Impression Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning as primary outcome measures. Polypharmacy is widely used in treating schizophrenia, and usually, add-on medications are started because of worsening of the clinical state. A major confounding feature of these add-ons is whether observed improvements are caused by the medication or explained by the natural fluctuating course of the disorder. The present study, in spite of its small size, indicates the necessity of reconsidering the value of polypharmacy in treating schizophrenia.

  15. Effectiveness and safety of oral olanzapine treatment transitioned from rapid-acting intramuscular olanzapine for agitation associated with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri H

    2018-04-01

    administration, and 13.4±6.2 (n=351 at final observation (with the last observation carried forward approach, showing that reduction in agitation seen with RAIM was sustained with oral dose of olanzapine. The most common TEAEs were dyslalia and somnolence (each event occurred in four patients, and abnormal hepatic function and constipation (occurred in three patients. One serious adverse event of sudden cardiac death occurred after transitioned to oral olanzapine with many other antipsychotic drugs. Conclusion: In the treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia, RAIM could be generally transitioned to oral olanzapine without exacerbating adverse events or losing treatment effect. Keywords: agitation, schizophrenia, rapid-acting intramuscular olanzapine, Japan postmarketing surveillance study, PANSS-EC

  16. Antipsychotic drugs classified by their effects on the release of dopamine and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and striatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, B.H.C.; Kawahara, Y; de Boer, P; Geels, C; de Vries, J.B; Wikström, H.V; van Kalkeren, A; van Vliet, B; Kruse, C.H; Long, S.K

    2001-01-01

    Dose-effect curves were established for the effects of the antipsychotic drugs haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone on extracellular levels of dopamine and noradrenaline in the medial prefrontal cortex, and of dopamine in the striatum. Haloperidol was more effective in

  17. The effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on the electrical activity of the brain in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oytun Erbaş

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antipsychotic drugs are known to have strongeffect on the bioelectric activity in the brain. However,some studies addressing the changes on electroencephalography(EEG caused by typical and atypical antipsychoticdrugs are conflicting. We aimed to compare the effectsof typical and atypical antipsychotics on the electricalactivity in the brain via EEG recordings in a rat model.Methods: Thirty-two Sprague Dawley adult male ratswere used in the study. The rats were divided into fivegroups, randomly (n=7, for each group. The first groupwas used as control group and administered 1 ml/kg salineintraperitoneally (IP. Haloperidol (1 mg/kg (group 2,chlorpromazine (5 mg/kg (group 3, olanzapine (1 mg/kg(group 4, ziprasidone (1 mg/ kg (group 5 were injectedIP for five consecutive days. Then, EEG recordings ofeach group were taken for 30 minutes.Results: The percentages of delta and theta waves inhaloperidol, chlorpromazine, olanzapine and ziprasidonegroups were found to have a highly significant differencecompared with the saline administration group (p<0.001.The theta waves in the olanzapine and ziprasidonegroups were increased compared with haloperidol andchlorpromazine groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: The typical and atypical antipsychotic drugsmay be risk factor for EEG abnormalities. This studyshows that antipsychotic drugs should be used with caution.J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3: 279-284Key words: Haloperidol, chlorpromazine, olanzapine,ziprasidone, EEG, rat

  18. The Validity and Sensitivity of PANSS-6 in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren D; Foldager, Leslie; Mors, Ole

    2017-01-01

    correlation coefficient = 0.86). Based on 5080 ITT ratings, PANSS-6 identified symptom remission with an accuracy of 0.99 (95% confidence interval = 0.99-0.99). In ITT analyses, PANSS-6 and PANSS-30 identified the same statistically significant differences in antipsychotic efficacy, ie, olanzapine...

  19. Practical Guidelines for the Use of New Generation Antipsychotic Drugs (except Clozapine) in Adult Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Jose; Greenlee, Brian; Barber, Jack; Sabaawi, Mohamed; Singh, Nirbhay N.

    2009-01-01

    New generation antipsychotic (NGA) drugs introduced to the US market after clozapine (aripiprazole, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone) are frequently used in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, there is very limited research to fully establish evidence-based or personalized medicine approaches…

  20. Intramuscular Olanzapine in the Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Hospitalized Older Adults: A Retrospective Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Duong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While behavioral and psychological symptoms are frequent in hospitalized older adults with dementia or delirium, data supporting the off-label use of intramuscular atypical antipsychotics remain scarce. We examined the use of short-acting intramuscular (IM olanzapine in hospitalized older adults to manage behavioral and psychological symptoms. Methods. A retrospective observational study of inpatients 65 years or older with at least one order for olanzapine IM during admission in urban Ontario Canada was conducted. Patient demographics, prescriptions for olanzapine IM, reason for administration, perceived effectiveness, adverse events, concurrently prescribed psychotropics, comorbidities, and patient discharge destination were recorded. Results. Among 82 patients aged 65–96 years (mean ± SD 79.3 ± 7.7 85 cases were identified. Cognitive impairment or dementia affected 63.5% and 50.6% had comorbidities. Olanzapine IM was ordered 102 times and 34 patients (41% received at least one dose. The intended efficacy was achieved in 79.4% of 78 cases of 124 doses given (62.9%. Fourteen (41% patients who received doses experienced adverse events, with sedation and hypotension being the most common. Conclusions. Olanzapine IM appears effective in hospitalized older adults but is associated with potential adverse events. Structured monitoring and documentation are needed to ensure safe use in this high-risk population.

  1. Comparative safety of atypical antipsychotics and the risk of pneumonia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya; Pulungan, Zulkarnain; Jones, Barton T; Teigland, Christie

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have documented increased risk of pneumonia with antipsychotic use in the elderly; however, differential risk across individual atypical antipsychotics remains unaddressed. This study examines the effect of individual atypical antipsychotics on risk of pneumonia in elderly patients. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large claims database. The study population included new users of atypical antipsychotics (≥65 years). The multiple propensity-score adjusted survival model was used to examine risk of pneumonia within a 1-year follow-up period. A total of 92 234 patients newly prescribed atypical antipsychotic medication were identified. Of these, 41 780 (45.30%) were quetiapine users, 31 048 (33.66%) risperidone users, 11 375 (12.33%) olanzapine users, 6790 (7.36%) aripiprazole users, and 1241 (1.35%) ziprasidone users. Within the 1-year follow-up period, 12 411 (13.46%) patients taking atypical antipsychotics had a diagnosis of pneumonia. The multiple propensity-score-adjusted survival model revealed increased risk of pneumonia with the use of risperidone (hazard ratios (HR) 1.14, 95%CI 1.10-1.18) and olanzapine (HR 1.10, 95%CI 1.04-1.16) compared with the use of quetiapine. This large population-based study suggests that use of risperidone and olanzapine increases risk of pneumonia compared with use of quetiapine in elderly patients. This study provides new information on the comparative risk of pneumonia associated with different atypical antipsychotics in the elderly to support optimal treatment decisions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Sleep architecture and cognitive changes in olanzapine-treated patients with depression: a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazowski, Lauren K; Townsend, Ben; Hawken, Emily R; Jokic, Ruzica; du Toit, Regina; Milev, Roumen

    2014-07-17

    Disturbance in sleep quality is a symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) and thus improving quality of sleep is an important aspect of successful treatment. Here, a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study examined the effect of olanzapine (an atypical antipsychotic) augmentation therapy on sleep architecture, specifically slow wave sleep (SWS), in the treatment of depression. The effect of olanzapine augmentation therapy on other features of sleep (e.g., sleep continuity) and depression (e.g., illness severity and cognitive function) were also determined. Patients currently experiencing a major depressive episode and who were on a stable medication were included. Sleep architecture was measured by overnight ambulatory polysomnography. Illness severity was determined using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive function was examined using Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB): Spatial Working Memory (SWM), Spatial Span (SSP), and Reaction Time (RTI) tasks. Polysomnographs, clinical measures and cognitive tests were administered at baseline, after 2-4 days of treatment and after 28-31 days of treatment. Twenty-five patients participated in the study (N = 10, N = 15 for placebo and olanzapine treated groups respectively). The primary objective of the study was to assess the objective (polysomnographic) changes in sleep quality, defined as changes in SWS, following olanzapine treatment for depression. Latency to but not duration of SWS was found to significantly differ between olanzapine- and placebo-treated participants (Hedge's g: 0.97, 0.13 respectively). A significant improvement in olanzapine-treated participants over placebo-treated participants was observed in secondary outcome measures, including sleep efficiency, total sleep time, and sleep latency. Secondary objectives assessed the subjective changes in sleep quality parameters and correlated them with

  3. Incident users of antipsychotic agents and future use of cholesterol-lowering drugs: an observational, pharmacoepidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrede, Silje; Tvete, Ingunn F; Tanum, Lars; Steen, Vidar M; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic agents have serious metabolic adverse effects, among them dyslipidemia, which may necessitate secondary prophylaxis with cholesterol-lowering drugs. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), particularly clozapine and olanzapine, are known to confer a higher risk of metabolic adverse effects than first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs). However, little is known regarding the real-life number of antipsychotic-treated patients receiving statins. By extracting data from the Norwegian prescription database, all patients 18-69 years old that started treatment with an antipsychotic during 2004-2012 formed the basis for analysis (n = 301,713). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of FGA and SGA users prescribed with cholesterol-lowering agent during the same period. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate the risk of redeeming a cholesterol-lowering drug for formerly antipsychotic drug-naive patients (n = 147,218). Statin prescription rates in patients receiving antipsychotic agents were lower (5.3%) than comparable rates in studies covering the general population (34%) and lower than would be expected based on the recognized negative impact of antipsychotics on serum lipids. Statin prescription rates were affected by patient age, antipsychotic dose, and the number of antipsychotic agents prescribed, but rates were only 5% elevated in patients receiving SGAs compared to patients receiving FGAs (P = .048). Our results may support the notion that patients treated with antipsychotic agents receive suboptimal care with regard to metabolic adverse effects. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Olanzapine-associated hypothermia: a case report of a rare event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Monti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia, a potentially fatal condition, is defined as a drop of the body temperature below 35°C. The most common cause of severe hypothermia is the environmental exposure to low-temperatures. Other causes include septicemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, trauma, acute spinal cord injury, prolonged cardiac arrest and hypothyroidism. The hypothermia is an infrequent, but previously documented, adverse effect of antipsychotic medications. A 83-year-old Italian woman was transported to the Emergency Room with a reduced level of consciousness, Glasgow coma scale 7. She was bradycardic (heart rate 42 bpm, 80/150 mmHg blood pressure and respiratory rate 26/min. Her physical examination was significant for an anal temperature of 31°C. Blood exam and chest X-ray were unremarkable. In her clinical history, she was suffering from generalized anxiety disorder for the last 2 years and was prescribed olanzapine 7.5 mg daily. In recent days, the patient experienced a cognitive impairment with heat intolerance and had been reduced the dose of olanzapine 5 mg daily. On the basis of the clinical findings, the patient’s body temperature and blood exam, the diagnosis of olanzapine-associated hypothermia was made. The patient was gradually rewarmed with blankets and warm saline infusion and the olanzapine therapy was discontinued. She gradually regained consciousness after 18 h and, after 1 day, the patient’s body temperature increased up to 37.8°C with an improvement of the neurological conditions. We reported about the case of a patient treated with stable doses of olanzapine for a long period of time that developed hypothermia, a potentially fatal complication. This case shows that it is important to consider every change in the patient behavior, e.g., the poor resistance to heat present in our patient, that should exhibit warning sign of hypothermia.

  5. 'Myxoedema madness' with Capgras syndrome and catatonic features responsive to combination olanzapine and levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykov, Maksim A; Rath, Swapnil; Badger, Alison; Winder, Gerald Scott

    2016-09-09

    We present the case of an elderly woman with hypothyroidism and no psychiatric history who presented with new onset of psychosis, paranoia, catatonic features and Capgras syndrome (CS). This case illustrates the spectrum of neuropsychiatric symptoms that may accompany hypothyroidism and the importance of considering thyroid dysfunction as a primary contributor to severe psychiatric symptoms, especially in previously stable patients. We demonstrate the effectiveness of combination levothyroxine and olanzapine, with its favourable cardiac profile, in the treatment of myxoedema madness. Antipsychotics can be weaned once psychiatric symptoms resolve and hormone levels are stabilised. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Srisurapanont, Manit; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (’atypical’) antipsychotic drugs have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. It is not clear how the effects of the various second generation antipsychotic drugs differ. Objectives To evaluate the effects of quetiapine compared with other second generation antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007), inspected references of all identified studies, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information. Selection criteria We included all randomised control trials comparing oral quetiapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 21 randomised control trials (RCTs) with 4101 participants. These trials provided data on four comparisons - quetiapine versus clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone or ziprasidone. A major limitation to all findings is the high number of participants leaving studies prematurely (57.6%) and the substantial risk of biases in studies. Efficacy data favoured olanzapine and risperidone compared with quetiapine (PANSS total score versus olanzapine:10 RCTs, n=1449, WMD 3.66 CI 1.93 to 5.39; versus risperidone: 9 RCTs, n=1953, WMD 3.09 CI 1.01 to 5.16), but clinical meaning is unclear

  7. Risk of venous thromboembolism during treatment with antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masopust, Jiří; Malý, Radovan; Vališ, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The evidence to date on the relation between the risk of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) and antipsychotic agents derives primarily from observational and case history studies. While an increased risk of VTE has been associated with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic agents, particularly clozapine, there appears to be a growing number of reports on the occurrence of this adverse reaction during the use of second-generation antipsychotics, such as risperidone and olanzapine. The highest risk of pathological blood clotting emerges during the first 3 months after initiation of treatment with the product. Potential etiopathogenetic factors leading to VTE during treatment with antipsychotic agents include sedation, obesity, elevation of antiphospholipid antibodies, increased platelet activation and aggregation, hyperhomocysteinemia, and hyperprolactinemia. Diagnoses of schizophrenia and/or bipolar affective disorder, as well as hospitalization or stress with sympathetic activation and elevation of catecholamine levels, have been reported as known prothrombogenic factors. The present article contains the new version of the guideline for the prevention of VTE in psychiatric patients with limited mobility. Further prospective studies are necessary to elucidate the biological mechanisms of the relations between antipsychotic agents and VTE. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  8. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia. We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior.

  9. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Forte, Alberto; Erbuto, Denise; Serafini, Gianluca; Fiorillo, Andrea; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia). We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior. PMID:27727180

  10. Minimizing weight gain for patients taking antipsychotic medications: The potential role for early use of metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Victoria; Dasher, Robert; Gitlin, Michael; Parsi, Mehrban

    2017-05-01

    Patients taking antipsychotic medications are at high risk for weight gain, which in turn leads to poor health outcomes, nonadherence with treatment, and low self-esteem. We reviewed published studies of pharmacologic interventions aimed at minimizing antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Treatments initiated prior to onset of weight gain were compared with those that started once weight gain already had occurred. Although data are limited, adjunctive medications for weight management appear to be more effective when initiated at or near the time when patients are first exposed to antipsychotic medications. Interventions initiated later in the course of treatment-typically after weight gain already has occurred-rarely help patients return to their pretreatment weight. The most commonly used adjunctive intervention has been metformin. Certain patients benefit from initiating metformin early in their exposure to second-generation antipsychotic agents. In particular, young, healthy patients beginning olanzapine or clozapine probably will experience less weight gain if they concomitantly initiate metformin.

  11. Different antipsychotics elicit different effects on magnocellular oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic neurons as revealed by Fos immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, A; Bundzikova, J; Pirnik, Z

    2010-01-01

    of risperidone and haloperidol. Variabilities in Fos distribution in the PVN, SON, and ACS induced by antipsychotics may be helpful to understand more precisely the extent of their extra-forebrain actions with possible presumption of their functional impact and side effect consequences....... accessory (ACS) cell groups, and 4 distinct PVN subdivisions using a computerized light microscope. Most apparent activation of single Fos, Fos/OXY, and Fos/AVP cells was induced by clozapine and olanzapine; effects of risperidone and haloperidol were substantially lower; no colocalizations were revealed...... in naive or vehicle treated control rats. The data indicate the existence of a substantial diversity in the stimulatory effect of the selected antipsychotics on quantity of Fos, Fos/OXY, and Fos/AVP immunostainings with the preferential action of the atypicals clozapine over olanzapine and little effects...

  12. Intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome associated with use of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masato; Sano, Ichiya; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Fujihara, Etsuko; Tanito, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    We report 3 cases of intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (IFIS) during cataract surgery in patients without a history of selective α1-blocker use but with a long-term history of antipsychotic drug use. We reviewed previously reported cases of antipsychotic drug-associated IFIS cases. Observational case series. In case 1, bilateral IFIS developed in a 39-year-old man with chronic angle-closure glaucoma. He had used several classes of antipsychotic drugs to treat schizophrenia, including the first-generation antipsychotic drugs haloperidol and chlorpromazine, the dopamine system stabilizer aripiprazole, the dopamine serotonin antagonists olanzapine and quetiapine, and the serotonin dopamine antagonists risperidone and blonanserin for 7 years. In case 2, a 63-year-old woman with schizophrenia had used aripiprazole, quetiapine, and risperidone for more than 10 years. In case 3, a 65-year-old woman with an organic mental disorder had used haloperidol for more than 10 years. At least 5 cases of antipsychotic drug-induced IFIS have been reported in the literature. Any class of antipsychotic drugs can cause IFIS. Although antipsychotic drug-induced IFIS can be mild, surgeons should be alert to the possibility of IFIS when they treat patients with current and past use of antipsychotic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Atypical antipsychotic use and outcomes in an urban maternal mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatters Friedman, Susan; Moller-Olsen, Charmian; Prakash, Chandni; North, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    Objective Despite many women suffering from psychosis in their childbearing years, limited data exist about the use of atypical antipsychotic agents in pregnancy. Atypical antipsychotic agents are often used to treat bipolar disorder, instead of lithium or valproate because of the known teratogenicity of those agents. As well, atypical antipsychotics are often prescribed in anxiety disorders and depression. This study sought to describe pregnancy outcomes for women prescribed atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy. Methods This retrospective review included all cases treated by Auckland Maternal Mental Health services in which atypical antipsychotic agents were utilized during pregnancy over three years. Results Over the three years, 45 pregnant women were prescribed atypical antipsychotic agents, most commonly quetiapine or olanzapine. Two-fifths (40%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorder and almost one-third (31%) with a psychotic disorder. Two-thirds (64%) were prescribed multiple psychotropic medications during their pregnancy. Instrumental delivery rates were elevated at 38%. A minority (13%) of the women developed gestational diabetes mellitus. Although 7% of infants were born premature, all were born after 35 weeks. Two major malformations were noted, similar to baseline community rates. Conclusions This naturalistic study adds to the limited literature about treatment with atypical antipsychotic agents in pregnancy, though not adequately powered to detect small differences in malformations or obstetrical outcomes. It also highlights the myriad of indications for which pregnant women are prescribed atypical antipsychotics, and the multiple other risk factors seen in this population.

  14. Determination of olanzapine and N-desmethyl-olanzapine in plasma using a reversed-phase HPLC coupled with coulochemical detection: correlation of olanzapine or N-desmethyl-olanzapine concentration with metabolic parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mong-Liang Lu

    Full Text Available Olanzapine (OLZ is one of the most prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs but its use is associated with unfavorable metabolic abnormalities. N-desmethyl-olanzapine (DMO, one of the OLZ metabolites by CYP1A2, has been reported to have a normalizing action on metabolic abnormalities, but this remains unclear. Our aim was to explore the correlation between the concentrations of OLZ or DMO with various metabolic parameters in schizophrenic patients.The chromatographic analysis was carried out with a solvent delivery system coupled to a Coulochem III coulometric detector to determine OLZ and DMO simultaneously in OLZ-treated patients. The correlation between the concentration of OLZ or DMO and the metabolic parameters was analyzed by the Spearman rank order correlation method (r s.The established analytical method met proper standards for accuracy and reliability and the lower limitation of quantification for each injection of DMO or OLZ was 0.02 ng. The method was successfully used for the analysis of samples from nonsmoking patients (n = 48 treated with OLZ in the dosage range of 5-20 mg per day. There was no correlation between OLZ concentrations and tested metabolic parameters. DMO concentrations were negatively correlated with glucose (r s = -0.45 and DMO concentrations normalized by doses were also negatively correlated with insulin levels (r s = -0.39; however, there was a marginally positive correlation between DMO and homocysteine levels (r s = +0.38.The observed negative correlations between levels of DMO and glucose or insulin suggest a metabolic normalization role for DMO regardless of its positive correlation with a known cardiovascular risk factor, homocysteine. Additional studies of the mechanisms underlying DMO's metabolic effects are warranted.

  15. Formulation and evaluation of olanzapine matrix pellets for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal Gupta, N; Gowda, Dv; Balamuralidhara, V; Mohammed Khan, S

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia. This research was carried out to design oral controlled release matrix pellets of water insoluble drug Olanzapine (OZ), using blend of Sodium Alginate (SA) and Glyceryl Palmito-Stearate (GPS) as matrix polymers, micro crystalline cellulose (MCC) as spheronizer enhancer and Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS) as pore forming agent. OZ formulations were developed by the pelletization technique by drug loaded pellets and characterized with regard to the drug content, size distribution, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Diffraction study (XRD). Stability studies were carried out on the optimized formulation for a period of 90 days at 40±2 °C and 75±5% relative humidity. The drug content was in the range of 93.34-98.12%. The mean particle size of the drug loaded pellets was in the range 1024 to 1087µm. SEM photographs and calculated sphericity factor confirmed that the prepared formulations were spherical in nature. The compatibility between drug and polymers in the drug loaded pellets was confirmed by DSC and FTIR studies. Stability studies indicated that pellets are stable. XRD patterns revealed the crystalline nature of the pure OZ. Loose surface crystal study indicated that crystalline OZ is present in all formulations and more clear in formulation F5. Drug release was controlled for more than 24 hrs and mechanism of the drug release followed by Fickian diffusion. It may be concluded that F5 is an ideal formulation for once a day administration.

  16. Combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants in treatment-resistant depression: preclinical and clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóż, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of adding atypical antipsychotic drugs to ongoing treatments with antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in ameliorating drug-resistant depression. The aim of this paper was to summarize some preclinical evidence describing the mechanism responsible for the therapeutic action of combined treatment with antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics and also some clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of the augmentation strategy for improving antidepressant-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics. This analysis is based on five microdialysis studies and nine behavioral studies assessing the impact of combined atypical antipsychotic and antidepressant treatments on extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats and on antidepressant-induced effects, respectively. In addition, clinical data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of augmentation strategies for treatment-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics were included. Combined treatment of rats with all studied atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, clozapine and quetiapine) and antidepressants (citalopram, fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) increased the extracellular level of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex compared to a respective drug given alone; in addition, a combination of olanzapine or quetiapine plus fluoxetine or fluvoxamine increased the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics administered in a low dose enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of antidepressants, with (among other mechanisms) the serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and adrenergic α2 receptors likely playing an important role in their action. The results support the conclusion that atypical antipsychotics may be effective as adjunctive therapy in treatment-resistant depression; however, their adverse effect profile may be

  17. A systematic review of cardiovascular effects following atypical antipsychotic medication overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hock Heck; Hoppe, Jason; Heard, Kennon

    2009-01-01

    As the use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AAPM) increases, the number of overdoses continues to grow. Cardiovascular toxicity was common with older psychiatric medications, but appears uncommon with AAPM. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe the cardiovascular effects reported following overdose of 5 common AAPM: Aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. We included case reports and case series describing overdose of these 5 medications iden...

  18. Neurological Adverse Effects of Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Amador, Margarita; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Moreno, Carmen; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Alda, José A; Muñoz, Daniel; Andrés Nestares, Patricia; Cantarero, Carmen Martínez; Arango, Celso

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate demographic, clinical, and treatment factors that may impact on neurological adverse effects in naive and quasi-naive children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. This was a 1-year, multicenter, observational study of a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population receiving antipsychotic treatment. Two subanalyses were run using the subsample of subjects taking the 3 most used antipsychotics and the subsample of antipsychotic-naive subjects. Total dyskinesia score (DyskinesiaS) and total Parkinson score (ParkinsonS) were calculated from the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center Involuntary Movement Scale, total UKU-Cognition score was calculated from the UKU Side Effect Rating Scale. Risk factors for tardive dyskinesias (TDs) defined after Schooler-Kaine criteria were studied using a logistic regression. Two hundred sixty-five subjects (mean age, 14.4 [SD, 2.9] years) with different Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I disorders were recruited. DyskinesiaS (P < 0.001) and ParkinsonS (P < 0.001) increased at 1-year follow-up. Risperidone was associated with higher increases in DyskinesiaS compared with quetiapine (P < 0.001). Higher increases in ParkinsonS were found with risperidone (P < 0.001) and olanzapine (P = 0.02) compared with quetiapine. Total UKU-Cognition Score decreased at follow-up. Findings were also significant when analyzing antipsychotic-naive subjects. Fifteen subjects (5.8%) fulfilled Schooler-Kane criteria for TD at follow-up. Younger age, history of psychotic symptoms, and higher cumulative exposure time were associated with TD at follow-up. Antipsychotics increased neurological adverse effects in a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population and should be carefully monitored. Risperidone presented higher scores in symptoms of dyskinesia and parkinsonism. Quetiapine was the antipsychotic with less neurological adverse effects. Younger subjects, psychosis, and

  19. Evaluation of striatal dopamine transporter density using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT in schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine: pilot study

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    Kim, Chul Eung; Moon, Hey Won; Choe, Won Sick; Kim, Chang Ho; Chi, Dae Yoon [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    This pilot study was performed to understand the pharmacological effect of olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, on dopamine transporter in schizophrenic patients. Six patients (3 male, 3 female) with schizophrenia, who had not taken any psychotropic drugs for at least four weeks, were studied. Nuclear imaging using ({sup 123}I)-{beta}-CIT SPECT was obtained before and after 4-week treatment with olanzapine. Analysis of ROI on the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen was performed. Post-treatment uptake was significantly increased in all the ROIs compared with pre-treatment uptake. This preliminary study with the small number of schizophrenic patients suggested an increase in uptake of dopamine transporter in the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen after 4-week treatment with olanzapine, which warrants a large-scaled controlled study to confirm the current findings.

  20. Delirium with anticholinergic symptoms after a combination of paliperidone and olanzapine pamoate in a patient known to smoke cannabis: an unfortunate coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Anja; Rijavec, Nikolina; Tavčar, Rok

    2016-06-22

    We report a case of delirium with anticholinergic symptoms in a 19-year-old female patient with schizophrenia. On the day the symptoms emerged, the patient received olanzapine long-acting injection and a higher dose of paliperidone. We observed symptoms ranging from confusion to delirium as well as some anticholinergic symptoms. The delirium lasted 24 hours and was managed by intravenous fluid substitution and oral benzodiazepines. Olanzapine pamoate, paliperidone and cannabis are central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and their combination can increase the risks of CNS depression. In this case report, we review the symptoms of delirium in a case of antipsychotic overdose and provide general guidelines for managing these symptoms. We also review possible complications in combined use of cannabis, olanzapine and paliperidone. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Frequency of Extrapyramidal Adverse Reactions in Schizophrenic Outpatients Treated with Risperidone, Olanzapine, Quetiapine or Haloperidol : Results of the EIRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Julio; Rejas, J; Garcia-Garcia, M; Rico-Villademoros, F; García-Portilla, M P; Madrigal, M; Hernández, G

    2002-09-01

    The EIRE (Estudio de Investigaciön de Resultados en Esquizofrenia - Outcomes Research Study in Schizophrenia) study was initiated in order to assess the frequency of adverse reactions [extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), hyperprolactinaemia, sexual dysfunction and weight gain] caused by atypical antipsychotics and haloperidol in patients with schizophrenia during routine treatment in clinical practice. This paper presents the results of the assessment of extrapyramidal adverse reactions. Outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV), criteria and receiving a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or haloperidol) for at least 4 weeks were consecutively recruited. In this cross-sectional and non-interventional study data were collected in a single visit; this included demographic and clinical characteristics, current antipsychotic and concomitant treatment, and data on several adverse effects listed in a modified version of the UKU (Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser - Committee on Clinical Investigations) scale. For paired comparisons of the frequency of adverse reactions between treatments the Chi-squared (χ 2 ) test was used. For estimation of the risk of a given adverse reaction with a given treatment a logistic regression method was used. 636 evaluable patients (of 669 recruited) were assessed. The frequency of EPS with haloperidol (78.3% of the cases) was higher than with risperidone (55.1%), quetiapine (39.5%) and olanzapine (35.8%) [χ 2 : p < 0.05], and the difference between risperidone and olanzapine was also statistically significant (χ 2 : p < 0.05). Very similar results were obtained in the individualised analysis of the items as regards the occurrence of akathisia, which was also more frequent in the haloperidol (36.8%) and risperidone (19.7%) groups than in the olanzapine (11.4%) and quetiapine (2.6%) groups (χ 2 : p < 0.05). Olanzapine, quetiapine

  2. Subchronic olanzapine exposure leads to increased expression of myelination-related genes in rat fronto-medial cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersland, Kari M; Skrede, Silje; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar M

    2017-11-30

    Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder with severe and disabling symptoms, such as hallucinations, delusions, blunted affect and social withdrawal. The neuropathology remains elusive, but disturbances in immunity-related processes, neuronal connectivity and myelination have consistently been linked to schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs can be efficient in reducing symptoms, acting primarily on the dopamine system, but additional biological targets are likely to exist. Here we have screened for novel mechanisms of action in an animal model, using adult rats exposed to long-acting olanzapine, achieving stable and clinically relevant antipsychotic drug concentrations. By microarray-based examination of global gene expression in the fronto-medial cortex, at the single gene- and gene-set level, we observed downregulation of two neuropeptide-encoding genes, Vgf and Cort (fold change -1,25 and -1,48, respectively) in response to olanzapine exposure. Furthermore, we demonstrated significant upregulation of five out of ~2000 GO predefined gene sets after olanzapine exposure. Strikingly, all were linked to myelination and oligodendrocyte development; "Ensheathment of neurons", "Axon ensheathment", "Myelination", "Myelin sheath" and "Oligodendrocyte development" (FDR-values myelination-related dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  3. Early response predicts subsequent response to olanzapine long-acting injection in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial of treatment for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Zhao, Fangyi; Detke, Holland C; Nyhuis, Allen W; Lawson, Anthony H; Stauffer, Virginia L; Montgomery, William; Witte, Michael M; McDonnell, David P

    2011-09-23

    In patients with schizophrenia, early non-response to oral antipsychotic therapy robustly predicts subsequent non-response to continued treatment with the same medication. This study assessed whether early response predicted later response when using a long-acting injection (LAI) antipsychotic. Data were taken from an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of olanzapine LAI in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia (n = 233). Early response was defined as ≥ 30% improvement from baseline to Week 4 in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS0-6) Total score. Subsequent response was defined as ≥ 40% baseline-to-endpoint improvement in PANSS0-6 Total score. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and predictive accuracy were calculated. Clinical and functional outcomes were compared between Early Responders and Early Non-responders. Early response/non-response to olanzapine LAI predicted later response/non-response with high sensitivity (85%), specificity (72%), PPV (78%), NPV (80%), and overall accuracy (79%). Compared to Early Non-responders, Early Responders had significantly greater improvement in PANSS0-6 Total scores at all time points and greater baseline-to-endpoint improvement in PANSS subscale scores, Quality of Life Scale scores, and Short Form-36 Health Survey scores (all p ≤ .01). Among Early Non-responders, 20% demonstrated response by Week 8. Patients who lacked early improvement (at Week 4) in Negative Symptoms and Disorganized Thoughts were more likely to continue being non-responders at Week 8. Among acutely ill patients with schizophrenia, early response predicted subsequent response to olanzapine LAI. Early Responders experienced significantly better clinical and functional outcomes than Early Non-responders. Findings are consistent with previous research on oral antipsychotics. F1D-MC-HGJZ: Comparison of Intramuscular Olanzapine Depot With Placebo in the Treatment of

  4. Frequency of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol: the results of the EIRE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, J; Garc A-Portilla, M P; Rejas, J; Hern Ndez, G; Garcia-Garcia, M; Rico-Villademoros, F; Porras, A

    2003-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics seem to differ mainly in their tolerability profile. The aim of this cross-sectional study, the Estudio de Investigaci n de Resultados en Esquizofrenia (Outcomes Research Study in Schizophrenia; EIRE study), was to assess in a clinical setting the frequency of several side-effects related to haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. This article addresses sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects (gynecomastia, menorrhage, amenorrhea, and galactorrhea). We recruited outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria and who had received a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol) for at least 4 weeks. During a single visit, we collected data, including demographic and clinical characteristics, current antipsychotic and concomitant treatment, and adverse effects listed in a modified version of the UKU Scale. We used a Chi-squared test to determine pairs comparisons of the frequency of adverse reactions between treatments. To estimate risk of a given adverse reaction with a given treatment, we used a logistic regression method. We assessed 636 evaluable patients out of 669 recruited. Frequency of sexual dysfunction was high with haloperidol (38.1%) and also with olanzapine (35.3%), quetiapine (18.2%), and risperidone (43.2%). We found the frequency of other reproductive side-effects to be relatively low with all four drugs: haloperidol (6.9%), olanzapine (6.4%), quetiapine (2.7%), and risperidone (11.7%). Sexual dysfunction appeared to be dose-related with haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine. Risperidone and olanzapine showed a higher risk of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive sideeffects than haloperidol. Quetiapine showed a lower risk of sexual dysfunction during short-term treatment ( 12 weeks) are lacking. Our results suggest that none of the atypical

  5. Patient perspectives on antipsychotic treatments and their association with clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu-Seifert1, Olawale O Osuntokun1, Jenna L Godfrey2, Peter D Feldman11Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: This analysis examined patient-reported attitudes toward antipsychotic medication and the relationship of these attitudes with clinical outcomes and pharmacotherapy adherence. The analysis included three randomized, double-blind studies in patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition and randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine 5–20 mg/day or another antipsychotic (haloperidol 2–20 mg/day, risperidone 2–10 mg/day, or ziprasidone 80–160 mg/day. Patient-reported improvements were significantly greater for olanzapine (n = 488 versus other treatments (haloperidol n = 145, risperidone n = 158, or ziprasidone n = 271 on multiple Drug Attitude Inventory items. A positive attitude toward medication reported by patients was significantly associated with greater clinical improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and lower discontinuation rates. These results suggest that patients’ perceptions of treatment benefits are associated with objective clinical measures, including reduction of symptom severity and lower discontinuation rates. Furthermore, olanzapine may be associated with more positive treatment attitudes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of reasons for treatment adherence from patients’ own perspectives.Keywords: antipsychotic agents, medication adherence, patient satisfaction, schizophrenia, treatment efficacy

  6. The use of olanzapine in Huntington disease accompanied by psychotic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Alhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. The disease begins between the ages of 30-50, including motor symptoms, psychiatric symptoms and is characterized by progressive dementia. Common psychiatric disorders of Huntington’s disease include mood and anxiety disorders, behavior and personality changes. Psychosis is relatively rare. Here, a patient is present, who has Huntington’s disease, which is associated with psychotic symptoms. 61-year-old male patient who were followed for Huntington disease for 25 years was admitted for complaints of thinking of poisoning and refuse to eat something. Patient was started on olanzapine at dose of 5 mg/day. In follow up psychotic symptoms disappeared. Emerging psychotic symptoms in Huntington disease is created a need for antipsychotic treatment. Atypical antipsychotic agents should be preferred in the treatment and as in the case olanzapine may be used as a treatment option should be kept in mind to control both involuntary movements and psychotic symptoms in Huntington's disease with psychotic features. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 326-328

  7. Effects of olanzapine and betahistine co-treatment on serotonin transporter, 5-HT2A and dopamine D2 receptor binding density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2013-12-02

    Olanzapine is widely used in treating multiple domains of schizophrenia symptoms but induces serious metabolic side-effects. Recent evidence has showed that co-treatment of betahistine (a histaminergic H1 receptor agonist and H3 receptor antagonist) is effective for preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain/obesity, however it is not clear whether this co-treatment affects on the primary therapeutic receptor binding sites of olanzapine such as serotonergic 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) and dopaminergic D2 receptors (D2R). Therefore, this study investigated the effects of this co-treatment on 5-HT2AR, 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) and D2R bindings in various brain regions involved in antipsychotic efficacy. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered orally (t.i.d.) with either olanzapine (1mg/kg), betahistine (2.7 mg/kg), olanzapine plus betahistine (O+B), or vehicle (control) for 2 weeks. Quantitative autoradiography was used to detect the density of [(3)H]ketanserin, [(3)H]paroxetine and [(3)H]raclopride binding site to 5-HT2AR, 5-HTT and D2R. Compared to the controls, olanzapine significantly decreased [(3)H]ketanserin bindings to 5-HT2AR in the prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, and nucleus accumbens. Similar changes in 5-HT2AR bindings in these nuclei were also observed in the O+B co-treatment group. Olanzapine also significantly decreased [(3)H]paroxetine binding to 5-HTT in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra, however, both olanzapine only and O+B co-treatment did not affect [(3)H]raclopride binding to D2R. The results confirmed the important role of 5-HT2AR in the efficacy of olanzapine, which is not influenced by the O+B co-treatment. Therefore, betahistine co-treatment would be an effective combination therapy to reduce olanzapine-induced weight gain side-effects without affecting olanzapine's actions on 5-HT2AR transmissions. © 2013.

  8. Antipsychotic Use in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Julia; Sherman, Chelsea; Velkers, Clive; Maxwell, Colleen; Gill, Sudeep; Rochon, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotics are necessary for many older adults to treat major mental illnesses or reduce distressing psychiatric symptoms. Current controversy exists over the role of antipsychotics in the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in persons with dementia. Although some NPS may be appropriately and safely treated with antipsychotics, a fine balance must be achieved between the benefits of these medications, which are often modest, and adverse events, which may have significant consequences. Approximately one-third of all persons with dementia are currently prescribed antipsychotic medications, and there is significant variation in the use of antipsychotics across care settings and providers. Reducing the inappropriate or unnecessary use of antipsychotics among persons with dementia has been the focus of increasing attention owing to better awareness of the potential problems associated with these medications. Several approaches can be used to curb the use of antipsychotics among persons with dementia, including policy or regulatory changes, public reporting, and educational outreach. Recently, there has been encouraging evidence of a downward trend in the use of antipsychotics in many long-term care settings, although prescribing rates are still higher than what is likely optimal. Although reducing the inappropriate use of antipsychotics is a complex task, psychiatrists can play an important role via the provision of clinical care and research evidence, contributing to improved care of persons with dementia in Canada and elsewhere. PMID:28212496

  9. Comparative efficacy and safety of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a network meta-analysis in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Taro; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Matsunaga, Shinji; Matsuda, Yuki; Oya, Kazuto; Iwata, Nakao

    2017-01-01

    The relative efficacy and tolerability of antipsychotics for schizophrenia are considerably well studied. This study aimed to examine whether previous findings could be replicated in a genetically distinct and homogenous group (ie, Japanese patients with schizophrenia) and whether previous findings could be extended to a broader range of antipsychotics with previously unclear relative efficacy and tolerability. Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed in which randomized trials comparing any of the following interventions were included: second-generation antipsychotics, haloperidol, or placebo. The primary outcomes for efficacy and acceptability were the response rate and all-cause discontinuation. The secondary outcomes included the improvement of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores, discontinuation because of adverse events, and individual adverse events. Eighteen relevant studies were identified (total n=3,446; aripiprazole =267, blonanserin =285, clozapine =47, clocapramine =295, haloperidol =857, mosapramine =493, olanzapine =179, paliperidone =136, perospirone =146, placebo =138, quetiapine =212, and risperidone =338; mean study duration =8.33±1.41 weeks). In primary outcomes, olanzapine and paliperidone showed efficacy than placebo, and olanzapine and paliperidone showed superior acceptability compared with placebo. There were differences in the incidences of individual adverse events (the best antipsychotic: extrapyramidal symptoms = olanzapine, hyperprolactinemia- related symptoms = quetiapine, sedation = paliperidone, and weight change = blonanserin) among antipsychotics. Although the current analysis exclusively included Japanese patients with schizophrenia, no remarkable differences were observed in efficacy and safety compared with previous meta-analyses. Diverse hierarchies in safety outcomes also support the implication that individual risk expectations for adverse events can guide clinical decisions. However, the sample size was

  10. Olanzapine versus haloperidol: Which can control stuttering better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: It seems that olanzapine does have better impact in controlling stuttering, and it may be recommended to prescribe olanzapine for stutters as the first choice to control the stuttering under a careful follow-up.

  11. Medical costs and utilization in patients with depression treated with adjunctive atypical antipsychotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anagha Nadkarni,1 Iftekhar Kalsekar,1 Min You,1 Robert Forbes,2 Tony Hebden11Bristol-Myers Squibb, Plainsboro, NJ, USA; 2Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development and Commercialization, Princeton, NJ, USAObjective: To compare total medical costs and utilization over a 12-month period in commercially insured patients receiving FDA-approved adjunctive atypical antipsychotics (aripiprazole, olanzapine, or quetiapine for depression.Methods: A retrospective claims analysis was conducted from 2005–2010 using the PharMetrics database. Subjects were adult commercial health-plan members with depression, identified using International Classification of Diseases codes and followed for 12 months after augmentation with an atypical antipsychotic. Outcomes included total medical costs, hospitalization, and ER visits. Generalized linear models and logistic regression were used to compare the total medical costs and the odds of hospitalization and ER visits between the treatment groups after adjusting for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics.Results: A total of 9675 patients with depression were included in the analysis, of which 68.4% were female, with a mean age of 45.2 (±12.0 years. Adjusted 12-month total medical costs were higher for olanzapine ($14,275 and quetiapine ($12,998 compared to aripiprazole ($9,801; P < 0.05 for all comparisons with aripiprazole. When divided into inpatient and outpatient costs, olanzapine and quetiapine had significantly higher adjusted inpatient costs compared to aripiprazole ($6,124 and $4,538 vs $2,976, respectively; P < 0.05 for all comparisons with aripiprazole. Similar results were seen for adjusted outpatient costs. Adjusted odds of hospitalization for olanzapine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73; 95% CI confidence interval [CI] = 1.42–2.10 and quetiapine (OR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.21–1.60 were significantly higher than aripiprazole at 12 months. The adjusted odds of an ER visit for olanzapine (OR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.18–1

  12. Combined use of risperidone and olanzapine in the treatment of patients with resistant schizophrenia: a preliminary case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, V; Chudakova, B; Kravets, S; Polyakova, I

    2000-01-01

    Polypharmacy, or the use of multiple drugs in the therapy of psychiatric disorders, is not recommended. However, appropriate combinations of pharmacologic mechanisms may enhance the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs and alter the course of schizophrenia. In recent years, some articles have been published about the successful use of clozapine and risperidone in combination for the treatment of patients with resistant schizophrenic and schizoaffective disorders. However, safety of this drug combination is open to discussion. This report presents the results of a preliminary study of five patients with resistant schizophrenia successfully treated with risperidone-olanzapine combination. The results suggest that this combination may be useful. In the future, the efficacy of risperidone-olanzapine combination should be confirmed in larger study populations before its clinical application is considered.

  13. Diabetic control and atypical antipsychotics: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Romina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction People with schizophrenia are at increased risk of developing metabolic disturbances. This risk may be further exacerbated by the use of antipsychotic agents. Research is still ongoing to determine the metabolic impact of antipsychotics on glucose regulation. In this case report we review some of the possible mechanisms of action of antipsychotic medication on glucose regulation. Case presentation We present the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia who developed type 2 diabetes mellitus whilst on treatment with second generation antipsychotics (SGA. His diabetes was controlled by a combination of antidiabetic drugs that were associated with his psychotropic treatment. Due to deterioration in his mental state, the patient was admitted on two occasions to a psychiatric unit during which his prescribed medication (olanzapine and risperidone was discontinued and changed to aripiprazole. On both occasions, the patient suffered hypoglycaemic episodes and his antidiabetic treatment had to be adjusted accordingly. The patient did not require any antidiabetic treatment whilst on aripiprazole during the follow up period. Conclusion Clinicians face regular dilemmas in trying to find the right balance between achieving control over a patient's mental illness and reducing any adverse effects associated with the prescribed medication. In patients receiving concomitant antidiabetic therapy, caution should be exercised when changing from one SGA to another. Whilst more longitudinal data are required, a trial of alternative SGAs, including aripiprazole in those developing type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance may be a worthwhile therapeutic option.

  14. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrdlicka M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Michal Hrdlicka, Iva Dudova Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs have been successfully used in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS. This review summarizes the randomized, double-blind, controlled studies of AAPs in EOS, including clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. No significant differences in efficacy between AAPs were found, with the exception of clozapine and ziprasidone. Clozapine demonstrated superior efficacy in treatment-resistant patients with EOS, whereas ziprasidone failed to demonstrate efficacy in the treatment of EOS. Our review also focuses on the onset of action and weight gain associated with AAPs. The data on onset of action of AAPs in pediatric psychiatry are scanty and inconsistent. Olanzapine appears to cause the most significant weight gain in patients with EOS, while ziprasidone and aripiprazole seem to cause the least. Keywords: early-onset schizophrenia, atypical antipsychotics, efficacy, onset of action, weight gain

  15. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with

  16. Negative effects of chronic oral chlorpromazine and olanzapine treatment on the performance of tasks designed to assess spatial learning and working memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, A V; Warner, S E; Vandenhuerk, L; Pillai, A; Mahadik, S P; Zhang, G; Bartlett, M G

    2008-10-28

    Learning potential and memory capacity are factors that strongly predict the level of rehabilitation and the long-term functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia. Unfortunately, however, the effects of antipsychotic drugs (i.e. the primary treatments for schizophrenia) on these components of cognition are unclear, particularly when they are administered chronically (i.e. a standard clinical practice). In this rodent study we evaluated the effects of different time periods (ranging from 2 weeks to 6 months) of oral treatment with the first generation antipsychotic chlorpromazine (10.0 mg/kg/day), or the second generation antipsychotic olanzapine (10.0 mg/kg/day) on the repeated acquisition of a water maze task (i.e. a method of assessing spatial learning potential in a repeated testing format). We assessed locomotor function (in an open field) and employed a radial arm maze (RAM) task to assess antipsychotic effects (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg/day doses) on spatial working memory during the treatment period between 15 days and 2 months. Finally, we conducted experiments using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of our method of drug delivery (oral administration in drinking water). In the water maze experiments, both antipsychotics were associated with impairments in acquisition in the earlier test sessions that could eventually be overcome with repeated testing while olanzapine also impaired retention in probe trials. Both antipsychotics were also associated with impairments in delayed non-match-to-position trials in the RAM and some impairments of motor function (especially in the case of olanzapine) as indicated by slightly reduced swim speeds in the water maze and decreased activity in some components of the open field assessment. Finally, LC-MS/MS studies indicated that the method of antipsychotic administration generated clinically relevant plasma levels in the rat. These animal data indicate that

  17. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

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    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of sublingual orally disintegrating olanzapine versus oral olanzapine on body mass index: the PLATYPUS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagianis, J.; Grossman, L.; Landry, J.; Reed, V. A.; de Haan, L.; Maguire, G. A.; Hoffmann, V. P.; Milev, R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have frequently reported weight gain during olanzapine treatment. Previous studies have observed a decrease in weight gain, or weight loss, in patients switching from standard olanzapine tablets (SOT) to orally disintegrating olanzapine

  19. Optimal duration of risperidone or olanzapine adjunctive therapy to mood stabilizer following remission of a manic episode: A CANMAT randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatham, L N; Beaulieu, S; Schaffer, A; Kauer-Sant'Anna, M; Kapczinski, F; Lafer, B; Sharma, V; Parikh, S V; Daigneault, A; Qian, H; Bond, D J; Silverstone, P H; Walji, N; Milev, R; Baruch, P; da Cunha, A; Quevedo, J; Dias, R; Kunz, M; Young, L T; Lam, R W; Wong, H

    2016-08-01

    Atypical antipsychotic adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate is effective in treating acute mania. Although continuation of atypical antipsychotic adjunctive therapy after mania remission reduces relapse of mood episodes, the optimal duration is unknown. As many atypical antipsychotics cause weight gain and metabolic syndrome, they should not be continued unless the benefits outweigh the risks. This 52-week double-blind placebo-controlled trial recruited patients with bipolar I disorder (n=159) who recently remitted from a manic episode during treatment with risperidone or olanzapine adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate. Patients were randomized to one of three conditions: discontinuation of risperidone or olanzapine and substitution with placebo at (i) entry ('0-weeks' group) or (ii) at 24 weeks after entry ('24-weeks' group) or (iii) continuation of risperidone or olanzapine for the full duration of the study ('52-weeks' group). The primary outcome measure was time to relapse of any mood episode. Compared with the 0-weeks group, the time to any mood episode was significantly longer in the 24-weeks group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33, 0.86) and nearly so in the 52-weeks group (HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.02). The relapse rate was similar in the 52-weeks group compared with the 24-weeks group (HR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.71, 1.99); however, sub-group analysis showed discordant results between the two antipsychotics (HR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.17; 1.32 olanzapine patients; HR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.00, 3.41 risperidone patients). Average weight gain was 3.2 kg in the 52-weeks group compared with a weight loss of 0.2 kg in the 0-weeks and 0.1 kg in the 24-weeks groups. These findings suggest that risperidone or olanzapine adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks is beneficial but continuation of risperidone beyond this period does not reduce the risk of relapse. Whether continuation of olanzapine beyond this period reduces relapse risk remains unclear

  20. Impulsivity and novel object recognition test of rat model for vascular cognitive impairment after antipsychotics treatment

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    Ronny T Wirasto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI is a common condition in which no standard treatment has been approved. VCI is often accompanied by behavioral problems which require psychiatric interventions. The common therapeutic agent used for the acute management is antipsychotic injections. Current findings showed that atypical antipsychotic possess better safety profile for treating behavioral problems related to VCI compared to typical antipsychotic. In this study, we induced VCI in Sprague Dawley rats between 6-8 weeks old using bilateral carotid communist artery occlusion technique. The subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups: sham, olanzapine, haloperidol, and risperidone groups. Subjects received intramuscular injections of subsequent drugs for 3 days post VCI induction. Impulsive behavior and object recognition were examined using cliff jumping test and novel object recognition test. The analyses results showed that impulsive behavior was lower in the olanzapine and haloperidol groups compared to sham group, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.651. The results also showed that there were no significant differences in the time spent exploring old and novel objects in all groups (p = 0.945;0.637 respectively. In conclusion, antipsychotic injection might not be effective to control impulsive behavior post VCI induction.

  1. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...... initial antipsychotic prescribing patterns and associated use of mental health care services. METHOD: Population-based cohort study linking the following Danish national registers: the Central Psychiatric Research Register, the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and Statistics Denmark. RESULTS...

  2. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome following catatonia: Vigilance is the price of antipsychotic prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Reilly

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following antipsychotic treatment of catatonia, highlighting the potentially serious complications of this rare adverse drug reaction. Methods: We present a case report of a patient who developed this syndrome with various sequelae. Results: The patient developed neuroleptic after being treated with lorazepam and olanzapine for catatonia. He subsequently developed the complications of rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, pulmonary embolism, urinary retention and ileus. He received high-dose lorazepam, anticoagulation and intravenous fluids. Antipsychotic medication in the form of haloperidol was reinstated with no adverse effect, and he went on to make a full recovery. Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential life-threatening complications of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the need for a low index of clinical suspicion. It also highlights the lack of evidence for treatment of catatonia, including the use of antipsychotics.

  3. Antipsychotic-induced Hyperprolactinemia

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    Suheyla Dogan Bulut

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin provides the growth of the mammary gland during pregnancy and synthesis and preparation of breast milk for lactation. Antipsychotics and antidepressants that are frequently used in psychiatry, cause hyperprolactinemia. The prevalent opinion is that especially typical antipsychotics increase prolactin levels primarily by blocking D2 receptors in the anterior pituitary. The effects of atypical antipsychotics on hyperprolactinemia vary. Hyperprolactinemia causes galactorrhea, gynecomastia, sexual dysfunction, infertility, acne, hirsutism in women, weight gain, obesity and mood changes in addition to menstrual irregularities such as oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea and amenorrhea. In the long term, hyperprolactinemia may cause reduction in bone density and osteoporosis. Hyperprolactinemia as a side effect of antipsychotics drugs and its treatment will be reviewed in this article. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 109-124

  4. Sertindole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Lewis, Ruth; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and, if so, how much the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sertindole compared with other second generation antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) and ClinicalTrials.gov (February 2009). Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral sertindole with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes two short-term low-quality randomised trials (total n=508) both comparing sertindole with risperidone. One third of participants left the studies early (2 RCTs, n=504, RR 1.23 CI 0.94 to 1.60). There was no difference in efficacy (2 RCTs, n=493, WMD PANSS total change from baseline 1.98 CI −8.24 to 12.20). Compared with relatively high doses of risperidone (between 4 and 12 mg/day), sertindole produced significantly less akathisia and parkinsonism (1 RCT, n=321, RR 0.24 CI 0.09 to 0.69, NNT 14, CI 8 to 100). Sertindole produced more cardiac effects (2 RCTs, n=508, RR QTc prolongation 4.86 CI 1.94 to 12.18), weight change (2 RCTs, n=328, WMD 0.99 CI 0.12 to 1.86) and male sexual dysfunction (2 RCTs, n=437, RR 2.90 CI 1.32 to 6.35, NNH 13 CI 8 to 33

  5. Cost-saving effects of olanzapine as long-term treatment for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuting

    2008-09-01

    Promoters of new medications often argue that using newer drug can reduce use of non-drug medical services and therefore reduce total healthcare spending. This cost-offset argument is plausible both in theory and in practice, but rigorous research on specific drugs or drug categories is needed to make targeted and efficient policy and management decisions. I examined the drug-offset hypothesis for bipolar disorder, an important yet under-studied clinical condition where effective medication treatments can service as substitutes for non-drug medical treatments. I compared two first line long-term treatments, a new atypical antipsychotic medication, olanzapine, and a traditional mood stabilizer, lithium. I used private sector insurance claims data collected from a nationally representative sample of U.S. health plans between January 1998 and December 2001. I first selected a cohort of patients with bipolar disorder who were continuously enrolled for at least two years. I then used a propensity-score method to match individuals taking each drug on observed variables that are known to affect medication choices. The central challenge for estimation is that drug treatments are not randomly assigned among patients with bipolar disorder. To identify a causal link between choice of drugs and non-drug medical spending, I employed three different advanced econometrics techniques to assess the robustness of findings; namely interrupted time series, differencing strategies, and an instrumental variables approach. I found that compared to similar lithium users, olanzapine users spent approximately $330 more on monthly average non-drug medical services during the first year after initiation of drug treatment. The higher spending for olanzapine users was accounted for by both higher rates of re-hospitalization and more outpatient visits. In addition, olanzapine cost $153 per month while lithium cost $16 per month. Including the direct cost of the drugs, compared to similar

  6. Atypical antipsychotic medications to control symptoms of delirium in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, Susan Beckwitt; Jacobson, Julienne; Munzig, Elizabeth; Tavaré, C Jane

    2012-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have been documented to be effective in the management of delirium in adults, but despite considerable need, their use has been less studied in pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review was done to describe the use of atypical antipsychotics in controlling symptoms of delirium in children and adolescents. Pharmacy records at Children's Hospital Los Angeles were reviewed to identify patients to whom antipsychotic agents were dispensed over a 24-month period. Psychiatric inpatient consultations during the same 24-month period were reviewed. Patients 1-18 years old diagnosed with delirium given antipsychotics constituted the study population. Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98) scores were retrospectively calculated, when possible, at time antipsychotic was started to confirm the initial diagnosis of delirium and evaluate symptom severity, and again when antipsychotic was stopped, to assess symptom response. Olanzapine (n=78), risperidone (n=13), and quetiapine (n=19) were used during the 2 years of the study. Mean patient age, length of treatment, and response were comparable for the three medications. For patients with two DRS-R98 scores available (n=75/110), mean DRS-R98 scores decreased significantly (pdelirium symptoms in pediatric patients while underlying etiology was addressed.

  7. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Priya; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; El-Sayeh, Hany George; Leucht, Stefan

    2013-02-28

    In most western industrialised countries, second generation (atypical) antipsychotics are recommended as first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. In this review we specifically examine how the efficacy and tolerability of one such agent - aripiprazole - differs from that of other comparable second generation antipsychotics. To evaluate the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2011), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information. We included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing aripiprazole (oral) with oral and parenteral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. Where possible, we calculated illustrative comparative risks for primary outcomes. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. We assessed risk of bias for each included study. We included 12 trials involving 6389 patients. Aripiprazole was compared to olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. All trials were sponsored by an interested drug manufacturer. The overall number of participants leaving studies early was 30% to 40%, limiting validity (no differences between groups).When compared with olanzapine no differences were apparent for global state (no clinically important change: n = 703, 1 RCT, RR short-term 1.00 95% CI 0.81 to 1.22; n = 317, 1 RCT, RR medium-term 1.08 95% CI 0.95 to 1.22) but mental state tended

  8. Post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome in patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine long-acting injection, II: investigations of mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stickelmeyer Mary

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI is a salt-based depot antipsychotic combining olanzapine and pamoic acid. The slow intramuscular dissolution of this practically insoluble salt produces an extended release of olanzapine lasting up to 4 weeks. However, in a small number of injections ( Methods Healthcare providers involved in the PDSS cases were queried for clinical information around the events. Plasma samples from patients experiencing PDSS were collected when possible (12/30 cases and olanzapine concentrations compared with the known pharmacokinetic profile for olanzapine LAI. Product batches and used vials from the PDSS cases were evaluated for compliance with established manufacturing standards and/or possible user error. Because this depot formulation depends upon slow dissolution at the intramuscular injection site, in-vitro experiments were conducted to assess solubility of olanzapine pamoate in various media. Results Injection administrators reported no unusual occurrences during the injection. No anomalies were found with the product batches or the remaining suspension in the used vials. Olanzapine concentrations during PDSS events were higher than the expected 5-73 ng/mL range, with concentrations exceeding 100 ng/mL and in some cases reaching >600 ng/mL during the first hours after injection but then returning to the expected therapeutic range within 24 to 72 hours. Solubility and dissolution rate of olanzapine pamoate were also found to be substantially greater in plasma than in other media such as those approximating the environment in muscle tissue. Conclusions Manufacturing irregularities, improper drug reconstitution, and inappropriate dosing were ruled out as possible causes of PDSS. In-vitro solubility and in-vivo pharmacokinetic investigations suggest that PDSS is related to exposure of the injected product to a substantial volume of blood. This exposure is most likely the result of unintended partial

  9. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.) blonanserin (b.i.d.) <olanzapine (q.d.)

  10. Olanzapine promotes fat accumulation in male rats by decreasing physical activity, repartitioning energy and increasing adipose tissue lipogenesis while impairing lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Judson, Jessica G.; She, Pengxiang; Lang, Charles H.; Maresca, Kevin P.; Joyal, John L.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine and other atypical antipsychotics cause metabolic side effects leading to obesity and diabetes; while these continue to be an important public health concern, their underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Therefore, an animal model of these side effects was developed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic administration of olanzapine elevated fasting glucose, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, increased fat mass but, in contrast to female rats, did not increase body weight or food intake. Acute studies were conducted to delineate the mechanisms responsible for these effects. Olanzapine markedly decreased physical activity without a compensatory decline in food intake. It also acutely elevated fasting glucose, and worsened oral glucose and insulin tolerance, suggesting these effects are adiposity independent. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies measuring 14C-2-deoxyglucose (14C-DOG) uptake revealed tissue-specific insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity was impaired in skeletal muscle, but either unchanged or increased in adipose tissue depots. Consistent with the olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia there was a tendency for increased 14C-DOG uptake into fat depots of fed rats and, surprisingly, free fatty acid (FFA) uptake into fat depots was elevated approximately 2-fold. The increased glucose and FFA uptake into adipose tissue was coupled with increased adipose tissue lipogenesis. Finally, olanzapine lowered fasting plasma FFA and whereas it had no effect on isoproterenol-stimulated rises in plasma glucose, it blunted isoproterenol-stimulated in vivo lipolysis in fed rats. Collectively, these results suggest olanzapine exerts several metabolic effects that together favor increased accumulation of fuel into adipose tissue, thereby increasing adiposity. PMID:20308992

  11. Typical and Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs Increase Extracellular Histamine Levels in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex: Contribution of Histamine H1 Receptor Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell A Svensson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and olanzapine have been shown to enhance histamine turnover and this effect has been hypothesized to contribute to their improved therapeutic profile compared to typical antipsychotics. In the present study, we examined the effects of antipsychotic drugs on histamine (HA efflux in the mPFC of the rat by means of in vivo microdialysis and sought to differentiate the receptor mechanisms which underlie such effects. Olanzapine and clozapine increased mPFC HA efflux in a dose related manner. Increased HA efflux was also observed after quetiapine, chlorpromazine and perphenazine treatment. We found no effect of the selective 5-HT2A antagonist MDL100907, 5-HT2c antagonist SB242084 or the 5-HT6 antagonist Ro 04-6790 on mPFC HA efflux. HA efflux was increased following treatment with selective H1 receptor antagonists pyrilamine, diphenhydramine and triprolidine, the H3 receptor antagonist ciproxifan and the mixed 5HT2A/H1 receptor antagonist ketanserin. The potential novel antipsychotic drug FMPD, which has a lower affinity at H1 receptors than olanzapine, did not affect HA efflux. Similarly, other antipsychotics with lower H1 receptor affinity (risperidone, aripiprazole and haloperidol were also without effect on HA efflux. Perfusion of clozapine and pyrilamine into the TMN, but not the mPFC, increased local HA efflux. Finally, HA efflux after antipsychotic treatment was significantly correlated with affinity at H1 receptors whereas 9 other receptors, including 5-HT2A, were not. These results demonstrate that both typical and atypical antipsychotics increase mPFC histamine efflux and this effect may be mediated via antagonism of histamine H1 receptors.

  12. One-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and associated treatment costs in bipolar disorder treated with atypical antipsychotics: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikalov Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared 1-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and treatment costs in commercially insured patients with bipolar disorder, treated with aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone. Methods This was a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study using the Ingenix Lab/Rx integrated insurance claims dataset. Patients with bipolar disorder and 180 days of pre-index enrollment without antipsychotic exposure who received atypical antipsychotic agents were followed for up to 12 months following the initial antipsychotic prescription. The primary analysis used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate time-dependent risk of hospitalization, adjusting for age, sex and pre-index hospitalization. Generalized gamma regression compared post-index costs between treatment groups. Results Compared to aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine and quetiapine had higher risks for hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.96, 1.55 and 1.56, respectively; p Conclusions In commercially insured adults with bipolar disorder followed for 1 year after initiation of atypical antipsychotics, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with a lower risk of psychiatric hospitalization than ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine and risperidone, although this did not reach significance with the latter. Aripiprazole was also associated with significantly lower total healthcare costs than quetiapine, but not the other comparators.

  13. Olanzapine and Betamethasone Are Effective for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting due to Metastatic Brain Tumors of Rectal Cancer

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    M. Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions originating from metastasis of colorectal cancer represent 3-5% of all brain metastases and are relatively rare. Of all distant metastases of colorectal cancer, those to the liver are detected in 22-29% of cases, while those to the lungs are detected in 8-18% of cases. In contrast, brain metastasis is quite rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.4 to 1.8%. Treatments for metastatic brain tumors include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and supportive care with steroids, etc. Untreated patients exhibit a median survival of only approximately 1 month. The choice of treatment for brain metastasis depends on the number of lesions, the patient's general condition, nerve findings and presence of other metastatic lesions. We herein report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with brain metastases originating from rectal carcinoma. He suffered from nausea, vomiting, anorexia and vertigo during body movement. He received antiemetics, glycerol and whole brain radiation therapy; however, these treatments proved ineffective. Olanzapine therapy was started at a dose of 1.25 mg every night. The persistent nausea disappeared the next day, and the frequency of vomiting subsequently decreased. The patient was able to consume solid food. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic that has recently been used as palliative therapy for refractory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. We consider that olanzapine was helpful as a means of supportive care for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to brain metastasis.

  14. Long-term treatment with olanzapine in hospital conditions: Prevalence and predictors of the metabolic syndrome

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    Popović Irena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The risk of metabolic abnormalities is greatly increased in schizophrenic patients started on an atypical antipsychotic medication. Patients with psychiatric disorders exceed mortality ranges resulting from, among others, increased risk of cardiovascular events. Other factors contributing to the development of metabolic syndrome include prolonged duration of illness, increasing age, female sex and lifestyle factors. Objective. This cross-sectional study was taken up to assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS in schizophrenic patients receiving olanzapine monotherapy for at least six months and to determine the most important risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome presence in these patients. Methods. A total of 93 long term hospitalized schizophrenic patients (71 men, 22 women, had a screening of the following: case-history data, psychiatric scales, anthropometric measures, blood (fasting glucose, lipid status, C-reactive protein - CRP and urine samples (microalbuminuria. Results. Prevalence of MetS according to International Diabetes Federation criteria in our study was 34.4%. The multivariate analysis distinguished the following significant predictors of MetS presence (in order of appearance: data about diabetes mellitus in family history (p=0.002, body mass index >25 kg/m2 (p=0.002, hyperlipidemia in family history (p=0.008, and elevated CRP value (p=0.042. Conclusion. High rate of MetS in patients treated with olanzapine in this study exceeds MetS prevalence in general population. Among observed parameters, our study pointed to several “high risk” predictors associated with MetS presence. Regular monitoring of cardiometabolic risk factors is highly recommended. Positive heredity distress mentioned above may direct a psychiatrist to prescribe some other drug than olanzapine in the long term treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Evaluation of the Expression Profile of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Due to Antipsychotics by Data Mining of Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

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    Kose, Eiji; Uno, Kana; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

     Typical antipsychotics are easily expressed as adverse events such as extrapyramidal symptom (EPS). On the other hand, incidence of adverse events due to atypical antipsychotics is low. Therefore, currently, atypical antipsychotics are widely used to treat schizophrenia. However, it has been reported that there is no difference in the frequency of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics. This study aimed to evaluate the expression profile of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics treatment using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. We analyzed reports of EPS in the JADER database and calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of antipsychotics potentially associated with EPS. We applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data in the JADER database. Consequently, there was little information to distinguish between the ROR of atypical and typical antipsychotics. A significant difference related to the time of onset of EPS in both antipsychotics was not recognized. However, when comparing each drug, Paliperidone, Perospirone, Blonanserin, and Aripiprazole were relatively developed as EPS in the early stage. On the other hand, Risperidone, Clozapine, Olanzapine, and Quetiapine were developed as EPS not only at an early stage but also after long-term use. In addition, this finding was suggested from the result of the cumulative incidence of EPS in each drug and of the time-to-onset analysis using Weibull distribution. These findings may contribute to future clinical practice because we revealed the expression profile of EPS in treatment with atypical and typical antipsychotics.

  16. Predictors of continuation with olanzapine during the 1-year naturalistic treatment of patients with schizophrenia in Japan

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    Ye W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wenyu Ye1, Haya Ascher-Svanum2, Yuka Tanji3, Jennifer A Flynn3, Michihiro Takahashi3,41Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lilly Research Laboratories Japan, Eli Lilly Japan KK, Kobe, 4Terauchi-Takahashi Psychiatric Clinic, Ashiya, JapanPurpose: Treatment continuation is considered an important measure of antipsychotic effectiveness in schizophrenia, reflecting the medication’s efficacy, safety, and tolerability from both patients’ and clinicians’ perspectives. This study identified characteristics of patients with schizophrenia who continue olanzapine therapy for a 1-year period in Japan.Methods: In a large (N = 1850, prospective, observational study, Japanese patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with olanzapine were followed for 1 year. Baseline characteristics were compared using t-tests and chi-square tests. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent baseline predictors of treatment continuation.Results: Most patients (68.2% continued with olanzapine therapy for the full 1-year study period, with an average duration of 265.5 ± 119.4 days. At baseline, patients who continued were significantly more likely to be male, older, and inpatients; have longer illness duration, higher negative and cognitive symptoms, better health-related quality of life, and prior anticholinergic use. Continuers were significantly less likely to engage in social activities, live independently, work for pay, or have prior antidepressant use. Continuers showed significantly greater early (3-month improvement in global symptom severity. Logistic regression found that continuation was significantly predicted by longer illness duration, lower positive symptoms, higher negative symptoms, and better health-related quality of life.Conclusions: In this large naturalistic study in Japan, most patients with schizophrenia stayed on olanzapine therapy for

  17. Long-term cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of adults with schizophrenia in the US

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    O'Day K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ken O'Day,1 Krithika Rajagopalan,2 Kellie Meyer,1 Andrei Pikalov,2 Antony Loebel21Xcenda, Palm Harbor, FL, 2Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Marlborough, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness (including hospitalizations and cardiometabolic consequences of atypical antipsychotics among adults with schizophrenia.Methods: A 5-year Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model, from a US payer perspective, was developed to compare lurasidone, generic risperidone, generic olanzapine, generic ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and quetiapine extended-release. Health states included in the model were patients: on an initial atypical antipsychotic; switched to a second atypical antipsychotic; and on clozapine after failing a second atypical antipsychotic. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs assessed incremental cost/hospitalization avoided. Effectiveness inputs included discontinuations, hospitalizations, weight change, and cholesterol change from comparative clinical trials for lurasidone and for aripiprazole, and the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness for other comparators. Atypical antipsychotic-specific relative risk of diabetes obtained from a retrospective analysis was used to predict cardiometabolic events per Framingham body mass index risk equation. Mental health costs (relapsing versus nonrelapsing patients and medical costs associated with cardiometabolic consequences (cardiovascular events and diabetes management were obtained from published sources. Atypical antipsychotic costs were estimated from Red Book® prices at dose(s reported in clinical data sources used in the model (weighted average dose of lurasidone and average dose for all other comparators. Costs and outcomes were discounted at 3%, and model robustness was tested using one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses.Results: Ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine extended-release, and aripiprazole were dominated

  18. First episode schizophrenia-related psychosis and substance use disorders: acute response to olanzapine and haloperidol.

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    Green, Alan I; Tohen, Mauricio F; Hamer, Robert M; Strakowski, Stephen M; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Glick, Ira; Clark, W Scott

    2004-02-01

    Co-occurring substance use disorders, mostly involving alcohol, cannabis or cocaine, occur commonly in patients with schizophrenia and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Available but limited data suggest that substance use disorders (especially cannabis use disorders) may also be common in first-episode patients and appear linked to a poor outcome in these patients. Strategies to curtail substance use form an important dimension of the treatment program for both first-episode and chronic patients. We report on rates of co-occurring substance use disorders in patients within their first episode of schizophrenia-related psychosis from a multicenter, international treatment trial of olanzapine vs. haloperidol. The study involved 262 patients (of 263 who were randomized and who returned for a post-randomization evaluation) within their first episode of psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or schizophreniform disorder) recruited from 14 academic medical centers in North America and Western Europe. Patients with a history of substance dependence within 1 month prior to entry were excluded. Of this sample, 97 (37%) had a lifetime diagnosis of substance use disorder (SUD); of these 74 (28% of the total) had a lifetime cannabis use disorder (CUD) and 54 (21%) had a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Patients with SUD were more likely to be men. Those with CUD had a lower age of onset than those without. Patients with SUD had more positive symptoms and fewer negative symptoms than those without SUD, and they had a longer duration of untreated psychosis. The 12-week response data indicated that 27% of patients with SUD were responders compared to 35% of those without SUD. Patients with AUD were less likely to respond to olanzapine than those without AUD. These data suggest that first-episode patients are quite likely to have comorbid substance use disorders, and that the presence of these disorders may negatively influence

  19. Second-generation antipsychotic and diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

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    Carlo Ripoli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second generation antipsychotics (SGA are used in children for the treatment of various psychiatric diseases, including pervasive developmental disorders. These drugs can cause metabolic effects as hyperglycemia and diabetes. A 16-year-old young-boy, diagnosed with autism, developed diabetes mellitus type 1 whilst he was on treatment with olanzapine (started 4 months before, clomipramine, valproic acid and lithium. The hypothesis of druginduced diabetes imposed olanzapine interruption and clozapine initiation. Insulin therapy was practiced, with progressive dosage reduction, until complete cessation of treatment after 13 months. Blood sugar and HbA1c levels remained stable for about a year and then increased again, requiring the introduction of metformin that improved glycemia. In children and adolescents assuming SGA serum glucose and lipid profile should always be assessed before therapy and then frequently monitored. Drug selection must consider family history and the individual risk. Molecule final choice remains equilibrium between efficacy and safety.

  20. Trends in Scientific Literature on Atypical Antipsychotics in South Korea: A Bibliometric Study

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    Shen, Winston W.; Pae, Chi-Un; Moreno, Raquel; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D.; Noriega, Concha; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel A.; Huelves, Lorena; Álamo, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have carried out a bibliometric study on the scientific publications in relation to atypical or second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in South Korea. Methods With the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, we selected those publications made in South Korea whose title included the descriptors atypic* (atypical*) antipsychotic*, second-generation antipsychotic*, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, sertindole, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride, zotepine, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone, perospirone and blonanserin. We applied some bibliometric indicators of paper production and dispersion with Price's law and Bradford's law, respectively. We also calculated the participation index (PI) of the different countries, and correlated the bibliometric data with some social and health data from Korea (such as total per capita expenditure on health and gross domestic expenditure on research and development). Results We collected 326 original papers published between 1993 and 2011. Our results state fulfilment of fulfilled Price's law, with scientific production on SGAs showing exponential growth (correlation coefficient r=0.8978, as against an r=0.8149 after linear adjustment). The most widely studied drugs were risperidone (91 papers), aripiprazole (77), olanzapine (53), and clozapine (43). Division into Bradford zones yielded a nucleus occupied by the Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry (36 articles). A total of 86 different journals were published, with 4 of the first 10 used journals having an impact factor being greater than 4. Conclusion The publications on SGAs in South Korea have undergone exponential growth over the studied period, without evidence of reaching a saturation point. PMID:23482954

  1. Orlistat in clozapine- or olanzapine-treated patients with overweight or obesity: a 16-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

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    Joffe, Grigori; Takala, Pirjo; Tchoukhine, Evgueni; Hakko, Helinä; Raidma, Mirjam; Putkonen, Hanna; Eronen, Markku; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-05-01

    Undesirable metabolic effects of modern antipsychotics, especially clozapine and olanzapine, merit development of new weight-control strategies, including pharmacologic ones. We investigated the feasibility of treatment with orlistat, a weight-control drug with no central effects, for overweight/obesity in clozapine- or olanzapine-treated male and female patients. Add-on orlistat was prescribed for 16 weeks in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to patients who were receiving stable clozapine or olanzapine medication and were aged 18 to 65 years, with no compliance with nonpharmacologic programs or hypocaloric diet required. The primary efficacy variable was body weight change. The study was conducted from 2004 through 2005. Of 71 randomly assigned subjects, 63 were eligible for modified intent-to-treat analysis. While no statistically significant effect was observed in the whole population, male (but not female) patients benefited from treatment with orlistat (-2.36 kg vs. 0.62 kg on placebo, p = .011). There were 5 responders (16.1%) (those with >or= 5% weight loss) that received orlistat versus 2 responders (6.3%) that received placebo (number needed to treat = 11), but the difference was not statistically significant. Without a hypocaloric diet, the effect of orlistat in overweight/obese clozapine-or olanzapine-treated patients is modest and may only be seen in men. More studies should define the optimal length of treatment and feasibility of combination of orlistat with behavioral programs in this population.

  2. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

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    Sárvári, Anitta K., E-mail: anittasarvari@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Veréb, Zoltán, E-mail: jzvereb@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Uray, Iván P., E-mail: ipuray@mdanderson.org [Clinical Cancer Prevention Department, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fésüs, László, E-mail: fesus@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); MTA DE Apoptosis, Genomics and Stem Cell Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Balajthy, Zoltán, E-mail: balajthy@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  3. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sárvári, Anitta K.; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P.; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  4. Temporal and Spatial Transcriptional Fingerprints by Antipsychotic or Propsychotic Drugs in Mouse Brain

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    Sakuma, Kensuke; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Maruyama, Minoru; Imaichi, Sachiko; Habata, Yugo; Mori, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Various types of antipsychotics have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia since the accidental discovery of the antipsychotic activity of chlorpromazine. Although all clinically effective antipsychotic agents have common properties to interact with the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) activation, their precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. Antipsychotics are well known to induce transcriptional changes of immediate early genes (IEGs), raising the possibility that gene expressions play an essential role to improve psychiatric symptoms. Here, we report that while different classes of antipsychotics have complex pharmacological profiles against D2R, they share common transcriptome fingerprint (TFP) profile of IEGs in the murine brain in vivo by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our data showed that various types of antipsychotics with a profound interaction of D2R including haloperidol (antagonist), olanzapine (antagonist), and aripiprazole (partial agonist) all share common spatial TFPs closely homologous to those of D2R antagonist sulpiride, and elicited greater transcriptional responses in the striatum than in the nucleus accumbens. Meanwhile, D2R agonist quinpirole and propsychotic NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP) exhibited the contrasting TFP profiles. Clozapine and propsychotic drug methamphetamine (MAP) displayed peculiar TFPs that reflect their unique pharmacological property. Our results suggest that transcriptional responses are conserved across various types of antipsychotics clinically effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia and also show that temporal and spatial TFPs may reflect the pharmacological features of the drugs. Thus, we propose that a TFP approach is beneficial to evaluate novel drug candidates for antipsychotic development. PMID:25693194

  5. Efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs (quetiapine, risperidone, aripiprazole and paliperidone compared with placebo or typical antipsychotic drugs for treating refractory schizophrenia: overview of systematic reviews

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    Tamara Melnik

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: According to some cohort studies, the prevalence of refractory schizophrenia (RS is 20-40%. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine and risperidone for treating RS. METHODS: This was a critical appraisal of Cochrane reviews published in the Cochrane Library, supplemented with reference to more recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs on RS. The following databases were searched: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline (1966-2009, Controlled Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (2009, Issue 2, Embase (Excerpta Medica (1980-2009, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (Lilacs (1982-2009. There was no language restriction. Randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating atypical antipsychotics for treating RS were included. RESULTS: Seven Cochrane systematic reviews and 10 additional RCTs were included in this review. The data generally showed minor differences between the atypical antipsychotics evaluated and typical antipsychotics, regarding improvement in disease symptoms, despite better adherence to treatment with atypical antipsychotics. Risperidone was specifically evaluated in patients with RS in one of the systematic reviews included, with favorable outcomes, but without definitive superiority compared with other drugs of proven efficacy, like amisulpride, clozapine and olanzapine. CONCLUSIONS: The findings underscore the difficulty in treating these patients, with high dropout rates and treatment patterns of modest improvement in assessments of effectiveness. Atypical antipsychotics have advantages over typical antipsychotics mainly through their better safety profile, which leads to better adherence to treatment. A combination of antipsychotics may also be an option for some refractory patients.

  6. Antipsychotic poisoning in young children: a systematic review.

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    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Balit, Corrine R; Kilham, Henry A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the spectrum and severity of effects of unintentional antipsychotic poisoning in children. A computerised literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005) and EMBASE (1980 to February 2005) was undertaken. The Internet was searched using URL: www.google.com. The proceedings of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology (NACCT) and the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists (EAPCCT) were hand searched. All cases of unintentional antipsychotic (all classes) poisoning in children aged 0-6 years were included. The data extracted included the age, weight, antipsychotic, dose, clinical effects, treatment and outcomes. The toxic dose was estimated as the lowest dose causing objective adverse effects.Sixty-eight reports were identified. Few contained all of the required information. Most of the case series included multiple antipsychotics with limited information on individual drugs or all ages with limited paediatric information. For most antipsychotics the ingestion of one tablet caused symptoms that were sometimes severe and usually lasted from 1 to 3 days. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) were often delayed for up to 12-24 hours. Chlorpromazine caused CNS depression, hypotension and miosis; EPS and cardiac effects were rare, and the toxic dose was estimated to be 15 mg/kg. Haloperidol caused drowsiness (rarely coma) and over one-half of patients had neuromuscular effects (mainly EPS), with a toxic dose estimated at 0.15 mg/kg. Thioridazine caused CNS depression and potentially cardiac effects, with a toxic dose of 1.4 mg/kg. Atypical antipsychotics caused significant CNS depression (except risperidone); EPS were less common. Toxic doses were clozapine 2.5 mg/kg, olanzapine 0.5 mg/kg and aripiprazole 3 mg/kg. EPS responded to anticholinergic drug treatment. In summary, unintentional antipsychotic ingestion in children can cause severe effects that last 1-3 days, often with one tablet. Children

  7. Effects of quetiapine and olanzapine in patients with psychosis and violent behavior: a pilot randomized, open-label, comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobbi G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabriella Gobbi,1,2 Stefano Comai,1 Guy Debonnel1,2,† 1Neurobiological Psychiatric Unit, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, 2Institut Philippe Pinel, Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada †Guy Debonnel passed away on November 4, 2006 Objective: Patients suffering from psychosis are more likely than the general population to commit aggressive acts, but the therapeutics of aggressive behavior are still a matter of debate. Methods: This pilot randomized, open-label study compared the efficacy of quetiapine versus olanzapine in reducing impulsive and aggressive behaviors (primary endpoints and psychotic symptoms (secondary endpoints from baseline to days 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70, in 15 violent schizophrenic patients hospitalized in a maximum-security psychiatric hospital. Results: Quetiapine (525±45 mg and olanzapine (18.5±4.8 mg were both efficacious in reducing Impulsivity Rating Scale from baseline to day 70. In addition, both treatments reduced the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression Scale scores at day 70 compared to baseline, and no differences were observed between treatments. Moreover, quetiapine, but not olanzapine, yielded an improvement of depressive symptoms in the items “depression” in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and “blunted affect” in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Modified Overt Aggression Scale scores were also decreased from baseline to the endpoint, but due to the limited number of patients, it was not possible to detect a significant difference. Conclusion: In this pilot study, quetiapine and olanzapine equally decreased impulsive and psychotic symptoms after 8 weeks of treatment. Double-blind, large studies are needed to confirm the validity of these two treatments in highly aggressive and violent schizophrenic patients. Keywords: schizophrenia, aggression

  8. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Antipsychotic Drugs for Tic Disorders: A Systematic Review and Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis.

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    Yang, Chunsong; Hao, Zilong; Zhang, Ling-Li; Zhu, Cai-Rong; Zhu, Ping; Guo, Qin

    2018-03-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antipsychotic drugs for tic disorders (TDs) in a network meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and 4 Chinese databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs for TDs were included. Sixty RCTs were included. In terms of tic symptom score, compared with placebo, haloperidol, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, olanzapine, and ziprasidone can significantly improve tic symptom score (standardized mean differences [SMD] ranged from -12.32 to -3.20). Quetiapine was superior to haloperidol, pimozide, risperidone, tiapride, aripiprazole, and penfluridol for improving tic symptom score (SMD ranged from -28.24 to -7.59). Compared with tiapride, aripiprazole could significantly improve tic symptom score (SMD=-4.27). Compared with all other drugs, penfluridol was not effective. Atypical antipsychotics were generally well tolerated. Atypical antipsychotics (risperidone and aripiprazole) appear to be the most robust evidence-based options for the treatment of TDs. Quetiapine may be a promising therapy. Ziprasidone and olanzapine are also effective, but the evidence is lacking. Further high-quality directly comparing different pharmacological treatment studies are justified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. [Antipsychotic Treatment of the Adult Patient in the Acute Phase of Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; de la Hoz, Ana María; Arenas, Álvaro; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of different antipsychotic drugs in the management of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in the acute phase. To formulate evidence-based recommendations on the antipsychotic (AP) drug management strategies for the treatment of the adult diagnosed with schizophrenia in the acute phase. Clinical practice guidelines were prepared, using the guidelines of the Methodology Guide of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, in order to identify, synthesise, and evaluate the evidence and formulate recommendations as regards the management and follow-up of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. The evidence of the NICE 82 guideline was adopted and updated, which answered the question on the management of the acute phase of adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The evidence and its level were presented to the Guideline Development Group (GDG) in order to formulate recommendations following the methodology proposed by the GRADE approach. Clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, amisulpride, paliperidone, haloperidol, quetiapine, and aripiprazole were more effective than placebo for the majority of psychotic symptoms and the abandonment of treatment, but asenapine was not. Paliperidone, risperidone, quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzapine showed significant increases in weight compared to placebo. Haloperidol, risperidone, ziprasidone, and paliperidone had a higher risk of extrapyramidal symptoms than placebo. There was a significant risk of sedation or drowsiness with, risperidone, haloperidol, ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine, and clozapine in the comparisons with placebo. Of the results of the comparisons between AP, it was shown that clozapine and paliperidone had a clinically significant effect compared to haloperidol and quetiapine, respectively. Olanzapine and risperidone had a lower risk of abandoning the treatment in general, and due to adverse reactions in two comparisons of each one, haloperidol was the

  10. Second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotic agents: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    For over 40 years, antipsychotic drugs have been used as long-term maintenance treatment to control symptoms and reduce relapse rates in patients with schizophrenia. 'First-generation' oral agents such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine are associated with high levels of unwanted neurological effects and poor rates of patient adherence.1,2 Long-acting ('depot') injections of antipsychotics were developed to try to improve adherence. 'Second-generation' antipsychotic agents (also known as atypical antipsychotics) were introduced into clinical practice over 16 years ago. Although these agents have a lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal side effects, they are associated with a range of other unwanted effects (e.g. weight gain and its sequelae).1,3,4 Initially, second-generation agents were only available as orally administered medicines. Three long-acting injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotics are now available in the UK: olanzapine embonate injection (ZypAdhera), paliperidone injection (Xeplion) and risperidone injection (Risperdal Consta). In this article we review the evidence for these agents and discuss the practical implications of their use.

  11. Antipsychotic use in children and adolescents: a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Calvo-Escalona, Rosa; Morer, Astrid; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Martínez-Cantarero, Ma Carmen; Andrés, Patrícia; Alda, José A; Sánchez, Bernardo; Arango, Celso; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the initial treatment with antipsychotics (APs) and its changes during the first year of treatment in patients visited in specialized child and adolescent psychiatry departments. Participants were 265 patients, aged 4 to 17 years, who attended consecutively at 4 different centers and were naive of AP or quasi-naive (less than 30 days since the beginning of AP treatment). Type of AP, dosage, and concomitant medication were registered at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after beginning the treatment with AP. At baseline, the patients' mean age was 14.4 (2.9) years, and 145 (54.7%) patients were males. Antipsychotics were more prescribed in the following: schizophrenia spectrum disorders (30.2%), disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) (18.9%), bipolar disorders (14.3%), depressive disorders (12.8%), and eating disorders (11.7%). A total of 93.2% of the patients were on an off-label indication of AP. Risperidone was the AP most prescribed in all the assessments, but differences were observed in the type of AP according to diagnosis. Thus, risperidone was significantly most prescribed in patients with DBD and olanzapine was most prescribed in patients with eating disorders. Olanzapine and quetiapine were the second-generation APs (SGAs) most prescribed after risperidone, and haloperidol was the most prescribed first-generation AP. Up to 8.3% of patients during the follow-up were on AP polypharmacy. Almost 16% patients had a change in its AP treatment during the follow-up, and the main switch was from one SGA to another. Second-generation APs were the APs most prescribed in our sample and approximately 93% of the patients used AP off-label. Risperidone was the most common AP used above all in patients with DBD, whereas olanzapine was most prescribed in patients with eating disorders. Antipsychotic polypharmacy and switch rates were low during the follow-up.

  12. Olanzapine modulation of long- and short-range functional connectivity in the resting brain in a sample of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Li, Lehua; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhao, Jingping

    2017-01-01

    Treatment effects of antipsychotic drugs on cerebral function are seldom examined. Exploring functional connectivity (FC) in drug-free schizophrenia patients before and after antipsychotic treatment can improve the understanding of antipsychotic drug mechanisms. A total of 17 drug-free patients with recurrent schizophrenia and 24 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Long- and short-range FC strengths (FCS) were calculated for each participant. Compared with the controls, the patients at baseline exhibited increased long-range positive FCS (lpFCS) in the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and decreased lpFCS in the brain regions of the default-mode network (DMN) regions and sensorimotor circuits of the brain. By contrast, increased short-range positive FCS was observed in the right IPL of the patients at baseline compared with the controls. After treatment with olanzapine, increased FC in the DMN and sensorimotor circuits of the brain was noted, whereas decreased FC was observed in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG). Moreover, the alterations of the FCS values and the reductions in symptom severity among the patients after treatment were correlated. The present study provides evidence that olanzapine normalizes the abnormalities of long- and short-range FCs in schizophrenia. FC reductions in the right IPL may be associated with early treatment response, whereas those in the left STG may be related to poor treatment outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Nphenylacetamides: Potential Antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Arylpiperazines have been recognized as the largest and most diverse class of compounds exerting actions on the central nervous system with strong affinity for serotonin and dopamine receptors. We here report the synthesis of some novel arylpiperazines and their evaluation for possible antipsychotic properties.

  14. Comparative efficacy and safety of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a network meta-analysis in a Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishi T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Taro Kishi,1,* Toshikazu Ikuta,2,* Shinji Matsunaga,1 Yuki Matsuda,1,3 Kazuto Oya,1 Nakao Iwata1 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Applied Sciences, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The relative efficacy and tolerability of antipsychotics for schizophrenia are considerably well studied. This study aimed to examine whether previous findings could be replicated in a genetically distinct and homogenous group (ie, Japanese patients with schizophrenia and whether previous findings could be extended to a broader range of antipsychotics with previously unclear relative efficacy and tolerability.Methods: Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed in which randomized trials comparing any of the following interventions were included: second-generation antipsychotics, haloperidol, or placebo. The primary outcomes for efficacy and acceptability were the response rate and all-cause discontinuation. The secondary outcomes included the improvement of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores, discontinuation because of adverse events, and individual adverse events.Results: Eighteen relevant studies were identified (total n=3,446; aripiprazole =267, blonanserin =285, clozapine =47, clocapramine =295, haloperidol =857, mosapramine =493, olanzapine =179, paliperidone =136, perospirone =146, placebo =138, quetiapine =212, and risperidone =338; mean study duration =8.33±1.41 weeks. In primary outcomes, olanzapine and paliperidone showed efficacy than placebo, and olanzapine and paliperidone showed superior acceptability compared with placebo. There were differences in the incidences of individual adverse events (the best antipsychotic: extrapyramidal

  15. A single-dose, randomized, two-way crossover study comparing two olanzapine tablet products in healthy adult male volunteers under fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafeey, Ahmed H; Elsherbiny, Mohamed A; Fathallah, Mohsen M

    2009-03-01

    Olanzapine is a psychotropic agent that belongs to the thienobenzodiazepine class. The aim of this study was to assess the bioequivalence of 2 commercial 10-mg tablet formulations of olanzapine by statistical analysis of the pharmacokinetic parameters C(max), AUC from 0 to 72 hours after dosing (AUC(0-72)), and AUC(0-infinity) as required by the Egyptian health authority for the marketing of a generic product. This bioequivalence study was carried out in healthy male volunteers using a single-dose, randomized, 2-way crossover design under fasting conditions. Statistical analysis of the pharmacokinetic parameters C(max), AUC(0-72), and AUC(0-infinity) was conducted to determine bioequivalence (after log-transformation of data using analysis of variance and 90% CIs) and to gain marketing approval in Egypt. The formulations were considered to be bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of the 3 pharmacokinetic parameters were within the predetermined bioequivalence range (ie, 80%-125%), as established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Both the test product (Trademark: Integrol((R)) [Global Napi Pharmaceuticals, Cairo, Egypt]) and the reference product (Trademark: Zyprexa((R)) [Eli Lilly and Company, Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom]) were administered as 10-mg tablets with 240 mL of water after an overnight fast on 2 treatment days, separated by a 2-week washout period. After dosing, serial blood samples were collected for 72 hours. Plasma samples were analyzed using a sensitive, reproducible, and accurate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method capable of quantitating olanzapine in the range of 0.167 to 16.7 ng/mL, with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.167 ng/mL. Adverse events were reported by the volunteers as instructed or observed by the resident physician, and were recorded, tabulated, and evaluated. Twenty-four healthy adult male volunteers participated in this study. Their mean (SD) age was 24.7 (6.2) years (range, 19

  16. Early response predicts subsequent response to olanzapine long-acting injection in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial of treatment for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauffer Virginia L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with schizophrenia, early non-response to oral antipsychotic therapy robustly predicts subsequent non-response to continued treatment with the same medication. This study assessed whether early response predicted later response when using a long-acting injection (LAI antipsychotic. Methods Data were taken from an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of olanzapine LAI in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia (n = 233. Early response was defined as ≥30% improvement from baseline to Week 4 in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS0-6 Total score. Subsequent response was defined as ≥40% baseline-to-endpoint improvement in PANSS0-6 Total score. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, and predictive accuracy were calculated. Clinical and functional outcomes were compared between Early Responders and Early Non-responders. Results Early response/non-response to olanzapine LAI predicted later response/non-response with high sensitivity (85%, specificity (72%, PPV (78%, NPV (80%, and overall accuracy (79%. Compared to Early Non-responders, Early Responders had significantly greater improvement in PANSS0-6 Total scores at all time points and greater baseline-to-endpoint improvement in PANSS subscale scores, Quality of Life Scale scores, and Short Form-36 Health Survey scores (all p ≤ .01. Among Early Non-responders, 20% demonstrated response by Week 8. Patients who lacked early improvement (at Week 4 in Negative Symptoms and Disorganized Thoughts were more likely to continue being non-responders at Week 8. Conclusions Among acutely ill patients with schizophrenia, early response predicted subsequent response to olanzapine LAI. Early Responders experienced significantly better clinical and functional outcomes than Early Non-responders. Findings are consistent with previous research on oral antipsychotics. Clinical Trials Registry F1D

  17. Treatment continuation of four long-acting antipsychotic medications in the Netherlands and Belgium: A retrospective database study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Decuypere

    Full Text Available Achieving greater continuation of treatment is a key element to improve treatment outcomes in schizophrenia patients. However, reported treatment continuation can differ markedly depending on the study design. In a retrospective setting, treatment continuation remains overall poor among patients using antipsychotics. This study aimed to document the difference in treatment continuation between four long-acting injectable antipsychotics based on the QuintilesIMS LRx databases, national, longitudinal, panel based prescription databases of retail pharmacies, in the Netherlands and Belgium. Paliperidone palmitate once monthly, risperidone microspheres, haloperidol decanoate, and olanzapine pamoate were studied. This study demonstrated significantly higher treatment continuation of paliperidone palmitate once monthly compared to risperidone microspheres (p-value<0,01 and haloperidol decanoate (p-value<0,01 in both countries, a significantly higher treatment continuation of paliperidone palmitate once monthly compared to olanzapine pamoate in the Netherlands (p-value<0,01, and a general trend towards better treatment continuation versus olanzapine pamoate in Belgium. Analysing the subgroup of patients without previous exposure to long-acting antipsychotic treatment revealed the positive impact of previous exposure on treatment continuation with a subsequent long acting treatment. Additionally, the probability of restarting the index therapy was higher among patients treated with paliperidone palmitate once monthly compared to patients treated with risperidone microspheres and haloperidol decanoate. The data source used and the methodology defined ensured for the first time a comparison of treatment continuation in a non-interventional study design for the four long-acting injectable antipsychotics studied.

  18. [Prevention and Treatment of Common Acute Adverse Effects With Antipsychotic Use in Adults With Schizophrenia Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Castro Díaz, Sergio Mario; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    To determine the most adequate strategies for the prevention and treatment of the acute adverse effects of the use of antipsychotics. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search was carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The non-pharmacological interventions such as nutritional counseling by a nutritionist, exercise and psychotherapy are effective in preventing weight gain with the use of antipsychotics. (Kg Weight reduction in DM of -3.05 (-4.16, -1.94)). The antipsychotic change from olanzapine to aripiprazole showed weight loss and decreased BMI (decreased weight in KG DM -3.21 (-9.03, -2.61). The use of beta blockers was ineffective in reducing akathisia induced by antipsychotic; using as outcome the 50% reduction of symptoms of akathisia comparing beta-blockers with placebo RR was 1.4 (0.59, 1.83). It is recommended to make psychotherapeutic accompaniment and nutrition management of overweight for patients with weight gain. If these alternatives are ineffective is suggested to change the antipsychotic or consider starting metformin. For the management of drug-induced akathisia it is recommended to decrease the dose of the drug and the addition of lorazepam. It is recommended using 5mg biperiden IM or trihexyphenidyl 5mg orally in case of secondary acute dystonia and for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism to decrease the dose of antipsychotic or consider using 2 - 4mg/day of biperiden or diphenhydramine 50mg once daily. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Antipsychotic-associated weight gain: management strategies and impact on treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayabandara M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Madhubhashinee Dayabandara, Raveen Hanwella, Suhashini Ratnatunga, Sudarshi Seneviratne, Chathurie Suraweera, Varuni A de Silva Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka Abstract: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is a major management problem for clinicians. It has been shown that weight gain and obesity lead to increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life and poor drug compliance. This narrative review discusses the propensity of various antipsychotics to cause weight gain, the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions available to counteract this effect and its impact on adherence. Most antipsychotics cause weight gain. The risk appears to be highest with olanzapine and clozapine. Weight increases rapidly in the initial period after starting antipsychotics. Patients continue to gain weight in the long term. Children appear to be particularly vulnerable to antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Tailoring antipsychotics according to the needs of the individual and close monitoring of weight and other metabolic parameters are the best preventive strategies at the outset. Switching to an agent with lesser tendency to cause weight gain is an option, but carries the risk of relapse of the illness. Nonpharmacologic interventions of dietary counseling, exercise programs and cognitive and behavioral strategies appear to be equally effective in individual and group therapy formats. Both nonpharmacologic prevention and intervention strategies have shown modest effects on weight. Multiple compounds have been investigated as add-on medications to cause weight loss. Metformin has the best evidence in this respect. Burden of side effects needs to be considered when prescribing weight loss medications. There is no strong evidence to recommend routine prescription of add-on medication for weight reduction. Heterogeneity of study methodologies and other

  20. Risk of falls and fractures in older adults using atypical antipsychotic agents: a propensity score-adjusted, retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Satabdi; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael L; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2012-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotic agents are extensively prescribed in the elderly to treat various behavioral and psychiatric disorders. Past literature has documented an increased risk of falls and factures with the use of risperidone and olanzapine compared with nonuse. However, none of the studies assessed the comparative safety profiles of atypical agents with respect to falls and fractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of falls and fractures associated with the use of risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine in community-dwelling adults aged ≥50 years. The study involved a propensity score-adjusted approach in new users of risperidone, olanzapine, or quetiapine anytime between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2008, using data from the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims database. Patients were followed up until a hospitalization/emergency department visit for fall/fracture or the end of the study period, whichever occurred earlier. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to evaluate the comparative risk of falls/fractures. The covariates in the final model included propensity scores and their interaction terms. There were 12,145 new users of atypical agents in the study population (5083 risperidone, 4377 olanzapine, and 2685 quetiapine). A total of 417 cases of falls/fractures with at least 1 hospitalization/ emergency department visit after the use of the antipsychotic agents were identified. The number of falls for risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine were 179 (3.56%), 123 (2.84%), and 115 (4.34%), respectively. After adjusting for propensity scores, the Cox proportional hazards model showed that there was no statistically significant difference with use of risperidone (hazard ratio = 1.10 [95% CI, 0.86-1.39]) or quetiapine (hazard ratio = 1.12 [95% CI, 0.86-1.46]) compared with olanzapine (reference group) in the risk of falls or fractures. The study found no significant difference across the individual atypical agents in the risk of falls

  1. Antipsychotic Prescriptions Among Adults With Major Depressive Disorder in Office-Based Outpatient Settings: National Trends From 2006 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2018-02-13

    A recent moderately long-term study found an antipsychotic to be more effective than an antidepressant as the next-step treatment of unresponsive major depressive disorder (MDD). It is thus timely to examine recent trends in the pharmacoepidemiology of antipsychotic treatment of MDD. Data from the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, nationally representative samples of office-based outpatient visits in adults with MDD (ICD-9-CM codes 296.20-296.26 and 296.30-296.36) (n = 4,044 unweighted), were used to estimate rates of antipsychotic prescribing over these 10 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified demographic and clinical factors independently associated with antipsychotic use in MDD. Antipsychotic prescribing for MDD increased from 18.5% in 2006-2007 to 24.9% in 2008-2009 and then declined to 18.9% in 2014-2015. Visits with adults 75 years or older showed the greatest decline from 27.0% in 2006-2007 to 10.7% in 2014-2015 (OR for overall trend = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.95). The most commonly prescribed antipsychotic agents were aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Antipsychotic prescription was associated with being black or Hispanic, having Medicare among adults under 65 years or Medicaid as a primary source of payment, and receiving mental health counseling, 3 or more concomitant medications, and diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (P < .01). Antipsychotics, prescribed for about one-fifth of adults with MDD, increased and then declined from 2006 to 2015, reflecting, first, FDA approval and then concern about adverse effects in the elderly. Future research should track evolving trends following the publication of evidence of greater long-term effectiveness of antipsychotic than antidepressant next-step therapy in adults with MDD. © Copyright 2018 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. Antipsychotics promote GABAergic interneuron genesis in the adult rat brain: Role of heat-shock protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Hiroo; Ukai, Wataru; Tsujino, Hanako; Furuse, Kengo; Kigawa, Yoshiyasu; Tayama, Masaya; Ishii, Takao; Hashimoto, Eri; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2017-09-01

    Current antipsychotics reduce positive symptoms and reverse negative symptoms in conjunction with cognitive behavioral issues with the goal of restoring impaired occupational and social functioning. However, limited information is available on their influence on gliogenesis or their neurogenic properties in adult schizophrenia brains, particularly on GABAergic interneuron production. In the present study, we used young adult subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived progenitor cells expressing proteoglycan NG2 cultures to examine the oligodendrocyte and GABAergic interneuron genesis effects of several kinds of antipsychotics on changes in differentiation function induced by exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. We herein demonstrated that antipsychotics promoted or restored changes in the oligodendrocyte/GABAergic interneuron differentiation functions of NG2(+) cells induced by the exposure to MK-801, which was considered to be one of the drug-induced schizophrenia model. We also demonstrated that antipsychotics restored heat-shock protein (HSP) production in NG2(+) cells with differentiation impairment. The antipsychotics olanzapine, aripiprazole, and blonanserin, but not haloperidol increased HSP90 levels, which were reduced by the exposure to MK-801. Our results showed that antipsychotics, particularly those recently synthesized, exerted similar GABAergic interneuron genesis effects on NG2(+) neuronal/glial progenitor cells in the adult rat brain by increasing cellular HSP production, and also suggest that HSP90 may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and is a key target for next drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Eating disorders in psychiatric patients during treatment with second generation antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, L M; Gorobets, L N; Bulanov, V S; Litvinov, A V; Ivanova, G P; Tsarenko, M A; Polyakovskaya, T P

    2015-01-01

    To identify the frequency and characteristics of eating disorders in patients with schizophrenia treated with second generation antipsychotics. A sample included 56 patients (48 women and 8 men, mean age 28 ± 4.5 years) with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Patients received risperidone, quetiapine and olanzapine. The study employed clinical-anamnestic, endocrinological methods and assessment of eating behavior with DEBQ (The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire). All of the patients had extra Body mass or obesity: extra Body mass of the 1st grade was found in 18 patients (BMIobesity grade 2-3 in 38 patients (BMI>30 kg/m²). Authors identified different types of eating disorders: external, restrictive and emotiogenic as well as the relationship of their prevalence and severity with sex, drug, presence and grade of obesity. Based on these we developed recommendations for management of patients treated with second generation antipsychotics.

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of olanzapine as an adjunctive treatment for anorexia nervosa in adolescent females: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moher David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia Nervosa (AN is a serious, debilitating condition that causes significant physical, emotional, and functional impairment. The condition is characterized by destructive weight loss behaviours and a refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height. AN often develops in adolescence and is a predominantly female disorder. Treatment for AN typically involves medical, nutritional and psychological interventions. Pharmacotherapy is also often used; however, the literature on the effectiveness of these drugs in a pediatric population is very limited. Olanzapine, which is an 'atypical' antipsychotic, is becoming more widespread in the treatment of AN. Olanzapine is hypothesized to facilitate weight gain, while decreasing levels of agitation and decreasing resistance to treatment in young women with AN. This randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial seeks to examine the effectiveness and safety of olanzapine in female youth with AN. Methods/Design Adolescent females between the ages of 12 and 17 diagnosed with AN (either restricting or binge/purge type or Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified with a Body Mass Index of less than or equal to 17.5, will be offered inclusion in the study. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive either olanzapine or placebo. Patients assigned to receive olanzapine will start at a low dose of 1.25 mg/day for three days, followed by 2.5 mg/day for four days, 5 mg/day for one week, then 7.5 mg/day (the target dose chosen for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks at 7.5 mg the medication will be tapered and discontinued over a period of two weeks. The effectiveness of olanzapine versus placebo will be determined by investigating the change from baseline on measures of eating attitudes and behaviors, depression and anxiety, and change in Body Mass Index at week 12, and after a follow-up period at week 40. It is anticipated that 67 participants will be recruited

  5. Clinically relevant interactions between newer antidepressants and second-generation antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Edoardo; de Leon, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Combinations of newer antidepressants and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are frequently used by clinicians. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction (PK DI) and poorly understood pharmacodynamic (PD) drug interaction (PD DI) can occur between them. This paper comprehensively reviews PD DI and PK DI studies. More PK DI studies are needed to better establish dose correction factors after adding fluoxetine and paroxetine to aripiprazole, iloperidone and risperidone. Further PK DI studies and case reports are also needed to better establish the need for dose correction factors after adding i) fluoxetine to clozapine, lurasidone, quetiapine and olanzapine; ii) paroxetine to olanzapine; iii) fluvoxamine to asenapine, aripiprazole, iloperidone, lurasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone; iv) high sertraline doses to aripiprazole, clozapine, iloperidone and risperidone: v) bupropion and duloxetine to aripiprazole, clozapine, iloperidone and risperidone; and vi) asenapine to paroxetine and venlafaxine. Possible beneficial PD DI effects occur after adding SGAs to newer antidepressants for treatment-resistant major depressive and obsessive-compulsive disorders. The lack of studies combining newer antidepressants and SGAs in psychotic depression is worrisome. PD DIs between newer antidepressants and SGAs may be more likely for mirtazapine and bupropion. Adding selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and SGAs may increase QTc interval and may very rarely contribute to torsades de pointes.

  6. Prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaki Chakravarty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital (SMCH of Assam. Methods: It is a prospective cross-sectional study which was carried out for three months from August to November 2015 in the outpatient department of psychiatry. All patients irrespective of their ages and sexes were included in this study. Inpatients, referred patients, patients not willing to give consent, patients of epilepsy as well as those cases where diagnoses were not certain were excluded from the study. The prescription patterns of antipsychotic drugs and the occurrences of various psychiatric diseases on both the sexes were studied after taking permission from the Institutional Ethical Committee (SMCH. Results: A total of 112 prescriptions were analysed. The most common disease was found to be schizophrenia. Total drugs prescribed were 265 and average number of drugs per prescription was 2.36. It was seen that out of the 112 prescriptions, monotherapy was practiced in 19.64% (22 compared to polytherapy in 80.35% (90. Out of 265 prescribed drugs atypical antipsychotics were 112 (42.26%, typical antipsychotics 12 (4.52%, antiepileptics 57 (21.50%, antidepressants 29 (10.94%, antiparkinsonian 29 (10.94%, and others 26 (9.81%. Antipsychotics given orally were 122 of which olanzapine was 54 (44.26%, risperidone 40 (32.78%, chlorpromazine ten (8.19%, quetiapine eight (6.55%, aripiprazole five (4.09%, amisulpiride five (4.09% were seen. Injectable antipsychotics were two, of which only haloperidol two (100%. Antipsychotics in combination prescription with same groups were 14 (12.5%, with antidepressants, antipileptics, antiparkinsonian were 88 (78.57% and other agents were ten (8.92%, which included pantoprazole, multivitamins, and benfotiamine. Conclusion: This study shows that atypical antipsychotics are the most common drugs prescribed in patients with psychotic illness and

  7. Prolactin and macroprolactin levels in psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotics: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Kyu Young; Lee, Kye-Seong; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Won

    2016-05-30

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether atypical antipsychotics can elevate serum levels of both macroprolactin and prolactin, and whether the macroprolactin levels differ according to the type of atypical antipsychotic being taken. In total, 245 subjects were enrolled consecutively in 6 hospitals. Serum prolactin and macroprolactin levels were measured at a single time point during maintenance antipsychotic monotherapy. The mean total serum prolactin levels including macroprolactin were 11.91, 20.73, 16.41, 50.83, 12.84, and 59.1ng/mL for patients taking aripiprazole, blonanserin, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, and risperidone, respectively, while those for macroprolactin were 1.71, 3.86, 3.73, 7.28, 2.77, and 8.0ng/mL. The total prolactin and macroprolactin levels were significantly higher among those taking paliperidone and risperidone than among those taking any of the other antipsychotics (pprolactin and macroprolactin. Sexual dysfunction was reported in 35.5% (87/245) of the total subjects. However, the total prolactin level did not differ significantly between subjects with and without sexual dysfunction except gynecomastia. These findings suggest that treatment with risperidone and paliperidone can induce hyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Blonanserin extensively occupies rat dopamine D3 receptors at antipsychotic dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Baba

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor has been hypothesized to be beneficial for schizophrenia cognitive deficits, negative symptoms and extrapyramidal symptoms. However, recent animal and human studies have shown that most antipsychotics do not occupy D3 receptors in vivo, despite their considerable binding affinity for this receptor in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the D3 receptor binding of blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors antagonist, in vitro and in vivo. Blonanserin showed the most potent binding affinity for human D3 receptors among the tested atypical antipsychotics (risperidone, olanzapine and aripiprazole. Our GTPγS-binding assay demonstrated that blonanserin acts as a potent full antagonist for human D3 receptors. All test-drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like efficacy in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats. Treatment with blonanserin at its effective dose blocked the binding of [3H]-(+-PHNO, a D2/D3 receptor radiotracer, both in the D2 receptor-rich region (striatum and the D3 receptor-rich region (cerebellum lobes 9 and 10. On the other hand, the occupancies of other test-drugs for D3 receptors were relatively low. In conclusion, we have shown that blonanserin, but not other tested antipsychotics, extensively occupies D3 receptors in vivo in rats.

  9. Blonanserin extensively occupies rat dopamine D3 receptors at antipsychotic dose range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Satoko; Enomoto, Takeshi; Horisawa, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ono, Michiko

    2015-03-01

    Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor has been hypothesized to be beneficial for schizophrenia cognitive deficits, negative symptoms and extrapyramidal symptoms. However, recent animal and human studies have shown that most antipsychotics do not occupy D3 receptors in vivo, despite their considerable binding affinity for this receptor in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the D3 receptor binding of blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors antagonist, in vitro and in vivo. Blonanserin showed the most potent binding affinity for human D3 receptors among the tested atypical antipsychotics (risperidone, olanzapine and aripiprazole). Our GTPγS-binding assay demonstrated that blonanserin acts as a potent full antagonist for human D3 receptors. All test-drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like efficacy in methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats. Treatment with blonanserin at its effective dose blocked the binding of [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO, a D2/D3 receptor radiotracer, both in the D2 receptor-rich region (striatum) and the D3 receptor-rich region (cerebellum lobes 9 and 10). On the other hand, the occupancies of other test-drugs for D3 receptors were relatively low. In conclusion, we have shown that blonanserin, but not other tested antipsychotics, extensively occupies D3 receptors in vivo in rats. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing of bioactive-nanovesicles on hepatotoxicity of atypical antipsychotics via digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk Kirbay, Fatma; Geyik, Caner; Guler, Emine; Yesiltepe, Ozan; Gumus, Zinar Pinar; Odaci Demirkol, Dilek; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2017-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs induce hepatic toxicity. Thus, it is of importance to eliminate the side effects of these drugs. Herein we describe the preparation of nanoemulsions with a dietary supplement; wheat germ oil (WGO), to ameliorate the liver damage induced by clozapine and olanzapine. THLE-2 cell line was used as a model to investigate the effects of these nanoemulsions on cell viability as well as antioxidative efficiency after antipsychotic insult. In this context, a conventional cell culture method; MTT was used along with a novel cellular imaging technique called digital holography (DH) to evaluate cell viability. Obtained data confirmed that both clozapine and olanzapine induced the liver damage in in vitro model and WGO nanoemulsions were found to be effective on cells and eliminate the cytotoxic effects of these drugs. Briefly, this study has some outputs as follows; it showed that different dietary supplements can be used in such formulations instead of their pristine forms to increase bioavailability. Also, DH was successfully applied for the monitoring of cell viability and it could be a promising approach as the reactive-free cytotoxicity test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Olanzapine-induced weight gain: chronic infusion using osmotic minipumps does not result in stable plasma levels due to degradation of olanzapine in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Adan, Roger A. H.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain have not yet been fully elucidated. To examine the effects of long-term treatment with olanzapine on different aspects of energy balance, we administered olanzapine to male rats. Osmotic minipumps were chosen as preferred mode of

  12. Comparative study of treatment continuation using second-generation antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azekawa T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Takaharu Azekawa, Shizuko Ohashi, Akira ItamiShioiri Mental Clinic, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken, JapanBackground: Effectiveness of a drug is a key concept dependent on efficacy, safety, and tolerability. Time to discontinuation of treatment is also representative of effectiveness. We investigated differences in treatment discontinuation among newly started second-generation antipsychotics in the clinical setting.Methods: Using a retrospective cohort study design, we screened all outpatients (n = 7936 who visited the Shioiri Mental Clinic between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010. We identified a cohort of patients (n = 703 diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and calculated the time to discontinuation of each second-generation antipsychotic.Results: Of the 703 patients, 149 were newly treated with aripiprazole, 67 with blonanserin, 95 with olanzapine, 36 with quetiapine, 74 with perospirone, and 120 with risperidone. The time to discontinuation for all causes was significantly longer for aripiprazole than for blonanserin, olanzapine, and risperidone. In addition, aripiprazole tended to be continued for longer than quetiapine and perospirone, but these differences were not significant.Conclusion: Aripiprazole may be considered the best available option for long-term treatment of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.Keywords: retrospective study, second-generation antipsychotics, effectiveness, treatment continuation, schizophrenia, aripiprazole

  13. A case report of somnambulism associated with olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridhosseini, Farhad; Zamani, Azar

    2012-01-01

    Somnambulism consists of a group of behaviors leading to unwanted movements during sleep or even sleepwalking. Medications applied for psychiatric disorders could increase the likelihood of somnambulism in adults. The following article is a case report of somnambulism seen in a patient with schizophrenia, which occurred after remission of an acute episode following treatment with olanzapine. When olanzapine dosage was decreased, no previous and similar symptoms were reported after 6 months of follow up.

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ORAL OLANZAPINE AND ORAL HALOPERIDOL ON GLUCOSE TOLERANCE LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

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    G N S Sangeetha Lakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by persistent defects in the perception, thinking or the expression of reality. The term “schizophrenia” translates roughly as “shattered mind,” and comes from the Greek (schizo, “to split” or “to divide” and (phrēn, “mind”. Material and Methods: The study was designed to be a prospective control study. Schizophrenic patients taking Olanzapine and Haloperidol were selected and follow up at three weeks and six weeks was done. Results: In this prospective control study, Olanzapine and Haloperidol were associated with an increase in Blood Glucose Levels. The mean changes in Glucose remained within clinically normal range in this six week study. Conclusion: Antipsychotic treatmemt leads to the development of Diabetes mellitus in a significant 10.1% of patients within 6 weeks. Given the serious implications for morbidity and mortality attributable to diabetes mellitus, clinicians need to be aware of these risk factors when treating patients with chronic schizophrenia

  15. A Subgroup Analysis of Chinese Patients Switched to Paliperidone Palmitate One-Month Injectable by Prior Oral Antipsychotic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, T; Fan, J; Wang, X; Wang, C; Xu, C; Zhuo, J; Feng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Safely tapering current antipsychotic medication, while balancing efficacy and tolerability, is an important consideration when switching patients from their antipsychotic therapy to a new treatment. The efficacy and tolerability of paliperidone palmitate one-month (PP1M) in Chinese patients switched from previous antipsychotic treatments were examined in order to develop effective switching and dosing strategies. A 13-week open-label, single arm, prospective, interventional study was conducted in Chinese patients (n = 610) with acute schizophrenia to examine their response, by previous treatment group, when switched to PP1M (75-150 mg eq). Among 610 patients with ≥ 30% reduction in PANSS total score were 191/263 (72.6%) risperidone/paliperidone extended-release patients, 36/52 (69.2%) olanzapine patients, and 214/293 (73.0%) other antipsychotic patients. Patient functioning and adherence were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved for all subgroups. Patients on higher doses of prior antipsychotics generally took longer to withdraw from their current medication. Most patients were administered the 100 mg eq dose, and all subgroups received a similar mean dose (114-119 mg eq) of PP1M. Recommendations for transitioning patients to PP1M from each subgroup are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis of antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms based on receptor occupancy theory incorporating endogenous dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui-Sakata, Akiko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2005-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the risks of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) induced by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs using a common pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model based on the receptor occupancy. We collected the data for EPS induced by atypical antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, and a typical antipsychotic, haloperidol from literature and analyzed the following five indices of EPS, the ratio of patients obliged to take anticholinergic medication, the occurrence rates of plural extrapyramidal symptoms (more than one of tremor, dystonia, hypokinesia, akathisia, extrapyramidal syndrome, etc.), parkinsonism, akathisia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. We tested two models, i.e., a model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition and a model not considering the endogenous dopamine release, and used them to examine the relationship between the D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of drug-induced EPS. The model incorporating endogenous dopamine release better described the relationship between the mean D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of EPS than the other model, as assessed by the final sum of squares of residuals (final SS) and Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC). Furthermore, the former model could appropriately predict the risks of EPS induced by two other atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and ziprasidone, which were not incorporated into the model development. The developed model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition may be useful for the prediction of antipsychotics-induced EPS.

  17. Propensity score estimation to address calendar time-specific channeling in comparative effectiveness research of second generation antipsychotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie B Dusetzina

    Full Text Available Channeling occurs when a medication and its potential comparators are selectively prescribed based on differences in underlying patient characteristics. Drug safety advisories can provide new information regarding the relative safety or effectiveness of a drug product which might increase selective prescribing. In particular, when reported adverse effects vary among drugs within a therapeutic class, clinicians may channel patients toward or away from a drug based on the patient's underlying risk for an adverse outcome. If channeling is not identified and appropriately managed it might lead to confounding in observational comparative effectiveness studies.To demonstrate channeling among new users of second generation antipsychotics following a Food and Drug Administration safety advisory and to evaluate the impact of channeling on cardiovascular risk estimates over time.Florida Medicaid data from 2001-2006.Retrospective cohort of adults initiating second generation antipsychotics. We used propensity scores to match olanzapine initiators with other second generation antipsychotic initiators. To evaluate channeling away from olanzapine following an FDA safety advisory, we estimated calendar time-specific propensity scores. We compare the performance of these calendar time-specific propensity scores with conventionally-estimated propensity scores on estimates of cardiovascular risk.Increased channeling away from olanzapine was evident for some, but not all, cardiovascular risk factors and corresponded with the timing of the FDA advisory. Covariate balance was optimized within period and across all periods when using the calendar time-specific propensity score. Hazard ratio estimates for cardiovascular outcomes did not differ across models (Conventional PS: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.81-3.18 versus calendar time-specific PS: 0.93, 95%CI: 0.77-3.04.Changes in channeling over time was evident for several covariates but had limited impact on cardiovascular risk

  18. Atypical Antipsychotic Medications and Hyponatremia in Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study

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    Sonja Gandhi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of case reports have suggested a possible association between atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia. Currently, there are no reliable estimates of hyponatremia risk from atypical antipsychotic drugs. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia in older adults dispensed an atypical antipsychotic drug relative to no antipsychotic use. Design: The design of this study was a retrospective, population-based cohort study. Setting: The setting of this study was in Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2012. Patients: Adults 65 years or older with an identified psychiatric condition who were newly dispensed risperidone, olanzapine, or quetiapine in the community setting compared to adults with similar indicators of baseline health who were not dispensed such a prescription. Measurements: The primary outcome was the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia. The tracer outcome (an outcome that is not expected to be influenced by the study drugs was the 30-day risk of hospitalization with bowel obstruction. These outcomes were assessed using hospital diagnosis codes. Methods: Using health administrative data, we applied a propensity score technique to match antipsychotic users 1:1 to non-users of antipsychotic drugs (58,008 patients in each group. We used conditional logistic regression to compare outcomes among the matched users and non-users. Results: A total of 104 baseline characteristics were well-balanced between the two matched groups. Atypical antipsychotic use compared to non-use was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia within 30 days (86/58,008 (0.15 % versus 53/58,008 (0.09 %; relative risk 1.62 (95 % confidence interval (CI 1.15 to 2.29; absolute risk increase 0.06 % (95 % CI 0.02 to 0.10. The limited number of events precluded some additional analyses to confirm if the association was robust. Atypical

  19. Zotepine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Selvizhi; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan; Komossa, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background In many parts of the world, particularly in industrialised countries, second generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs have become first line treatment for people suffering from schizophrenia. The question as to whether the effects of various second generation antipsychotic drugs differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of zotepine compared with other second generation antipsychotic drugs for people suffering from schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2009), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. Selection criteria We included only randomised clinical controlled trials that compared zotepine with any forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole or ziprasidone in people suffering from only schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis SS and KK extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results We included three studies (total n=289; 2 RCTs zotepine vs clozapine; 1 RCT zotepine vs clozapine vs risperidone (at 4 mg, 8 mg doses) vs remoxipride. All studies were of limited methodological quality. When zotepine was compared with clozapine, it was clozapine that was found to be more effective in terms of global state (n=59, 1 RCT, RR No clinically significant response 8.23 CI 1.14 to 59.17). Mental state scores also favoured clozapine (n=59, 1 RCT, MD average score (BPRS total, high = poor) 6.00 CI 2.17 to 9.83) and there was less use of antiparkinson medication in the clozapine group (n=116, 2 RCTs, RR 20.96 CI 2.89 to 151.90). In the

  20. A bibliometric study of scientific research conducted on second-generation antipsychotic drugs in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Sim, Kang; Shen, Winston Wu; Huelves, Lorena; Moreno, Raquel; Molina, Juan de Dios; Rubio, Gabriel; Noriega, Concha; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel; Alamo, Cecilio

    2014-01-01

    A bibliometric study was carried out to ascertain the volume and impact of scientific literature published on second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in Singapore from 1997 to 2011. A search of the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases was performed to identify articles originating from Singapore that included the descriptors 'atypic* antipsychotic*', 'second-generation antipsychotic*', 'clozapine', 'risperidone', 'olanzapine', 'ziprasidone', 'quetiapine', 'sertindole', 'aripiprazole', 'paliperidone', 'amisulpride', 'zotepine', 'asenapine', 'iloperidone', 'lurasidone', 'perospirone' and 'blonanserin' in the article titles. Certain bibliometric indicators of production and dispersion (e.g. Price's Law on the increase of scientific literature, and Bradford's Law) were applied, and the participation index of various countries was calculated. The bibliometric data was also correlated with some social and health data from Singapore, such as the total per capita expenditure on health and gross domestic expenditure on research and development. From 1997 to 2011, a total of 51 articles on SGAs in Singapore were published. Our results suggested non-fulfilment of Price's Law (r = 0.0648 after exponential adjustment vs. r = 0.2140 after linear adjustment). The most widely studied drugs were clozapine (21 articles), risperidone (16 articles) and olanzapine (8 articles). Division into Bradford zones yielded a nucleus occupied by the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology (6 articles) and the Singapore Medical Journal(4 articles). The analysed material was published in a total of 30 journals, with the majority from six journals. Four of these six journals have an impact factor greater than 2. Publications on SGAs in Singapore are still too few to confirm an exponential growth of scientific literature.

  1. Daytime sleepiness and EEG abnormalities in patients treated with second generation antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Lukasz; Jernajczyk, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Waliniowska, Elżbieta; Jakubczyk, Tomasz; Jarema, Marek; Wichniak, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether or not an increased prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or EEG abnormalities is observed in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), and to compare the effects of second generation antipsychotics (SGA) on patients' daytime sleepiness level and EEG recordings. EEG recordings and self-reports of EDS, assessed with Epworth (ESS) and Stanford (SSS) Sleepiness Scales, were compared between 244 patients with SSD and 82 patients with anxiety, personality or behavioral disorders (non-psychotic disorders, NPD). To examine the effects of various SGA, patients treated in monotherapy with aripiprazole, olanzapine, clozapine, risperidone and sertindole were compared. A higher prevalence of abnormal EEG recordings was observed in SSD patients. No significant differences in average daytime sleepiness were found between patients with SSD and NPD; however, patients with SSD had longer sleep duration. Aripiprazole treatment was associated with significantly smaller and less frequent EEG abnormalities than treatment with any other SGA, while treatment with clozapine and olanzapine was related to an increased prevalence of severe EEG abnormalities. Patients with SSD treated with SGA in monotherapy were less sleepy than unmedicated patients with NPD. Although antipsychotics may have profound effects on EEG patients with schizophrenia do not have higher daytime sleepiness than patients with anxiety/personality disorders. Patients with schizophrenia may compensate sedative effects of antipsychotic treatment with sleep duration prolongation and report even less sleepiness than non-psychotic patients. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose-associated changes in safety and efficacy parameters observed in a 24-week maintenance trial of olanzapine long-acting injection in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Susan B

    2011-02-01

    considering olanzapine LAI, as with all antipsychotics, it is important to carefully consider the potential benefits and risks for an individual patient. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00088491

  3. An algorithm-based approach to first-episode schizophrenia: response rates over 3 prospective antipsychotic trials with a retrospective data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agid, Ofer; Arenovich, Tamara; Sajeev, Gautam; Zipursky, Robert B; Kapur, Shitij; Foussias, George; Remington, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Early, effective treatment in first-episode schizophrenia is advocated, although evidence based on a systematic approach over multiple antipsychotic trials is lacking. Employing a naturalistic design, we examined response rates over 3 circumscribed antipsychotic trials. Between June 2003 and December 2008, 244 individuals with first-episode schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were treated at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, following an algorithm that moved them through 2 antipsychotic trials, followed by a trial with clozapine. For the first 2 trials, treatment consisted of risperidone followed by olanzapine, or vice versa; each trial consisted of 3 stages (low-, full-, or high-dose) lasting up to 4 weeks at each level and adjusted according to response/tolerability. Clinical response was defined as a Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement score of 2 (much improved) or 1 (very much improved) and/or a Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Thought Disorder subscale score ≤ 6. Data were analyzed retrospectively, and publication of anonymized clinical data was approved by the Research Ethics Board of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in May 2003. In trial 1, 74.5% of individuals responded, with rates significantly higher for olanzapine (82.1%, 115/140) versus risperidone (66.3%, 69/104; P = .005). With trial 2, response rate dropped dramatically to 16.6% but again was significantly higher for olanzapine (25.7%, 9/35) compared to risperidone (4.0%, 1/25; P = .04). Response rate climbed above 70% once more, specifically 75.0% (21/28), in those individuals who agreed to a third trial with clozapine. Results confirm a high response rate (75%) to initial antipsychotic treatment in first-episode schizophrenia. A considerably lower response rate (algorithm. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Atypical antipsychotic drugs and diabetes mellitus in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event database: a systematic Bayesian signal detection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ross A; Pikalov, Andrei; Tran, Quynh-Van; Kremenets, Tatyana; Arani, Ramin B; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2009-01-01

    Prior literature suggests that the risk of diabetes-related adverse events (DRAEs) differs between atypical antipsychotics. The present study evaluated the potential association between atypical antipsychotics or haloperidol and diabetes using data from the FDA AERS database. Analysis of AERS data was conducted for clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole or haloperidol with 24 DRAEs from the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities using a Multi-item Gamma Poisson Shrinker (MGPS) data-mining algorithm. Using MGPS, adjusted reporting ratios (Empiric Bayes Geometric Mean or EBGM) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs; EB05-EB95) were calculated to estimate the degree of drug-event association relative to all drugs and events. Logistic regression odds ratios and 90% CIs (LR05-LR95) were calculated for diabetes mellitus events. All six atypicals had an EB05 >/= 2 for at least one DRAE. The most common event was diabetes mellitus (2,784 cases). Adjusted reporting ratios (CIs) for diabetes mellitus were: olanzapine 9.6 (9.2-10.0; 1306 cases); risperidone 3.8 (3.5-4.1; 447 cases); quetiapine 3.5 (3.2-3.9; 283 cases); clozapine 3.1 (2.9-3.3; 464 cases); ziprasidone 2.4 (2.0-2.9; 74 cases); aripiprazole 2.4 (1.9-2.9; 71 cases); haloperidol 2.0 (1.7-2.3; 139 cases). Logistic regression odds ratios agreed with adjusted reporting ratios. In the AERS database, lower associations with DRAEs were seen for haloperidol, aripiprazole and ziprasidone, and higher associations were seen for olanzapine, risperidone, clozapine and quetiapine. Our findings support differential risk of diabetes across atypical antipsychotics, reinforcing the need for metabolic monitoring of patients taking antipsychotics.

  5. Eosinophilic myocarditis during treatment with olanzapine - report of two possible cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Torkel; Rosenzweig, Mary; Bruhn, Christina Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    similarity between olanzapine and clozapine, we hypothesized the existence of such an association. We searched the spontaneous adverse drug reports database of the Danish Health and Medicines Authority for olanzapine and myocarditis in the period from October 21, 1996 to - June 03, 2015. We identified two...... exceeding the recommendations. CONCLUSION: Olanzapine may have contributed to and/or worsened the two reported fatal cases of myocarditis. Additional studies are required to establish a causal link between olanzapine and eosinophilic myocarditis....

  6. Pharmaceutical studies on and clinical application of olanzapine suppositories prepared as a hospital preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Kimura, Satoru; Takahashi, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Yuta; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Kushibiki, Satoko; Katamachi, Morio; Kizu, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Background A new formulation of olanzapine available for terminally ill patients is needed. Rectal administration using suppositories is an alternative for patients for whom administration via the oral route is not feasible. In the present study, we prepared olanzapine suppositories, and confirmed using pharmaceutical tests. Furthermore, we demonstrated the efficacy and safety of olanzapine suppositories in terminally ill patients. Methods We prepared olanzapine suppositories using bases cons...

  7. Comparative study of adverse effects of Olanzapine and Risperidone on blood suger, lipid and other side effects in psychotic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra safa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Safa M1, Mohammadi MR2, Saki M3, Delfan B4, Tarrahi MJ5, Rouhandeh M6 1. Assistant Professor, Department of psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 2. GP, Khorramabad, Iran 3. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 4. Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 5. Instructor, Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 6. BSc in Nursing, Khorramabad, Iran Abstract Background: Chronic mental disorders are among the problems in psychiatrics. Atypical anti psychotic drugs are new effective medications to treat these disorders. Unfortunately these drugs lead to side effects such as increase in blood glocuse, weight gain and edema. This study aims to investigate adverse effects of Olanzapine and Rispridone on lipid level and blood glocuse and other complications in patients with psychotic disorders. Materials and methods: This clinical trial-double blinded study, patients with psychotic disorders were randomly categorized into two groups. Group one treated with Olanzapine and other with Rispridone. All the subjects were initially assessed for blood sugar and lipids, and in the case of normal, they were randomly assigned to two groups in a double- blinded method to be treated with Olanzapine or Risperidone. Blood sugar and lipids tests were performed for all subjects at the 1st week and 3 months after initiation of therapy. Other complications were assessed too, then the data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The results of the study indicated that the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and blood suger rose significantly at the 1st week and third month after beginning the treatment. Increase of cholesterol and triglyceride in the Olanzapine and Risperidone

  8. Effect of second-generation antipsychotics on caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Kaczynski, Richard; Sultzer, David L; Schneider, Lon S

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) imposes a severe burden upon patients and their caregivers. Severity of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances is an important determinant of caregivers' experience of burden. These symptoms may be improved with atypical antipsychotic treatment. Data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness-Alzheimer's Disease (CATIE-AD) trial were used to evaluate the effect of atypical antipsychotics versus placebo on the experiences of caregivers of outpatients with AD. We compared the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, risperidone, or quetiapine-considered together as a group) versus placebo on the experiences of caregivers of AD outpatients (diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR). We also evaluated whether improvement in patients' psychiatric and behavioral symptoms mediated the relationship between drug treatment and caregiver burden. The CATIE-AD trial, conducted from April 2001 through November 2004, included outpatients (mean age = 77.9 years [SD = 7.5 years]) in usual care settings and assessed treatment effectiveness over a 9-month period at 42 US sites. In a set of secondary analyses, data from CATIE-AD participants who had at least 1 postbaseline outcome assessment and data from their caregivers were examined in an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis (N = 361). A phase 1-only analysis was conducted including only observations while patients were receiving the initially randomized drug (N = 153). The Burden Interview, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) Caregiver Distress Scale were used to evaluate caregiver burden. In both ITT and phase 1-only analyses, caregivers of patients treated with second-generation antipsychotics scored significantly lower than caregivers of patients receiving placebo on both the Burden Interview (P = .0090) and the NPI Caregiver Distress Scale (P = .0209). These differences appeared to have been mediated by lower levels of agitation

  9. Role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Gros, Daniel F; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Evidence-based treatment approaches for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) comprise psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of the two. First-line pharmacotherapy agents include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and, in certain European guidelines, pregabalin, which gained European Commission approval. Although short- and long-term efficacy have been established for these agents in controlled trials, response rates of 60-70 % are insufficient, remission rates are relatively modest, and relapse rates considerable. Moreover, questions increasingly arise regarding tolerability and side-effect profiles. As an alternative, antipsychotics have long been of interest for the treatment of anxiety disorders, but investigation had been tempered by their potential for irreversible side effects. With the improved side-effect profiles of atypical antipsychotics, these agents are increasingly being investigated across Axis I disorders. Atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and risperidone have been shown to be helpful in addressing a range of anxiety and depressive symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders, and have since been used in the treatment of a range of mood and anxiety disorders. In this article, we review the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy and/or monotherapy for individuals with GAD, a currently off-label indication. The most evidence has accumulated for quetiapine. Findings suggest that approximately 50 % of participants tolerate the side effects, most commonly sedation and fatigue. Among this subset, those who continue treatment demonstrate significant reductions in anxiety when used as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. The appropriateness of the use of antipsychotics in the treatment of GAD is discussed.

  10. Effects of 4-week treatment with lithium and olanzapine on levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein in the sub-regions of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Michael D; Shim, Seong S

    2009-08-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that lithium, the prototype mood stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar disorder, has diverse neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions, and the actions are associated with its efficacy in treating bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that up-regulation of neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) may underlie these neuroplastic actions of the drug. Olanzapine, an atypical anti-psychotic drug, has been shown to be an effective mood stabilizer. Olanzapine also has neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions, and these actions may underlie the efficacy of the drug for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism by which the drug produces the neuroplastic actions is poorly understood. To understand a common molecular mechanism underlying the neuroplastic actions of lithium and olanzapine, we assessed the effect of 4-week lithium and olanzapine treatment on the levels of BDNF, Bcl-2 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor involved in expression of BDNF and Bcl-2, in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Our results show that 4-week treatment with both olanzapine and lithium increases the levels of Bcl-2 and CREB in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Four-week lithium treatment up-regulates BDNF in the dentate gyrus, and 4-week olanzapine treatment marginally did so. Neither drug altered BDNF levels in area CA1. These results suggest that the up-regulation of Bcl-2 and CREB may underlie the neuroplastic actions of olanzapine and lithium.

  11. Twenty-four months of antipsychotic treatment in children and adolescents with first psychotic episode: discontinuation and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Ana; Ballesta, Patricia; Baeza, Immaculada; Arango, Celso; de la Serna, Elena; González-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Otero, Soraya; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-08-01

    The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study is a longitudinal study of early-onset first psychotic episodes. This report describes the naturalistic psychopharmacological treatment administered during a 24-month follow-up period, as well as discontinuation rates, reasons for discontinuation, and adverse effects. The sample comprised 110 patients, aged 9 to 17 years, with a first psychotic episode. Pharmacological treatment, changes, reasons for discontinuation, and the UKU (Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser) Side Effect Rating Scale were registered at 6, 12, and 24 months of follow-up. Second-generation antipsychotics, especially risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine, were the most commonly used. The discontinuation rate was 44.5% at 6 months, 59.1% at 12 months, and 70.9% at 24 months. Discontinuation rates or reasons for discontinuation (adverse reaction, insufficient response, and other) did not differ significantly between antipsychotics. At 6 months, significant differences were found in body mass index increase and body mass index z score increase, which were higher with olanzapine, and in neurological effects, which were higher with risperidone; at 12 and 24 months, these differences were no longer significant. High maintenance rates were found in the clozapine group, although they had higher scores on the autonomic subscale of the UKU. A long follow-up period reveals high discontinuation rates similar to those observed in adults, particularly during the first year. No differences were found between antipsychotics. Differences in adverse effects were found at 6 months but not subsequently after changes in treatment. Clozapine had a high maintenance rate, and its tolerability was comparable to that of other antipsychotics.

  12. Importance of intervention timing in the effectiveness of antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Yang, Yu-Yin; Wan, Fang-Jung; Tung, Che-Se

    2018-02-02

    The use of early pharmacological intervention in treating young patients with schizophrenia is a debating issue for psychiatrists. However, on the basis of developmental theory, early antipsychotic intervention can be beneficial in terms of protecting neurons from further deterioration. This study investigated whether the initiation of second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) treatment at a younger age can effectively reverse schizophrenia-relevant behavioral and neurochemical features, namely acoustic prepulse inhibition (PPI) and accumbal dopamine (DA) efflux, respectively. Risperidone (RIS, 1mg/kg/day) or olanzapine (OLA, 2.5mg/kg/day) was administered for 6weeks in rats subjected to isolation rearing (IR) in adolescence or young adulthood. Behavioral testing was performed at 3 and 5 (for locomotor activity) and 2 and 4 (for PPI) weeks after the initiation of the pharmacological regimen. An additional PPI test was performed 6weeks after the initiation of the pharmacological regimen to assess the acute add-on effect of RIS or OLA. Dopamine (DA) efflux of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated through in vivo microdialysis at the end of the study, for measuring both the baseline levels after the chronic regimen and the responsiveness to acute add-on RIS or OLA treatment. Our results demonstrated that the effects of SGAs on PPI and accumbal DA efflux were dissociated. Specifically, RIS intervention was more beneficial for adolescent than young adult IR rats in restoring their PPI deficit, whereas OLA was age-independently effective in stimulating the accumbal DA efflux. Both PPI and accumbal DA could be employed to reflect IR-induced abnormalities, in which accumbal DA appeared to be more suitable in depicting the long-term effect of IR, whereas PPI might be a more accurate biological index for revealing the advantages of early RIS intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intranasal delivery of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katare, Yogesh K; Piazza, Justin E; Bhandari, Jayant; Daya, Ritesh P; Akilan, Kosalan; Simpson, Madeline J; Hoare, Todd; Mishra, Ram K

    2017-06-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat psychotic disorders that afflict millions globally and cause tremendous emotional, economic and healthcare burdens. However, the potential of intranasal delivery to improve brain-specific targeting remains unrealized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and methods used for brain targeting via the intranasal (IN) route as well as the potential advantages of improving this type of delivery. We extensively review experimental studies relevant to intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychosis and mental illnesses. We also review clinical studies in which intranasal delivery of peptides, like oxytocin (7 studies) and desmopressin (1), were used as an adjuvant to antipsychotic treatment with promising results. Experimental animal studies (17) investigating intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs have revealed successful targeting to the brain as suggested by pharmacokinetic parameters and behavioral effects. To improve delivery to the brain, nanotechnology-based carriers like nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been used in several studies. However, human studies assessing intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs are lacking, and the potential toxicity of nanoformulations used in animal studies has not been explored. A brief discussion of future directions anticipates that if limitations of low aqueous solubility of antipsychotic drugs can be overcome and non-toxic formulations used, IN delivery (particularly targeting specific tissues within the brain) will gain more importance moving forward given the inherent benefits of IN delivery in comparison to other methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck Carol Paton Rafael Euba Cait Goddard, S

    2001-01-01

    Although their primary purpose is to treat psychosis, antipsychotics are commonly prescribed for the elderly to treat the behavioural disturbances and agitation associated with dementia. Such use is controversial. Atypical antipsychotics cause fewer extrapyramidal sideeffects than the older drugs in younger adults, but the evidence base for their efficacy and tolerability in the elderly is poor. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of atypical antipsychotic prescribing for the elderly, the indications for use and documented side-effects. The medication cards of all patients from 19 Trusts, occupying a psychiatric bed for the over 65s, were screened during one week in March 2000. Data were collected by pharmacists from the clinical notes. Half of those prescribed an antipsychotic received an atypical, and risperidone was the one most commonly prescribed. Half the sample had a diagnosis of dementia. Documented side-effects from the atypical were uncommon. Atypicals are frequently prescribed as first-line antipsychotics for behavioural problems associated with dementia, despite the poor evidence base for their efficacy and safety in this population. Undermonitoring of side-effects may remain a problem.

  15. Comparison of intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, oral risperidone solution, and intramuscular haloperidol in the management of acute agitation in an acute care psychiatric ward in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Yu; Huang, Si-Sheng; Lee, Bo-Shyan; Chiu, Nan-Ying

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety among intramuscular olanzapine, intramuscular haloperidol, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution for agitated patients with psychosis during the first 24 hours of treatment in an acute care psychiatric ward. Forty-two inpatients from an acute care psychiatric ward of a medical center in central Taiwan were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 treatment groups (10-mg intramuscular olanzapine, 10-mg olanzapine oral disintegrating tablet, 3-mg oral risperidone solution, or 7.5-mg intramuscular haloperidol). Agitation was measured by using the excited component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC), the Agitation-Calmness Evaluation Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression--Severity Scale during the first 24 hours. There were significant differences in the PANSS-EC total scores for the 4 intervention groups at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after the initiation of treatment. More significant differences were found early in the treatment. In the post hoc analysis, the patients who received intramuscular olanzapine or orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets showed significantly greater improvement in PANSS-EC scores than did patients who received intramuscular haloperidol at points 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after injection. These findings suggest that intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution are as effective treatments as intramuscular haloperidol for patients with acute agitation. Intramuscular olanzapine and disintegrating olanzapine tablets are more effective than intramuscular haloperidol in the early phase of the intervention. There is no significant difference in effectiveness among intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution.

  16. SREBP activation by antipsychotic- and antidepressant-drugs in cultured human liver cells: relevance for metabolic side-effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Maria B; Fernø, Johan; Vik-Mo, Audun O; Steen, Vidar M

    2006-09-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a major problem in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, especially with some antipsychotic- and antidepressant drugs. We have recently demonstrated that antipsychotic- and antidepressant drugs activate the SREBP (sterol regulatory element-binding proteins) transcription factors in human- and rat glial cells, with subsequent up-regulation of downstream genes involved in cholesterol- and fatty acid biosynthesis. Since stimulation of cellular lipogenesis in the liver could be of relevance for the metabolic side effects of these drugs, we have now investigated the effects of antidepressants, antipsychotic- and mood-stabilizing drugs on cell cultures of human liver cells. For several of the drugs being strongly associated with weight gain (clozapine, imipramine, and amitriptyline), we observed a very pronounced activation of SREBP. Ziprasidone and buproprion, however, which are not associated with weight gain, did hardly stimulate the SREBP system. For haloperidol, olanzapine and mirtazapine, the correspondence between metabolic side effects and SREBP stimulation in liver cells was less obvious. The mood-stabilizers did not increase SREBP activation. The results indicate a relationship between drug-induced activation of SREBP in cultured human liver cells and weight gain side-effects of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs.

  17. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of pathological aggression in children and adolescents: literature review and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Henrique Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature about the use of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of pathological aggression in children and adolescents. Method: The databases MEDLINE, SciELO, and LILACS were searched for publications in Portuguese or English from 1992 to August 2011 using the following keywords: mental disease, child, adolescent, treatment, atypical antipsychotic, aggressive behavior, aggression, and violent behavior. Results: Sixty-seven studies of good methodological quality and clinical interest and relevance were identified. Studies including children and adolescents were relatively limited, because few atypical antipsychotics have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. All the medications included in this review (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and clozapine have some effectiveness in treating aggression in children and adolescents, and choices should be based on clinical indications and side effects. Conclusions: There are few studies about the effectiveness and safety of atypical antipsychotics for the pediatric population, and further randomized controlled studies with larger groups of patients and more diagnostic categories, such as severe conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, should be conducted to confirm the results reported up to date and to evaluate the impact of long-term use.

  18. Comparative study of treatment continuation using second-generation antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azekawa, Takaharu; Ohashi, Shizuko; Itami, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness of a drug is a key concept dependent on efficacy, safety, and tolerability. Time to discontinuation of treatment is also representative of effectiveness. We investigated differences in treatment discontinuation among newly started second-generation antipsychotics in the clinical setting. Using a retrospective cohort study design, we screened all outpatients (n = 7936) who visited the Shioiri Mental Clinic between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010. We identified a cohort of patients (n = 703) diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and calculated the time to discontinuation of each second-generation antipsychotic. Of the 703 patients, 149 were newly treated with aripiprazole, 67 with blonanserin, 95 with olanzapine, 36 with quetiapine, 74 with perospirone, and 120 with risperidone. The time to discontinuation for all causes was significantly longer for aripiprazole than for blonanserin, olanzapine, and risperidone. In addition, aripiprazole tended to be continued for longer than quetiapine and perospirone, but these differences were not significant. Aripiprazole may be considered the best available option for long-term treatment of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

  19. New users of antipsychotic medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, L; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    payments were analyzed using linear regression models and duration analysis. The analyses were adjusted for the following confounding variables: age, gender, diagnosis, marital status, length of education, and utilization of mental health care services. RESULTS: The majority of new antipsychotic users...... patterns and labor market affiliation, considering both authority approved and off-label prescriptions and the relation to polypharmacy. METHODS: Register-based cohort study using a dataset of 71,254 new antipsychotic users with a psychiatric diagnosis. Labor market affiliation and duration of welfare...

  20. Clinical consequences of switching from olanzapine to risperidone and vice versa in outpatients with schizophrenia: 36-month results from the worldwide schizophrenia outpatients health outcomes (W-SOHO) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background With many atypical antipsychotics now available in the market, it has become a common clinical practice to switch between atypical agents as a means of achieving the best clinical outcomes. This study aimed to examine the impact of switching from olanzapine to risperidone and vice versa on clinical status and tolerability outcomes in outpatients with schizophrenia in a naturalistic setting. Methods W-SOHO was a 3-year observational study that involved over 17,000 outpatients with schizophrenia from 37 countries worldwide. The present post hoc study focused on the subgroup of patients who started taking olanzapine at baseline and subsequently made the first switch to risperidone (n=162) and vice versa (n=136). Clinical status was assessed at the visit when the first switch was made (i.e. before switching) and after switching. Logistic regression models examined the impact of medication switch on tolerability outcomes, and linear regression models assessed the association between medication switch and change in the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia (CGI-SCH) overall score or change in weight. In addition, Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox-proportional hazards models were used to analyze the time to medication switch as well as time to relapse (symptom worsening as assessed by the CGI-SCH scale or hospitalization). Results 48% and 39% of patients switching to olanzapine and risperidone, respectively, remained on the medication without further switches (p=0.019). Patients switching to olanzapine were significantly less likely to experience relapse (hazard ratio: 3.43, 95% CI: 1.43, 8.26), extrapyramidal symptoms (odds ratio [OR]: 4.02, 95% CI: 1.49, 10.89) and amenorrhea/galactorrhea (OR: 8.99, 95% CI: 2.30, 35.13). No significant difference in weight change was, however, found between the two groups. While the CGI-SCH overall score improved in both groups after switching, there was a significantly greater change in those who switched to olanzapine

  1. Comparative teratogenicity analysis of valnoctamide, risperidone, and olanzapine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Ogle, Krystal; Lin, Linda Ying; Bialer, Meir; Finnell, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Based on the recent findings from animal studies, it has been proposed that the therapeutic use of valnoctamide, an anxiolytic drug developed in the early 1960s, be extended to treat other neurological disorders such as epilepsy and bipolar disease. Given the scarcity of adequate data on its prenatal toxicity, a comparative teratogenicity study of valnoctamide and two of the most commonly used drugs to treat bipolar disorder, risperidone and olanzapine, was carried out in a mouse model system. Pregnant dams were treated with the aforementioned three drugs at the dose levels calculated as an equal proportion of the respective LD50 values of these drugs. The main reproductive indices examined included the numbers of implantations and resorptions, viable and dead fetuses, and fetal gross, visceral and skeletal abnormalities. The outcomes of the present study indicated that olanzapine was the most teratogenic of the three drugs, inducing maternal-, embryo-, and fetotoxicity. Risperidone also exerted a significant prenatal toxicity, but its adverse effect was less pronounced than that induced by olanzapine. Valnoctamide did not show any teratogenic effect, even when used in relatively higher dosages than olanzapine and risperidone. The observed increased skeletal abnormalities in one of the valnoctamide treatment groups were nonspecific and, as such, signaled a modest developmental delay rather than an indication that the compound could induce structural malformations. Under our experimental conditions, valnoctamide demonstrated the lowest prenatal toxicity of the three tested drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Effect of Ranitidine on Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced weight gain is a disturbing side effect of Olanzapine that affects the quality of life in psychotic patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Ranitidine in attenuating or preventing Olanzapine-induced weight gain. A parallel 2-arm clinical trial was done on 52 patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective and schizophreniform disorders who received Olanzapine for the first time. All these were first-episode admitted patients. They were randomly allocated to receive either Ranitidine or placebo. The trend of body mass index (BMI was compared between groups over 16-week course of treatment. Mean weight was 62.3 (SD: 9.6 kg at baseline. Thirty-three subjects (63.5% had positive family history of obesity. The average BMI increment was 1.1 for Ranitidine group and 2.4 for the placebo group. The multivariate analysis showed this effect to be independent of sex, family history of obesity, and baseline BMI value. The longitudinal modeling after controlling for baseline values failed to show the whole trend slope to be different. Although the slight change in trend’s slope puts forward a hypothesis that combined use of Ranitidine and Olanzapine may attenuate the weight gain long run, this needs to be retested in future larger scale long-term studies. This trial is registered with IRCT.ir 201009112181N5.

  3. Could Reward-Disturbances Caused by Antipsychotic Medication Lead to Weight Gain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Nørbak, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    MRI anticipation signal at baseline, and the patients with the highest weight gain were also showing the highest increase in salience contrast signal over time. We do not know what this change in BOLD response in striatum correspond to at the cellular level. However based on previous work, it seems reasonable...... to the regulation of appetite, and most antipsychotics cause some degree of weight gain. Recently, a relation between weight gain caused by one week of olanzapine treatment and change in reward signalling was found in healthy volunteers. To our knowledge there are no previous studies examining how the effect...... in three parts of striatum was analyzed. RESULTS During the treatment period the patients received on average 248 mg of Amisulpride and improved significantly in PANSS total, positive and general score (all paverage weight gain of 2.2 kilograms in the treatment period...

  4. Atypical Antipsychotics and the Risk of Hyperlipidemia: A Sequence Symmetry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Ishiguro, Chieko; Uyama, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Although hyperlipidemia is a well known adverse event of atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medication, there are few studies that have quantitatively compared the risks of various AAPs. Our aim was to comparatively evaluate the risk of hyperlipidemia associated with the use of AAPs approved in Japan through a consecutive epidemiological study. We conducted a sequence symmetry analysis (SSA) using health insurance claims data to analyze the following nine AAPs approved for use in Japan: risperidone, paliperidone, perospirone hydrochloride hydrate, blonanserin, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine fumarate, aripiprazole, and zotepine. Exposed cases were identified from drug dispensing records as those who had been administered both AAPs and antihyperlipidemic drugs. The adjusted sequence ratio (ASR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for each individual AAP and for all AAPs were calculated while controlling for time trends in dispensing patterns. Olanzapine was significantly associated with increased hyperlipidemia occurrence (ASR 1.56; 95 % CI 1.25-1.95). The ASRs obtained for risperidone (1.01; 95 % CI 0.80-1.27), perospirone hydrochloride hydrate (0.93; 95 % CI 0.63-1.39), blonanserin (0.83; 95 % CI 0.52-1.33), quetiapine fumarate (0.93; 95 % CI 0.73-1.18), and aripiprazole (1.02; 95 % CI 0.82-1.26) were approximately 1.0. Unstable estimates (wide CIs) were obtained for paliperidone and zotepine due to the small sample sizes. Among the AAPs used in Japan, only olanzapine was found to have an elevated risk of hyperlipidemia. In contrast, risperidone, perospirone hydrochloride hydrate, blonanserin, quetiapine fumarate, and aripiprazole had relatively low risks.

  5. Some novelties and recommendations by swithing antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nika Aleksandra Kravos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical outcome of patients with severe mental disorders treated with antipsychotics depends on individual response to therapy, adverse events, physical health, maintaining of physical health and of the patient’s, interpersonal (patient - therapist, health and environmental features. Replacement of antipsychotics is a common therapeutic measure. The response depends on mostly unknown genetic factors, physiological particularities of the patient and its variations. This article summarizes the most important and the most recent pharmacological properties and consequences of cross-action of antipsychotics. It specifies the basic rules and ways of replacing antipsychotic drugs in different clinical situations, and summarizes alerts, recommendations and suggestions when changing antipsychotics.

  6. Second-generation antipsychotic use in children and adolescents: a six-month prospective cohort study in drug-naïve patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Celso; Giráldez, Miriam; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Baeza, Inmaculada; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Alda, Jose-Angel; Martínez-Cantarero, Carmen; Moreno, Carmen; de Andrés, Pilar; Cuerda, Cristina; de la Serna, Elena; Correll, Christoph U; Fraguas, David; Parellada, Mara

    2014-11-01

    To assess weight and metabolic effects of 6 months of treatment with second-generation antipsychotics in naïve/quasi-naïve youths. This study looked at a nonrandomized, naturalistic, multicenter, inception cohort study of 279 patients aged 4 to 17 years (mean = 14.6 ± 2.9 years). Of those, 248 (88.8%) received a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, or quetiapine) and completed 2 visits, and 178 (63.8%) completed the 6-month follow-up. Patients had schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (44.5%), mood-spectrum disorders (23.2%), disruptive behavioral disorders (17.3%), or other disorders (15.1%). Fifteen age- and gender-matched, healthy, nonmedicated individuals served as a comparison group. From baseline to 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, all anthropometric measures increased significantly with each antipsychotic, that is, 6-month changes with risperidone (n = 157; 7.1 kg and 0.66 body mass index [BMI] z score), olanzapine (n = 44; 11.5 kg and 1.08 BMI z score), and quetiapine (n = 47; 6.3 kg and 0.54 BMI z score), but not in healthy control participants (-0.11 kg and 0.006 BMI z score). Fasting metabolic parameters increased significantly with risperidone (glucose [3.8] mg/dL, insulin [4.9] mU/L, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR: 1.2], triglycerides [15.6] mg/dL), and olanzapine (glucose [5.0] mg/dL, total cholesterol [21.2] mg/dL, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [44.6] mg/dL), but not with quetiapine or in healthy control participants. The percentage of research participants considered to be "at risk of adverse health outcome" increased during the 6 months from 8.9% to 29.2% for risperidone (p < .0001), 6.8% to 38.1% for olanzapine (p < .0001), and 6.3% to 4.0% for quetiapine (p = .91). Olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone increase body weight but have different cardiometabolic side effect profiles and different temporal side effect patterns. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent

  7. QSAR–CoMSIA applied to antipsychotic drugs with their dopamine D2 and serotonine 5HT2A membrane receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPERANTA AVRAM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are psychiatric medication primarily used to manage psychosis (e.g., delusions or hallucinations, particularly in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. First and second generations of antipshychotics tend to block receptors in the brain's dopamine pathways, but antipsychotic drugs encompass a wide range of receptor targets. The inhibition constant, Ki, at the level of membrane receptors is a major determinant of their pharmacokinetic behavior and, consequently, it can affect their antipsychotic activity. Here, predicted inhibition constants, Ki for 71 antipsychotics, already approved for clinical treatment, as well as representative new chemical structures which exhibit antipsychotic activity, were evaluated using 3D-QSAR–CoMSIA models. Significant values of the cross-validated correlation q2 (higher than 0.70 and the fitted correlation r2 (higher than 0.80 revealed that these models have reasonable power to predict the biological affinity of the 15 new risperidone and 12 new olanzapine derivatives in interactions with dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors; these compounds are suggested for further studies.

  8. Social memory in mice: disruption with an NMDA antagonist and attenuation with antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue-Min; Elmer, Gregory I; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Tamminga, Carol A

    2009-04-01

    Social recognition reflects the ability of one animal to learn and remember the identity of another. Animal models of social learning and memory are pertinent to several different CNS diseases involving disruptions in cognition. Moreover, the increased understanding of the basic biology of memory increases the likelihood of discovery of memory-enhancing treatments in these human diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the non-competitive NMDA antagonist ketamine on social recognition in mice across a broad dose range (5-30 mg/kg) and time-course (60 min-7 days). We also tested the ability of two antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol and olanzapine, to block the ketamine effect. Our results show that mice demonstrate social recognition over a several day period, with loss of recognition between 3-7 days. Ketamine disrupts social memory at doses which do not affect task performance. Chronic oral administration of haloperidol or olanzapine attenuates these ketamine-induced effects on social recognition, tending to normalize the memory behavior. The neural mechanisms of these actions are not known, although medial temporal lobe memory systems have been implicated.

  9. Effect of Second Generation Antipsychotics on Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Kaczyinski, Richard; Sultzer, David; Schneider, Lon S.

    2014-01-01

    Context Alzheimer disease (AD) imposes a severe burden upon patients and their caregivers. Severity of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances are important determinants of caregivers’ experience of burden. These symptoms may be improved with atypical antipsychotic treatment. Objective In this study we use data from the CATIE-AD trial to evaluate the effect of atypical antipsychotics as compared to placebo on the experiences of caregivers of outpatients with Alzheimer disease. Design We compared the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine) considered together as a group, to placebo, on experiences of caregivers of AD outpatients. We also evaluated whether improvement in patients’ psychiatric and behavioral symptoms mediated the relationship between drug treatment and caregiver burden. Setting CATIE-AD included outpatients in usual care settings, and assessed treatment effectiveness over a nine-month period. Participants Data from CATIE-AD participants who had at least one post-baseline outcome assessment, and from their caregivers, were examined in an intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) (N=361), and then in a phase 1 only analysis including only observations while on the initially randomized drug (N=153). Measures The Burden Interview, Beck Depression Inventory, and the NPI Caregiver Distress Scale were used to evaluate caregiver burden. Results In both ITT and phase 1-only analyses, caregivers of patients treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) scored significantly lower than those on placebo on both the Burden Interview (p = 0.009) and the NPI Caregiver Distress Scale’s scores (p = 0.0209). These differences appeared to have been mediated by lower levels of agitation, hostility, and psychotic distortions. Conclusion In AD patients with symptoms of psychosis, agitation or aggressive behavior, medications can have a small but significant impact on caregiver burden. PMID:21939611

  10. Is there an interrelationship between the effects of antipsychotics on psychopathology and on metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhin, Evgeny; Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Takala, Pirjo; Hakko, Helinä; Putkonen, Hanna; Räsänen, Pirkko; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Eronen, Markku; Joffe, Grigori

    2016-01-01

    Increased body weight and hyperlipidemia caused by antipsychotics may be associated with improved antipsychotic efficacy in schizophrenia. If this association has a causal interrelationship via a genuine pathophysiological mechanism, then body weight loss in antipsychotic-treated patients would be accompanied by worsened psychopathology. This could have clinical implications. To explore whether the decreased body weight in these patients is associated with a worsened psychopathology. In our previously published study, a 16 week treatment period with add-on orlistat (but not placebo) resulted in body weight loss in male (but not female) clozapine- or olanzapine-treated overweight or obese patients. In the current study, we investigated whether body weight loss in those male patients could worsen psychosis. Changes in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores within groups and body weight changes and lipid profiles over the treatment period were analysed by the paired samples t-test. Between-group comparisons were analysed by the independent samples t-test. Over the treatment period body weight decreased by 2.56 ± 3.25 kg from initial 106.02 ± 12.61 kg (p = 0.04) for the orlistat group, with no statistically significant changes for the placebo group. Lipid levels did not change in either group. The orlistat-induced weight decrease was not associated with worsening in the PANSS scores. Weight loss was not associated with a worsening of psychosis. The interrelationship between the antipsychotic-induced weigh gain and improved schizophrenia psychopathology observed in earlier studies appears to be indirect. Orlistat treatment in our study did not worsen psychopathology in this population.

  11. Olanzapine and fluoxetine combination therapy for treatment-resistant depression: review of efficacy, safety, and study design issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William V Bobo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available William V Bobo, Richard C SheltonDepartment of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD is a common occurrence in clinical practice. Up to 30% of patients with major depression do not respond to conventional antidepressant treatment, while a significantly greater number of patients experience only partial symptom reduction. Numerous strategies may be applied by the practicing clinician to overcome limitations in the effectiveness of antidepressant monotherapy, including combining drug treatment with evidence-supported psychotherapies, combining antidepressants (combination pharmacotherapy, and combining antidepressants with other non-antidepressant psychotropic medications (augmentation treatment. One such augmentation strategy, the combination of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX, with the atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine (OLZ, is supported by the results of four randomized, double-blind, acute phase studies of patients who had responded inadequately to antidepressant monotherapy. In each study, the FLX/OLZ combination caused rapid reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating scale scores, with two of the four studies showing significantly greater improvement than antidepressant monotherapy at study endpoint. Effects of the FLX/OLZ combination were strongest in cases where failure to respond to two antidepressants prior to randomization was established during the current depressive episode. The FLX/OLZ combination was well-tolerated; however, body weight gain and increases in prolactin were greater than that of the antidepressant monotherapy groups, and were comparable to that of OLZ monotherapy. While effective during acute-phase treatment, questions remain regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of FLX/OLZ relative to antidepressant monotherapy and other combination strategies. Efforts aimed at determining the placement of

  12. Anthropometric parameters as indicators of metabolic derangements in schizophrenia patients stabilized on olanzapine in an Indian rural population

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    Jayanta Kumar Rout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: For any given body mass, Asian Indians have higher central obesity than Europeans. A periodic measurement of body mass index (BMI and waist hip ratio (WHR is practically more feasible than other parameters of metabolic syndrome by repeated blood collection. However, few studies are available on the relative importance of BMI and WHR as markers of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in schizophrenia patients stabilized on second generation antipsychotics in Indian population. Aim: We conducted the present study on such patients to examine whether BMI or WHR can better predict dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in these patients in a rural area. Settings and Design: The study was a hospital based case control study under rural settings on 38 schizophrenia patients stabilized on olanzapine and 30 matched controls. Materials and Methods: Fasting concentrations of blood glucose, lipid parameters and serum insulin were assessed. Data for Homeostatic model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, BMI, and WHR were obtained to assess the insulin resistance, overall body fat distribution and abdominal fat dispensation respectively. Statistical analysis used: ′t′ test was performed to assay any difference in corresponding mean values between cases and controls. Dependence of HOMA-IR on key parameters was assessed by analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA study. Results: Cases exhibited significantly higher values for HOMA-IR, serum triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc with a significantly lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc level. ANCOVA study reflected that irrespective of age and sex, HOMA-IR was dependent on serum triglyceride level and WHR (F=8.3 and 5.7 respectively, P<0.05, but not on BMI (F<0.001, P=0.997. Conclusions: Central obesity could be more closely associated with the pathogenesis of prediabetic state in our case group. So, WHR is a better anthropometric parameter than BMI for an early

  13. Efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of 8 atypical antipsychotics in Chinese patients with acute schizophrenia: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhihua; Wang, Guoqiang; Cai, Shangli; Ding, Xindi; Liu, Weiwei; Huang, Depei; Shen, Weidi; Zhang, Juncheng; Chen, Kui; Yang, Yuqing; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Xiaochen; Ouyang, Qiong; Zhao, Jingping; Lu, Huafei; Hao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to create hierarchies of the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of eight atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of Chinese patients with acute schizophrenia. We systematically searched for RCT articles published between January 1st 2005 and December 31st 2014 in electronic databases (Medline, Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrial.gov for studies in English and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan Fang, and VIP Information/Chinese Scientific Journals Database for studies in Chinese). The primary outcome was efficacy, as measured by the change of PANSS total score. Pairwise comparisons were performed using random-effects model by the Dersimonian-Laird method and network meta-analyses were performed in a Bayesian set. Sixty high-quality RCTs with 6418 participants were included. A pattern of superiority from olanzapine, paliperidone and amisulpride was seen in the primary outcome. Only paliperidone was found better than aripiprazole (odds ratio, 0.49 [95% credible intervals, 0.25 to 0.99]), ziprasidone (0.42 [0.21 to 0.85]) and quetiapine (0.36 [0.13 to 0.93]) in terms of all-cause discontinuation. The best and worst drugs in terms of weight gain, EPS and somnolence were aripiprazole and olanzapine, clozapine and amisulpride, aripiprazole and clozapine, respectively. The rank of efficacy did not change substantially in sensitivity analyses or in meta-regressions. Our findings provided the hierarchies of eight antipsychotics in efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. These findings are expected to help Chinese clinicians to select the appropriate antipsychotic drug for their patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors associated with early response to olanzapine and clinical and functional outcomes of early responders treated for schizophrenia in the People’s Republic of China

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    Ye W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wenyu Ye,1 William Montgomery,2 Zbigniew Kadziola,3 Li Liu,4 Haibo Xue,4 Michael D Stensland,5 Tamas Treuer61Real World Analytics, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, Australia; 3Real World Analytics Capabilities, Eli Lilly GmbH, Vienna, Austria; 4Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Shanghai Branch, People’s Republic of China; 5Agile Outcomes Research, Inc., Rochester, MN, USA; 6Neuroscience Research, Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, HungaryBackground: The aims of this analysis were to identify factors associated with early response (at 4 weeks to olanzapine treatment and to assess whether early response is associated with better longer-term outcomes for patients with schizophrenia in the People’s Republic of China.Methods: A post hoc analysis of a multi-country, 6-month, prospective, observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia or bipolar mania who initiated or switched to treatment with oral olanzapine was conducted using data from the Chinese schizophrenia subgroup (n=330. Factors associated with early response were identified using a stepwise logistic regression with baseline clinical characteristics, baseline participation in a weight control program, and adherence with antipsychotics during the first 4 weeks of treatment. Mixed models for repeated measures with baseline covariates were used to compare outcomes over time between early responders and early nonresponders to olanzapine.Results: One hundred and thirty patients (40% achieved an early response. Early response was independently predicted by higher baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.97, fewer years since first diagnosis (OR 0.94, CI 0.90–0.98, a greater number of social activities (OR 1.22, CI 1.05–1.40, participation in a weight control program (OR 1.81, CI 1.04–3.15, and high adherence

  15. Orlistat in clozapine- or olanzapine-treated patients with overweight or obesity: a 16-week open-label extension phase and both phases of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchoukhine, Evgueni; Takala, Pirjo; Hakko, Helinä; Raidma, Mirjam; Putkonen, Hanna; Räsänen, Pirkko; Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Eronen, Markku; Joffe, Grigori

    2011-03-01

    To explore long-term effects of orlistat in adult clozapine- or olanzapine-treated patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed schizophrenia and overweight or obesity who tolerate orlistat. Orlistat or placebo was added to clozapine or olanzapine in stable doses in a 16-week randomized controlled trial. Open-label orlistat was added to the antipsychotics during a 16-week extension phase for those completing the double-blind phase. No low-calorie diet or participation in behavioral programs was required. Body weight (primary outcome) and some metabolic parameters were measured prospectively. Analyses were performed for those completing both phases (ie, population differing from that reported earlier). The study was conducted from 2004 through 2005. During the open-label phase, the 44 patients experienced mean ± SD body weight loss of -1.29 ± 3.04 kg, P = .007. During both phases, men (but not women) showed a weight loss of -2.39 ± 5.45 kg, P = .023. Some subgroups showed desirable changes in several metabolic parameters. Prolonged (32 weeks) orlistat treatment yielded no additional benefits as compared to short (16 weeks) treatment. In clozapine- or olanzapine-treated overweight or obese patients able to take orlistat on a long-term basis, the drug, with no concomitant hypocaloric diet or behavioral interventions, caused moderate weight loss only in men. However, some metabolic benefits may be achieved independently of weight changes. In patients who do not respond to orlistat within the first 16 weeks, continuation treatment may provide no additional benefits. controlled-trials.com Identifier: ISRCTN65731856. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Predictors and correlates for weight changes in patients co-treated with olanzapine and weight mitigating agents; a post-hoc analysis

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    Heinloth Alexandra N

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on exploring the relationship between changes in appetite or eating behaviors and subsequent weight change for adult patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder treated with olanzapine and adjunctive potential weight mitigating pharmacotherapy. The aim is not to compare different weight mitigating agents, but to evaluate patients' characteristics and changes in their eating behaviors during treatment. Identification of patient subgroups with different degrees of susceptibility to the effect of weight mitigating agents during olanzapine treatment may aid clinicians in treatment decisions. Methods Data were obtained from 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 16-week clinical trials. Included were 158 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and a body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 who had received olanzapine treatment in combination with nizatidine (n = 68, sibutramine (n = 42, or amantadine (n = 48. Individual patients were analyzed for categorical weight loss ≥ 2 kg and weight gain ≥ 1 kg. Variables that were evaluated as potential predictors of weight outcomes included baseline patient characteristics, factors of the Eating Inventory, individual items of the Eating Behavior Assessment, and the Visual Analog Scale. Results Predictors/correlates of weight loss ≥ 2 kg included: high baseline BMI, low baseline interest in food, and a decrease from baseline to endpoint in appetite, hunger, or cravings for carbohydrates. Reduced cognitive restraint, increase in hunger, and increased overeating were associated with a higher probability of weight gain ≥ 1 kg. Conclusion The association between weight gain and lack of cognitive restraint in the presence of increased appetite suggests potential benefit of psychoeducational counseling in conjunction with adjunctive pharmacotherapeutic agents in limiting weight gain during antipsychotic drug therapy. Trial Registration This analysis was not

  17. Olanzapine treatment for tics in an adult woman with severe tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wen-Juh

    2012-12-01

    Olanzapine had been reported to be effective in the control of tics in a few adult female patients who had a short follow-up period. The author reports the successful outcome of long-term olanzapine treatment in an adult woman with severe Tourette syndrome. A 33-year-old woman who had severe motor and vocal tics (Modified Rush Videotape Rating Scale: 17/20) showed an excellent response to olanzapine 10 mg/day within 2 months. Her tic symptoms were well controlled with gradual reduction of her dose of olanzapine to 2.5 mg/day during the following 8 years. She was symptom-free without medications in the past 2 years. In addition, she had a normal menstrual cycle and became pregnant during the period of olanzapine treatment. Olanzapine may be the drug of first choice for treating severe Tourette syndrome in pubescent female adolescents and young women who wish to have children.

  18. Recruitment of beta-arrestin2 to the dopamine D2 receptor: insights into anti-psychotic and anti-parkinsonian drug receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klewe, Ib V; Nielsen, Søren M; Tarpø, Louise

    2008-01-01

    , SNPA all acted as partial agonists with decreasing efficacy in the BRET assay. In contrast, a wide selection of typical and atypical anti-psychotics was incapable of stimulating beta-arrestin2 recruitment to the D2 receptor. Moreover, we observed that haloperidol, sertindole, olanzapine, clozapine...... and ziprasidone all fully inhibited the dopamine induced beta-arrestin2 recruitment to D2 receptor (short variant) in a concentration dependent manner. We conclude that most anti-psychotics are incapable of stimulating beta-arrestin2 recruitment to the dopamine D2 receptor, in accordance with their antagonistic......Drugs acting at dopamine D2-like receptors play a pivotal role in the treatment of both schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for G-protein independent D2 receptor signaling pathways acting through beta-arrestin. In this study we describe the establishment...

  19. Simultaneous Determination of Antipsychotic Drugs and Their Active Metabolites by LC-MS-MS and its Application to Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Igor I; Baymeeva, Natalia V

    2018-04-07

    A quantitative method was developed to support therapeutic drug monitoring of eight antipsychotic drugs: chlorpromazine, haloperidol, zuclopenthixol, clozapine, risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole or olanzapine and some active metabolites (dehydroaripiprazole, N-desmethylclozapine and 9-hydroxyrisperidone) in human serum. Separation of the compounds was achieved using a Zorbax SB-C18 (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column and mass-spectrometric detection in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Human blood samples were collected in vacutainer tubes and the analytes were extracted with methyl-tert-butyl ether. The lower limits of quantitation were equal 0.5-1 ng/mL for all analytes. The method was applied with success to serum samples from schizophrenic patients undergoing polypharmacy with two or more different antipsychotic drugs. Precision data, accuracy results were satisfactory, and no interference from other psychotropic drugs was found. Hence, the method is suitable for the TDM of the analytes in psychotic patients' serum.

  20. Effects of olanzapine on LPS-induced inflammation in rat primary glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour-Nmarne, Caroline; Azab, Abed N

    2016-01-01

    Olanzapine (OLZ) is an atypical antipsychotic drug that also has mood-stabilizing effects. The mechanism of action of OLZ is not fully understood. Accumulating data suggest that inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of mental disorders and that psychotropic drugs exhibit some anti-inflammatory properties. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of OLZ on LPS-induced inflammation in rat primary glia cells. Glia cells were extracted from newborn rat brains. OLZ (1 or 50 µM) was added to culture medium at 6 or 72 h before addition of LPS for another 18 h, and levels of IL-10, prostaglandin (PG) E2, NO and TNF-α, and expression of cyclo-oxygensase (COX)-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) were determined. Treatment with 50 µM OLZ (but not 1 µM) significantly decreased LPS-induced secretion of IL-10, PGE2 and TNF-α. In contrast, 50 µM OLZ significantly increased NO levels. OLZ did not alter the expression of COX-2 or iNOS in LPS-treated cells. These results suggest that OLZ differently affects the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Most of the significant effects of OLZ were obtained when 50 µM was used, which is a high and probably therapeutically irrelevant concentration. Therefore, under the conditions used in the present study OLZ seemed to lack a potent anti-inflammatory effect. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The potential role of appetite in predicting weight changes during treatment with olanzapine

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    Case Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinically significant weight gain has been reported during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. It has been suggested that weight changes in patients treated with olanzapine may be associated with increased appetite. Methods Data were used from adult patients for whom both appetite and weight data were available from 4 prospective, 12- to 24-week clinical trials. Patients' appetites were assessed with Eating Behavior Assessment (EBA, Study 1, Platypus Appetite Rating Scale (PARS, Study 2, Eating Inventory (EI, Study 3, Food Craving Inventory (FCI, Study 3, and Eating Attitude Scale (EAS, Study 4. Results In Studies 1 (EBA and 4 (EAS, patients who reported overall score increases on appetite scales, indicating an increase in appetite, experienced the greatest overall weight gains. However, in Studies 2 (PARS and 3 (EI, FCI, patients who reported overall score increases on appetite scales did not experience greater weight changes than patients not reporting score increases. Early weight changes (2-4 weeks were more positively correlated with overall weight changes than early or overall score changes on any utilized appetite assessment scale. No additional information was gained by adding early appetite change to early weight change in correlation to overall weight change. Conclusions Early weight changes may be a more useful predictor for long-term weight changes than early score changes on appetite assessment scales. Clinical Trials Registration This report represents secondary analyses of 4 clinical studies. Studies 1, 2, and 3 were registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home, under NCT00190749, NCT00303602, and NCT00401973, respectively. Study 4 predates the registration requirements for observational studies that are not classified as category 1 observational studies.

  2. Hypomania after augmenting venlafaxine and olanzapine with sarcosine in a patient with schizophrenia: a case study

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    Strzelecki D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Strzelecki, Justyna Szyburska, Magdalena Kotlicka-Antczak, Olga KałużyńskaDepartment of Affective and Psychotic Disorders, Medical University of Lódz, Central Clinical Hospital, Lódz, PolandAbstract: Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system plays an important and well-established role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Agents with glutamatergic properties such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor coagonists (ie, glycine, D-cycloserine and glycine transporter type 1 inhibitors (eg, sarcosine, bitopertin are investigated in schizophrenia with special focus on negative and cognitive symptomatology. In this article, we describe a case of a 34-year-old woman with diagnosis of schizophrenia with persistent moderate negative and cognitive symptoms, a participant of the Polish Sarcosine Study (PULSAR treated with olanzapine (25 mg per day and venlafaxine (75 mg per day. During ten weeks of sarcosine administration (2 g per day the patient’s activity and mood improved, but in the following 2 weeks, the patient reported decreased need for sleep, elevated mood, libido and general activity. We diagnosed drug-induced hypomania and recommended decreasing the daily dose of venlafaxine to 37.5 mg per day, which resulted in normalization of mood and activity in about 1 week. After this change, activity and mood remained stable and better than before adding sarcosine, and subsequent depressive symptoms were not noted. We describe here the second case report where sarcosine induced important affect changes when added to antidepressive and antipsychotic treatment, which supports the hypothesis of clinically important glutamate–serotonin interaction.Keywords: MNDA receptor, glutamatergic system, serotoninergic system

  3. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

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    Irina Vasilyeva

    Full Text Available Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines, particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results.A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs.After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use, risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively. At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05.In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  4. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Irina; Biscontri, Robert G; Enns, Murray W; Metge, Colleen J; Alessi-Severini, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine) have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines), particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results. A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs. After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use), risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively). At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05. In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  5. Novel versus conventional antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R C

    1996-01-01

    Novel antipsychotic agents differ from conventional ones in several key characteristics, including effectiveness, adverse reactions, and receptor-binding profile. Most of the newer agents have an affinity for the serotonin 5HT2 receptor that is at least 10 times greater than that for the dopamine D2 receptor. This increased affinity for the serotonin receptor may be responsible for another distinguishing characteristic of novel antipsychotic agents--decreased frequency of extrapyramidal side effects. These side effects, which include pseudoparkinsonism, acute dystonias, and akathisia, frequently are the reason for noncompliance with conventional drug therapy. The newer drugs are often effective in patients resistant to treatment with conventional agents. They also appear to reduce the negative symptoms of schizophrenia in many patients.

  6. Prolactin-related adverse events and change in prolactin levels in pediatric patients given antipsychotics for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyts, Eric; Zoratti, Michael J; Toor, Kabirraaj; Wu, Ping; Kanji, Salmaan; Rabheru, Kiran; Mills, Edward J; Thorlund, Kristian

    2016-11-09

    Second-generation antipsychotics are commonly prescribed for pediatric patients with schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders despite their lack of approval for use in children. Although considered a safer alternative to first-generation antipsychotics, there is evidence to suggest that second-generation antipsychotics may be associated with some adverse events as well as an increase in prolactin levels. The purpose of this review is to examine the risk of prolactin-related adverse events in pediatric patients using antipsychotics and to quantify changes in prolactin for this population. Literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and PsycINFO databases, supplemented with review of select gray literature to identify both randomized controlled trials and observational studies on pediatric patients prescribed antipsychotic medications for schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Using a narrative approach, data on adverse events were recorded and changes from baseline in prolactin were pooled, where possible, from the randomized trials. Change from baseline in prolactin was evaluated for each treatment, as well as in comparison to placebo and to other treatments. Where data was available, these changes were evaluated separately for male and female patients. Six randomized controlled trials and five observational studies, all examining the effects of second-generation antipsychotics, were selected. Literature reporting the effects of risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and paliperidone was identified, with varying doses. Prolactin-related adverse events were sparsely reported across studies. In evidence gathered from randomized controlled trials, risperidone, olanzapine, and two doses of paliperidone (3-5 mg/day and 6-12 mg/day) were associated with increased prolactin levels compared to baseline. With the exception of paliperidone, similar trends were observed in males

  7. Role of Omega-3 fatty acids in preventing metabolic disturbances in patients on olanzapine plus either sodium valproate or lithium: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faghihi Toktam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic and cardiovascular side effects have been noted with the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs and mood stabilizers. Since Omega-3 fatty acids have been known to prevent some cardiovascular risks, this preliminary study was designed to evaluate the cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 when added to the combinations of olanzapine with mood stabilizers. Methods This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject trial in adult psychiatric patients who were receiving olanzapine combined with lithium (Li or valproate sodium (VPA. Omega-3 as fish oil with less than 1 g/day of EPA/DHA or its placebo was added to patients’ olanzapine and mood stabilizer regimens for 6 weeks. Metabolic parameters including anthropometric variables, lipid profile, metabolic syndrome indices, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and lipoprotein (a [(Lp (a] were assessed for participants. Results Forty one participants completed this study; 20 patients received omega-3 and 21 patients received placebo, added to their regimen of SGA and mood stabilizer. Omega-3 addition did not modulate anthropometric, metabolic syndrome and lipid parameter changes in 6 weeks. However, fibrinogen levels significantly decreased, Lp (a did not increase and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C did not go beyond its target level after omega-3 supplementation. Additionally, a significant inter-group effect was noted for Lp(a. Conclusions This study suggests that use of short-term omega-3 supplementation added to a combined regimen of olanzapine and mood stabilizer may have a small modulating effect on some cardiovascular risk factors. Trials in longer periods of time and with larger number of patients are needed to further evaluate the effects of omega-3 supplements on preventing cardiovascular risk factors. This trial is registered at irct.ir and its Identifier is as following: IRCT138712231764N1

  8. Recent evidence and potential mechanisms underlying weight gain and insulin resistance due to atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Volpato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs promote obesity and insulin resistance. In this regard, the main objective of this study was to present potential mechanisms and evidence concerning side effects of atypical antipsychotics in humans and rodents. Method: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the MEDLINE database. We checked the references of selected articles, review articles, and books on the subject. Results: This review provides consistent results concerning the side effects of olanzapine (OL and clozapine (CLZ, whereas we found conflicting results related to other AAPs. Most studies involving humans describe the effects on body weight, adiposity, lipid profile, and blood glucose levels. However, it seems difficult to identify an animal model replicating the wide range of changes observed in humans. Animal lineage, route of administration, dose, and duration of treatment should be carefully chosen for the replication of the findings in humans. Conclusions: Patients undergoing treatment with AAPs are at higher risk of developing adverse metabolic changes. This increased risk must be taken into account when making decisions about treatment. The influence of AAPs on multiple systems is certainly the cause of such effects. Specifically, muscarinic and histaminergic pathways seem to play important roles.

  9. Differential effects of antipsychotic agents on obsessive-compulsive symptoms in schizophrenia: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmbeck, Frederike; Rausch, Franziska; Englisch, Susanne; Eifler, Sarah; Esslinger, Christine; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Zink, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    Indirect evidence supports the assumption that antiserotonergic second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) induce and aggravate obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in schizophrenia. However, multimodal studies assessing the long-term interaction of pharmacotherapy and psychopathology are missing. Over 12 months, we followed-up 75 schizophrenia patients who were classified into two groups according to antipsychotic treatment: clozapine or olanzapine (group I) versus aripiprazole or amisulpride (group II). We applied the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) and investigated between-group changes over time as the primary endpoint. Group I showed markedly higher YBOCS scores at both time points. Repeated measure analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed significant interaction effects of group and time (per protocol sample (PP): p=0.006). This was due to persistently high OCS severity within group I, and decreasing YBOCS scores within group II. OCS severity correlated significantly with the negative and general psychopathology subscales of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), as well as with depressive symptoms. The progressive differences in OCS severity between our groups support the assumption of differential pharmacodynamic effects on comorbid OCS in schizophrenia. Further studies should address the pathogenetic mechanism, define patients at risk and facilitate early detection as well as therapeutic interventions.

  10. Olanzapine versus Placebo in Adolescents with Schizophrenia; a 6-Week, Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskaya, Ludmila; Schulz, Charles; McDougle, Christopher; Frazier, Jean; Dittman, Ralf; Robertson-Plouch, Carol; Bauer, Theresa; Xu, Wen; Wang, Wei; Carlson, Janice; Tohen, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of olanzapine in treating schizophrenia was tested through a placebo-controlled trial involving one hundred seven inpatient and outpatients adolescents. Patients who took olanzapine experienced significant symptom improvement.

  11. Effect of antipsychotic medication on overall life satisfaction among individuals with chronic schizophrenia: findings from the NIMH CATIE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fervaha, Gagan; Agid, Ofer; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Foussias, George; Remington, Gary

    2014-07-01

    The field of schizophrenia is redefining optimal outcome, moving beyond clinical remission to a more comprehensive model including functional recovery and improved subjective well-being. Although numerous studies have evaluated subjective outcomes within the domain of subjective quality of life in patients with schizophrenia, less is known about global evaluations of subjective well-being. This study examined the effects of antipsychotic medication on overall life satisfaction in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Data were drawn from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study, where participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia were randomized to receive olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone or ziprasidone under double-blind conditions (N=753). The primary outcome measure was prospective change in subjectively evaluated overall life satisfaction scores following 12 months of antipsychotic treatment. Psychopathology, medication side effects and functional status were also evaluated, among other variables. Patients experienced modest improvements in overall life satisfaction (d=0.22, p0.05). Change in severity of positive, negative, and depressive symptoms as well as functional status each demonstrated a small, albeit statistically significant, association with change in life satisfaction (r=0.10-0.21, p׳slife satisfaction scores (explained variance satisfaction with life. Clinicians should be aware that these two domains are not inextricably linked. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. [Atypical antipsychotics and sexual dysfunction: five case-reports associated with risperidone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefliger, T; Bonsack, C

    2006-01-01

    -reports describe the occurrence of retrograde ejaculation associated with risperidone but the exact prevalence is unknown. Retrograde ejaculation is thought to be related to the strong adrenolytic activity of risperidone. Alberto refused his medication because the ejaculatory dysfunction was unbearable for him. A switch to haloperidol depot was eventually well tolerated, without any sexual complaints. His case emphasizes the importance of sexual function for self-esteem and how this may amplify the intolerance to side-effects. David is on depot-risperidone in a setting of a legally forced treatment. Though he - reluctantly - accepts his medication, this side effect exacerbates his pre-existing delusions, strongly focused on sexual themes. His case illustrates how intolerance to sexual side-effects may be amplified by nature of delusions. Mireille is a 58 year old psychotic female patient, whose 2 mg risperidone treatment produced a unilateral galactorrhea. This sign became problematic because potentially visible at a time when Mireille started an activity in a sheltered occupation in town. Lowering dosage of antipsychotic allowed disappearance of the problem. Subjective responses to galactorrhea have been reported to be highly individual. Apart being a potentially visible side-effect, it may be misinterpreted as evidence of pregnancy or of a tumoral process. The cases of Ermina and Denise illustrate two contrasted situations in terms of subjective tolerability of reproductive function side-effects. Both were pre-menopausal patients with hyperprolactinemia secondary to risperidone treatment, resulting in amenorrhea. This was unbearable for Ermina. A switch to olanzapine allowed, one month later, the menses to resume. For Denise, on the other hand, the amenorrhea was a positive event, freeing her of unpleasant menses. Amenorrhea occurs in about 30% of pre-menopausal women treated with risperidone. It is a consequence of hyperprolactinemia, which, although often silent, is not devoid

  13. Olanzapine for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelkeba L

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV remains the most distressing event in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC. Objective: Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of olanzapine containing regimen in preventing acute, delayed and overall phases of CINV. Methods: PubMed, EBSCO, and Cochrane central register of controlled trials electronic databases were searched to identify RCTs that compared the effects of olanzapine with non-olanzapine regimen in preventing CINV. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs that compared olanzapine containing regimen with non-olanzapine regimen were included. The primary outcomes were the percentage of patients achieving no vomiting or no nausea in acute, delayed and overall phases. Results: 13 RCTs that enrolled 1686 participants were included in this meta-analysis. 852 patients were assigned to olanzapine and 834 patients were assigned to non-olanzapine regimen (other standard antiemetic regimen. The percentages of no emesis achieved were 87.5%, 76.2%, 73.6% in olanzapine versus 76.7%, 61.8%, and 56.4% in non-olanzapine regimen in acute, delayed and overall phases, respectively. The percentages of no nausea were 82%, 64.3%, 61.6% in olanzapine group versus 71.3%, 41.8%, and 40.6% in non-olanzapine group in acute, delayed and overall phases, respectively. In general, olanzapine containing regimen achieved statistical superiority to non-olanzapine regimen in no vomiting endpoint in acute phase (OR 2.16; 95%CI 1.60 to 2.91, p<0.00001; I-square=5%; p=0.40, delayed phase (OR 2.28; 95%CI 1.1.46 to 3.54, p=0.0003; I-square=65%; p=0.001 and overall phase (OR 2.48; 95%CI 1.59 to 3.86, p<0.0001; I-square=69%; p< 0.0001. Conclusion: The current meta-analysis showed that olanzapine was statistically and clinically superior to non-olanzapine regimen in preventing CINV in most domains of the parameters.

  14. A bibliometric study of scientific research conducted on second-generation antipsychotic drugs in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Sim, Kang; Shen, Winston Wu; Huelves, Lorena; Moreno, Raquel; Molina, Juan de Dios; Rubio, Gabriel; Noriega, Concha; Ángel Miguel, Pérez-Nieto; Álamo, Cecilio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A bibliometric study was carried out to ascertain the volume and impact of scientific literature published on second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in Singapore from 1997 to 2011. METHODS A search of the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases was performed to identify articles originating from Singapore that included the descriptors ‘atypic* antipsychotic*’, ‘second-generation antipsychotic*’, ‘clozapine’, ‘risperidone’, ‘olanzapine’, ‘ziprasidone’, ‘quetiapine’, ‘sertindole’, ‘aripiprazole’, ‘paliperidone’, ‘amisulpride’, ‘zotepine’, ‘asenapine’, ‘iloperidone’, ‘lurasidone’, ‘perospirone’ and ‘blonanserin’ in the article titles. Certain bibliometric indicators of production and dispersion (e.g. Price's Law on the increase of scientific literature, and Bradford's Law) were applied, and the participation index of various countries was calculated. The bibliometric data was also correlated with some social and health data from Singapore, such as the total per capita expenditure on health and gross domestic expenditure on research and development. RESULTS From 1997 to 2011, a total of 51 articles on SGAs in Singapore were published. Our results suggested non-fulfilment of Price's Law (r = 0.0648 after exponential adjustment vs. r = 0.2140 after linear adjustment). The most widely studied drugs were clozapine (21 articles), risperidone (16 articles) and olanzapine (8 articles). Division into Bradford zones yielded a nucleus occupied by the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology (6 articles) and the Singapore Medical Journal (4 articles). The analysed material was published in a total of 30 journals, with the majority from six journals. Four of these six journals have an impact factor greater than 2. CONCLUSION Publications on SGAs in Singapore are still too few to confirm an exponential growth of scientific literature. PMID:24452974

  15. Clinical, functional, and economic ramifications of early nonresponse to antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Nyhuis, Allen W; Faries, Douglas E; Kinon, Bruce J; Baker, Robert W; Shekhar, Anantha

    2008-11-01

    Early nonresponse to antipsychotics appears to predict subsequent nonresponse to treatment when assessed in randomized controlled trials of predominately acute inpatients treated for schizophrenia. This study assessed the predictive accuracy of early nonresponse to treatment and its clinical, functional, and economic ramifications in the naturalistic treatment of predominately chronic outpatients treated for schizophrenia. This post hoc analysis used data from a 1-year, randomized, open-label study of olanzapine, risperidone, and typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. If clinically warranted, patients could switch antipsychotics following 8 weeks of treatment. Patients completing 8 weeks of treatment (n = 443 of 664 enrollees) were included. Patients with early response (> or = 20% improvement from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale at 2 weeks) were compared with early nonresponders on symptom remission, functionality, perceptions of medication influence, and total health care costs at 8 weeks. Early response/nonresponse at 2 weeks predicted subsequent response/nonresponse at 8 weeks with a high level of accuracy (72%) and specificity (89%). After 8 weeks, early nonresponders were less likely to achieve symptom remission (P < .001), improved less on functional domains (P < .05), perceived medication as less beneficial (P = .004), and incurred total heath care costs over twice that of early responders ($4349 vs $2102, P = .010). In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, early nonresponse appears to reliably predict subsequent nonresponse to continued treatment with the same medication to be associated with poorer outcomes and higher health care costs. Identifying early nonresponders may minimize prolonging exposure to suboptimal or ineffective treatment strategies.

  16. In vivo effects of olanzapine on striatal dopamine D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] receptor binding in schizophrenic patients: an iodine-123 iodobenzamide single-photon emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, S.; Rossmueller, B.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Munich (Germany)); Mager, T.; Meisenzahl, E.; Moeller, H.J. (Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich (Germany))

    1999-08-01

    Olanzapine is a new atypical antipsychotic agent that belongs to the same chemical class as clozapine. The pharmacological efficacy of olanzapine (in contrast to that of risperidone) has been shown to be comparable to that of clozapine, but olanzapine has the advantage of producing a less pronounced bone marrow depressing effect than clozapine. The specific aims of this study were (a) to assess dopamine D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] receptor availability in patients treated with olanzapine by means of iodine-123 iodobenzamide [[sup 123]I]IBZM single-photon emission tomography (SPET), (b) to compare the results with findings of [[sup 123]I]IBZM SPET in patients under treatment with risperidone and (c) to correlate the results with the occurrance of extrapyramidal side-effects (EPMS). Brain SPET scans were performed in 20 schizophrenic patients (DSM III R) at 2 h after i.v. administration of 185 MBq [[sup 123]I]IBZM. Images were acquired using a triple-head gamma camera (Picker Prism 3000 XP). For semiquantitative evaluation of D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] receptor binding, transverse slices corrected for attenuation were used to calculate specific uptake values [STR-BKG]/BKG (STR=striatum; BKG=background). The mean daily dose of olanzapine ranged from 0.05 to 0.6 mg/kg body weight. The dopamine D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] receptor binding was reduced in all patients treated with olanzapine. Specific IBZM binding [STR-BKG]/BKG ranged from 0.13 to 0.61 (normal controls >0.95). The decreased D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] receptor availability revealed an exponential dose-response relationship (r=-0.85, P<0.001). The slope of the curve was similar to that of risperidone and considerably higher than that of clozapine as compared with the results of a previously published study. EPMS were observed in only one patient, presenting with the lowest D[sub 2]/D[sub 3] availability. The frequency of EPMS induced by olanzapine (5%) was considerably lower than the frequency under risperidone treatment (40%). Our findings

  17. In vivo effects of olanzapine on striatal dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor binding in schizophrenic patients: an iodine-123 iodobenzamide single-photon emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, S.; Rossmueller, B.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Munich (Germany); Mager, T.; Meisenzahl, E.; Moeller, H.J. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    Olanzapine is a new atypical antipsychotic agent that belongs to the same chemical class as clozapine. The pharmacological efficacy of olanzapine (in contrast to that of risperidone) has been shown to be comparable to that of clozapine, but olanzapine has the advantage of producing a less pronounced bone marrow depressing effect than clozapine. The specific aims of this study were (a) to assess dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor availability in patients treated with olanzapine by means of iodine-123 iodobenzamide [{sup 123}I]IBZM single-photon emission tomography (SPET), (b) to compare the results with findings of [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPET in patients under treatment with risperidone and (c) to correlate the results with the occurrance of extrapyramidal side-effects (EPMS). Brain SPET scans were performed in 20 schizophrenic patients (DSM III R) at 2 h after i.v. administration of 185 MBq [{sup 123}I]IBZM. Images were acquired using a triple-head gamma camera (Picker Prism 3000 XP). For semiquantitative evaluation of D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor binding, transverse slices corrected for attenuation were used to calculate specific uptake values [STR-BKG]/BKG (STR=striatum; BKG=background). The mean daily dose of olanzapine ranged from 0.05 to 0.6 mg/kg body weight. The dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor binding was reduced in all patients treated with olanzapine. Specific IBZM binding [STR-BKG]/BKG ranged from 0.13 to 0.61 (normal controls >0.95). The decreased D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor availability revealed an exponential dose-response relationship (r=-0.85, P<0.001). The slope of the curve was similar to that of risperidone and considerably higher than that of clozapine as compared with the results of a previously published study. EPMS were observed in only one patient, presenting with the lowest D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} availability. The frequency of EPMS induced by olanzapine (5%) was considerably lower than the frequency under risperidone treatment (40%). Our findings

  18. Efficacy of Olanzapine Combined Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Resistant to Standard Antiemetic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Abe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Olanzapine is proved to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV. But its efficacy in combination with standard antiemetic therapy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to prove the preventive effect of olanzapine for the prevention of CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy when used with standard antiemetic therapy. Method. Gynecologic cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy who had grade 2 or 3 nausea in overall phase (0–120 h after chemotherapy despite standard therapy were assigned to this study. From the next cycles to cycles in which patients developed grade 2 or 3 nausea, they received olanzapine with standard therapy. 5 mg oral olanzapine was administered for 7 days from the day before chemotherapy. The effectiveness of preventive administration of olanzapine was evaluated retrospectively. The primary endpoint was nausea control rate (grade 0 or 1 with olanzapine. Results. Fifty patients were evaluable. The nausea control rate with olanzapine was improved from 58% to 98% in acute phase (0–24 h after chemotherapy and 2% to 94% in delayed phase (24–120 h after chemotherapy. In overall phase, the nausea control rate improved from 0% to 92%, and it was statistically significant (P<0.001. Conclusion. Preventive use of olanzapine combined with standard antiemetic therapy showed improvement in control of refractory nausea.

  19. A randomized open-label comparison of the impact of olanzapine versus risperidone on sexual functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegtering, H; Boks, M; Blijd, C; Castelein, S; Van den Bosch, RJ; Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sexual functioning in patients treated with olanzapine or risperidone. This open-label trial included 46 patients randomized to olanzapine (5-15mg/d) or risperidone (1-6mg/d) for 6 weeks. We used sexual dysfunction was assessed by a semistructured interview

  20. Olanzapine-induced obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a patient with bipolar II disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Frits; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2002-01-01

    There are indications that olanzapine can trigger or exacerbate obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in patients with schizophrenia (Morrison et al. 1998; Mottard and de la Sablonniere 1999). Olanzapine has mood-stabilizing properties in bipolar patients (McElroy et al. 1998) and has proven effective

  1. Orally disintegrating olanzapine and potential differences in treatment-emergent weight gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagianis, Jamie; Hoffmann, Vicki Poole; Arranz, Belen; Treuer, Tamás; Maguire, Gerald A.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Chawla, Bharat

    2008-01-01

    Several papers and communications have reported possible weight reduction or less weight gain when patients start or switch to orally disintegrating olanzapine, as contrasted with standard oral olanzapine tablets. In this paper, the current literature is reviewed and hypothesized mechanisms of

  2. Application of an empiric Bayesian data mining algorithm to reports of pancreatitis associated with atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauben, Manfred

    2004-09-01

    To compare the results from one frequently cited data mining algorithm with those from a study, which was published in a peer-reviewed journal, that examined the association of pancreatitis with selected atypical antipsychotics observed by traditional rule-based methods of signal detection. Retrospective pharmacovigilance study. The widely studied data mining algorithm known as the Multi-item Gamma Poisson Shrinker (MGPS) was applied to adverse-event reports from the United States Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System database through the first quarter of 2003 for clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone to determine if a significant signal of pancreatitis would have been generated by this method in advance of their review or the addition of these events to the respective product labels. Data mining was performed by using nine preferred terms relevant to drug-induced pancreatitis from the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Results from a previous study on the antipsychotics were reviewed and analyzed. Physicians' Desk References (PDRs) starting from 1994 were manually reviewed to determine the first year that pancreatitis was listed as an adverse event in the product label for each antipsychotic. This information was used as a surrogate marker of the timing of initial signal detection by traditional criteria. Pancreatitis was listed as an adverse event in a PDR for all three atypical antipsychotics. Despite the presence of up to 88 reports/drug-event combination in the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System database, the MGPS failed to generate a signal of disproportional reporting of pancreatitis associated with the three antipsychotics despite the signaling of these drug-event combinations by traditional rule-based methods, as reflected in product labeling and/or the literature. These discordant findings illustrate key principles in the application of data mining algorithms to drug safety

  3. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    seldom received a combination of an atypical and a conventional antipsychotic, whereas a lesser number of patients with off- label indications received atypical antipsychotics less often than those of the two comparison groups (p<0.05). Stepwise logistic regression revealed that patients with a psychotic disorder were more ...

  4. Constrictive Pericarditis Associated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-chin Jean Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful surgical intervention in a case of constrictive pericarditis after long-term use of atypical antipsychotics. Pericarditis developed in our patient with a longstanding history of schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics. Pericardiectomy was undertaken, and the patient's presenting symptom of shortness of breath resolved subsequently with an uneventful postoperative course.

  5. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  6. Newer antipsychotics and upcoming molecules for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melvin; Amrutheshwar, Radhika; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip; Kattimani, Shivanand; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-08-01

    The management of schizophrenia has seen significant strides over the last few decades, due to the increasing availability of a number of antipsychotics. Yet, the diminished efficacy in relation to the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, and the disturbing adverse reactions associated with the current antipsychotics, reflect the need for better molecules targeting unexplored pathways. To review the salient features of the recently approved antipsychotics; namely, iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and blonanserin. We discuss the advantages, limitations and place in modern pharmacotherapy of each of these drugs. In addition, we briefly highlight the new targets that are being explored. Promising strategies include modulation of the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways, as well as cholinergic systems. Although regulatory bodies have approved only a handful of antipsychotics in recent years, the wide spectrum of targets that are being explored could eventually bring out antipsychotics with improved efficacy and acceptability, as well as the potential to revolutionize psychiatric practice.

  7. Antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes arrhythmia risk and mortality in older adults ‐ a Swedish nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Julius; Jonasdottir Bergman, Gudrun; Borg, Natalia; Salmi, Peter; Fastbom, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to examine mortality risk associated with use of antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes (TdP) risk in elderly. Methods A matched case–control register study was conducted in people 65 years and older dying outside hospital from 2008–2013 (n = 286 092) and matched controls (n = 1 430 460). The association between prescription of antidepressants and antipsychotics with various TdP risk according to CredibleMeds (www.crediblemeds.org) and all‐cause mortality was studied by multivariate conditional logistic regression adjusted for comorbidity and several other confounders. Results Use of antidepressants classified with known or possible TdP risk, was associated with higher adjusted risk for mortality (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.51, 1.56 and OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.61, 1.67, respectively) compared with antidepressants classified with conditional TdP risk (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.22, 1.28) or without TdP classification (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.94, 1.05). Antipsychotics classified with known TdP risk were associated with higher risk (OR 4.57, 95% CI 4.37, 4.78) than antipsychotics with possible risk (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.52, 2.64) or without TdP classification (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.03, 2.65). The following risk ranking was observed for commonly used antidepressants: mirtazapine > citalopram > sertraline > amitriptyline and for antipsychotics: haloperidol > risperidone >olanzapine > quetiapine. Conclusion The CredibleMeds system predicted drug‐associated risk for mortality in the elderly at the risk class level. Among antipsychotics, haloperidol, and among antidepressants, mirtazapine and citalopram, were associated with the highest risks. The results suggest that the TdP risk with antidepressants and antipsychotics should be taken into consideration when prescribing to the elderly. PMID:26574175

  8. Antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes arrhythmia risk and mortality in older adults - a Swedish nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Bengt; Collin, Julius; Jonasdottir Bergman, Gudrun; Borg, Natalia; Salmi, Peter; Fastbom, Johan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine mortality risk associated with use of antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes (TdP) risk in elderly. A matched case-control register study was conducted in people 65 years and older dying outside hospital from 2008-2013 (n = 286,092) and matched controls (n = 1,430,460). The association between prescription of antidepressants and antipsychotics with various TdP risk according to CredibleMeds (www.crediblemeds.org) and all-cause mortality was studied by multivariate conditional logistic regression adjusted for comorbidity and several other confounders. Use of antidepressants classified with known or possible TdP risk, was associated with higher adjusted risk for mortality (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.51, 1.56 and OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.61, 1.67, respectively) compared with antidepressants classified with conditional TdP risk (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.22, 1.28) or without TdP classification (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.94, 1.05). Antipsychotics classified with known TdP risk were associated with higher risk (OR 4.57, 95% CI 4.37, 4.78) than antipsychotics with possible risk (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.52, 2.64) or without TdP classification (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.03, 2.65). The following risk ranking was observed for commonly used antidepressants: mirtazapine > citalopram > sertraline > amitriptyline and for antipsychotics: haloperidol > risperidone >olanzapine > quetiapine. The CredibleMeds system predicted drug-associated risk for mortality in the elderly at the risk class level. Among antipsychotics, haloperidol, and among antidepressants, mirtazapine and citalopram, were associated with the highest risks. The results suggest that the TdP risk with antidepressants and antipsychotics should be taken into consideration when prescribing to the elderly. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Pharmaceutical studies on and clinical application of olanzapine suppositories prepared as a hospital preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Kimura, Satoru; Takahashi, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Yuta; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Kushibiki, Satoko; Katamachi, Morio; Kizu, Junko

    2016-01-01

    A new formulation of olanzapine available for terminally ill patients is needed. Rectal administration using suppositories is an alternative for patients for whom administration via the oral route is not feasible. In the present study, we prepared olanzapine suppositories, and confirmed using pharmaceutical tests. Furthermore, we demonstrated the efficacy and safety of olanzapine suppositories in terminally ill patients. We prepared olanzapine suppositories using bases consisting of different compositions of Witepsol H-15, Witepsol S-55, and Witepsol E-75. The suppository release test was performed, and the olanzapine suppository with the best dissolution rate was selected. The suppository was assessed using the content uniformity test, content test in suppositories, hardness test, stability test, and clinical efficacy and safety. The dissolution rate at 360 min of olanzapine suppositories with Witepsol H-15 was the best (77.0 ± 3.3 %). The suppositories prepared had a uniform weight (2.47 ± 0.02 g) and content (2.11 ± 0.07 mg). The power required to break suppositories was 7.96 ± 0.55 kgf. When olanzapine suppositories were stored with protection from light, their contents were maintained regardless of whether the temperature was at 4 °C or room temperature. The numbers of patients administered 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg of olanzapine suppositories were 4, 19, and 1. The percentages of patients with delirium or nausea and vomiting cured with olanzapine suppositories were 82 and 57 %, respectively. We suggest that olanzapine suppositories prepared in the hospital by pharmacists will improve the quality of life of terminally ill patients. UMIN000022172. May 2, 2016 retrospectively registered.

  10. Changes in antipsychotic use among patients with severe mental illness after a Food and Drug Administration advisory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusetzina, Stacie B; Busch, Alisa B; Conti, Rena M; Donohue, Julie M; Alexander, G Caleb; Huskamp, Haiden A

    2012-12-01

    A 2003 Food and Drug Administration advisory warned of increased hyperlipidemia and diabetes risk for patients taking second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). After the advisory, a professional society consensus statement provided treatment recommendations and stratified SGAs into high, intermediate, and low metabolic risk. We examine subsequent changes in incident and prevalent SGA use among individuals with severe mental illness. We created a retrospective cohort using Florida Medicaid's claims from 2001 to 2006. We included non-Medicare eligible adults with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia who filled an SGA prescription. We assessed changes in overall and agent-specific use, discontinuations, interruptions, and therapeutic alternative use among prevalent users and agent-specific use among incident users. Pre-advisory utilization was compared with utilization initially after the advisory and two subsequent periods. Among prevalent users, overall SGA use decreased slightly, and no increases in treatment interruptions or discontinuations were observed after the advisory and consensus statement publication. Compared with the pre-advisory period, in the months immediately after the advisory, the use of the highest metabolic-risk agent, olanzapine, decreased by 34% among prevalent users with bipolar disorder (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.66, 95%CI = 0.59-0.74) and 26% among prevalent users with schizophrenia (aRR = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.72-0.76). A greater decrease was estimated among incident users with bipolar disorder (aRR = 0.37, 95%CI = 0.29-0.47) and schizophrenia (aRR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.35-0.51) during this period. During each subsequent post-advisory period, olanzapine use continued to decrease whereas quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole use increased. The metabolic risk advisory and the published consensus statement were associated with a selective reduction in olanzapine use without evidence of treatment disruptions among

  11. Olanzapine-induced electroencephalographic changes reversed by lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasuna L Velur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The atypical neuroleptic, olanzapine (OLZ, may induce electroencephalographic (EEG abnormalities. The anticonvulsant, lamotrigine (LMG, reduces interictal epileptiform discharges and is effective in seizures in patients with both primary and partial epilepsy syndromes. The effect of LMG on neuroleptic-induced EEG abnormalities has not been previously reported. We describe the case of a 13-year-old male with paroxysmal nonepileptic spells who underwent diagnostic video-EEG telemetry, whose abnormal OLZ-induced EEG findings were strikingly affected by LTG withdrawal and reintroduction. The effect of LTG in normalizing EEG changes in suspected epilepsy caused by atypical neuroleptics is discussed.

  12. Sammenligning af sertindols og olanzapins effekt på kognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst

    Der er gennem de senere år kommet tiltagende fokus, både nationalt og internationalt, på de kognitive deficits der ses hos patienter med skizofreni. Det er kendt at den farmakologiske behandling har indflydelse på kognition funktion, men det er endnu ikke fyldestgørende klarlagt hvorledes de enke...... enkelte atypiske antipsykotika påvirker kognitiv funktion. Der vil blive beskrevet studiedesign for SEROLA studiet, som sammenligner sertindol og olanzapin med kognition, målt med CANTAB, som primært outcome....

  13. Severe ischemic colitis following olanzapine use: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Raimundo Fernandes

    Full Text Available Ischemic colitis is the most common subtype of intestinal ischemia usually resulting from vasospasm, vessel occlusion or mesenteric hypoperfusion. Neuroleptics have seldom been linked to ischemic colitis by blocking peripheral anticholinergic and antiserotonergic receptors inducing severe gastrointestinal paresis. We report a young patient with severe ischemic colitis requiring surgery due to necrosis of the bowel. After exclusion of other potential causes, olanzapine was admitted as the cause of ischemia. Clinicians should be aware of how to recognize and treat the potentially life-threatening effects of neuroleptics.

  14. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona.

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    Ana M Gaviria

    Full Text Available The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes.To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain.A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized database of 1,765 patients with schizophrenia treated between 2011 and 2013.The most used antipsychotic was risperidone, identified in 463 (26.3% patients, followed by olanzapine in 249 (14.1%, paliperidone in 225 (12.7%, zuclopenthixol in 201 (11.4%, quetiapine in 141 (8%, aripiprazole in 100 (5.7%, and clozapine in 100 (5.7%. Almost 8 out of 10 patients (79.3% were treated with atypical or second-generation antipsychotics. Long-acting injectable (LAI formulations were used in 44.8% of patients. Antipsychotics were generally prescribed in their recommended doses, with clozapine, ziprasidone, LAI paliperidone, and LAI risperidone being prescribed at the higher end of their therapeutic ranges. Almost 7 out of 10 patients (69.6% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy, and 81.4% were on psychiatric medications aside from antipsychotics. Being prescribed quetiapine (OR 14.24, 95% CI 4.94-40.97, LAI (OR 9.99, 95% CI 6.45-15.45, psychiatric co-medications (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.72-6.64, and paliperidone (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.23-7.92 were all associated with an increased likelihood of polypharmacy. Being prescribed risperidone (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35-0.83 and older age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99 were related to a low polypharmacy probability.Polypharmacy is the most common pattern of antipsychotic use in this region of Spain. Use of atypical antipsychotics is extensive. Most patients receive psychiatric co-medications such as anxiolytics or antidepressants. Polypharmacy is associated with the use of quetiapine or

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants and antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, A C C; Rojnic Kuzman, M; Tiwari, A K; Zivkovic, M V; Chowdhury, N I; Medved, V; Kekin, I; Zai, C C; Lieberman, J A; Meltzer, H Y; Bozina, T; Bozina, N; Kennedy, J L; Sertic, J; Müller, D J

    2014-07-01

    Weight gain and metabolic disturbances represent serious side-effects in antipsychotic (AP) treatment, particularly with clozapine and olanzapine. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is a key determinant in the folate metabolism and previous studies reported a significant effect on AP-induced weight gain and related metabolic abnormalities. Thus, we investigated MTHFR gene variants and changes in several important metabolic parameters in AP-treated patients. In this study, two functional MTHFR polymorphisms, rs1801133 (C677T) and rs1801131 (A1298C), were investigated for changes in weight and metabolic parameters. Genotypic associations were evaluated in a large population (n = 347 including 66 first episode psychosis, FEP patients) treated mostly with clozapine and olanzapine. We did not detect any genotypic association with weight changes (p > 0.05) in our total sample and in the sample refined for ancestry and medication. In our allelic analyses, we observed a trend for the 677-C allele to be associated with weight gain in the total sample (p = 0.03). This effect appeared to be driven by the FEP patients where those carrying the C-allele gained, on average, twice as much weight. Exploratory analyses revealed a significant association between the C677T and the A1298C polymorphism with HDL cholesterol serum levels in patients (p = 0.031). Overall we did not detect a major effect of two functional MTHFR gene variants and AP-induced weight gain. However, our findings suggest an effect of the C677T polymorphism in FEP patients and changes in weight and cholesterol levels. Further investigations in a larger sample are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of dried blood spots for quantification of 15 antipsychotics and 7 metabolites with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry.

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    Patteet, Lisbeth; Maudens, Kristof E; Stove, Christophe P; Lambert, Willy E; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard; Neels, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring of antipsychotics is important in optimizing individual therapy. In psychiatric populations, classical venous blood sampling is experienced as frightening. Interest in alternative techniques, like dried blood spots (DBS), has consequently increased. A fast and easy to perform DBS method for quantification of 16 antipsychotics (amisulpride, aripiprazole, asenapine, bromperidol, clozapine, haloperidol, iloperidone, levosulpiride, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, pipamperone, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole and zuclopenthixol) and 8 metabolites was developed. DBS were prepared using 25 μL of whole blood and extraction of complete spots was performed using methanol: methyl-t-butyl-ether (4:1). After evaporation, the extract was reconstituted in the mobile phase and 10 μL were injected on an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Separation using a C18 column and gradient elution with a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min resulted in a 6-min run-time. Ionization was performed in positive mode and a dynamic MRM method was applied. Median recovery was 66.4 % (range 28.7-84.5%). Accuracy was within the acceptance criteria, except for pipamperone (LLOQ and low concentration) and lurasidone (low concentration). Imprecision was only aberrant for lurasidone at low and medium concentration. All compounds were stable during 1 month at room temperature, 4 °C and -18 °C. Lurasidone was unstable when the extract was stored for 12 h on the autosampler. Absolute matrix effects (ME) (median 66.1%) were compensated by the use of deuterated IS (median 98.8%). The DBS method was successfully applied on 25-μL capillary DBS from patients and proved to be a reliable alternative for quantification of all antipsychotics except for olanzapine and N-desmethylolanzapine. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. How can lipid nanocarriers improve transdermal delivery of olanzapine?

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    Iqbal, Nimra; Vitorino, Carla; Taylor, Kevin M G

    2017-06-01

    The development of a transdermal nanocarrier drug delivery system with potential for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is described. Lipid nanocarriers (LN), encompassing various solid:liquid lipid compositions were formulated and assessed as potential nanosystems for transdermal delivery of olanzapine. A previously optimized method of hot high pressure homogenization (HPH) was adopted for the production of the LN, which comprised solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions (NE). Precirol  ® was selected as the solid lipid for progression of studies. SLN exhibited the best performance for transdermal delivery of olanzapine, based on in vitro release and permeation studies, coupled with results from physicochemical characterization of several solid:liquid lipid formulations. Stability tests, performed to give an indication of long-term storage behavior of the formulations, were in good agreement with previous studies for the best choice of solid:liquid lipid ratio. Overall, these findings highlight the SLN-based formulation as promising for the further inclusion in and production of transdermal patches, representing an innovative therapeutic approach.

  18. Atypical antipsychotics as add-on treatment in late-life depression

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    Cakir S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sibel Cakir,1 Zeynep Senkal2 1Department of Psychiatry, Mood Disorders, Geriatric Psychiatry Unit, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, 2Department of Psychiatry, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs have been used in the augmentation of treatment-resistant depression. However, little is known about their effectiveness, tolerability, and adverse events in the treatment of late-life depression, which were the aim of this study.Methods: The retrospective data of patients aged >65 years who had a major depressive episode with inadequate response to antidepressant treatment and had adjuvant SGA treatment were analyzed. The outcome measures were the number of the patients who continued to use SGAs in the fourth and twelfth weeks, adverse events, and changes in symptoms of depression. Results: Thirty-five patients were screened: 21 (60% had quetiapine, twelve (34.28% had aripiprazole, and two (5.71% had olanzapine adjuvant treatment. The mean age was 72.17±5.02 years, and 65.7% of the patients were women. The mean daily dose was 85.71±47.80 mg for quetiapine, 3.33±1.23 mg for aripiprazole, and 3.75±1.76 mg for olanzapine. The Geriatric Depression Scale scores of all patients were significantly decreased in the fourth week and were significant in the aripiprazole group (P=0.02. Of the 35 patients, 23 (65.7% patients discontinued the study within 12 weeks. The frequency of adverse events was similar in all SGAs, and the most common were sedation, dizziness, constipation, and orthostatic hypotension with quetiapine, and akathisia and headache because of aripiprazole. Conclusion: This study indicates that dropout ratio of patients with SGAs is high, and a subgroup of patients with late-life depression may benefit from SGAs. Effectiveness is significant in aripiprazole, and adverse events of SGAs were not serious but common in elderly patients. Keywords: treatment resistance, aripiprazole

  19. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS USE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

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    Nataša Potočnik-Dajčman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Classical antipsychotics – neuroleptics are one of the most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs in child psychiatry. Atypical antipsychotics are used for the same indications – psychotic (schizophrenia as well as unpsychotic disorders (pervasive developmental disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders and tics disorders. It is surprising that the studies on their use with regard to this age group are rather rare. They are carried out on a small number of samples and only exceptionally double blind. This article summarizes published clinical experience with atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents. A short overview of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and side effects is given. Schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders are major indications for use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents, but they have also been successfully used for other disorders such as aggressive behaviour, tics and anorexia nervosa.Conclusions. With better side-effect profile, some of the atypical antipsychotics are expected to be doctrinally recognised as the first-line treatment for childhood schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders. However, more long-term studies carried out on a larger sample are needed. Atypical antipsychotics are already used in everyday practice as first-line treatment of childhood and adolescents schizophrenia.

  20. Selectivity of action of typical and atypical anti-psychotic drugs as antagonists of the behavioral effects of 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI).

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    Wettstein, J G; Host, M; Hitchcock, J M

    1999-04-01

    1. There has been considerable research in the field of schizophrenia over the past few years with emphasis on the discovery of better drugs, particularly those with 5-HT2 antagonist activity. 2. In an effort to enhance identification of such compounds and to further understand the contribution of 5-HT2 activity to the effects of antipsychotic drugs, a series of conventional, atypical and purported antipsychotic compounds were assessed as antagonists of DOI-induced behaviors in rats. 3. DOI (1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride) is an hallucinogen having high affinity and selectivity as an agonist at 5-HT2A/2C receptors. Over a 30-min period after injection, DOI (0.3-10.0 mg/kg; i.p.) produced dose-related behavioral effects including head-and-body shakes, forepaw tapping and skin-jerks. Effects of the antipsychotic drugs and other compounds (30 min pretreatment; i.p.) were examined against a fixed dose of DOI (3.0 mg/kg). 4. In a dose-dependent manner, M100907 (MDL 100,907), risperidone, haloperidol, clozapine, iloperidone, olanzapine, amperozide, remoxipride, ritanserin and the neurotensin agonist NT1 (N alpha MeArg-Lys-Pro-Trp-Tle-Leu) antagonized each of the three behavioral effects of DOI. Drugs attenuating the head-and-body shakes were equally effective in blocking both forepaw tapping and skin-jerks indicating that these behaviors are mediated by similar mechanisms. The following compounds had either inconsistent or no effect on the DOI-induced behaviors: SB 200646A, citalopram, imipramine, fluoxetine, morphine, CP 99994, diazepam, ondansetron and SKF 97541. 5. The data show that antipsychotic agents, as a drug class, effectively block the effects of DOI. These actions are selective, as a series of nine non-antipsychotic and centrally-acting drugs were generally inactive in the procedure.

  1. Tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia with second-generation antipsychotics in non-elderly schizophrenic patients unexposed to first-generation antipsychotics: a cross-sectional and retrospective study.

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    Ryu, Seunghyong; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Sun; Baek, Ji Hyun; Ha, Kyooseob; Kwon, Jun Soo; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the clinical nature, prevalence rates, and associated factors of second-generation antipsychotic (SGA)-related tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia. To date, these subjects have not been thoroughly investigated.The subjects were 80 non-elderly schizophrenic patients who received SGAs for more than 1 year without any previous exposure to first-generation antipsychotics. Multiple (≥2) direct assessments of movement symptoms were performed. Hospital records longer than 1 recent year describing any observed tardive movement symptoms were reviewed.A current or history of tardive dyskinesia and/or tardive dystonia associated with SGA was identified in 28 (35%) subjects. These patients were being treated with risperidone (n = 15), amisulpride, olanzapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, or clozapine at the time of the onset of the movement symptoms. Tardive dyskinesia was mostly in the orolingual area, and the most frequently observed tardive dystonia was torticollis. The median interval between the first exposure to the SGA and the movement syndrome onset was 15 months for tardive dyskinesia and 43 months for tardive dystonia. A history of acute dystonia was significantly associated with tardive dystonia, and comorbid obsessive-compulsive syndrome was related to both tardive movement syndromes.This study indicates that more clinical attention and research efforts are needed regarding SGA-associated tardive movement syndromes, including a larger-scale prevalence assessment. This study is the first to indicate that a comorbid obsessive-compulsive syndrome might be an associated factor of tardive movement syndrome. The association warrants further investigation.

  2. Number needed to treat to harm for discontinuation due to adverse events in the treatment of bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder with atypical antipsychotics.

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    Gao, Keming; Kemp, David E; Fein, Elizabeth; Wang, Zuowei; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2011-08-01

    To estimate the number needed to treat to harm (NNTH) for discontinuation due to adverse events with atypical antipsychotics relative to placebo during the treatment of bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). English-language literature published and cited in MEDLINE from January 1966 to May 2009 was searched with the terms antipsychotic, atypical antipsychotic, generic and brand names of atypical antipsychotics, safety, tolerability, discontinuation due to adverse events, somnolence, sedation, weight gain, akathisia, or extrapyramidal side effect; and bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, or generalized anxiety disorder; and randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. This search was augmented with a manual search. Studies with a cumulative sample of ≥ 100 patients were included. The NNTHs for discontinuation due to adverse events, somnolence, sedation, ≥ 7% weight gain, and akathisia relative to placebo were estimated with 95% confidence intervals to reflect the magnitude of variance. Five studies in bipolar depression, 10 studies in MDD, and 4 studies in GAD were identified. Aripiprazole and olanzapine have been studied in bipolar depression and refractory MDD. Only quetiapine extended release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in 3 psychiatric conditions with different fixed dosing schedules. For aripiprazole, the mean NNTH for discontinuation due to adverse events was 14 in bipolar depression, but was not significantly different from placebo in MDD. For olanzapine, the mean NNTHs were 24 in bipolar depression and 9 in MDD. The risk for discontinuation due to adverse events during quetiapine-XR treatment appeared to be associated with dose. For quetiapine-XR 300 mg/d, the NNTHs for discontinuation due to adverse events were 9 for bipolar depression, 8 for refractory MDD, 9 for MDD, and 5 for GAD. At the same dose of quetiapine-XR, patients with GAD appeared to have a lower tolerability than

  3. Japan useful medication program for schizophrenia (JUMPs)-long-term study on discontinuation rate, resolution and remission, and improvement in social functioning rate associated with atypical antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia

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    2013-01-01

    Background It is desirable to establish evidence for the selection of antipsychotics from the viewpoint of recovery of social activity in individual patient with schizophrenia receiving medication. From this perspective, awareness of the importance of studies about drug effectiveness on treatment discontinuation rate, remission rate, and improvement in QOL has grown recently. In Western countries, numerous reports are available in effectiveness studies, which are related to olanzapine and risperidone primarily, whereas evidence for other second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) is poor. In Japan, no effectiveness study has been reported: thus, it is desirable to collect data that will serve as evidence for selection of the 3 SGAs approved after olanzapine. Methods The present study was a long-term effectiveness study under healthcare setting in Japan. It was designed as an open-label, multicenter, randomized, comparative study involving 104-week oral treatment with 1 of the 3 drugs (aripiprazole, blonanserin, and paliperidone) in patients with schizophrenia aged 20 years or over who required antipsychotic medication or switching of the current medication to others for reasons such as lack of efficacy and intolerability. The primary endpoint is treatment discontinuation rate for any causes. The secondary endpoints include remission rate, improvement of social activity, alleviation, aggravation or recurrence of psychiatric symptoms, and safety. The target number of subjects was set at 300. Discussion Because this study is expected to yield evidence regarding the selection of antipsychotics for facilitating the recovery of social activity in patients with schizophrenia, it is considered highly valuable to perform this effectiveness study under ordinary healthcare setting in Japan. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry 000007942 PMID:24090047

  4. Teratogenic Effects of Coadministration of Fluoxetine and Olanzapine on Rat Fetuses

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    Bakhtiarian, Azam; Takzare, Nasrin; Sheykhi, Mehdi; Sistany, Narges; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Giorgi, Mario; Nikoui, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Depression during pregnancy is a relatively common problem. Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of concomitant administration of fluoxetine and olanzapine during the organogenesis period, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of coadministration of fluoxetine and olanzapine on rat fetuses. Method. Forty-two pregnant rats were divided into seven groups, randomly. The first group received 0.5 mL of normal saline as the control. The secon...

  5. Metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics in bipolar youth: comparison with other psychotic and nonpsychotic diagnoses.

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    Moreno, Carmen; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Alvarez, Mar; Baeza, Inmaculada; Alda, Jose A; Martínez-Cantarero, Carmen; Parellada, Mara; Sánchez, Bernardo; de la Serna, Elena; Giráldez, Marisa; Arango, Celso

    2010-03-01

    Despite known metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) on children and adolescents, comparative effects in youth with different diagnoses remain underreported. We compared differences in metabolic changes three months after starting treatment with SGAs in youth with bipolar disorder and with other psychotic and nonpsychotic disorders. Weight and metabolic differences among diagnostic groups before and three months after starting treatment with SGAs were compared in a naturalistic cohort of children and adolescents (14.9 +/- 3.0 years) diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 31), other psychotic disorders (n = 29), and other nonpsychotic disorders (n = 30), with no (35.6%) or very little (6.6 +/- 9.0 days) previous exposure to antipsychotics. Composite measurements of significant weight gain [weight increase > or = 5% at three months or increase > or = 0.5 in body mass index (BMI) z-score] and 'risk for adverse health outcome' (> or = 95(th) BMI percentile, or > or = 85(th) BMI percentile plus presence of one other obesity-related complication) were included. SGAs (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) were prescribed in comparable proportion among groups. Baseline weight and metabolic indices were not significantly different among diagnoses. Three months after starting treatment with SGAs, more than 70% patients had significant weight gain, BMI z-score increased in all diagnostic groups (p or = 1 obesity-related complication at follow-up. There are early weight gain and metabolic changes across diagnoses in youth treated with SGAs.

  6. Change in Prolactin Levels in Pediatric Patients Given Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: A Network Meta-Analysis

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    Chakrapani Balijepalli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment of schizophrenia with first- and second-generation antipsychotics has been associated with elevated prolactin levels, which may increase the risk for prolactin-related adverse events. Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs included in a recent systematic review were considered for this analysis. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to compare changes in prolactin levels in pediatric patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders treated with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs. Results. Five RCTs, including 989 patients combined, have evaluated the changes in prolactin for pediatric patients after 6 weeks of treatment with risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and paliperidone. In the overall study population, treatment with risperidone was associated with the highest increase in mean prolactin levels compared to other SGAs. Patients treated with risperidone 4–6 mg/day were found to experience the greatest increases (55.06 ng/ml [95% CrI: 40.53–69.58] in prolactin levels, followed by risperidone 1–3 mg/day, paliperidone 3–6 mg/day, and paliperidone 6–12 mg/day. Conclusions. This study shows that there are differences in SGAs ability to cause hyperprolactinemia. Further, there is clear evidence of safety concerns with risperidone and paliperidone treatment in adolescent schizophrenia patients. Registration. PROSPERO CRD42014009506.

  7. Differential effects of antipsychotic drugs on insight in first episode schizophrenia: Data from the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST).

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    Pijnenborg, G H M; Timmerman, M E; Derks, E M; Fleischhacker, W W; Kahn, R S; Aleman, A

    2015-06-01

    Although antipsychotics are widely prescribed, their effect of on improving poor illness insight in schizophrenia has seldom been investigated and therefore remains uncertain. This paper examines the effects of low dose haloperidol, amisulpride, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on insight in first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder. The effects of five antipsychotic drugs in first episode psychosis on insight were compared in a large scale open randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 European countries: the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST). Patients with at least minimal impairments in insight were included in the present study (n=455). Insight was assessed with item G12 of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), administered at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The use of antipsychotics was associated with clear improvements in insight over and above improvements in other symptoms. This effect was most pronounced in the first three months of treatment, with quetiapine being significantly less effective than other drugs. Effects of spontaneous improvement cannot be ruled out due to the lack of a placebo control group, although such a large spontaneous improvement of insight would seem unlikely. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. The promotion of olanzapine in primary care: an examination of internal industry documents.

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    Spielmans, Glen I

    2009-07-01

    Media reports have discussed how olanzapine was marketed off-label for dementia and subsyndromal bipolar disorder. Much of this marketing occurred in primary care settings. However, these reports have provided few details. In legal proceedings, Lilly disclosed internal documents that detail the strategies utilized to market olanzapine. The current paper addresses the marketing of olanzapine in detail based upon a review of these documents. All 358 documents released by Lilly are publicly available online. Documents were utilized for this review if they were relevant to the marketing of olanzapine in primary care settings in the United States. It was found that olanzapine was marketed off-label in primary care settings for relatively mild symptoms that were framed as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A key strategy in this campaign was the use of hypothetical patient profiles in detailing visits, most of which clearly failed to meet diagnostic criteria for any recognized mental disorder. Evidence emerged that olanzapine was also marketed off-label as a treatment for dementia.

  9. Thrombocytopenia associated with olanzapine: A case report and review of literature

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    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited literature on olanzapine-associated thrombocytopenia. In this report, we present a case of a 32-year-old female, suffering from persistent delusional disorder who had thrombocytopenia (46,000/mm3 with the use of olanzapine 25 mg/day, 6 weeks after starting medication. Blood film did not reveal any evidence of any dysplastic cells, disturbance in the count of other cell lines, and autoimmune workup including antinuclear antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were found to be negative. Given no other etiology, olanzapine was gradually tapered, and platelet counts were monitored. Reduction in the dose of olanzapine led to an improvement in platelet counts which reached the normal range after complete stoppage of olanzapine. In view of continued psychotic symptoms, she was started on clozapine and which was gradually increased to 200 mg/day with biweekly monitoring of total platelet counts before each increment in the dose of clozapine. Thrombocytopenia did not recur with use of clozapine. With clozapine, her psychosis improved by nearly 60%. A review of literature revealed only eight case reports supporting the association of olanzapine and thrombocytopenia.

  10. A Comparative Study between Olanzapine and Risperidone in the Management of Schizophrenia

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    Saeed Shoja Shafti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since a variety of comparisons between risperidone and olanzapine have resulted in diverse outcomes, so safety and efficacy of them were compared again in a new trial. Method. Sixty female schizophrenic patients entered into one of the assigned groups for random allocation to olanzapine or risperidone (n=30 in each group in a double-blind, 12-week clinical trial. Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS and Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS were used as the primary outcome measures. Clinical Global Impressions-Severity Scale (CGI-S, Schedule for Assessment of Insight (SAI, and finally Simpson Angus Scale (SAS as well were employed as secondary scales. Results. While both of olanzapine and risperidone were significantly effective for improvement of positive symptoms (P<0.0001, as regards negative symptoms, it was so only by means of olanzapine (P<0.0003. CGI-S and SAI, as well, were significantly improved in both of the groups. SAS increment was significant only in the risperidone group (P<0.02. Conclusion. While both of olanzapine and risperidone were equally effective for improvement of positive symptoms and insight, olanzapine showed superior efficacy with respect to negative symptoms, along with lesser extrapyramidal side effects, in comparison with risperidone.

  11. Memantine enhances the effect of olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia: A randomized, placebo-controlled study

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    Ahmad Fakhri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate dysregulation may be involved in the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Memantine, a drug approved by the FDA for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, acts as a partial uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of memantine as an adjunctive treatment to olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, patients with schizophrenia according to DSM-IV clinical criteria were selected. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either memantine (week 1:10 mg/day; weeks 2-6:20 mg/day plus olanzapine (15-20 mg/day or olanzapine plus placebo. At baseline, no statistically significant difference regarding the mean total PANSS scores between treatment groups was found. Results showed that memantine significantly improved the positive and negative PANSS score in patients maintained on olanzapine after six weeks compared to olanzapine alone (P<0.001. Furthermore, female patients showed significantly better response than males, especially in positive PANSS score. No significant changes in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed.These findings indicate that olanzapine efficacy might be augmented with memantine. Furthermore, this effect is more remarkable in female patients with schizophrenia.

  12. Antipsychotics for fibromyalgia in adults.

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    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-06-02

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue. It affects approximately 2% of the general population. Up to 70% of patients with fibromyalgia meet the criteria for a depressive or anxiety disorder. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life. Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving health-related quality of life. Antipsychotics might reduce fibromyalgia and associated mental health symptoms. To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of antipsychotics in fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL (2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE and EMBASE to 20 May 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews and two clinical trial registries. We also contacted trial authors. We selected controlled trials of at least four weeks duration of any formulation of antipsychotics used for the treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. We extracted the data from all included studies and two review authors independently assessed study risks of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. We derived first tier evidence from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for drop-outs, at least 200 participants in the comparison, eight to 12 weeks duration, parallel design), second tier evidence from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and that we considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison, and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that we considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. We rated the

  13. Neural basis for the ability of atypical antipsychotic drugs to improve cognition in schizophrenia

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    Tomiki eSumiyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia.It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs, e.g. clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence.The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and GABA neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefitted by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g. event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some atypical antipsychotic drugs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors.These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia.

  14. First Episode Schizophrenia Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Assessment after Atypical Antipsychotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimbu, A.; Mititelu, R.; Marinescu, G.; Ghita, S.; Mazilu, C.; Codorean, I.; Gheorghe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Aim: Since regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings in schizophrenic patients are inconsistent, the aim of our study was to evaluate and compare rCBF in the first episode of schizophrenia, before and after atypical antipsychotic treatment. Method: 21 patients who met criteria for schizophrenia were assessed PANSS score and tomographic brain perfusion (SPECT). The treatment was administered for 10-12 weeks and the dose was 4.8mg/day Risperidone, 11.6mg/day Olanzepine, 440mg/day Quetiapine. After finishing treatment all patients underwent a control SPECT study. Results: PANSS scores revealed two groups: group A-14 patients with predominant positive symptoms; 9 received Olanzapine and 5 Quetiapine. In group B -7 patients with predominant negative symptoms received Risperidone. Positive symptoms were associated with hypoperfusion in posterior parietal regions and superior temporal gyrus, bilaterally; for negative symptoms we found hypoperfusion in prefrontal cortex, predominantly in left side and a hyper perfusion in left basal ganglia. All patients that received atypical antipsychotic drugs had clinical improvement and decreases in PANSS scores; the control SPECT analysis revealed the same cortical changes as first studies in 15 patients and an increase of the rCBF in frontal lobes for 4 patients. 14 patients we noticed an increased rCBF at subcortical level, especially in left caudate nuclei. Conclusions: We found nonspecific features of rCBF in patients with first episode of schizophrenia, suggesting a perfusion dynamic balance rather than a fixed model. Those aspects are much more related to clinical symptoms, than to the therapeutical response. The rCBF changes in subcortical level after treatment (64.4% increase of rCBF; 35.6% not modified), can have a good prognostic value for therapeutic response. (author)

  15. Effect of age, family history of diabetes, and antipsychotic drug treatment on risk of diabetes in people with psychosis: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2015-12-01

    Psychosis is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. A positive synergy between antipsychotic drug effects and a pre-existing liability to diabetes mellitus might explain the especially high relative risk of diabetes mellitus in young adults with psychosis. We aimed to assess the individual and joint effect of age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and currently prescribed antipsychotic drug treatment on risk for diabetes mellitus. In this study, we used data from the 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis-an observational study done at seven sites in five Australian states. We included data from 1155 people with psychosis aged 18-64 years who were in contact with psychiatric services and who gave a fasting blood sample to test for current diabetes mellitus. Using logistic regression, we modelled the association of diabetes mellitus with age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and current antipsychotic drug treatment. We compared model fit with and without two-way and three-way interaction terms and used likelihood ratio tests to establish which terms to include in the final model. After adjustment for older age, which was an independent risk factor, compared with not taking antipsychotic drugs, antipsychotic drug treatment was associated with diabetes mellitus only in those without a family history of diabetes mellitus (clozapine adjusted odds ratio [OR] 7·22, 95% CI 1·62-32·20, p=0·01; quetiapine 5·91, 1·33-26·30, p=0·02; aripiprazole 5·06, 0·86-29·64, p=0·07; risperidone 4·17, 0·90-19·24, p=0·07; and olanzapine 2·23, 0·45-11·06, p=0·32). Antipsychotic drug treatment was not associated with additional risk of diabetes mellitus in those with a family history (clozapine adjusted OR 1·51, 95% CI 0·64-3·54, p=0·34; quetiapine 1·09, 0·49-2·43, p=0·82; aripiprazole 0·43, 0·12-1·49, p=0·18; risperidone 1·12, 0·48-2·63, p=0·79; and olanzapine 0·67, 0·26-1·71, p=0·39). People with psychosis are at

  16. Anticonvulsivantes e antipsicóticos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar Anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alberto Moreno

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O transtorno bipolar é uma condição médica complexa e até o momento não há um tratamento único comprovadamente eficaz no controle de todos aspectos da doença. Foram revisadas a literatura disponível sobre o uso de anticonvulsivantes (valproato, carbamazepina, oxcarbazepina, lamotrigina, gabapentina, topiramato, clonazepam e antipsicóticos atípicos (clozapina, risperidona, olanzapina, quetiapina, ziprasidona e aripiprazole no tratamento agudo e profilático do transtorno bipolar. Existe um acúmulo de evidências acerca da eficácia do lítio na profilaxia e de ser melhor no tratamento da mania aguda do que nos episódios depressivos. Outros dados indicam que a carbamazepina e o valproato são eficazes na mania aguda. A lamotrigina parece reduzir ciclagem e ser eficaz em episódios depressivos. Baseado nas informações disponíveis, as evidências apontam a olanzapina como o antipsicótico atípico mais apropriado no tratamento de pacientes bipolares em mania, embora existam estudos sugerindo a eficácia da risperidona, aripiprazol e da clozapina. Resultados preliminares avaliando a eficácia de ziprasidona e quetiapina no transtorno bipolar ainda são bastante limitadas. Não há dados consistentes apoiando o uso profilático dos novos antipsicóticos.Bipolar disorder is a complex medical condition, and up to the date there is no single treatment with proven efficacy in the control of all aspects of the illness. The available literature on the use of anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, clonazepam and atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole for acute and prophylactic treatment of bipolar disorder was reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence that lithium is efficacious in the prophylaxis of episodes and better for acute mania than for depressive episodes. Other data show that carbamazepine and valproate are

  17. Schizophrenia risk gene CAV1 is both pro-psychotic and required for atypical antipsychotic drug actions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J A; Yadav, P N; Setola, V; Farrell, M; Roth, B L

    2011-08-16

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a scaffolding protein important for regulating receptor signaling cascades by partitioning signaling molecules into membrane microdomains. Disruption of the CAV1 gene has recently been identified as a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia. Although Cav-1 knockout (KO) mice displayed no baseline behavioral disruptions, Cav-1 KO mice, similar to schizophrenic individuals, exhibited increased sensitivity to the psychotomimetic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). Thus, PCP disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and PCP-induced mouse locomotor activity were both enhanced by genetic deletion of Cav-1. Interestingly, genetic deletion of Cav-1 rendered the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine and the 5-HT(2A)-selective antagonist M100907 ineffective at normalizing PCP-induced disruption of PPI. We also discovered that genetic deletion of Cav-1 attenuated 5-HT(2A)-induced c-Fos and egr-1 expression in mouse frontal cortex and also reduced 5-HT(2A)-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in primary cortical neuronal cultures. The behavioral effects of the 5-HT(2A) agonist (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine) including head twitch responses and disruption of PPI were also attenuated by genetic deletion of Cav-1, indicating that Cav-1 is required for both inverse agonist (that is, atypical antipsychotic drug) and agonist actions at 5-HT(2A) receptors. This study demonstrates that disruption of the CAV1 gene--a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia--is not only pro-psychotic but also attenuates atypical antipsychotic drug actions.

  18. The Complex Relationship between Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain and Therapeutic Benefits: A Systematic Review and Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex T. Raben

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG and other adverse metabolic effects represent serious side effects faced by many patients with psychosis that can lead to numerous comorbidities and which reduce the lifespan. While the pathophysiology of AIWG remains poorly understood, numerous studies have reported a positive association between AIWG and the therapeutic benefit of antipsychotic medications.Objectives: To review the literature to (1 determine if AIWG is consistently associated with therapeutic benefit and (2 investigate which variables may mediate such an association.Data Sources: MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Database and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles containing all the following exploded MESH terms: schizophrenia [AND] antipsychotic agents/neuroleptics [AND] (weight gain [OR] lipids [OR] insulin [OR] leptin [AND] treatment outcome. Results were limited to full-text, English journal articles.Results: Our literature search uncovered 31 independent studies which investigated an AIWG-therapeutic benefit association with a total of 6063 enrolled individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or another serious mental illness receiving antipsychotic medications. Twenty-two studies found a positive association while, 10 studies found no association and one study reported a negative association. Study variables including medication compliance, sex, ethnicity, or prior antipsychotic exposure did not appear to consistently affect the AIWG-therapeutic benefit relationship. In contrast, there was some evidence that controlling for baseline BMI/psychopathology, duration of treatment and specific agent studied [i.e., olanzapine (OLZ or clozapine (CLZ] strengthened the relationship between AIWG and therapeutic benefit.Limitations: There were limitations of the reviewed studies in that many had small sample sizes, and/or were retrospective. The heterogeneity of the studies also made comparisons difficult and publication bias

  19. Use of second-generation antipsychotics in the acute inpatient management of schizophrenia in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhadhari S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulaiman Alkhadhari,1 Nasser Al Zain,2 Tarek Darwish,3 Suhail Khan,4 Tarek Okasha,5 Hisham Ramy,5 Talaat Matar Tadros6 1Kuwait Center for Mental Health, Safat, Kuwait; 2Al Amal Complex for Mental Health Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3Behavioural Science Pavilion, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4Jeddah Psychiatric Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 5Institute of Psychiatry, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 6Ibrahim Bin Hamad Obaidallah and Seif Bin Ghubash Hospitals, Ras Alkhaimah, United Arab Emirates Background: Management of acute psychotic episodes in schizophrenic patients remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Despite treatment guidelines recommending that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs should be used as monotherapy, first-generation antipsychotics, polypharmacy, and lower than recommended doses are frequently administered in clinical practice. Minimal data exist regarding the use of SGAs in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to examine the discrepancies between current clinical practice and guideline recommendations in the region. Methods: RECONNECT-S Beta was a multicenter, noninterventional study conducted in Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates to observe the management of schizophrenic patients who were hospitalized due to an acute psychotic episode. Patients underwent one visit on the day of discharge. Demographic and medical history, together with data on antipsychotic treatment and concomitant medication during the hospitalization period and medication recommendations at discharge were recorded. Results: Of the 1,057 patients, 180 (17.0% and 692 (65.5% received SGAs as monotherapy and in combination therapy, respectively. Overall, the most frequently administered medications were given orally, and included risperidone (40.3%, olanzapine (32.5%, and quetiapine (24.6%; the doses administered varied between countries and deviated from the recommended

  20. Neural Basis for the Ability of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Higuchi, Yuko; Uehara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT) receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs), e.g., clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence. The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefited by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g., event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some AAPDs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors. These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia. PMID:24137114

  1. Neural basis for the ability of atypical antipsychotic drugs to improve cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Higuchi, Yuko; Uehara, Takashi

    2013-10-16

    Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT) receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs), e.g., clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence. The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefited by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g., event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some AAPDs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors. These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia.

  2. Adherence to guidelines for glucose assessment in starting second-generation antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raebel, Marsha A; Penfold, Robert; McMahon, Ann W; Reichman, Marsha; Shetterly, Susan; Goodrich, Glenn; Andrade, Susan; Correll, Christoph U; Gerhard, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    In 2003, the US Food and Drug Administration issued warnings about hyperglycemia and diabetes with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs); guidelines have recommended metabolic screening since 2004. However, little is known of contemporary practices of glucose screening among youth initiating SGAs. Our objective was to evaluate baseline glucose assessment among youth in the Mini-Sentinel Distributed Database starting an SGA. The cohort included youth ages 2 through 18 newly initiating SGAs January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2011, across 10 sites. Baseline glucose was defined as fasting/random glucose or hemoglobin A1c (GLU) measurement occurring relative to first SGA dispensing. Differences in GLU assessment were evaluated with χ(2) tests and logistic regression. The cohort included 16,304 youth; 60% boys; mean age 12.8 years. Risperidone was most commonly started (43%). Eleven percent (n = 1858) had GLU assessed between 90 days before and 3 days after first dispensing. Assessment varied across SGAs (olanzapine highest), sites (integrated health care systems higher), ages (16-18 highest), years (2007 highest), and gender (female higher; all P diabetes risk may not be identified. Further, lack of screening impedes determining the contribution of SGAs to hyperglycemia development. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. A systematic review of cardiovascular effects after atypical antipsychotic medication overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hock Heng; Hoppe, Jason; Heard, Kennon

    2009-06-01

    As the use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AAPMs) increases, the number of overdoses continues to grow. Cardiovascular toxicity was common with older psychiatric medications but seems uncommon with AAPM. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe the cardiovascular effects reported after overdose of 5 common AAPM: aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone. We included case reports and case series describing overdose of these 5 medications identified in a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and abstracts from major toxicology meetings. We found 13 pediatric cases (age, cases (age, 7-16 years), and 185 adult cases. No pediatric case described a ventricular dysrhythmia or a cardiovascular death. In the adolescent and adult cases, we found numerous reports of prolonged corrected QT interval and hypotension, but there were only 3 cases of ventricular dysrhythmia and 3 deaths that may have been due to direct cardiovascular toxicity. The results from case series reports were similar to the single case report data. Our review suggests that overdose of AAPM is unlikely to cause significant cardiovascular toxicity.

  4. Do we need another atypical antipsychotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried

    2008-08-01

    Atypical antipsychotics were a great advance in the treatment of schizophrenia. But, there is still no atypical antipsychotic with an exceptional efficacy and safety profile for all patients. Clinicians are required to draw on their experiential knowledge to examine suitable options for individual patients. Following its suspension in 1998, the safety and efficacy of sertindole have been investigated in several post-marketing studies based in clinical settings. These have provided the safety data to support the reintroduction of sertindole, as well as specific examples demonstrating that certain patients, in particular, may benefit from a switch from other atypical antipsychotics to sertindole. Sertindole's individual and mostly favourable profile of treatment-emergent effects and safety allows for flexibility in treating patients. The propensity of sertindole to cause anticholinergic effects, which can be particularly troublesome, is small and, more recently, there have been suggestions that sertindole may have beneficial effects on cognition.

  5. Combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and antipsychotics (both clozapine and non-clozapine in treatment resistant schizophrenia: A comparative meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the relative efficacies of clozapine plus Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT compared against non-clozapine typical and atypical antipsychotics plus ECT for the treatment of “Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia” (TRS. Primarily to assess if clozapine delivers a significant improvement over other antipsychotics when combined with ECT. Design: Major electronic databases were searched between 1990 and March 2017 for trials measuring the effects of either clozapine augmented ECT, other antipsychotic-augmented ECT, or both. After the systematic review of the data, a random-effects meta-analysis was conducted measuring the relative effect sizes of the different treatment regimens. Subjects: 1179 patients in 23 studies reporting the usage of ECT augmentation with antipsychotics. A total of 95 patients were tested with clozapine, and ECT (9 studies and 1084 patients were tested with non-clozapine antipsychotics (14 studies such as flupenthixol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, sulpiride, olanzapine, and loxapine with concurrent ECT treatment considered for systematic review. Of these, 13 studies reported pre and post-treatment scores were included in the meta-analysis. Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was the presence and degree of both positive and negative psychotic symptoms, as measured by either of two standardized clinician administered tests, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, and the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS. Results: The comparison of the different antipsychotics established the supremacy of ECT-augmented clozapine treatment against other typical and atypical antipsychotics. The Forest Plot revealed that the overall standard mean difference was 0.891 for non-clozapine studies and 1.504 for clozapine studies, at a 95% interval. Furthermore, the heterogeneity plots showed that while clozapine studies showed no significant heterogeneity, non-clozapine studies showed an I2 statistic value at 42

  6. Second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics in schizophrenia: patient functioning and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montemagni C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristiana Montemagni,1,2 Tiziana Frieri,1,2 Paola Rocca1,2 1Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Psychiatry, University of Turin, 2Department of Mental Health, Azienda Sanitaria Locale (ASL Torino 1 (TO1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria (AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Turin, Italy Abstract: Long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs were developed to make treatment easier, improve adherence, and/or signal the clinician when nonadherence occurs. Second-generation antipsychotic LAIs (SGA-LAIs combine the advantages of SGA with a long-acting formulation. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the available literature concerning the impact of SGA-LAIs on patient functioning and quality of life (QOL. Although several studies regarding schizophrenia patients’ functioning and QOL have been performed, the quantity of available data still varies greatly depending on the SGA-LAI under investigation. After reviewing the literature, it seems that SGA-LAIs are effective in ameliorating patient functioning and/or QOL of patients with schizophrenia, as compared with placebo. However, while methodological design controversy exists regarding the superiority of risperidone LAI versus oral antipsychotics, the significant amount of evidence in recently published research demonstrates the beneficial influence of risperidone LAI on patient functioning and QOL in stable patients and no benefit over oral treatment in unstable patients. However, the status of the research on SGA-LAIs is lacking in several aspects that may help physicians in choosing the correct drug therapy. Meaningful differences have been observed between SGA-LAIs in the onset of their clinical efficacy and in the relationships between symptoms and functioning scores. Moreover, head-to-head studies comparing the effects of SGA-LAIs on classical measures of psychopathology and functioning are available mainly on risperidone LAI, while those comparing olanzapine LAI with other

  7. Teratogenic Effects of Coadministration of Fluoxetine and Olanzapine on Rat Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Bakhtiarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression during pregnancy is a relatively common problem. Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of concomitant administration of fluoxetine and olanzapine during the organogenesis period, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of coadministration of fluoxetine and olanzapine on rat fetuses. Method. Forty-two pregnant rats were divided into seven groups, randomly. The first group received 0.5 mL of normal saline as the control. The second and third groups received fluoxetine at doses of 9 mg/kg and 18 mg/kg, respectively. Olanzapine was injected at 3 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg to the fourth and fifth groups, respectively. The sixth group received 9 mg/kg fluoxetine and 3 mg/kg olanzapine. Finally, the seventh group was administrated with fluoxetine and olanzapine at 18 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Drugs were injected intraperitoneally between day eight and day 15 of the pregnancy. On the 17th day of pregnancy, the fetuses were removed and micro-/macroscopically studied. Results. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of these drugs showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, premature eyelid opening and torsion anomalies, compared to the control group (P≤0.01. It is concluded that these drugs can lead to teratogenicity, so their concomitant use during pregnancy should be avoided, or if necessary their doses must be decreased.

  8. Pregnancy exposure to olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, aripiprazole and risk of congenital malformations. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Damkier, Per

    2015-01-01

    To review available data on first-trimester exposure to olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and aripiprazole and risk of congenital malformations. We performed a systematic literature search in accordance with PRISMA guidelines identifying studies containing original data on first-trimester expos......To review available data on first-trimester exposure to olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and aripiprazole and risk of congenital malformations. We performed a systematic literature search in accordance with PRISMA guidelines identifying studies containing original data on first......-trimester exposure and pregnancy outcome with respect to congenital malformations. Cumulated data for olanzapine were 1090 first-trimester-exposed pregnancies with 38 malformations resulting in a malformation rate of 3.5%. The corresponding numbers for quetiapine, risperidone and aripiprazole were 443/16 (3.6%), 432....../22 (5.1%) and 100/5 (5.0%), respectively. Relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals were 1.0 (0.7-1.4) (olanzapine), 1.0 (0.6-1.7) (quetiapine), 1.5 (0.9-2.2) (risperidone) and 1.4 (0.5-3.1) (aripiprazole). First-trimester exposure to olanzapine is not associated with an increased risk...

  9. Efficacy and safety of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination vs fluoxetine monotherapy following successful combination therapy of treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Elizabeth; Tohen, Mauricio; Osuntokun, Olawale; Landry, John; Thase, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed prevention of relapse in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) taking olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC). Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who failed to satisfactorily respond to ≥ 2 different antidepressants for ≥ 6 weeks within the current MDD episode were acutely treated for 6-8 weeks, followed by stabilization (12 weeks) on OFC. Those who remained stable were randomized to OFC or fluoxetine for up to 27 weeks. Time-to-relapse was the primary efficacy outcome defined as 50% increase in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score with Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Depression score of ≥ 4; hospitalization for depression or suicidality; or discontinuation for lack of efficacy or worsening of depression or suicidality. A total of 444 patients were randomized 1:1 to OFC (N=221) or fluoxetine (N=223). Time-to-relapse was significantly longer in OFC-treated patients compared with fluoxetine-treated patients (pserious adverse events. We believe this is the first controlled relapse-prevention study in subjects with TRD that supports continued use of a second-generation antipsychotic beyond stabilization. A thorough assessment of benefits and risks (in particular metabolic changes) associated with continuing treatment with OFC or fluoxetine must be done based on individual patient needs.

  10. Antipsychotics, glycemic disorders, and life-threatening diabetic events: a Bayesian data-mining analysis of the FDA adverse event reporting system (1968-2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMouchel, William; Fram, David; Yang, Xionghu; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Grogg, Amy L; Engelhart, Luella; Ramaswamy, Krishnan

    2008-01-01

    This analysis compared diabetes-related adverse events associated with use of different antipsychotic agents. A disproportionality analysis of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) was performed. Data from the FDA postmarketing AERS database (1968 through first quarter 2004) were evaluated. Drugs studied included aripiprazole, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone. Fourteen Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Primary Terms (MPTs) were chosen to identify diabetes-related adverse events; 3 groupings into higher-level descriptive categories were also studied. Three methods of measuring drug-event associations were used: proportional reporting ratio, the empirical Bayes data-mining algorithm known as the Multi-Item Gamma Poisson Shrinker, and logistic regression (LR) analysis. Quantitative measures of association strength, with corresponding confidence intervals, between drugs and specified adverse events were computed and graphed. Some of the LR analyses were repeated separately for reports from patients under and over 45 years of age. Differences in association strength were declared statistically significant if the corresponding 90% confidence intervals did not overlap. Association with various glycemic events differed for different drugs. On average, the rankings of association strength agreed with the following ordering: low association, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, haloperidol, and risperidone; medium association, quetiapine; and strong association, clozapine and olanzapine. The median rank correlation between the above ordering and the 17 sets of LR coefficients (1 set for each glycemic event) was 93%. Many of the disproportionality measures were significantly different across drugs, and ratios of disproportionality factors of 5 or more were frequently observed. There are consistent and substantial differences between atypical antipsychotic drugs in the

  11. Symptom response and side-effects of olanzapine and risperidone in young adults with recent onset schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, Johanna; Tijssen, Jans; Dingemans, Petrus; Gersons, Berthold; Linszen, Donald

    2003-01-01

    The symptom response and side-effects of olanzapine and risperidone were compared in patients with recent onset schizophrenia. Actively symptomatic patients n=44) randomly, received olanzapine 15 mg (median dose) or risperidone 4 mg (median dose). Symptom response and side-effects were measured

  12. Sertindole, in contrast to clozapine and olanzapine, does not disrupt water maze performance after acute or chronic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didriksen, Michael; Kreilgaard, Mads; Arnt, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    .e. percentage of trials where the rat was unable to find the platform within the total trial time of 60 s. Clozapine (40 mg/kg, p.o.) and olanzapine (2.5 mg/kg, s.c.) impaired water maze performance when given acutely. However, tolerance developed to the deficit induced by clozapine, whereas the olanzapine...

  13. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    As part of a pharmacovigilance/pharmacoepidemiology program, all drugs given on 5 reference days (1999 – 2001) in the 98- bed psychiatric ... Key words: Antipsychotic drugs; Off-label use; Prescription habits; Psychotic disorders; Affective disorders ..... Laux G, Baier D. Quality-monitoring of psychotropic drug therapy in.

  14. Antipsychotic prescription patterns and treatment costs of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antipsychotic drugs most commonly prescribed for schizophrenia patients in Peshawar, Pakistan and to analyze the treatment costs associated with these drugs. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were recruited from outpatient psychiatry departments in Peshawar, ...

  15. Antipsychotic prescription patterns and treatment costs of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antipsychotic drugs most commonly prescribed for schizophrenia patients in. Peshawar, Pakistan and to analyze the treatment costs associated with these drugs. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were recruited from outpatient psychiatry departments in Peshawar, ...

  16. Antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... factors associated with antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia patients .... treatment. Results. Socio-demographic characteristics of schizophrenia patients. Out of the total 423 recruited patients, 412 filled in the questionnaire ... involving chewing parts of the fresh green leaves.

  17. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. METHODS: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation......=514 olanzapine). Both groups improved from baseline to 6 weeks in mean YMRS and HAMD-5 total scores, with greater mean improvements in the olanzapine compared with the valproate group. Olanzapine was associated with more weight gain and less gastrointestinal difficulties than valproate. DISCUSSION......: The EMBLEM results support those of the RCT, which suggest that olanzapine monotherapy seems to be more effective than valproate monotherapy in the treatment of acute mania....

  18. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M; Bertsch, J; Reed, C; Perrin, E; Tohen, M

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation of Medication) was a 2-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with the treatment of mania. Severity of mania and depression were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks using the YMRS and the 5-item version of the HAMD, respectively. 621 patients were analysed (n=107 valproate, n=514 olanzapine). Both groups improved from baseline to 6 weeks in mean YMRS and HAMD-5 total scores, with greater mean improvements in the olanzapine compared with the valproate group. Olanzapine was associated with more weight gain and less gastrointestinal difficulties than valproate. The EMBLEM results support those of the RCT, which suggest that olanzapine monotherapy seems to be more effective than valproate monotherapy in the treatment of acute mania.

  19. An integrated analysis of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination in clinical trials of treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Thase, Michael E; Osuntokun, Olawale; Henley, David B; Case, Michael; Watson, Susan B; Campbell, Giedra M; Corya, Sara A

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC) versus olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy across all clinical trials of treatment-resistant depression sponsored by Eli Lilly and Company. Efficacy and safety data from 1146 patients with a history of nonresponse during the current depressive episode who subsequently exhibited nonresponse during a 6- to 8-week antidepressant open-label lead-in phase and were randomly assigned to OFC (N = 462), fluoxetine (N = 342), or olanzapine (N = 342) for double-blind treatment were analyzed. All patients had a diagnosis of major depressive disorder as defined by DSM-III or DSM-IV criteria. The dates in which the trials were conducted ranged from May 1997 to July 2005. After 8 weeks, OFC patients demonstrated significantly greater Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale improvement (mean change = -13.0) than fluoxetine (-8.6, p or= 10% of OFC patients were weight gain, increased appetite, dry mouth, somnolence, fatigue, headache, and peripheral edema. Random glucose mean change (mg/dL) was +7.92 for the OFC group, +1.62 for the fluoxetine group (p = .020), and +9.91 for the olanzapine group (p = .485). Random cholesterol mean change (mg/dL) was +12.4 for OFC, +2.3 for fluoxetine (p or= 240 subsequently) was significantly higher for the OFC group (10.2%) than for the fluoxetine group (3.1%, p = .017) but not the olanzapine group (8.0%, p = .569). Mean weight change (kg) was +4.42 for OFC, -0.15 for fluoxetine (p or= 7% body weight (vs. olanzapine: 42.9%, p = .515; fluoxetine: 2.3%, p < .001). Results of this analysis showed that OFC-treated patients experienced significantly improved depressive symptoms compared with olanzapine- or fluoxetine-treated patients following failure of 2 or more antidepressants within the current depressive episode. Safety results for OFC were generally consistent with those for its component monotherapies. The total cholesterol increase associated with OFC was more pronounced

  20. Discovery of potential antipsychotic agents possessing pro-cognitive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameh, Jelveh; McFarland, Krista; Ohlsson, Jorgen; Ek, Fredrik; Piu, Fabrice; Burstein, Ethan S; Tabatabaei, Ali; Olsson, Roger; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Bonhaus, Douglas W

    2012-03-01

    Current antipsychotic drug therapies for schizophrenia have limited efficacy and are notably ineffective at addressing the cognitive deficits associated with this disorder. The present study was designed to develop effective antipsychotic agents that would also ameliorate the cognitive deficits associated with this disease. In vitro studies comprised of binding and functional assays were utilized to identify compounds with the receptor profile that could provide both antipsychotic and pro-cognitive features. Antipsychotic and cognitive models assessing in vivo activity of these compounds included locomotor activity assays and novel object recognition assays. We developed a series of potential antipsychotic agents with a novel receptor activity profile comprised of muscarinic M(1) receptor agonism in addition to dopamine D(2) antagonism and serotonin 5-HT(2A) inverse agonism. Like other antipsychotic agents, these compounds reverse both amphetamine and dizocilpine-induced hyperactivity in animals. In addition, unlike other antipsychotic drugs, these compounds demonstrate pro-cognitive actions in the novel object recognition assay. The dual attributes of antipsychotic and pro-cognitive actions distinguish these compounds from other antipsychotic drugs and suggest that these compounds are prototype molecules in the development of novel pro-cognitive antipsychotic agents.

  1. Antipsychotic reduction and/or cessation and antipsychotics as specific treatments for tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Hanna; Rathbone, John; Agarwal, Vivek; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2018-02-06

    Since the 1950s antipsychotic medication has been extensively used to treat people with chronic mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. These drugs, however, have also been associated with a wide range of adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Various strategies have been examined to reduce a person's cumulative exposure to antipsychotics. These strategies include dose reduction, intermittent dosing strategies such as drug holidays, and antipsychotic cessation. To determine whether a reduction or cessation of antipsychotic drugs is associated with a reduction in TD for people with schizophrenia (or other chronic mental illnesses) who have existing TD. Our secondary objective was to determine whether the use of specific antipsychotics for similar groups of people could be a treatment for TD that was already established. We updated previous searches of Cochrane Schizophrenia's study-based Register of Trials including the registers of clinical trials (16 July 2015 and 26 April 2017). We searched references of all identified studies for further trial citations. We also contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included reports if they assessed people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illnesses who had established antipsychotic-induced TD, and had been randomly allocated to (a) antipsychotic maintenance versus antipsychotic cessation (placebo or no intervention), (b) antipsychotic maintenance versus antipsychotic reduction (including intermittent strategies), (c) specific antipsychotics for the treatment of TD versus placebo or no intervention, and (d) specific antipsychotics versus other antipsychotics or versus any other drugs for the treatment of TD. We independently extracted data from these trials and estimated risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assumed that people who

  2. Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, John; Kao, Dennis; Soydan, Haluk; Adams, Clive E

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term treatment with antipsychotic medications in early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders is common, but both short and long-term effects on the illness are unclear. There have been numerous suggestions that people with early episodes of schizophrenia appear to respond differently than those with multiple prior episodes. The number of episodes may moderate response to drug treatment. Objectives To assess the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment on people with early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group register (July 2007) as well as references of included studies. We contacted authors of studies for further data. Selection criteria Studies with a majority of first and second episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders comparing initial antipsychotic medication treatment with placebo, milieu, or psychosocial treatment. Data collection and analysis Working independently, we critically appraised records from 681 studies, of which five studies met inclusion criteria. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. For continuous data, we calculated mean difference (MD). We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results Five studies (combined total n=998) met inclusion criteria. Four studies (n=724) provided leaving the study early data and results suggested that individuals treated with a typical antipsychotic medication are less likely to leave the study early than those treated with placebo (Chlorpromazine: 3 RCTs n=353, RR 0.4 CI 0.3 to 0.5, NNT 3.2, Fluphenaxine: 1 RCT n=240, RR 0.5 CI 0.3 to 0.8, NNT 5; Thioridazine: 1 RCT n=236, RR 0.44 CI 0.3 to 0.7, NNT 4.3, Trifulperazine: 1 RCT n=94, RR 0.96 CI 0.3 to 3.6). Two studies contributed data to assessment of adverse effects and present a general pattern of more frequent side effects among individuals treated with typical antipsychotic medications

  3. Antipsychotic-induced somnolence in mothers with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2012-03-01

    Although it is known that many antipsychotic drugs, at the doses prescribed for schizophrenia, are sedative and cause daytime drowsiness, the effect of potentially diminished vigilance on parenting parameters has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to advise clinicians about sedative load in mothers who are prescribed antipsychotic medication. A Medline search was conducted into the sedative effects of antipsychotics, with the following search terms: sleep; sedation; somnolence; wakefulness; antipsychotics; schizophrenia, parenting, maternal behavior, and custody. The results showed that antipsychotic drugs differ in their propensity to induce sedation and do so via their effects on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. It is important to note that mothers with schizophrenia risk losing custody of their infants if they are perceived as potentially neglectful because of excessive daytime sleepiness. Clinicians must choose antipsychotic medications carefully and monitor for sedative effects whenever the patient has important responsibilities that require the maintenance of vigilance.

  4. CARDIOTOXICITY ANTIPSYCHOTICS: MORPHO-ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Volkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the morphological and functional heart disorders in patients with different duration of antipsychotic treatment. Material and methods. Medical documents of 78 deceased schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs were studied. The patients were split into 4 groups depending on duration of neuroleptic treatment: group 1 — <10 years, group 2 — 11-20 years; group 3 — 21-30 years, group 4 — >30 years. ECG-disorders and left ventricular morphometric data were analyzed. Сorrelation analysis of myocardium morphological changes and electrophysiological disorders was performed. Results. The dependence of morphometric myocardium changes on the treatment duration was found: increase in stromal-parenchymal ratio (from 9.9±4.1% to 80.0±10.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of atrophied cardiomyocytes (from 8.0±3.8% to 45.1±12.6% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of degenerative cardiomyocytes (from 5.2±3.1% to 35.2±12.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively. Increased incidence of extrasystole detection (from 2.2% to 11.2% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, as well as left anterior fascicular block (from 1.1% to 25.9% in groups 1 and 2, respectively and left ventricle hypertrophy (from 2.2% to 18.5% in groups 1 and 4, respectively were found. A strong positive correlation (r=0.88–0.99 was revealed between antipsychotic treatment duration and ECG disorders, as well as between morphological myocardium state and ECG disorders. Conclusion. Awareness about the neuroleptic-depended ECG changes is necessary for early diagnosis, secondary prevention and correction of existing heart disorders due to cardiotoxic side effects of antipsychotic drugs.

  5. CARDIOTOXICITY ANTIPSYCHOTICS: MORPHO-ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Volkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the morphological and functional heart disorders in patients with different duration of antipsychotic treatment. Material and methods. Medical documents of 78 deceased schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs were studied. The patients were split into 4 groups depending on duration of neuroleptic treatment: group 1 — <10 years, group 2 — 11-20 years; group 3 — 21-30 years, group 4 — >30 years. ECG-disorders and left ventricular morphometric data were analyzed. Сorrelation analysis of myocardium morphological changes and electrophysiological disorders was performed. Results. The dependence of morphometric myocardium changes on the treatment duration was found: increase in stromal-parenchymal ratio (from 9.9±4.1% to 80.0±10.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of atrophied cardiomyocytes (from 8.0±3.8% to 45.1±12.6% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of degenerative cardiomyocytes (from 5.2±3.1% to 35.2±12.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively. Increased incidence of extrasystole detection (from 2.2% to 11.2% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, as well as left anterior fascicular block (from 1.1% to 25.9% in groups 1 and 2, respectively and left ventricle hypertrophy (from 2.2% to 18.5% in groups 1 and 4, respectively were found. A strong positive correlation (r=0.88–0.99 was revealed between antipsychotic treatment duration and ECG disorders, as well as between morphological myocardium state and ECG disorders. Conclusion. Awareness about the neuroleptic-depended ECG changes is necessary for early diagnosis, secondary prevention and correction of existing heart disorders due to cardiotoxic side effects of antipsychotic drugs.

  6. Olanzapine and fluoxetine administration and coadministration increase rat hippocampal pregnenolone, allopregnanolone and peripheral deoxycorticosterone: implications for therapeutic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Khisti, Rahul T; Trost, William T; Bradford, Daniel W; Grobin, A Chistina; Massing, Mark W; Madison, Roger D; Butterfield, Marian I; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Morrow, A Leslie

    2006-08-01

    Olanzapine and fluoxetine elevate the GABAergic neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone to physiologically relevant concentrations in rodent cerebral cortex. It is unknown if these agents also alter pregnenolone or deoxycorticosterone. Since olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination have clinical utility and may demonstrate synergistic effects, we investigated neuroactive steroid alterations following olanzapine, fluoxetine or coadministration. Male rats received IP vehicle, olanzapine, fluoxetine or the combination of both agents in higher-dose (0, 10, 20 or 10/20 mg/kg, respectively) and lower-dose (0, 5, 10 or 5/10 mg/kg, respectively) experiments. Pregnenolone and allopregnanolone levels in hippocampus were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Peripheral deoxycorticosterone and other steroid levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Olanzapine, fluoxetine or the combination increased hippocampal pregnenolone and serum deoxycorticosterone in both higher- and lower-dose experiments, and elevated hippocampal allopregnanolone in higher-dose conditions. No synergistic effects on pregnenolone or allopregnanolone were observed following olanzapine and fluoxetine coadministration compared to either compound alone. Pregnenolone and its sulfate enhance learning and memory in rodent models, and therefore pregnenolone elevations may be relevant to cognitive changes in psychotic and affective disorders. Since pregnenolone decreases have been linked to depression, it is possible that olanzapine- and fluoxetine-induced pregnenolone elevations may contribute to the antidepressant actions of these agents.

  7. Metabolic and neurological complications of second-generation antipsychotic use in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Lam, Darren; Ching, Heidi; Patten, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Available evidence indicates that the use of antipsychotics, especially second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), for children with mental health disorders has increased dramatically. Given the demonstrated metabolic and neurological adverse effects seen in adult patients on these medications, detailed evaluation of the risk for these adverse effects in children is appropriate. The aim of the study was to assess the evidence for specific metabolic and neurological adverse effects associated with the use of SGAs in children. MEDLINE (1996-May 2010) and EMBASE (1996-May 2010) databases were searched using highly sensitive search strategies for clinical trials in a paediatric population (children up to age 18 years). We included any double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of SGA medications conducted specifically in a paediatric population for the treatment of a mental health disorder. This included the medications risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, clozapine, ziprasidone and paliperidone. The primary outcomes assessed for this review were metabolic and neurological adverse effects, as measured using physical examination manoeuvres, rating scales or laboratory tests. A total of 35 RCTs were included in the analysis, but not all studies had data that could be used in the meta-analysis. Abstracts retrieved from the searches were reviewed independently by two different reviewers for potential relevant articles. Full-text articles were then read in detail independently by two different reviewers to see if inclusion criteria were fulfilled. Data were extracted independently by two review authors from included studies and entered onto pre-designed summary forms. Clinical trials were evaluated for methodological quality using quality criteria developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Based on the fulfilment of quality criteria, studies were rated as good, fair or poor. Meta-analysis was performed on the data for synthesis, and was carried out

  8. Olanzapine vs. Risperidone in Treating Aggressive Behaviours in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Single Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore, M.; Bertelli, M.; Villani, D.; Tamborini, S.; Rossi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aggressive behaviour represents a frequent symptom in people with intellectual disability (PWID). Despite uncertain evidence of effectiveness, the use of antipsychotics (APs) drugs to treat aggressive behaviour is very common. Antipsychotic medication of aggressivity in PWID has recently become one of the most debated issues in mental…

  9. Olanzapine treatment of adolescent rats alters adult reward behaviour and nucleus accumbens function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinish, M.; Elnabawi, A.; Milstein, J.A.; Burke, J.S.; Kallevang, J.K.; Turek, K.C.; Lansink, C.S.; Merchenthaler, I.; Bailey, A.M.; Kolb, B.; Cheer, J.F.; Frost, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly used in children and adolescents to treat a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, little is known about the long-term effects of early life antipsychotic drug (APD) treatment. Most APDs are potent antagonists or partial agonists of dopamine (DA) D₂

  10. Efficacy and safety of blonanserin versus other antipsychotics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Anant D. Patil

    2013-01-01

    Although many atypical antipsychotics are available, there is a need of an atypical antipsychotic effective in all symptom domains of schizophrenia and well tolerated especially for side effects like extrapyramidal side effects, weight gain and blood prolactin elevation. Blonanserin is an atypical antipsychotic which blocks dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors. Its efficacy and safety has been studied in patients with schizophrenia and delirium. Blonanserin is found to be effective and w...

  11. Serum prolactin levels and sexual dysfunctions in antipsychotic medication, such as risperidone : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegtering, H; Lambers, PA; Prakken, G; ten Brink, C

    Classical antipsychotic drugs increase the level of serum prolactin. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine barely increases prolactin levels. An open naturalistic study in the University Hospital of Groningen suggests that treatment with risperidone in comparison to classical antipsychotics seems to

  12. Risk of Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Older Patients with Diabetes Using Antipsychotic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Kris; van der Linden, Paul D; Souverein, Patrick C; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Toine; Knol, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antipsychotics may disrupt metabolic regulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The risk of hypoglycemia in older users of antipsychotics with diabetes is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the use of antipsychotic drugs and hypoglycemia requiring

  13. A rare case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome presenting with serious hyperthermia treated with a non-invasive cooling device: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A rare side effect of antipsychotic medication is neuroleptic malignant syndrome, mainly characterized by hyperthermia, altered mental state, haemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase and rigor. There may be multi-organ dysfunction including renal and hepatic failure as well as serious rhabdomyolysis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The prevalence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome is between 0.02% and 2.44% for patients taking neuroleptics and it is not necessary to fulfil all cardinal features characterizing the syndrome to be diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Because of other different life-threatening diseases matching the various clinical findings, the correct diagnosis can sometimes be hard to make. A special problem of intensive care treatment is the management of severe hyperthermia. Lowering of body temperature, however, may be a major clinical problem because hyperthermia in neuroleptic malignant syndrome is typically unresponsive to antipyretic agents while manual cooling proves difficult due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Case presentation A 22-year-old Caucasian man was admitted unconscious with a body temperature of 42°C, elevated serum creatine phosphokinase, tachycardia and hypotonic blood pressure. In addition to intensive care standard therapy for coma and shock, a non-invasive cooling device (Arctic Sun 2000®, Medivance Inc., USA, originally designed to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was used to lower body temperature. After successful treatment it became possible to obtain information from the patient about his recent ambulant treatment with Olanzapin (Zyprexa® for schizophrenia. Conclusion Numerous case reports have been published about patients who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome due to Olanzapin (Zyprexa® medication. Frequently hyperthermia has been observed

  14. [Prolactin, antipsychotics and breast cancer: is there a connection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, T; Detraux, J; De Hert, M

    The use of antipsychotics can result in elevated prolactin levels or hyperprolactinemia. An increasing number of studies suggests that prolactin plays a role in mammary carcinogenesis, leading to concerns about a possible relationship between antipsychotics and breast cancer. To provide an overview of recent literature regarding the relationship between prolactin, antipsychotics and breast cancer and an association between schizophrenia and breast cancer. We used PubMed to search for English- or Dutch-language articles concerning breast cancer risk (factors), prolactin, antipsychotics and schizophrenia. Studies have not shown any causal link between antipsychotics and the development of breastcancer. Moreover, antipsychotic medication seems to have no influence on locally produced prolactin - which some experts believe plays a role in the tumor genesis - and certain antipsychotics actually provide protection against breast cancer. There are conflicting reports on the prevalence of breast cancer among patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, research has revealed that several well-known risk factors for breast cancer (such as an unhealthy lifestyle) are more prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. There is no conclusive evidence that antipsychotic medication that raises prolactin levels increases the risk of breast cancer. Nevertheless, clinicians should always be cautious about prescribing antipsychotics for breast cancer patients. In our view, clinicians should always treat breast cancer risk factors as efficiently as possible, particularly when attending to patients who have schizophrenia.

  15. Olanzapine has better efficacy compared to risperidone for treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both treatments were well-tolerated and efficacious. Greater reductions in severity of the illness and negative symptoms were seen with olanzapine consistently through 1 year. The frequency and severity of extrapyramidal symptoms were negligible and similar in the two treatment groups. Weight gain, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia were comparable in both groups. Risperidone produced significant hyperprolactinemia.

  16. Open-label study of olanzapine in children with pervasive developmental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemner, C.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Jonge, M.J.A. de; Tuynman-Qua, H.G.; Engeland, H.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The effects of olanzapine on the symptomatology of children with pervasive developmental disorder with emphasis on problems of communication and the safety of the drug were investigated in a 3-month open-label, open-dosage study. Participating in the study were 25 children age 6 to 16 years with a

  17. Effect of Olanzapine on Clinical and Polysomnography Profiles in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zia Ul Haq Katshu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and short-term administration of olanzapine has a favorable effect on sleep in schizophrenia patients. This study aimed to clarify the effect of olanzapine on polysomnographic profiles of schizophrenia patients during the acute phase of illness after controlling for previous drug exposure. Twenty-five drug-naïve or drug-free schizophrenia patients were assessed at baseline and after six weeks of olanzapine treatment on Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, and Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser (UKU side-effect rating scale and a whole-night polysomnography; fifteen patients completed the study. There was a significant reduction in all psychopathological variables with maximum reduction in PANSS total, BPRS total, and PANSS positive scores. A significant increase in total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, nonrapid eye movement (NREM stage 1 duration, stage 3 duration, stage 4 duration, and stage 4 percentage of TST, number of rapid eye movement (REM periods, REM duration, and REM percentage of TST was observed. REM latency at baseline inversely predicted the reduction in BPRS total and PANSS total and positive scores. In summary, short-term treatment with olanzapine produced significant improvement in clinical and polysomnography profiles of patients with schizophrenia with shorter REM latency predicting a good clinical response.

  18. Pharmacological treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Newton-Howes, Giles; Clarke, Mike J

    2017-01-24

    Antipsychotic-related constipation is a common and serious adverse effect, especially for people taking clozapine. Clozapine has been shown to impede gastrointestinal motility, leading to constipation, and has been reported in up to 60% of patients receiving clozapine. In rare cases, complications can be fatal. Appropriate laxatives should be prescribed to treat constipation in people taking antipsychotics, but there is a lack of guidance on the comparative effectiveness and harms of different agents in this population. An understanding of the effectiveness and safety of treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation is important for clinicians and patients alike. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatment (versus placebo or compared against another treatment) for antipsychotic-related constipation (defined as constipated patients of any age, who are treated with antipsychotics, regardless of dose, in which constipation is considered to be an antipsychotic-related side effect). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (15 June 2015), which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, PubMed, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials, grey literature, and conference proceedings. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in this register. We also handsearched bibliographies and contacted relevant authors for additional information. We included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of pharmacological treatments in patients with antipsychotic-related constipation. Pharmacological treatments included laxatives and other medicines that could reasonably be used to combat constipation in this population (e.g. anticholinergic agents, like bethanecol). Two review authors independently extracted data from all included studies and assessed trials for risk of bias. A third author reviewed

  19. Effects of prenatal exposure to antipsychotic risperidone on developmental neurotoxicity, apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral sequelae in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K P; Singh, Manoj Kr; Singh, Manish

    2016-08-01

    A tremendous increase has been documented in the recent past in prescribing second generation atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) to the pregnant women with psychosis, considering their reproductive and teratogenic safety. Among AAPDs, risperidone (RIS) ranked third after olanzapine (OLZ) and quetiapine (QUE) used during pregnancy, as OLZ is associated to substantial weight gain in adults and offspring. Although teratogenic safety of RIS has been established, its potential role in developmental neurotoxicity and related neurobehavioral impairments in adolescents has not been documented so far. Therefore, present study has been undertaken to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to risperidone (RIS) on developmental neurotoxicity and apoptotic neurodegeneration in neocortical region of fetal brain; and related functional sequelae in young rat offspring. The pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to RIS at 0.8, 1.0 and 2.0mg/kg, at equivalent therapeutic doses, orally from GD 6 to 21. Half of the pregnant rats were sacrificed and their brains were collected, weighed, and processed for neurohistopathological and apoptotic neurodegenerative evaluation. The remaining dams were allowed to deliver naturally, and their offspring were reared up to 10 weeks for neurobehavioral study. Prenatal exposure to RIS induced significant stunting of fetal body and brain weight, substantial reduction in the thickness of neocortical layers and apoptotic neurodegeneration in fetal brains, and delayed postnatal development and growth of the offspring; as well as long- lasting impact on anxiety like impaired behavioral responses on explorative mazes. Therefore, health care providers should be careful in prescribing atypical antipsychotics in general and RIS in particular, to the pregnant psychotic population. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The threshold rate of oral atypical anti-psychotic adherence at which paliperidone palmitate is cost saving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Natalie C; Muser, Erik; Doshi, Dilesh; Fastenau, John

    2012-01-01

    To identify, estimate, and compare 'real world' costs and outcomes associated with paliperidone palmitate compared with branded oral atypical anti-psychotics, and to estimate the threshold rate of oral atypical adherence at which paliperidone palmitate is cost saving. Decision analytic modeling techniques developed by Glazer and Ereshefsky have previously been used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of depot haloperidol, LAI risperidone, and, more recently, LAI olanzapine. This study used those same techniques, along with updated comparative published clinical data, to evaluate paliperidone palmitate. Adherence rates were based on strict Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) criteria. The evaluation was conducted from the perspective of US healthcare payers. Paliperidone palmitate patients had fewer mean annual days of relapse (8.7 days; 6.0 requiring hospitalization, 2.7 not requiring hospitalization vs 17.8 days; 12.4 requiring hospitalization, 5.4 not requiring hospitalization), and lower annual total cost ($20,995) compared to oral atypicals (mean $22,481). Because paliperidone palmitate was both more effective and less costly, it is considered economically dominant. Paliperidone palmitate saved costs when the rate of adherence of oral atypical anti-psychotics was below 44.9% using strict MEMS criteria. Sensitivity analyses showed results were robust to changes in parameter values. For patients receiving 156 mg paliperidone palmitate, the annual incremental cost was $1216 per patient (ICER = $191 per day of relapse averted). Inclusion of generic risperidone (market share 18.6%) also resulted in net incremental cost for paliperidone palmitate ($120; ICER = $13). Limitations of this evaluation include use of simplifying assumptions, data from multiple sources, and generalizability of results. Although uptake of LAIs in the US has not been as rapid as elsewhere, many thought leaders emphasize their importance in optimizing outcomes in patients with

  1. Efeitos adversos metabólicos de antipsicóticos e estabilizadores de humor Metabolic side effects of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Ribeiro Teixeira

    2006-08-01

    use of lithium and valproic acid once again directed the attention to their metabolic effects. This study aims to review the medical literature with regard to metabolic side effects associated with the use of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. METHOD: Research was carried out at MEDLINE and LILACS through October 2005. CONCLUSION: Metabolic side effects remain a major concern for psychopharmacology. Clinically relevant weight gain occurs frequently in patients taking antipsychotics and mood stabilizers, particularly clozapine, olanzapine, lithium, and valproic acid. Clozapine and olanzapine are also associated with higher incidence of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemias, either due to weight gain or because of a direct deleterious action on glucose metabolism. Incidence of obesity and other metabolic disorders is lower with risperidone when compared to olanzapine or clozapine. Carbamazepine is associated with lower weight gain when compared to lithium or valproic acid. Drugs such as haloperidol, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and lamotrigine are not associated with significant weight gain or with higher incidence of diabetes mellitus. They are alternatives for patients more likely to develop these adverse effects.

  2. Prolactin-Elevating Antipsychotics and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Yin, Hui; Abenhaim, Haim A; du Fort, Guillaume Galbaud; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    The use of antipsychotics may increase the risk of endometrial cancer through elevation of prolactin levels. We investigated the association between antipsychotics that are known to cause prolactin elevation and the risk of endometrial cancer. In data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink, all women who were newly treated with antipsychotics from 1990-2013 were identified and followed until 2014. Within this cohort of antipsychotic users, a nested case-control analysis was conducted. Main exposure was nonsporadic use of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics, and the active comparator was prolactin-sparing antipsychotics. Cases were women newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer (ICD-10) matched with up to 20 controls on age, calendar year of cohort entry, linkability to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository, and duration of follow-up. Conditional logistic regression models were used to determine the association of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics and endometrial cancer compared with prolactin-sparing antipsychotics. All analyses were adjusted for relevant potential confounders, including smoking, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. The cohort included 65,930 women. During 366,112 person-years of follow-up, there were 139 cases of endometrial cancer (incidence rate: 38/100,000 person-years), which were matched to 1,603 controls. Compared with the use of prolactin-sparing antipsychotics, the use of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics was not associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.48). These findings remained similar with different durations of use (≤ 1 year, aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 0.64-1.78, and > 1 year, aOR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.58-1.54) and were robust to various sensitivity analyses. Prolactin-elevating antipsychotics were not associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Morbid Obesity and Use of Second Generation Antipsychotics among Adolescents in Foster Care: Evidence from Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Benjamin T; Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S

    2016-08-01

    Many adolescents enter foster care with high body mass index (BMI), and patterns of treatment further exacerbate the risk of morbid obesity. A principal risk factor for such exacerbation is the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We examine the association between receiving a morbid obesity diagnosis and SGA prescriptions among adolescents in foster care. We analyzed claims from 36 states' Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) files for 2000 through 2003. Obesity diagnoses were ascertained through a primary or secondary diagnosis claim of morbid obesity. Covariates included gender, race/ethnicity. age, insurance status, state obesity rate, and state fixed effects. We calculated relative risks of a diagnosis based upon four SGAs (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone) associated with obesity and a polypharmacy indicator. Of the 1,261,806 foster care adolescent-years in the MAX files, 6,517 were diagnosed with morbid obesity, an annual prevalence of 0.5%. The risk of a morbid obesity diagnosis is much higher for female and non-white adolescents. The risk increases with age. Quetiapine and clozapine increased the risk of a morbid obesity diagnosis more than 2.5 times, and two or more psychotropic drugs (polypharmacy) increased the risk fivefold. Adolescents in foster care are much more likely to be on SGA medications, and therefore may be more susceptible to weight gain and obesity. Given that SGA prescribing for younger populations has only expanded since these data were released, our study may actually understate the magnitude of the problem. Care is needed when prescribing SGAs for foster care adolescents.

  4. Increased orbitofrontal cortex activation associated with “pro-obsessive” antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmbeck, Frederike; Mier, Daniela; Esslinger, Christine; Rausch, Franziska; Englisch, Susanne; Eifler, Sarah; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kirsch, Peter; Zink, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia have an approximately 10-fold higher risk for obsessive–compulsive symptoms (OCS) than the general population. A large subgroup seems to experience OCS as a consequence of second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGA), such as clozapine. So far little is known about underlying neural mechanisms. Methods To investigate the role of SGA treatment on neural processing related to OCS in patients with schizophrenia, we stratified patients according to their monotherapy into 2 groups (group I: clozapine or olanzapine; group II: amisulpride or aripiprazole). We used an fMRI approach, applying a go/no-go task assessing inhibitory control and an n-back task measuring working memory. Results We enrolled 21 patients in group I and 19 patients in group II. Groups did not differ regarding age, sex, education or severity of psychotic symptoms. Frequency and severity of OCS were significantly higher in group I and were associated with pronounced deficits in specific cognitive abilities. Whereas brain activation patterns did not differ during working memory, group I showed significantly increased activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during response inhibition. Alterations in OFC activation were associated with the severity of obsessions and mediated the association between SGA treatment and co-occurring OCS on a trend level. Limitations The main limitation of this study is its cross-sectional design. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first imaging study conducted to elucidate SGA effects on neural systems related to OCS. We propose that alterations in brain functioning reflect a pathogenic mechanism in the development of SGA-induced OCS in patients with schizophrenia. Longitudinal studies and randomized interventions are needed to prove the suggested causal interrelations. PMID:25268790

  5. Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes - Risperidone compared with low- and high-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, [No Value; de Boer, A; Herings, RMC; Roos, RAC; Jansen, PAF; Leufkens, HGM

    Aim: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) between patients using risperidone and those using low-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in outpatient clinical practice, as measured by the use of anticholinergic medication. We tried to replicate results from previous

  6. Relationships among neurocognition, symptoms and functioning in patients with schizophrenia: a path-analytic approach for associations at baseline and following 24 weeks of antipsychotic drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keefe Richard SE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurocognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms have been associated with deficits in psychosocial and occupational functioning in patients with schizophrenia. This post-hoc analysis evaluates the relationships among cognition, psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning in patients with schizophrenia at baseline and following sustained treatment with antipsychotic drugs. Methods Data were obtained from a clinical trial assessing the cognitive effects of selected antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia. Patients were randomly assigned to 24 weeks of treatment with olanzapine (n = 159, risperidone (n = 158, or haloperidol (n = 97. Psychosocial functioning was assessed with the Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale [QLS], cognition with a standard battery of neurocognitive tests; and psychiatric symptoms with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS]. A path-analytic approach was used to evaluate the effects of changes in cognitive functioning on subdomains of quality of life, and to determine whether such effects were direct or mediated via changes in psychiatric symptoms. Results At baseline, processing speed affected functioning mainly indirectly via negative symptoms. Positive symptoms also affected functioning at baseline although independent of cognition. At 24 weeks, changes in processing speed affected changes in functioning both directly and indirectly via PANSS negative subscale scores. Positive symptoms no longer contributed to the path-analytic models. Although a consistent relationship was observed between processing speed and the 3 functional domains, variation existed as to whether the paths were direct and/or indirect. Working memory and verbal memory did not significantly contribute to any of the path-analytic models studied. Conclusion Processing speed demonstrated direct and indirect effects via negative symptoms on three domains of functioning as measured by the QLS at baseline and

  7. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of dialectical behavior therapy plus olanzapine for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Joaquim; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Campins, Josefa; Barrachina, Judith; Puigdemont, Dolors; Alvarez, Enrique; Pérez, Victor

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of dialectical behavior therapy plus olanzapine compared with dialectical behavior therapy plus placebo in patients with borderline personality disorder. Sixty patients with borderline personality disorder were included in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. All patients received dialectical behavior therapy and were randomly assigned to receive either olanzapine or placebo following a 1-month baseline period. Seventy percent of the patients completed the 4-month trial. Combined treatment showed an overall improvement in most symptoms studied in both groups. Olanzapine was associated with a statistically significant improvement over placebo in depression, anxiety, and impulsivity/aggressive behavior. The mean dose of olanzapine was 8.83 mg/day. A combined psychotherapeutic plus pharmacological approach appears to lower dropout rates and constitutes an effective treatment for borderline personality disorder.

  8. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. METHODS: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation...... of Medication) was a 2-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with the treatment of mania. Severity of mania and depression were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks using the YMRS and the 5-item version of the HAMD, respectively. RESULTS: 621 patients were analysed (n=107 valproate, n......=514 olanzapine). Both groups improved from baseline to 6 weeks in mean YMRS and HAMD-5 total scores, with greater mean improvements in the olanzapine compared with the valproate group. Olanzapine was associated with more weight gain and less gastrointestinal difficulties than valproate. DISCUSSION...

  9. Schizophrenia symptoms and functioning in patients receiving long-term treatment with olanzapine long-acting injection formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuskens, Joseph; Porsdal, Vibeke; Pecenak, Jan

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This analysis of pooled data evaluates maintenance treatment outcomes of patients with schizophrenia receiving maintenance treatment with olanzapine long-acting injection (OLAI) by means of a categorical approach addressing the symptomatic and functional status of patients...

  10. Economic evaluations of novel antipsychotic medications: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Teresa J; Sullivan, Greer; Feng, Weiwei; Owen, Richard R; Thrush, Carol R

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence that novel antipsychotic medications offer a cost advantage compared to traditional antipsychotic medications. Literature for this review was identified through a computerized search of Medline, Healthstar and Psyc-INFO databases inclusive from January 1989 to January 2002. Articles included in the review were required to include cost evaluation and to be published in peer-reviewed journals. Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria. All five studies that used experimental designs found that second-generation antipsychotic medications were associated with a cost advantage or were cost-neutral, and, in some cases, improved quality of life. Of the ten studies using a pre-post design, four found an increase in total costs, six reported a decrease in total costs, and four reported increased effectiveness with use of a second-generation antipsychotic. All seven of the simulation studies reported a cost advantage for novel antipsychotics for specific patient populations under certain conditions. The majority of studies found that novel antipsychotics are at least cost-neutral and may offer cost advantages compared to traditional agents. Some studies also reported greater improvement in effectiveness and quality of life when novel antipsychotics were compared to traditional antipsychotic medications. However, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions given the small sample sizes and limited study designs available in this literature.

  11. Adherence of mentally stable patients to antipsychotic medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study indicated that participants shared same viewpoints related to aspects of adherence to antipsychotic treatment; the mentally stable patients have knowledge related to the causes of mental illness; poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment results from the health seeking behaviour of the patients.

  12. Antipsychotic use in elderly patients and the risk of pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambassi, Giovanni; Sultana, Janet; Trifirò, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotics are frequently and increasingly prescribed off-label for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with dementia, despite their modest efficacy. Instead, the safety profile of antipsychotics has been questioned repeatedly in recent years with various concerns, including death. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials found that one of the major causes of death associated with atypical antipsychotics use was pneumonia. Only few observational studies, however, have investigated the risk of pneumonia in elderly patients, especially among those receiving conventional antipsychotics. The aim of this editorial is to synthesize the current evidence from observational studies regarding the risk of pneumonia in elderly patients receiving either conventional or atypical antipsychotics. The studies conducted so far document that the risk of pneumonia is two- to threefold increased in a dose-dependent fashion with both classes compared to nonuse, with a possibly higher risk attributable to atypical antipsychotics. The risk seems to peak at the beginning of treatment (e.g., 7 - 30 days), and dissipates over time for both conventional and atypical antipsychotics. The risk-benefit ratio suggests that there will be 1 excess hospitalization for pneumonia for every 2 - 5 patients receiving any clinical improvement in symptoms. Considering the modest improvement in terms of efficacy, the risks associated with antipsychotics in elderly patients may outweigh their benefit.

  13. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, J.; Vardar, S; Cicek, R.; Bos, H. J.; Hoekstra, P. J.; de Vries, T. W.; Hak, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. Methods:

  14. Treatment of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Antipsychotic Medication: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Antonia; Baretic, Maja; Osvatic, Martina Matovinovic; Filipcic, Igor; Jovanovic, Nikolina; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic

    2017-10-01

    The second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation, which may be associated with the use of SGAs. This study aims to review published reports of patients with schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug-associated DKA, focusing on the effective management of both conditions. Using a predefined search strategy, we searched PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to July 2016. The search terms were related to "diabetic ketoacidosis" and "antipsychotic medication." Case reports, case series, and reviews of case series written in English language were included in the review. Sixty-five reports were analyzed. In most patients who developed antipsychotic-associated DKA, 1 or more suspected antipsychotic medications were discontinued. In 5 cases, a rechallenge test was trialed, and in only 1 case, it resulted in the elevation of blood glucose. The majority was subsequently treated with a different SGA in combination with insulin/oral hypoglycemic agents; although approximately a third of patients had a complete resolution of symptoms or could control diabetes with diet only at the point of discharge. Patients taking antipsychotic medications should be regularly screened for insulin resistance and educated about potential complications of antipsychotic medications. This will allow clinicians to individualize treatment decisions and reduce iatrogenic contribution to morbidity and mortality. To achieve best treatment outcomes, antipsychotic-induced DKA should be treated jointly by psychiatry and endocrinology teams.

  15. Determination of antipsychotic drug in human serum by radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinchang; Jiang Yimin

    1989-01-01

    Serum antipsychotic drug in 50 psychosis cases were measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and the values were compared in parallel with that by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results showed that the RRA values were lower than the RIA values, but both assays gave significant correlation between the serum drug level and antipsychotic dose

  16. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics | Zullino | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The newer atypical antipsychotics are prescribed because of their enhanced safety profiles and their larger pharmacological profile in comparison to the conventional antipsychotics. This has led to broad off-label utilisation. The aim of the present survey was to study the prescribing practice of hospital psychiatrists ...

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of “High Dose” Antipsychotic Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: High dose antipsychotic prescribing is common in psychiatric care, despite a lack of its benefit from research evidence. While several studies have explored the prevalence and factors associated with high dose antipsychotic prescribing, no such report has emanated from a developing country like Nigeria.

  18. Enhancing the aqueous solubility and dissolution of olanzapine using freeze-drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Dixit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop an olanzapine freeze-dried tablet (FDT. The solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble olanzapine was improved by preparing a freeze-dried tablet of olanzapine using the freeze-drying technique . The FDT was prepared by dispersing the drug in an aqueous solution of highly water-soluble carrier materials consisting of gelatin, glycine, and sorbitol. The mixture was poured in to the pockets of blister packs and then was subjected to freezing and lyophilisation. The FDT was characterised by DSC, XRD and SEM and was evaluated for saturation solubility and dissolution. The samples were stored in a stability chamber to investigate their physical stability. Results obtained by DSC and X-ray were analysed and showed the crystalline state of olanzapine in FDT transformation to the amorphous state during the formation of FDT. Scanning electron microscope (SEM results suggest reduction in olanzapine particle size. The solubility of olanzapine from the FDT was observed to be nearly four and a half times greater than the pure drug. Results obtained from dissolution studies showed that olanzapine FDT significantly improved the dissolution rate of the drug compared with the physical mixture (PM and the pure drug. More than 90% of olanzapine in FDT dissolved within 5 minutes, compared to only 19.78% of olanzapine pure drug dissolved over the course of 60 minutes. In a stability test, the release profile of the FDT was unchanged, as compared to the freshly prepared FDT after 90 days of storing.O objetivo do presente estudo foi desenvolver comprimidos liofilizados de olanzapina (FDT. A solubilidade e a taxa de dissolução da olanzapina, fracamente solúvel em água, foram melhoradas com a preparação de comprimidos liofilizados de olanzapina usando a técnica de liofilização. O FDT foi preparado por dispersão do fármaco em solução aquosa de materiais altamente solúveis em água, como gelatina

  19. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. METHODS: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation......: The EMBLEM results support those of the RCT, which suggest that olanzapine monotherapy seems to be more effective than valproate monotherapy in the treatment of acute mania....

  20. [ADD psychosis: treatment with antipsychotics and methylphenidate?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, J D; Kooij, J J S

    2012-01-01

    Two patients with a psychotic disorder who also met the diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD were treated with antipsychotics and methylphenidate. The first patient remained stable for many years with this combination treatment, whereas the second became psychotic several months after he had increased the dose of methylphenidate and had started to use cocaine. In the light of these two case studies, we have reviewed the literature on ADD psychosis, and we formulate recommendations regarding the specialised treatment needed for this uncommon disorder.

  1. Improvement of Brain Reward Abnormalities by Antipsychotic Monotherapy in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT Schizophrenic symptoms are linked to a dysfunction of dopamine neurotransmission and the brain reward system. However, it remains unclear whether antipsychotic treatment, which blocks dopamine transmission, improves, alters, or even worsens the reward-related abnormalities. OBJECTIVE...... To investigate changes in reward-related brain activations in schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic monotherapy with a dopamine D2/D3 antagonist. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING Psychiatric inpatients and outpatients in the Capital Region of Denmark. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-three antipsychotic...... with the antipsychotic compound amisulpride. Controls were followed up without treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Task-related blood oxygen level-dependent activations as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after antipsychotic treatment. RESULTS At baseline, patients, as compared with controls...

  2. Effect of Liraglutide Treatment on Prediabetes and Overweight or Obesity in Clozapine- or Olanzapine-Treated Patients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Julie R; Vedtofte, Louise; Jakobsen, Mathilde S L; Jespersen, Hans R; Jakobsen, Michelle I; Svensson, Camilla K; Koyuncu, Kamuran; Schjerning, Ole; Oturai, Peter S; Kjaer, Andreas; Nielsen, Jimmi; Holst, Jens J; Ekstrøm, Claus T; Correll, Christoph U; Vilsbøll, Tina; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2017-07-01

    Compared with the general population, patients with schizophrenia have a 2- to 3-fold higher mortality rate primarily caused by cardiovascular disease. Previous interventions designed to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and cardiometabolic disturbances reported limited effects. To determine the effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide added to clozapine or olanzapine treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This randomized clinical double-blind trial enrolled participants at 2 clinical sites in Denmark. Of 214 eligible participants with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, 103 were randomized to liraglutide or placebo. Participants received stable treatment with clozapine or olanzapine, were overweight or obese, and had prediabetes. Data were collected from May 1, 2013, through February 25, 2016. Treatment for 16 weeks with once-daily subcutaneous injection of liraglutide or placebo. Trial drug therapy was titrated during the first 2 weeks of the study. The primary end point was change in glucose tolerance estimated by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test result. Secondary end points included change in body weight and cardiometabolic parameters. Of the 103 patients undergoing randomization (60 men [58.3%] and 43 women [41.7%]), 97 were included in the efficacy analysis, with a mean (SD) age of 42.5 (10.5) years and mean (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 33.8 (5.9). The liraglutide and placebo groups had comparable characteristics (mean [SD] age, 42.1 [10.7] vs 43.0 [10.5] years; 30 men in each group; mean [SD] body mass index, 33.7 [5.1] vs 33.9 [6.6]). A total of 96 randomized participants (93.2%) completed the trial. Glucose tolerance improved in the liraglutide group compared with the placebo group (P < .001). Altogether, 30 liraglutide-treated participants (63.8%) developed normal glucose tolerance compared with 8 placebo-treated participants (16.0%) (P

  3. Comparing the side effect profile of the Atypical Antipsychotics | Alao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postclozapine, l'Administration de la nourriture et de la Drogue (FDA) avait ratifié l'utilisation de quatre antipsychotique, atypique, risperidone, olanzapine quetiapine et ziprasidone tout neufs pour le traitement de schizophrénie. En conséquence de leur double récepteur obstruction fonctions, le sérotonine, et dopamine, ...

  4. Volumetric changes in the Basal Ganglia after antipsychotic monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, B H; Nørbak, H; Borgwardt, S

    2013-01-01

    studies. Results: We identified 13 studies published in the period from 1996 to 2011. Overall six compounds (two classified as FGAs and four as SGAs) have been investigated: haloperidol, zuclophentixol, risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine, and quetiapine. The follow-up period ranged from 3-24 months...

  5. The Safety of Second-Generation Antipsychotics During Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Per; Videbech, Poul

    2018-01-01

    exposed to an SGA during pregnancy. In utero exposure to aripiprazole, olanzapine, and quetiapine is not associated with increased risks of major congenital malformations, whereas risperidone and paliperidone may be associated with a very minor increased risk of congenital malformations. Safety data...

  6. Olanzapine does not enhance cognition in non-agitated and non-psychotic patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John; Deberdt, Walter; Siegal, Alan; Micca, Joseph; Degenhardt, Elisabeth; Ahl, Jonna; Meyers, Adam; Kaiser, Christopher; Baker, Robert W

    2005-11-01

    This was an exploratory study of olanzapine as potential treatment for improvement in cognition in patients with Alzheimer's disease without prominent psychobehavioral symptoms. Non-psychotic/non-agitated patients (n = 268) with Alzheimer's disease, who had baseline Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores of 14-26 were randomized to treatment with olanzapine (2.5 to 7.5 mg/d) or placebo for 26 weeks. The primary objectives were to determine if treatment with olanzapine improved cognition as indexed by the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale for Cognition (ADAS-Cog) and the Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Change (CIBIC) after 26 weeks of therapy. Patients treated with olanzapine vs placebo experienced significant worsening ADAS-Cog scores at weeks 12 (p = 0.03) and 26 (p = 0.004). Changes in CIBIC scores were not significantly different between treatment groups at either assessment. A post hoc analysis revealed that olanzapine-treated patients with more cognitive impairment at baseline (MMSE scores of 14-18) (n = 35) experienced significantly greater deterioration in ADAS-Cog performance than patients in the placebo group (n = 24; p cognitive impairment (n = 78, baseline MMSE scores of 23-26) between-group ADAS-Cog changes were not significant. In this 26-week study non-psychotic/non-agitated patients with Alzheimer's disease treated with olanzapine experienced significant worsening of cognition as compared to placebo. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Antipsychotic use in nursing homes varies by psychiatric consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Lemay, Celeste; Mazor, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Kanaan, Abir; Donovan, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Briesacher, Becky

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between psychiatric consultation and antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes (NH) is unknown. To identify the association between psychiatric consultant groups and NH-level antipsychotic prescribing after adjustment for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Nested cross-sectional study of 60 NHs in a cluster randomized trial. We linked facility leadership surveys to October 2009-September 2010 Minimum Data Set, Nursing Home Compare, the US Census, and pharmacy dispensing data. The main exposure is the psychiatric consultant group and the main outcome is NH-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use. We calculated annual means and interquartile ranges of NH-level antipsychotic use for each consultant group and arrayed consultant groups from lowest to highest prevalence. Generalized linear models were used to predict antipsychotic prescribing adjusting for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Observed versus predicted antipsychotic prescribing levels were compared for each consultant group. Seven psychiatric consultant groups served a range of 3-27 study facilities. Overall mean facility-level antipsychotic prescribing was 19.2%. Mean prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing ranged from 12.2% (SD, 5.8) in the lowest consultant group to 26.4% (SD, 3.6) in the highest group. All facilities served by the highest-ranked consultant group had observed antipsychotic levels exceeding the overall study mean with half exceeding predictions for on-label indications, whereas most facilities served by the lowest-ranked consultant group had observed levels below the overall study and predicted means. Preliminary evidence suggests that psychiatric consultant groups affect NH antipsychotic prescribing independent of resident case-mix and facility characteristics.

  8. Validation of a claims-based antipsychotic polypharmacy measure†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman-Westin, Emily; Kealey, Edith; Gupta, Nitin; Chen, Qingxian; Gerhard, Tobias; Crystal, Stephen; Olfson, Mark; Finnerty, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the metabolic and neurologic side effects of antipsychotics and concerns about the increased risks associated with concomitant use, antipsychotic polypharmacy is a quality concern. This study assessed the operating characteristics of a Medicaid claims-based measure of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods A random sample from 10 public mental health clinics and 312 patients met criteria for this study. Medical record extractors were blind to measure status. We examined the prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) in Medicaid claims, testing nine different definitions of antipsychotic polypharmacy, including >14, >60, or >90 days concurrent use of ≥2 antipsychotic agents, each with allowable gaps of up to 0, 14, or 32 days in days’ supply of antipsychotic medications. Results All Medicaid claims measure definitions tested had excellent specificity and PPV (>91%). Good to excellent sensitivity was dependent upon use of a 32-day gap allowance, particularly as duration of concurrent antipsychotic use increased. The proposed claims-based measure (90-day concurrent use of ≥2 or more antipsychotics, allowing for a 32-day gap) had excellent specificity (99.1%, 95%CI: 98.2–99.6) and PPV (90.9%, 95%CI: 83.1–95.7) with good sensitivity (79.4%, 95%CI: 70.4–86.6). The overall level of concordance between claims and medical record-based categorization of antipsychotic polypharmacy was high (96.4%, n = 301/312 clients, Cohen's K = 84.7, 95%CI: 75.9–93.5). Discrepant cases were reviewed, and implications are discussed. Conclusions Administrative claims data can be used to construct valid measures of antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:24664793

  9. Antipsychotic prescription and mortality in hospitalized older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Deborah; Marengoni, Alessandra; Nobili, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Mauro; Pasina, Luca; Franchi, Carlotta; Djade, Codjo D; Corrao, Salvatore; Salerno, Francesco; Marcucci, Maura; Romanelli, Giuseppe; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2017-11-01

    Recent scientific reports have shown that older persons treated with antipsychotics for dementia-related behavioural symptoms have increased mortality. However, the impact of these drugs prescribed during hospitalization has rarely been assessed. We aimed to investigate whether antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of mortality during hospitalization and at 3-month follow-up in elderly inpatients. We analyzed data gathered during two waves (2010 and 2012) by the REPOSI (Registro Politerapie Società Italiana Medicina Interna). All new prescriptions of antipsychotic drugs during hospitalization, whether maintained or discontinued at discharge, were collected, and logistic regression models were used to analyze their association with in-hospital and 3-month mortality. Covariates were age, sex, the Short Blessed Test (SBT) score, and the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. Among 2703 patients included in the study, 135 (5%) received new prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs. The most frequently prescribed antipsychotic during hospitalization and eventually maintained at discharge was haloperidol (38% and 36% of cases, respectively). Patients newly prescribed with antipsychotics were older and had a higher Cumulative Illness Rating Scale comorbidity index both at admission and at discharge compared to those who did not receive a prescription. Of those prescribed antipsychotics, 71% had an SBT score ≥10 (indicative of dementia), 12% had an SBT score of 5-9 (indicative of questionable dementia); and 17% had an SBT score antipsychotic drugs (14.3% vs 9.4%; P = 0.109), but in multivariate analysis only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were significantly related to mortality during hospitalization. At 3-month follow-up, only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were associated with mortality. We found that the prescription of antipsychotic drugs during hospitalization was not associated with in-hospital or follow-up mortality. Short

  10. Síndrome neuroléptica maligna de paciente em uso de olanzapina Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in patient using olanzapine

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    Fabrício Lins de Medeiros

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome neuroléptica maligna (SNM é uma reação idiossincrásica rara, extremamente grave e potencialmente fatal ao uso de antipsicóticos, tanto típicos quanto atípicos, bem como drogas de ação dopaminérgica. O diagnóstico fundamenta-se em critérios clínicos e laboratoriais e exclusão de outras condições médicas gerais ou psiquiátricas que melhor expliquem os sintomas. Segundo o DSM-IV, os principais critérios são rigidez muscular grave e temperatura elevada, associadas ao uso de medicação antipsicótica. Foi relatado um caso de paciente com 30 anos manifestando história de transtorno afetivo bipolar, que apresentou sinais e sintomas consistentes com SNM, após três semanas de tratamento com olanzapina. Esse relato visa a discutir o risco da SNM ao uso de antipsicóticos atípicos, bem como a importância de diagnóstico precoce e intervenção imediata.Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is an idiosyncratic, serious and potentially fatal disorder observed in patients who receive treatment with neuroleptics, typical and atypical, as well as medications with dopaminergic effects. The diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria and the exclusion of other general medical or psychiatric conditions that could best explain the symptoms. The main criteria according to DSM-IV are severe rigidity and fever associated with the use of antipsychotic medication. We present a case of a 30-year-old female with history of bipolar affective disorder that developed signs and symptoms consistent with NMS after three weeks of treatment with Olanzapine. This case aims to address the risk of NMS associated atypical antipsychotic, as well as the importance of an early diagnosis and immediate intervention.

  11. Effectiveness of olanzapine monotherapy and olanzapine combination treatment in the long term following acute mania--results of a two year observational study in bipolar disorder (EMBLEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Vieta, Eduard; Reed, Catherine; Novick, Diego; Barraco, Alessandra; Aguado, Jaume; Haro, Josep Maria

    2011-06-01

    This study compared the 2-year outcomes of patients with a manic/mixed episode of bipolar disorder taking olanzapine monotherapy or olanzapine in combination with other agents. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 2-year, prospective, observational study of clinical and functional outcomes of bipolar patients with an index manic/mixed episode. The study consisted of two phases: acute (12 weeks) and maintenance (follow-up over 2 years). The longitudinal outcome measure was the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder scale. Cox regression models compared outcomes of both therapy groups using intention-to-treat and switching medication analysis. Treatment-emergent adverse events were also assessed. 1076 patients were included in this analysis. 29% took olanzapine as monotherapy (n = 313) and 71% as combination (n = 763) at 12-weeks post-baseline (end of study acute phase). After adjusting for patient characteristics using switching medication analysis, only relapse rates differed (p = 0.01) in favour of monotherapy-treated patients. There was no significant difference in rates of improvement, remission, and recovery. Patients treated with combination therapy reported more tremor (OR 2.37, 95%CI 1.44-3.89) and polyuria (OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.45-6.54) treatment-emergent events than monotherapy, although weight change was greater in the monotherapy group. Unknown confounding and potential selection bias may differentially impact treatment outcomes. EMBLEM patients benefitted from the selected therapy to a similar extent. Differences in patient characteristics between those prescribed monotherapy and combination therapy appear to be clinically relevant in the treatment decision. Physicians must balance the benefits and risks when determining appropriate treatment for individual patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled proof of concept study to evaluate samidorphan in the prevention of olanzapine-induced weight gain in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bernard L; Martin, William; Memisoglu, Asli; DiPetrillo, Lauren; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M

    2017-11-17

    Antipsychotic medications are associated with weight gain and adverse metabolic effects that complicate the treatment and management of schizophrenia. Olanzapine (OLZ) in particular is associated with significant weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. The present Phase 1, proof of concept, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the safety and effect on weight of a combination of OLZ (10mg) and the opioid modulator samidorphan (SAM; 5mg) in comparison to OLZ alone in healthy, male normal weight volunteers. Altogether, 106 male subjects with stable body weight and BMI 18-25kg/m 2 were randomized to OLZ alone, OLZ+SAM, SAM alone, or placebo in a 2:2:1:1 ratio. The primary efficacy endpoint, mean (SD) body weight change from baseline to last assessment in the 3-week treatment period, was significantly less for OLZ+SAM vs. OLZ alone subjects [+2.2 (1.4) kg vs. +3.1 (1.9) kg; respectively; p=0.02]. In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight from baseline for either SAM or placebo [+0.1 (1.0) kg and +0.8 (1.4) kg, respectively]; p=0.09. Overall, OLZ+SAM compared to OLZ alone had similar safety and tolerability. In addition, less nausea was observed in subjects given OLZ+SAM compared to SAM alone. Thus, OLZ+SAM may offer effective treatment of schizophrenia with less weight gain and metabolic risk. Additional research exploring additional doses over longer durations in psychiatric populations is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differences in craving for cannabis between schizophrenia patients using risperidone, olanzapine or clozapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, Marise; Beduin, Albertine Scheltema; Dekker, Nienke; Kahn, Rene S.; Linszen, Don H.; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    Substance abuse and psychotic disorders have a high rate of comorbidity. Both disorders are associated with changes in the dopaminergic transmission in the mesocorticolimbic pathways of the brain. Since antipsychotic medications interact with the dopamine receptors in these pathways, these

  14. A patient with schizophrenia presenting with post-lobotomy catatonia treated with olanzapine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Kitazawa, Maiko; Ishibiki, Yoshiro; Narumi, Kenji; Ichimiya, Yosuke

    2017-05-01

    A 79-year-old Japanese woman with schizophrenia was hospitalized because of idiopathic duodenal stenosis. Three days after discontinuing ingestion, including the administration of psychotropic drugs, the patient demonstrated incoherent behaviour and strong general muscle tension, and was unable to engage in conversation. Computed tomography indicated bilateral regions of low density in the frontal lobes, subsequent to which she was diagnosed with post-lobotomy catatonia. Administration of olanzapine (10 mg/day) improved the patient's condition within a short period. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between the dysfunction of frontal circuits and catatonia; therefore, the observed catatonic episode might relate to the disconnection of nerve fibres in the prefrontal lobes induced by her lobotomy. Olanzapine was likely effective in treating catatonia because of its reported efficacy in improving frontal lobe function. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. The effect of antipsychotic medication on sexual function and serum prolactin levels in community-treated schizophrenic patients: results from the Schizophrenia Trial of Aripiprazole (STAR study (NCT00237913

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    Pans Miranda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia in a community based study on sexual function and prolactin levels comparing the use of aripiprazole and standard of care (SOC, which was a limited choice of three widely used and available antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone (The Schizophrenia Trial of Aripiprazole [STAR] study [NCT00237913]. Method This open-label, 26-week, multi-centre, randomised study compared aripiprazole to SOC (olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone in patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR criteria. The primary effectiveness variable was the mean total score of the Investigator Assessment Questionnaire (IAQ at Week 26. The outcome research variables included the Arizona Sexual Experience scale (ASEX. This along with the data collected on serum prolactin levels at week 4, 8, 12, 18 and 26 will be the focus of this paper. Results A total of 555 patients were randomised to receive aripiprazole (n = 284 or SOC (n = 271. Both treatment groups experienced improvements in sexual function from baseline ASEX assessments. However at 8 weeks the aripiprazole treatment group reported significantly greater improvement compared with the SOC group (p = 0.007; OC. Although baseline mean serum prolactin levels were similar in the two treatment groups (43.4 mg/dL in the aripiprazole group and 42.3 mg/dL in the SOC group, p = NS at Week 26 OC, mean decreases in serum prolactin were 34.2 mg/dL in the aripiprazole group, compared with 13.3 mg/dL in the SOC group (p Conclusion The study findings suggest that aripiprazole has the potential to reduce sexual dysfunction, which in turn might improve patient compliance.

  16. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

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    Nevena Divac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest, high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability.

  17. Antipsychotic treatment: experiences of fully recovered service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornestad, Jone; Davidson, Larry; Joa, Inge; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Langeveld, Johannes; Veseth, Marius; Melle, Ingrid; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Bronnick, Kolbjorn

    2017-06-01

    There is lack of long-term controlled studies evaluating treatment effects of antipsychotic medication. A complete investigation should include the service user perspective. To investigate experiences of clinically recovered service users of antipsychotic medications during and after a first episode of psychosis. We used a thematic analytic approach within an interpretative-phenomenological framework. 20 clinically recovered service users were interviewed. Themes: (1) Antipsychotic drugs reduce mental chaos during the acute phase, (2) Non-stigmatizing environments were perceived to increase chances of successful use, (3) Antipsychotic drugs beyond the acute phase - considered to compromise the contribution of individual effort in recovery, (4) Prolonged use - perceived to reduce likelihood of functional recovery, (5) Antipsychotic medication was considered as a supplement to trustful relationships. Acute phase antipsychotic treatment was mostly perceived as advantageous by this sample, who was in clinical recovery. However, costs were often seen as outweighing benefits beyond the acute stage. Findings clearly emphasize the need for a collaborative approach to be integrated across all phases of care. This study underscores the need to investigate sub-group differences with regard to long-term antipsychotic treatment.

  18. Geographic Distribution of Antipsychotic Use in Medicare Part D Patients

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    Angela Anthony

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine if there is a geographic variation in antipsychotic prescribing in Medicare recipients in 10 US divisions. Methods: Data was collected in the Microsoft Excel format from the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Part D Prescriber Public Use File for 2013 CMS data. Antipsychotics were sorted and downloaded into separate excel formats. The states were separated into the 10 geographic according to the US Census Bureau to identify prescribing trends. The primary endpoint was to determine the difference in the rates of CMS Medicare Part D utilizers who had antipsychotic prescriptions in each of the 10 geographic divisions. 
The rate of antipsychotic prescribing was calculated by determining the number of prescription claims for each antipsychotic for the division and dividing by the number of people utilizing Medicare Part D in each division. Data was converted to SPSS (version19, Armonk, NY for further analysis. ANOVA was used to compare the differences. Results: Approximately 35 million claims were included in the data set. Antipsychotics comprised 4.75% of the total spending on medications for Medicare Part D. New England was found to have the highest rate of claims at 0.83. No statistically significant differences in the rate of antipsychotic prescribing across geographic regions was observed; however, a statistically significant difference was observed for total claims (P<0.001 and total antipsychotic costs (P<0.017 across regions. Conclusion: Additional studies need to be conducted to determine if there is a difference in antipsychotic prescribing in the United States. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties

  19. Predictors of switching antipsychotic medications in the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauffer Virginia L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify patient characteristics and early changes in patients' clinical status that best predict subsequent switching of antipsychotic agents in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Methods This post-hoc analysis used data from a one-year randomized, open-label, multisite study of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted after the first eight weeks. Baseline patient characteristics were assessed using standard psychiatric measures and reviews of medical records. The prediction model included baseline sociodemographics, comorbid psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions, body weight, clinical and functional variables, as well as change scores on standard efficacy and tolerability measures during the first two weeks of treatment. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the best predictors of switching from the initially assigned antipsychotic medication. Results About one-third of patients (29.5%, 191/648 switched antipsychotics before the end of the one-year study. There were six variables identified as the best predictors of switching: lack of antipsychotic use in the prior year, pre-existing depression, female gender, lack of substance use disorder, worsening of akathisia (as measured by the Barnes Akathisia Scale, and worsening of symptoms of depression/anxiety (subscale score on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale during the first two weeks of antipsychotic therapy. Conclusions Switching antipsychotics appears to be prevalent in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia and can be predicted by a small and distinct set of variables. Interestingly, worsening of anxiety and depressive symptoms and of akathisia following two weeks of treatment were among the more robust predictors of subsequent switching of antipsychotics.

  20. Predictors of switching antipsychotic medications in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhuis, Allen W; Faries, Douglas E; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Stauffer, Virginia L; Kinon, Bruce J

    2010-09-28

    To identify patient characteristics and early changes in patients' clinical status that best predict subsequent switching of antipsychotic agents in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. This post-hoc analysis used data from a one-year randomized, open-label, multisite study of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted after the first eight weeks. Baseline patient characteristics were assessed using standard psychiatric measures and reviews of medical records. The prediction model included baseline sociodemographics, comorbid psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions, body weight, clinical and functional variables, as well as change scores on standard efficacy and tolerability measures during the first two weeks of treatment. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the best predictors of switching from the initially assigned antipsychotic medication. About one-third of patients (29.5%, 191/648) switched antipsychotics before the end of the one-year study. There were six variables identified as the best predictors of switching: lack of antipsychotic use in the prior year, pre-existing depression, female gender, lack of substance use disorder, worsening of akathisia (as measured by the Barnes Akathisia Scale), and worsening of symptoms of depression/anxiety (subscale score on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) during the first two weeks of antipsychotic therapy. Switching antipsychotics appears to be prevalent in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia and can be predicted by a small and distinct set of variables. Interestingly, worsening of anxiety and depressive symptoms and of akathisia following two weeks of treatment were among the more robust predictors of subsequent switching of antipsychotics.

  1. Multiple Antipsychotic Medication Use in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Horn, Paul S; McDougle, Christopher J; Erickson, Craig A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of multiple antipsychotic medications in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by reviewing the longitudinal medication management of 1100 patients consecutively treated for behavioral symptoms associated with ASD at a tertiary care specialty clinic. We identified all patients with ASD treated with daily doses of two or more antipsychotics for at least two visits at our clinic. For each patient meeting inclusion criteria, diagnostic and demographic data were collected. To evaluate clinical need and effectiveness of antipsychotic medications in this sample, we reviewed symptoms targeted with each antipsychotic medication and concomitant medications prescribed. Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale ratings had been completed at the time of each visit, and the duration of treatment with antipsychotic medications was determined. To evaluate the safety and tolerability of antipsychotic medication use in ASD, we reviewed reported adverse effects and calculated body mass index (BMI) change with treatment. Seventy patients met the inclusion criteria (6.4% of our sample). The majority of patients were moderately to severely ill Caucasian males, as determined by baseline mean CGI-S of 4.7 (SD = 0.8), and were diagnosed with autistic disorder and comorbid intellectual disability. The mean age was 15.1 years (SD = 10.9), the primary targeted symptoms were agitation/irritability, physical aggression, and self-injury. The majority of patients remained on two or more antipsychotics for >1 year. In this population, patients demonstrated greater symptomatic improvement and generally tolerated treatment without significant adverse effects. The use of two or more antipsychotic medications may be increasingly common in patients with ASD. This retrospective study demonstrates that this treatment approach may be of some clinical benefit, and is generally well

  2. Quality of Life and Hormonal, Biochemical, and Anthropometric Profile Between Olanzapine and Risperidone Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Dos Santos, Ana Cely Souza; Lemos, Telma Maria Araújo Moura; Medeiros, Caroline Addison Xavier; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Rubio-Valera, Maria

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional study compared quality of life and side effects in 108 users of olanzapine or risperidone suffering schizophrenia and being attended at psychiatric ambulatory services in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Economic, socio-demographic, anthropometric, biochemical, and hormonal variables were compared. The EuroQoL Five-Dimension Scale (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate quality of life, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ(2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %.The household incomes of approximately 80 % of patients were Risperidone users had a mean quality-adjusted life year value of 1. Mean total Simpson-Angus Scale scores was 0.38 for olanzapine users and 0.11 for risperidone users (p risperidone users, p risperidone users, p < 0.02). Olanzapine users had impaired quality of life, which can be explained in part by adverse motor, biochemical, and hormonal effects characteristic of metabolic syndrome.

  3. Plasma metabonomics study of first-Episode schizophrenia treated with olanzapine in female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ying; Zhang, Lei; He, Shen; Wen, Hui; Yu, Yi-Min; Cao, Chun-Hua; Li, Hua-Fang

    2016-03-23

    Schizophrenia is a persistent chronic mental illness with an unknown pathogenic mechanism; no empirical laboratory-based tests are available to support the diagnosis of schizophrenia or to identify biomarkers correlated with the therapeutic effect of olanzapine. For this study, 15 female first-episode, drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy female volunteers were recruited. Tests for blood glucose and lipids were conducted at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment with olanzapine. UPLC-MS based metabonomic analysis was performed on both case and control groups to identify biomarkers of schizophrenia at baseline and to explore which biomarkers correlated with the therapeutic effect of olanzapine after a 4-week treatment. Compared with the control group, the case group showed significant changes in plasma metabolites. Thirteen distinct metabolites were identified. Among all the therapeutically effective cases, levels of these metabolites appeared to shift towards the normal trend; 8 of the identified 13 metabolites changed dramatically. The metabolites that we found are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Antipsychotic-associated psoriatic rash - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujor, Camelia-Eugenia; Vang, Torkel; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antipsychotics are a heterogeneous group of drugs. Although, antipsychotics have been used for years, unexpected side effects may still occur. With this case report we focus on a possible association between psoriasis and antipsychotics. Data on the patient's course of psychiatric...... disease, onset of psoriasis and its evolution were extracted from the patient's medical files. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 21-year-old female diagnosed with schizophrenia. She was initially treated with quetiapine, and later switched to aripiprazole due to weight gain. After initiation...

  5. Role and clinical implications of atypical antipsychotics in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trauma-related, and somatic symptom disorders: a systematized review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Umberto; Carmassi, Claudia; Cosci, Fiammetta; De Cori, David; Di Nicola, Marco; Ferrari, Silvia; Poloni, Nicola; Tarricone, Ilaria; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAs) may play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and trauma-related disorders. No reviews on their differential use in these different disorders have been performed recently. The aim of this systematized review was to obtain data on efficacy and comparative effectiveness of AAs as a treatment of anxiety disorders, OCD, and trauma-related disorders to provide guidance for clinicians on when and which AA to use. We searched on PubMed, Psychnet, and Cochrane Libraries from inception to July 2015. Search results were limited to randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adult patients. Evidence of efficacy was considered the presence of positive results in two or more double-blind placebo-controlled studies. Our systematized search identified 1298 papers, of which 191 were subjected to a full-text review and 56 were included. Quetiapine extended-release showed a role in both acute and maintenance treatment of uncomplicated generalized anxiety disorder, whereas more studies are needed before drawing practical recommendations on the use of olanzapine and risperidone; aripiprazole and risperidone are effective in resistant OCD as augmentation treatments. Risperidone and olanzapine add-on may have a role in resistant or chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients, although only risperidone addition can be recommended on the basis of the criterion of two or more positive placebo-controlled trials. This systematized review supports the evidence that only a few AAs are effective in only a minority of the off-label conditions in which they are currently used and confirms that AAs are not all the same. Their use should be on the basis of a balance between efficacy and side effects, and the characteristics as well as the preference of the patient.

  6. New atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia: iloperidone

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    Silvio Caccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Silvio Caccia,1 Luca Pasina,2 Alessandro Nobili21Laboratory of Drug Metabolism, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy; 2Laboratory of Quality, Assessment of Geriatric Therapies and Services, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The optimal treatment of schizophrenia poses a challenge to develop more effective treatments and safer drugs, to overcome poor compliance, discontinuation and frequent switching with available antipsychotics. Iloperidone is a new dopamine type 2/serotonin type 2A (D2/5-HT2A antagonist structurally related to risperidone, expected to give better efficacy with less extrapyramidal symptoms than D2 receptor antagonist antipsychotics. In double-blind phase III trials iloperidone reduced the symptoms of schizophrenia at oral doses from 12 to 24 mg. It was more effective than placebo in reducing positive and negative syndrome total score and Brief Psychiatric Rating scale scores; it was as effective as haloperidol and risperidone in post-hoc analysis. Its long-term efficacy was equivalent to that of haloperidol. The most common adverse events were dizziness, dry mouth, dyspepsia and somnolence, with few extrapyramidal symptoms and metabolic changes in short- and long-term studies in adults. Akathisia was rare, but prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc interval was comparable to haloperidol and ziprasidone, which is of particular concern. Further comparative studies are needed to clarify the benefit/risk profile of iloperidone and its role in the treatment of schizophrenia.Keywords: iloperidone, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety

  7. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

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    Arlan L. Rosenbloom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia.

  8. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Trends in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joyce Nolan; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Gross, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of antipsychotic medications in some children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. However, recent national data show a dramatic rise in off-label and Food and Drug Administration–approved uses of these medications. Of particular note is a twofold to fivefold increase in the use of antipsychotic medications in preschool children, despite little information on their long-term effects. This article describes the trend in pediatric antipsychotic medication use, possible explanations for the increase, implications for children’s health, and recommendations for pediatric providers who work with parents of children and adolescents who seek or receive antipsychotic medication treatments. PMID:22360933

  9. Comparison of olanzapine and risperidone in the EMBLEM Study: translation of randomized controlled trial findings into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Diego; Reed, Catherine; Haro, Josep Maria; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Perrin, Elena; Aguado, Jaume; Tohen, Mauricio

    2010-09-01

    Data from the EMBLEM Study, a 2-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with acute treatment of patients experiencing a manic/mixed episode of bipolar disorder, was used to compare the effectiveness of olanzapine monotherapy versus risperidone monotherapy, and to investigate whether the treatment effects were similar to those reported in a 3-week, randomized controlled trial assessing the same treatments. Symptom severity measures included the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), the 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder Scale. A total of 245 EMBLEM inpatients were analyzed with YMRS >or=20: olanzapine (n=209), risperidone (n=36). Both the treatment groups had similar improvements in YMRS from baseline to 6 weeks, but there was a significantly greater improvement in 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale in the olanzapine group. There was a similar improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder Scale in both the groups and the occurrence of treatment-emergent adverse events and weight gain did not differ between the treatment groups. The EMBLEM results partly support those of the randomized controlled trial, which suggests olanzapine and risperidone have similar improvements in mania but that olanzapine monotherapy may be more effective than risperidone monotherapy in the treatment of depressive symptoms associated with mania. Limitations include differences in study design, patient population, and length of follow-up.

  10. Paliperidone palmitate versus oral antipsychotics in recently diagnosed schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Andreas; Aadamsoo, Kaire; Altamura, A Carlo; Franco, Manuel; Gorwood, Philip; Neznanov, Nikolaj G; Schronen, Juan; Ucok, Alp; Zink, Mathias; Janik, Adam; Cherubin, Pierre; Lahaye, Marjolein; Hargarter, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Relapse and acute exacerbation are common in schizophrenia and may impact treatment response and outcome. Evidence is conflicting in respect to superiority of long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapies versus oral antipsychotics in relapse prevention. This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of paliperidone palmitate versus oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention. Eligible patients with a recent diagnosis of schizophrenia (within 1-5 years) were randomized 1:1 to paliperidone palmitate (n=376) or oral antipsychotic monotherapy (n=388) and entered a 2-week initial acute oral treatment phase. Patients who met predefined response criteria were eligible to enter the 24-month rater-blinded core treatment phase. Patients were evaluated for relapse, symptoms, functioning, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and tolerability. In the core treatment phase, time to relapse was significantly longer in the paliperidone palmitate (n=352) compared with the oral antipsychotics arm (n=363): 85% of patients were relapse-free at 469 versus 249 days (P=0.019). Significantly fewer patients receiving paliperidone palmitate met the relapse criteria (52 [14.8%] versus 76 [20.9%, oral antipsychotics]; P=0.032), representing a 29.4% relative risk reduction. For paliperidone palmitate, a significantly greater improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score on Day 8 (P=0.021) and a trend at endpoint (P=0.075) were observed. Functioning improvements were comparable between treatment arms. No new safety signals were identified. The observed time to relapse superiority of paliperidone palmitate over oral antipsychotics provides further evidence for the value of long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapies in the treatment of schizophrenia, including during the early stages of illness. Copyright © 2015 Janssen Pharmaceutica NV. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schans, J.; Vardar, S.; ?i?ek, R.; Bos, H. J.; Hoekstra, P. J.; de Vries, T. W.; Hak, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using the University Groningen pharmacy database linked to academic achievement scores at the end of primary school (Dutch Cito-test) obtained from Statistics Ne...

  12. Atypical antipsychotic therapy in Parkinson's disease psychosis: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Mei; Sperry, Laura; Malhado?Chang, Norika; Duffy, Alexandra; Wheelock, Vicki; Farias, Sarah; O'Connor, Kevin; Olichney, John; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP) is a frequent complication of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) with significant impact on quality of life and association with poorer outcomes. Atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are often used for the treatment of PDP; however, their use is often complicated by adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this study, we present patients with PDP who were treated with the most commonly used atypical antipsychotic agents and review their respect...

  13. Metabolic Signature of Antipsychotics used in the Treatment of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    obsessive-4 compulsive and eating disorders [8]. Conventional antipsychotics, e.g., chloropromazine, haloperidol 5 and perphenazine, act primarily as...group. 11 Extrapyramidal Side Effects : movement disorders such as akinesia (decreased voluntary movement), 12 pseudoparkinsonism and akathisia...Endocrine manifestations of eating disorders . J.Clin.Endocrinol.Metab 96, 333-343 60. Jin,H. et al. (2008) Impact of atypical antipsychotic therapy on

  14. Obstetric and Neonatal Outcomes After Antipsychotic Medication Exposure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Catherine G.; Blackwell, Katherine A.; Bartley, Christine; Hay, Madeleine; Yonkers, Kimberly A.; Bloch, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antipsychotic medications are used by increasing numbers of women of reproductive age. The safety of these medications during pregnancy has not been well-described. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of the adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes associated with exposure to antipsychotics during pregnancy. Data Sources PubMed, Reprotox, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify potential studies for inclusion. Methods of Study Selection Case-control or cohort studies estimating adverse birth outcomes associated with antipsychotic exposure during pregnancy were included. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were used for dichotomous outcomes and weighted mean differences (WMD) were used for infant birth weight and gestational age. Thirteen cohort studies, including 6,289 antipsychotic-exposed and 1,618,039 unexposed pregnancies were included. Tabulation, Integration, and Results Antipsychotic exposure was associated with an increased risk of major malformations (Absolute Risk Difference = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00 – 0.05, p=0.04, Z = 2.06), heart defects (Absolute Risk Difference =0.01, 95% CI 0.00 – 0.01, pantipsychotic medications. Antipsychotic exposure was not associated with risk of large for gestational age births, stillbirth, and spontaneous abortion. Although antipsychotic exposure during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes, this association does not necessarily imply causation. This analysis was limited by the small number of included studies and limited adjustment in studies for possible confounders. Conclusion Women requiring antipsychotic treatment during pregnancy appear at higher risk of adverse birth outcomes, regardless of causation, and may benefit from close monitoring and minimization of other potential risk factors during pregnancy. PMID:25932852

  15. Peripheral Amino Acid Levels in Schizophrenia and Antipsychotic Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Emanuela; Messina, Giovanni; Viggiano, Alessandro; Borlido, Carol; Viggiano, Andrea; Monda, Marcellino

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal levels of amino acids have been reported in patients with schizophrenia and have also been investigated as a biomarker to monitor antipsychotic treatment, however results have been inconsistent. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the evidence in the literature of whether amino acid levels can be a biomarker and predict the treatment outcome in schizophrenia. The current review does not support amino acid concentration as a useful biomarker for monitoring antipsychotic ...

  16. ANTIPSYCHOTIC TREATMENT - SIDE-EFFECT AND/OR METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ružić, Klementina; Grahovac, Tanja; Žarković Palijan, Tija; Petranović, Duška; Šepić-Grahovac, Dubravka

    2011-01-01

    According to current medical opinion chronic mental diseases such as schizophrenia require life-long treatment. The choice of antipsychotics is an important treatment factor, since their side-effects often influence patients' compliance with treatment. Severe side-effects may cause the patients to reject such treatment, the latter being their right. In case a psychiatrist does not agree with the patient's decision to interrupt his antipsychotic treatment regardless its serious side-e...

  17. An exploratory analysis of factors associated with weight change in a 16-week trial of oral vs. orally disintegrating olanzapine: the PLATYPUS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagianis, J.; Landry, J.; Hoffmann, V. P.; Grossman, L.; de Haan, L.; Maguire, G.; Milev, R.; Holt, S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted exploratory analyses of the data from a multinational, randomised study to identify factors associated with weight change after 16 weeks of treatment with standard olanzapine tablets (SOT) or sublingual orally disintegrating olanzapine (ODO). One hundred and forty nine outpatients who

  18. Effect of olanzapine and risperidone on subjective well-being and craving for cannabis in patients with schizophrenia or related disorders: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Lonneke J.; de Haan, Lieuwe; van Beveren, Nico Jm; van der Helm, Mischa; van den Brink, Wim; Linszen, Don

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether subjective well-being and craving for cannabis were different in patients with schizophrenia or related disorders treated with either olanzapine or risperidone. METHOD: A 6-week, double-blind, randomized trial of olanzapine and risperidone was carried out in 128 young

  19. Social context and health consequences of the antipsychotics introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Kenneth C

    2005-01-01

    From the vantage point of fifty years after the introduction of antipsychotics to clinical practice, this article examines the social context and health consequences of their introduction. Historical review of literature sources with commentary. The availability of antipsychotics over nearly half a century has powerfully influenced concepts of mental illness, dominant models of care versus control, health outcomes and side effect burdens. The large demand and economic success of antipsychotic medications is an important driver for research and development as well as sophistication in marketing. Regulatory agencies, funders and clinicians are faced with a moving target as indications for use of antipsychotics move well beyond the traditional core of schizophrenia and acute mania into depression, anxiety, behavioral disturbance with dementia and some forms of personality disturbance. The history of antipsychotics and mental illness is arguably being written as forcefully now, in an environment of rapid scientific change, as was the case in the 1960s era of rapid social change when chlorpromazine prompted a shift of emphasis from asylum to community. Psychosis is a challenge to how we interpret and approach our inner experiences and societal structures. Accordingly, it is not surprising that the history of antipsychotic drugs resonates with a lively interplay of social, health and economic issues and an ongoing quest to comprehend mental phenomena and their variants.

  20. Antipsychotic treatments for the elderly: efficacy and safety of aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izchak Kohen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Izchak Kohen1, Paula E Lester2, Sum Lam31Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Zucker-Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA; 3Division of Pharmacy and Geriatrics, St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Queens, NY, USAAbstract: Delusions, hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms can accompany a number of conditions in late life. As such, elderly patients are commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications for the treatment of psychosis in both acute and chronic conditions. Those conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and dementia. Elderly patients are at an increased risk of adverse events from antipsychotic medications because of age-related pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes as well as polypharmacy. Drug selection should be individualized to the patient’s previous history of antipsychotic use, current medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and potential side effects of the antipsychotic. Specifically, metabolic side effects should be closely monitored in this population. This paper provides a review of aripiprazole, a newer second generation antipsychotic agent, for its use in a variety of psychiatric disorders in the elderly including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dementia, Parkinson’s disease and depression. We will review the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aripiprazole as well as dosing, diagnostic indications, efficacy studies, and tolerability including its metabolic profile. We will also detail patient focused perspectives including quality of life, patient satisfaction and adherence.Keywords: aripiprazole, antipsychotics, elderly, adverse drug reaction

  1. Antipsychotic Prescriptions for Children Aged 5 Years or Younger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lòpez-De Fede

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antipsychotics in very young children is of concern given the lack of empirical evidence in their efficacy and long-term impact on children’s health. This study examined the prescription of antipsychotics among children aged ≤5 years enrolled in a state Medicaid program. Secondary data analysis was conducted using the Medicaid administrative data of a southeastern state. Using SAS 9.3, descriptive statistics were performed to examine socio-demographic characteristics, psychiatric diagnoses, off-label use, receipt of medications from multiple psychotropic drug classes, and receipt of non-pharmacologic psychiatric services among children aged ≤5 years who received antipsychotic prescriptions in calendar year (CY 2011. A total of 112 children in the target age group received antipsychotics in CY 2011, the most common prescription being risperidone. The most common listed psychiatric diagnosis was attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two in five children received antipsychotics for off-label use. Three in four children also received medications from at least one other psychotropic drug class. More than half did not receive adjunct psychiatric services. State-level policies offering specific guidance and recommendations for antipsychotic use among very young children are urgently needed. Future research is warranted to examine long-term impact of such practices on children’s growth and development.

  2. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuardi A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD, a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  3. Differences in BMI between Mexican and Colombian patients receiving antipsychotics: results from the International Study of Latinos on Antipsychotics (ISLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Bernardo; Camacho, Alvaro; Parra, Katherine; de la Espriella, Ricardo; Rico, Victor; Lozano, Severiano; Troncoso, Mirna; Castilla-Puentes, Ruby C; Cook, Benjamin L; Jimenez, Daniel E

    2018-03-07

    The objective of this study is to examine the association of country of residence with body mass index (BMI) between Mexican and Colombian patients exposed to antipsychotics. We hypothesize that there will be a significant association between country of residence and BMI and that Mexican patients will have higher BMI than their Colombian counterparts. The International Study of Latinos on Antipsychotics (ISLA) is a multisite, international, cross sectional study of adult Latino patients exposed to antipsychotics in two Latin American Countries (i.e. Mexico and Colombia). Data were collected from a total of 205 patients (149 from Mexico and 56 from Colombia). The sites in Mexico included outpatient clinics in Mexicali, Monterrey and Tijuana. In Colombia, data were collected from outpatient clinics in Bogotá. For this study we included patients attending outpatient psychiatric community clinics that received at least one antipsychotic (new and old generation) for the last 3 months. A linear regression model was used to determine the association of country of residence with BMI for participants exposed to an antipsychotic. After controlling for demographics, behaviors, biological and comorbid psychiatric variables, there was a significant difference between Colombia vs. Mexico in the BMI of patients exposed to antipsychotics (β = 4.9; p Mexico and Colombia may reflect differences in prevalence of overweight/obesity at the population level in the respective countries, and highlights the involvement of other risk factors, which may include genetics.

  4. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics.

  5. Energy metabolism, leptin, and biochemical parameters are altered in rats subjected to the chronic administration of olanzapine Metabolismo calórico, leptina e parâmetros bioquímicos se alteram em ratos submetidos à administração crônica de olanzapina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra I. Zugno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug with affinities for dopamine, serotonin, and histamine binding sites appears to be associated with substantial weight gain and metabolic alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate weight gain and metabolic alterations in rats treated with olanzapine on a hypercaloric diet. METHODS: We used 40 rats divided into 4 groups: Group 1, standard food and water conditions (control; Group 2, standard diet plus olanzapine; Group 3, cafeteria diet (hypercaloric; and Group 4, olanzapine plus cafeteria diet. Olanzapine was administered by gavage at a dose of 3 mg/kg for 9 weeks. RESULTS There were no significant changes in the cholesterol levels in any group. Glucose levels increased in Group 3 by the fourth week. Triglyceride levels were altered in group 2 toward the end of the experiment. Leptin levels decreased in Groups 2 and 4. Complex II activity in the muscles and liver was altered in Group 2 (muscle, and Groups 2, 3, and 4 (liver. Complex IV activity was altered only in the liver in Group 2, without significant alterations within the muscles. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that olanzapine is correlated with weight gain and the risks associated with obesity.OBJETIVOS: A olanzapina, uma droga antipsicótica atípica com afinidade por locais de ligação de dopamina, serotonina e histamina, parece se associar a um ganho de peso e a alterações metabólicas consideráveis. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar o ganho de peso e as alterações metabólicas em ratos tratados com olanzapina numa dieta hipercalórica. MÉTODOS: Usamos 40 ratos divididos em 4 grupos: Grupo 1, condições padrão de alimento e água (controle; Grupo 2, dieta padrão mais olanzapina; Grupo 3, dieta hipercalórica; e Grupo 4, olanzapina mais dieta hipercalórica. Olanzapina foi administrada por gavagem a uma dose de 3 mg/kg por 9 semanas. RESULTADOS: Não houve alterações significativas nos níveis de colesterol

  6. An in vitro analysis of disintegration times of different formulations of olanzapine orodispersible tablet: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, David; Karagianis, Jamie; Treuer, Tamas; Raskin, Joel

    2013-12-01

    Orodispersible tablets (ODTs) are tablet or wafer forms of medication that disintegrate in the mouth, aided only by saliva. ODTs rely on different fast dissolve/disintegration manufacturing technologies. Disintegration time differences for several olanzapine ODT forms were investigated. Risperdal M-Tab(®) was included as a non-olanzapine ODT comparator. Eleven olanzapine ODT examples and orodispersible risperidone strengths were evaluated in vitro for formulation composition, manufacturing method, disintegration and dissolution characteristics, and formulation differences in comparison with freeze dried Zydis(®) ODT. Automated dissolution test equipment captured ODT dissolution rates by measuring real-time release of active ingredient. A high-speed video camera was used to capture tablet disintegration times in warm simulated saliva. The main outcome measure was the disintegration and dissolution characteristics of the ODT formulations. The ODT manufacturing method was associated with time to disintegrate; the fastest were freeze dried tablets, followed by soft compressed tablets and then hard/dense tablets. Olanzapine Zydis(®) was the only ODT that completely disintegrated in less than 4 s for all strengths (5, 10, 15, and 20 mg), followed by 5-mg Prolanz FAST(®) (12 s) and then risperidone ODT 4 mg (40 s). Reasons for slow dissolution of the olanzapine generics may include low product potency, excipient binding, excipient solubility, active ingredient particle size and incomplete disintegration. Differences in the formulation and manufacturing process of olanzapine ODTs appear to have a strong influence on the disintegration time of the active compound; differences that may potentially impact their use in clinical practice.

  7. Long-term outcomes in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone long-acting injection or oral antipsychotics in Spain: results from the electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, J M; Rodriguez-Morales, A; Diels, J; Povey, M; Jacobs, A; Zhao, Z; Lam, A; Villalobos Vega, J C; Cuéllar, J Alonso; de Castro, F J Alberca; Quintero, C Morillo-Velarde; Martíin, J F Román; Domínguez, P Tabares; Ojeda, J L Prados; Cortés, S Sanz; Cala, F I Mata; Marín, C Gutiérrez; Castro, L Moyano; Duaso, M A Haza; Albarracín, J Requena; Vergara, G Narbona; Benítez, A Fernández; Cleries, F Mayoral; Pérez-Brian, J M García-Herrera; Aragón, A Bordallo; Navarro, J C Rodríguez; Biedma, J A Algarra; de Pedro, R Bravo; González, J F Delgado; López, M E Jaén; Moreno, H Díaz; López, J A Soto; Rodríguez, E Ojeda; de Hoyos, C Martínez; Sacristán, M Pardilla; Martín, M D Molina; Ballesteros, E Martín; Rodríguez, P A Sopelana; Menéndez, L Fernández; Rivas, R Santos; del Pino Cuadrado, P; Lauffer, J Correas; Solano, J J Rodríguez; Martínez, J M Fernández; Solano, F García; Rodríguez, P García-Lamberde; Rodríguez, J A Romero; Cano, T Rodríguez; Fortacin, M Ducaju; Lobeiras, J M Blanco; Sampedro, J M Piñeiro; Bravo, A Pérez; Pellicer, A Fernández; López, M D Alonso; Liste, J Fraga; Fernández, M Riobo; Losada, A Casas; Mendez, R Vazquez-Noguerol; Romero, S Agra; Blanco, J J Blanco; Bonaselt, I Tortajada; Mahia, M C García; del Valle, E Ferrer Gómez; Yañez, P Quiroga; Camarasa, M Gelabert; Alonso, J A Barbado; Mendez, G Florez; Feliz, F Doce; Lamela, M A López; Piñero, M Vega; Alvarado, P Fuentes; Gómez, I López; Martín, P Fadon; Gómez, J L Santos; López, A García; Jiménez, A Rodríguez; Nafs, A Escudero; Barquero, N Casas; Ortiz, R Fernández-Villamor; Noguera, J L Velez; Carrasco, P Ruiz; Muñoz, J Martín; Palma, M Masegoza; Hortelano, C Marín; Bonome, L Sánchez; Sevilla, J Sánchez; Juan, J M Mongil San; Ramos, J M García; Muñoz, J L Vallejo; Guisasola, J Elorza; Vazquez, L Santamaria; Guerras, F Campo; Nebot, F J Arrufat; Fernández, F J Baron; Nicolau, A L Palomo; Subirats, R Catala; Kidias, M Messays; Navarro, V Fabregat; García, B Frades; del Rosal, F Mejias; de Vicente Muñoz, T; Ballester, J Año; Lieb, P Malabia; Martel, A Delgado; Bea, E Roca; Joaquim, I Grau; Enjuanes, F Boatas; Piñol, M Bañuelos; Carbonell, E Fontova I; Muñoz, R Martín; Giribets, C Argila; Sans, L Albages; Blanco, A Serrano; Felipe, M Arcega; Muñoz, P González; Villanueva, A Pons; Arroyo, M Bernardo; Borri, R Coronas; Fallada, S Miret; Merola, M Celma; Rodon, E Parellada; Palmes, J R Pigem; Martínez, E Pérez; Catala, J Matarredona; Coca, A Sandoval; Ferrandiz, F Pascual; Paya, E Ferrandiz; Caballero, G Iturri; Bonet, A Franco; Figueras, J Fluvia; Pagador, P Moreno; Garibo, M Medina; Camo, V Pérez; Carrillo, C Sanz; Valero, C Pelegrin; Rebollo, F J Caro; García Campayo, J; Sala Ayma, J M Sala; Roig, M Martínez; de Uña Mateos, M A; Bertolin, R García; García, A Martín; Mazo, F Jiménez; Velasco, J L Galvez; Pérez, L Santa Maria; Casado, C Jiménez; Barba, J J Mancheño; Diaz, M Conde; Rubio, J P Alcon; Mandoli, A Soler; Herrero, A Uson; Martínez, A Rodríguez; Serrano, P Salgado; Rodríguez, E Nieto; Montesinos, J Segui; Macia, J Ferragud; Mateos Marcos, A Mateos; Soto, J V Pérez-Fuster; Dumont, M Verdaguer; Pagan, J Parra; Martínez, V Balanza; Santiuste de Pablos, M; Delgado, C Espinosa; Quiles, M D Martínez; López, F J Manzanera; Navarro, P Pozo; Torres, A Micol; Ingles, F J Martínez; Arias-Camison, J M Salmeron; Manzano, J C López; Peña, R Villanueva; Guitarte, G Petersen; Fontecilla, H Blasco; Romero, J Barjau; Gil, R Sanz; Lozano, J Marín; Adanez, L Donaire; Zarranz Herrera-Oria, I; Jiménez, J Pérez; Vaz, F Carrato; García, O Sanz; Anton, C Contreras; Casula, R Reixach; Hernandez, M C Natividad; Escabias, F Teba; Torresano, J Rodríguez; Pérez-Villamil, A Huidobro; Estevez, L; Figuero, M Aragües; Muñoz de Morales, A; Calvin, J L Rodríguez; Criado, M Delgado; Rodríguez, V Molina; Ambrosolio, E Balbo; Madera, P M Holgado; Alfaro, G Ponce; Vidal, M M Rojas; Valtuille, A García; Ruiz, O; Cabornero, G Lucas; Echevarria Martínez de Bujo, M; Mallen, M J Maicas; Puigros, J Santandreu; Martorell, A Liñana; Forteza, A Clar; Arrebola, E Rodríguez; Rodríguez de la Torre, M; Saiz, C G Anton; Bardolet I Casas, C; Linde, E Rodríguez; De Arce Cordon, R; Molina, E M Padial; Carazo, F J Ruiz; Romero, J J Muro; Cano, D Vico; Dorado, M Soria; Velazquez, S Campos; Sánchez, A J Rodríguez; Leon, S Ocio; Sánchez, K Pachas; Benitez, M Henry; Zugarramurai, A Intxausti; Contreras, M A; De la Varga González, M; Marín, P Barreiro; Robina, F Gómez; García, M Sánchez; Pérez, F J Otero; Bros, P Cubero; Gómez, A Carrillo; de Dios Molina Martín, J; Perera, J L Carrasco; Averbach, M C; Perera, J L Carrasco; Palancares, E Goenaga; Gallego de Dios, M T; Rojo, C Fernández; Iglesias, S Sánchez; Merino, M I Rubio; Mestre, N Prieto; Urdaniz, A Pérez; Sánchez, J M Martínez; Seco, R Gordo; Muñoz, J Franco; Agut, M Mateos; Lozano, M L Blanco; Herguedas, F Martín; Pena, A Torcal; García, J Vicente; Martínez, A Varona; Sanz Granado, O Sanz; Fernández, M A Medina; Canseco, J M Moran; López, P A Megia; Martín, M A Franco; Barrio, J A Espina; Ubago, J Giner; Bennassar, M Roca; Díez, J M Olivares; Fleta, J L Hernandez; Fortes, F Porras; López, C Arango; Medina, O; Alvarez, D Figuera; Roca, J M Peña; Valladolid, G Rubio; Tavera, J A Furquet; García-Castrillon Sales, J A; Llordes, I Batalla; Melgarejo, C Anchuistegui; Cañas de la Paz, F; Callol, V Vallés; García, M Bousoño; García, J Bobes; Leal, F J Vaz; Corrales, E Cáceres; Iglesias, E Sánchez; Gómez, M A Carreiras; Serrano, G García; Chillarón, E G Román; Aguado, F J Samino; Castillo, J J Molina; González, A González; Vázquez, J Gallardo; Peralvarez, M Bolivar; Diaz, M Rios; Mesa, M Ybarzabal; Artiles, F J Acosta; Chao, M Ajoy; Mesa, M Ybarzabal; del Rosario Santana, P; Escudero, M A García; Berenguer, M Molla; Llacer, J M Bonete; Berna, J A Juan; Ortiz, J Barragán; Pardell, L Tost; Hernández-Alvarez de Sotomayor, C; Méndez, M R Cejas; Garate, R Cabrera; Múgica, B Díaz; González, M Caballero; Domingo, J Pujol; Navarro, C Sáez; Vera, G Selva; Cuquerella, M A; Monzo, J Lonjedo; Boada, P Cervera; Pérez, M F Martín; Parrado, E Carrasco; Sánchez, J J Yañez; Fernández, J Calvo

    2009-06-01

    The electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR) is a prospective, observational study of patients with schizophrenia designed to evaluate long-term treatment outcomes in routine clinical practice. Parameters were assessed at baseline and at 3 month intervals for 2 years in patients initiated on risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) (n=1345) or a new oral antipsychotic (AP) (n=277; 35.7% and 36.5% on risperidone and olanzapine, respectively) in Spain. Hospitalization prior to therapy was assessed by a retrospective chart review. At 24 months, treatment retention (81.8% for RLAI versus 63.4% for oral APs, p<0.0001) and reduction in Clinical Global Impression Severity scores (-1.14 for RLAI versus -0.94 for APs, p=0.0165) were significantly higher with RLAI. Compared to the pre-switch period, RLAI patients had greater reductions in the number (reduction of 0.37 stays per patient versus 0.2, p<0.05) and days (18.74 versus 13.02, p<0.01) of hospitalizations at 24 months than oral AP patients. This 2 year, prospective, observational study showed that, compared to oral antipsychotics, RLAI was associated with better treatment retention, greater improvement in clinical symptoms and functioning, and greater reduction in hospital stays and days in hospital in patients with schizophrenia. Improved treatment adherence, increased efficacy and reduced hospitalization with RLAI offer the opportunity of substantial therapeutic improvement in schizophrenia.

  8. Efficacy of olanzapine in symptom relief and quality of life in gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novin Nikbakhsh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the incidence and prevalence rates of gastric cancer in Mazandaran Province of Iran, this research was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of olanzapine in symptom relief and quality of life (QOL improvement of gastric patients receiving chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on thirty new cases of gastric cancer patients whose treatment protocol was planned on chemotherapy and were allocated into two groups by simple random sampling. Intervention group (15 patients received olanzapine tablets (2.5–10 mg/day a day before the beginning of chemotherapy; in the 1st day of chemotherapy to 8 weeks after chemotherapy, besides the routine treatment regimens. The control group received only the routine treatment regimens. The patients were followed for 8 weeks after intervention. All of the patients were assessed with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and WHO-QOL-BREF questionnaires; further, Rhodes index was used to evaluate nausea and vomiting (N/V status. Results: All the recruited patients continued the allocated interventions (no lost to follow-up. N/V decreased in the case group, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.438. The patients' appetite and body mass index increased (P = 0.006. Anxiety and depression subscales of HADS had significant differences between the two groups (P 0.05. No significant increase was observed in fasting and 2-h postprandial blood glucose and lipid profile (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Olanzapine can be considered as an effective drug to increase appetite and decrease anxiety and depression in patients with gastric cancer.

  9. Association of Selected Antipsychotic Agents With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events and Noncardiovascular Mortality in Elderly Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlberg, Marie; Holm, Ellen; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Andersson, Charlotte

    2015-09-01

    Data from observational studies have raised concerns about the safety of treatment with antipsychotic agents (APs) in elderly patients with dementia, but this area has been insufficiently investigated. We performed a head-to-head comparison of the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular mortality associated with individual APs (ziprasidone, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, levomepromazine, chlorprothixen, flupentixol, and haloperidol) in Danish treatment-naïve patients aged ≥70 years. We followed all treatment-naïve Danish citizens aged ≥70 years that initiated treatment with APs for the first time between 1997 and 2011 (n=91 774, mean age 82±7 years, 35 474 [39%] were men). Incidence rate ratios associated with use of different APs were assessed by multivariable time-dependent Poisson regression models. For the first 30 days of treatment, compared with risperidone, incidence rate ratios of major adverse cardiovascular events were higher with use of levomepromazine (3.80, 95% CI 3.43 to 4.21) and haloperidol (1.85, 95% CI 1.67 to 2.05) and lower for treatment with flupentixol (0.54, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.66), ziprasidone (0.31, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.97), chlorprothixen (0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.95), and quetiapine (0.68, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.80). Relationships were generally similar for long-term treatment. The majority of agents were associated with higher risks among patients with cardiovascular disease compared with patients without cardiovascular disease (P for interaction <0.0001). Similar results were observed for noncardiovascular mortality, although differences in associations between patients with and without cardiovascular disease were small. Our study suggested some diversity in risks associated with individual APs but no systematic difference between first- and second-generation APs. Randomized placebo-controlled studies are warranted to confirm our findings and to identify the safest agents. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf

  10. Safety, tolerability, and risks associated with first- and second-generation antipsychotics: a state-of-the-art clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmi M

    2017-06-01

    -generation antipsychotics (SGAs ushered in a progressive shift from the paternalistic management of SMI symptoms to a patient-centered approach, which emphasized targets important to patients – psychosocial functioning, quality of life, and recovery. These drugs are no longer limited to specific Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM categories. Evidence indicates that SGAs show an improved safety and tolerability profile compared with FGAs. The incidence of treatment-emergent extrapyramidal side effects is lower, and there is less impairment of cognitive function and treatment-related negative symptoms. However, treatment with SGAs has been associated with a wide range of untoward effects, among which treatment-emergent weight gain and metabolic abnormalities are of notable concern. The present clinical review aims to summarize the safety and tolerability profile of selected FGAs and SGAs and to link treatment-related adverse effects to the pharmacodynamic profile of each drug. Evidence, predominantly derived from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical trials of the drugs amisulpride, aripiprazole, asenapine, brexpiprazole, cariprazine, clozapine, iloperidone, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, CPZ, haloperidol, loxapine, and perphenazine, is summarized. In addition, the safety and tolerability profiles of antipsychotics are discussed in the context of the “behavioral toxicity” conceptual framework, which considers the longitudinal course and the clinical and therapeutic consequences of treatment-emergent side effects. In SMI, SGAs with safer metabolic profiles should ideally be prescribed first. However, alongside with safety, efficacy should also be considered on a patient-tailored basis. Keywords: antipsychotics, side effects, tolerability, safety, psychosis, psychiatry

  11. Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotic Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Depression, Quality of Life, and Safety Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmans, Glen I.; Berman, Margit I.; Linardatos, Eftihia; Rosenlicht, Nicholas Z.; Perry, Angela; Tsai, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atypical antipsychotic medications are widely prescribed for the adjunctive treatment of depression, yet their total risk–benefit profile is not well understood. We thus conducted a systematic review of the efficacy and safety profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of depression. Methods and Findings We included randomized trials comparing adjunctive antipsychotic medication to placebo for treatment-resistant depression in adults. Our literature search (conducted in December 2011 and updated on December 14, 2012) identified 14 short-term trials of aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC), quetiapine, and risperidone. When possible, we supplemented published literature with data from manufacturers' clinical trial registries and US Food and Drug Administration New Drug Applications. Study duration ranged from 4 to 12 wk. All four drugs had statistically significant effects on remission, as follows: aripiprazole (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.48–2.73), OFC (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.01–2.0), quetiapine (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.33–2.42), and risperidone (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 19 for OFC and nine for each other drug. All drugs with the exception of OFC also had statistically significant effects on response rates, as follows: aripiprazole (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.58–2.72; NNT, 7), OFC (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.87–1.93), quetiapine (OR, 1.53, 95% CI, 1.17–2.0; NNT, 10), and risperidone (OR, 1.83, 95% CI, 1.16–2.88; NNT, 8). All four drugs showed statistically significant effects on clinician-rated depression severity measures (Hedges' g ranged from 0.26 to 0.48; mean difference of 2.69 points on the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale across drugs). On measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications produced either no benefit or a very small benefit, except for risperidone, which had a small-to-moderate effect on quality of life (g

  12. Unresolved Issues for Utilization of Atypical Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Jeon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics (AAP are the prevailing form of schizophrenia treatment today due to their low side effects and superior efficacy. Nevertheless, some issues still need to be addressed. First, there are still a large number of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS, which has led to a growing trend to resort to AAP polypharmacy with few side effects. Most clinical treatment guidelines recommend clozapine monotherapy in TRS, but around one third of schizophrenic patients fail to respond to clozapine. For these patients, with clozapine-resistant schizophrenia AAP polypharmacy is a common strategy with a continually growing evidence base. Second, AAP generally have great risks for developing metabolic syndrome, such as weight gain, abnormality in glucose, and lipid metabolism. These metabolic side effects have become huge stumbling blocks in today’s schizophrenia treatment that aims to improve patients’ quality of life as well as symptoms. The exact reasons why this particular syndrome occurs in patients treated with AAP is as yet unclear though factors such as interaction of AAP with neurotransmitter receptors, genetic pholymorphisms, type of AAPs, length of AAP use, and life style of schizophrenic patients that may contribute to its development. The present article aimed to review the evidence underlying these key issues and provide the most reasonable interpretations to expand the overall scope of antipsychotics usage.

  13. Can antipsychotics improve social cognition in patients with schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna; Mortimer, Ann

    2013-05-01

    Social cognition is described as the higher mental processes that are engaged while people store, process, and use social information to make sense of themselves and others. Aspects of social cognition include emotion perception, social cue interpretation, attribution style, and theory of mind, all of which appear disordered in schizophrenia. Such social cognitive deficits are believed to be important predictors of functional outcome in schizophrenia, therefore they may represent a crucial treatment target. Few studies have evaluated the influence of antipsychotic treatment on these deficits. The purpose of this review is to examine the relationship between antipsychotic treatment and social cognition, whether antipsychotics improve social cognitive function, and if so to explore differential medication effects. Comprehensive searches of PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PUBMED were conducted to identify relevant published manuscripts. Fifteen relevant papers published in English were found, describing original studies. On the basis of this review, we have drawn the following conclusions: first, the results do not engender optimism for the possibility that antipsychotic drugs can specifically facilitate social recovery. Second, the actions of antipsychotics on social cognition are inconclusive, due to lack of standardization across research groups, leading to inconsistencies between study designs, methods used, and medication dosages. Third, large-scale longitudinal investigations are needed to explore the unclear relationships between social cognition, symptoms, and functional outcome. Other non-pharmacological treatments focusing on training patients in the social cognitive areas may hold more promise.

  14. Practitioner Review: The effects of atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilisers in the treatment of depressive symptoms in paediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Tobias; Nuñez, Nicolas; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2017-08-01

    The management of depressive and mixed symptoms in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) remains a matter of debate. The goal of this review is, thus, to systematically examine the impact of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and mood stabilisers in the treatment of bipolar depression and/or mixed states. A literature search was conducted for studies assessing the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder type I, type II and not otherwise specified with a recent depressive, mixed or manic episode (with depressive symptoms) following DSM-IV criteria in children and adolescents as either acute or maintenance treatment. The databases searched were PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar and Tripdatabase, as well as ClinicalTrials.gov. The search was limited to clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and open-label trials published in the English language between the years 2000 and 2015. Sixty clinical studies were found assessing the efficacy of mood stabilisers and AAPs in paediatric BD. Fifteen studies were not included in the primary analysis because they did not assess depressive symptomology/include scores on rating scales of depressive symptoms (Online Supplementary Material). There is sufficient evidence for a Grade A recommendation of the use of olanzapine plus fluoxetine at reducing depressive symptoms in bipolar depression and of quetiapine at high doses for depressive symptoms occurring during mixed episodes. Importantly, even though monotherapy with aripiprazole, risperidone, valproate and lithium was effective at controlling mania, these drugs were not effective at reducing depressive symptoms (level A evidence for nonrecommendation). These results mostly overlap with the approved treatments for bipolar depression in adults. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  15. Antipsychotic medication and prefrontal cortex activation : A review of neuroimaging findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith J.; Knegtering, Henderikus; Klein, Hans C.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Aleman, Andre

    Decreased prefrontal activation (hypofrontality) in schizophrenia is thought to underlie negative symptoms and cognitive impairments, and may contribute to poor social outcome. Hypofrontality does not always improve during treatment with antipsychotics. We hypothesized that antipsychotics, which

  16. Consumers' questions about antipsychotic medication : revealing safety concerns and the silent voices of young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersink, Rianne A; Taxis, Katja; McGuire, Treasure M; van Driel, Mieke L

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about consumer information needs regarding antipsychotic medicines. Medicines call centre (MCC)-derived data are underutilised; and could provide insight into issues of importance to consumers. This study aimed to explore consumers' information needs about antipsychotic

  17. Association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and antipsychotic drug-induced hyperprolactinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, L.M.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Ivanova, S.A.; Freidin, M.B.; Cohen, D.; Boiko, A.S.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Touw, D.J.; Semke, A.V.; Wilffert, B.; Bokhan, N.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Regular therapy for schizophrenia includes main tenance antipsychotic treatment. Unfortunately, antipsychotics also have a spectrum of side effects, including metabolic, endocrine, cardiovascular, and movement disorders. One of the common side effects of these drugs is hyperprolactinemia

  18. Association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and antipsychotic drug-induced hyperprolactinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, Lisanne; Pozhidaev, Ivan V; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Cohen, Dan; Boiko, Anastasia S; Osmanova, Diana Z; Fedorenko, Olga Yu; Touw, Daniël; Semke, Arkadiy V.; Wilffert, Berend; Bokhan, Nikolay A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Regular therapy for schizophrenia includes maintenance antipsychotic treatment. Unfortunately, antipsychotics also have a spectrum of side effects, including metabolic, endocrine, cardiovascular, and movement disorders. One of the common side effects of these drugs is hyperprolactinemia

  19. Antipsychotic drugs rapidly induce dopamine neuron depolarization block in a developmental rat model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, Ornella; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Gill, Kathryn M.; Grace, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs to normal rats has been shown to induce a state of dopamine neuron inactivation known as depolarization block, which correlates with the ability of the drugs to exhibit antipsychotic efficacy and extrapyramidal side-effects in schizophrenia patients. Nonetheless, in normal rats depolarization block requires weeks of antipsychotic drug administration, whereas schizophrenia patients exhibit initial effects soon after initiating antipsychotic drug t...

  20. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  1. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of olanzapine in the treatment of trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ameringen, Michael; Mancini, Catherine; Patterson, Beth; Bennett, Mark; Oakman, Jonathan

    2010-10-01

    Trichotillomania has been considered as part of the obsessive-compulsive disorder spectrum; however, trichotillomania treatment with obsessive-compulsive disorder medications has largely been unsuccessful. To determine whether a dopaminergic treatment as used in tics and Tourette's syndrome would be effective in trichotillomania. Twenty-five participants with DSM-IV trichotillomania participated in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of flexible-dose olanzapine for trichotillomania. Recruitment occurred between August 2001 and December 2005, and follow-up was completed in February 2006. The primary outcome measure was the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale, and secondary measures of efficacy included the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Trichotillomania (TTM-YBOCS) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale. Eleven of 13 participants (85%) in the olanzapine group and 2 of 12 (17%) in the placebo group were considered responders according to the CGI-I (P = .001). There was a significant change from baseline to end point in the TTM-YBOCS (P trichotillomania. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00182507. © Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. A QSAR model of Olanzapine derivatives as potential inhibitors for 5-HT2A Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Pooja; Rastogi, Aishwarya; Rajpoot, Mayank; Kumar, Ajay; Srivastava, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex, chronic mental disorder, affecting about 21 million people worldwide. It is characterized by symptoms, including distortions in thinking, perception, emotions, disorganized speech, sense of self and behavior. Recently, a numbers of marketed drugs for Schizophrenia are available against dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Here, we docked Olanzapine derivatives (collected from literature) with 5-HT2A Receptor using the program AutoDock 4.2. The docked protein inhibitor complex structure was optimized using molecular dynamics simulation for 5ps with the CHARMM-22 force field using NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program) incorporated in visual molecular dynamics (VMD 1.9.2) and then evaluating the stability of complex structure by calculating RMSD values. NAMD is a parallel, object-oriented molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. A quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was built using energy-based descriptors as independent variable and pKi value as dependent variable of eleven known Olanzapine derivatives with 5-HT2A Receptor, yielding correlation coefficient r2 of 0.63861. The predictive performance of QSAR model was assessed using different crossvalidation procedures. Our results suggest that a ligand-receptor binding interaction for 5-HT2A receptor using a QSAR model is promising approach to design more potent 5-HT2A receptor inhibitors prior to their synthesis.

  3. Simultaneous determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine hydrochloride in capsules by spectrophotometry, TLC-spectrodensitometry and HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Mahmoud A; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Elragehy, Nariman A; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes sensitive, accurate and precise spectrophotometric, TLC-spectrodensitometric and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for simultaneous determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine HCl. Two spectrophotometric methods were developed, namely; first derivative (D (1)) and derivative ratio (DD (1)) methods. The TLC method employed aluminum TLC plates precoated with silica gel GF254 as the stationary phase and methanol:toluene:ammonia (7:3:0.1, by volume) as the mobile phase, where the chromatogram was scanned at 235 nm. The developed HPLC method used a reversed phase C18 column with isocratic elution. The mobile phase composed of phosphate buffer pH 4.0:acetonitrile:triethylamine (53:47:0.03, by volume) at flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 235 nm. The methods were validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory-prepared mixtures. The developed methods were successfully applied for the determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine HCl in bulk powder and combined capsule dosage form.

  4. Time Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ane; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    : To investigate time trends in use of antipsychotics and other psychotropic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: The study included longitudinal data on all Danish residents ≥65 years. The study population was defined on January 1 of each year from 2000-2012. Data included prescriptions, discharge diagnoses......, and somatic and psychiatric comorbidities. Multivariate time trend analyses of psychotropic drug use in patients with dementia within 4-year age bands were performed. RESULTS: Overall, among patients with dementia the prevalence of antipsychotic drug use decreased from 31.3% in 2000 to 20.4% in 2012...... increased as the annual median number of defined daily doses (DDD) increased from 33.3 to 42.0 DDD. CONCLUSIONS: The changing patterns of psychotropic drug use may be caused by warnings against use of antipsychotics. Further research is needed to explore the implications for patient safety....

  5. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics…

  6. Initiation of antipsychotic treatment by general practitioners. A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Geartsje; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hak, Eelko; Kahn, René S; Burger, Huibert

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Antipsychotics are approved treatment for severe conditions and have serious side effects. Antipsychotics are often prescribed off-label. Although a substantial proportion of antipsychotics are prescribed in primary care, it is largely unknown what motivates the

  7. Comparison of the effect of Olanzapine and Sertraline on patients suffering from personality disorder, receiving methadone maintenance therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mozhgan Jariani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Borderline Personality disorder is a disabling disease affecting 2% of general population. Various drugs have been suggested for treatment of borderline Personality disorder. If a drug could alleviate a wide range of symptoms, it would be more suitable. In these disorders drug addiction is very common. This fact makes the symptoms complicated and the treatment more difficult. This study is designed to evaluate the effect of Olanzapine and Sertraline in patients suffering from personality disorders who are on methadone maintenance therapy. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was carried out on 120 male and female cases chosen for methadone maintenance therapy through interview by a psychiatrist based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for BPD. Afterwards they were randomly divided into two groups. These groups separately received Olanzapine (5-10 mg daily and Sertraline (50-100 mg daily therapy. The SCL-90 questionnaire was filled out by the participants before treatment and at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks of the treatment. Results: According to this clinical trial, Olanzapine and Sertraline were effective in ameliorating symptoms of depression, anxiety and aggression, reducing sensitivity in interpersonal relationship and alleviating obsessive symptoms, pessimistic behaviors and somatization disorders in patients with personality disorders on methadone maintenance therapy. Conclusion: As results of this study stated that Olanzapine and Sertraline are definitely effective in alleviating symptoms of patients with personality disorder, prescribing theses drugs are highly recommended for these patients. .

  8. Translation of Randomised Controlled Trial Findings into Clinical Practice : Comparison of Olanzapine and Valproate in the EMBLEM Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novick, D.; Gonzalez-Pinto, A.; Haro, J. M.; Bertsch, J.; Reed, C.; Perrin, E.; Tohen, M.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. Methods: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation of

  9. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schans, J; Vardar, S; Çiçek, R; Bos, H J; Hoekstra, P J; de Vries, T W; Hak, E

    2016-09-21

    Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the University Groningen pharmacy database linked to academic achievement scores at the end of primary school (Dutch Cito-test) obtained from Statistics Netherlands. Mean Cito-test scores and standard deviations were obtained for children on antipsychotic therapy and reference children, and statistically compared using analyses of covariance. In addition, differences in subgroups as boys versus girls, ethnicity, household income, and late starters (start date within 12 months of the Cito-test) versus early starters (start date > 12 months before the Cito-test) were tested. In all, data from 7994 children could be linked to Cito-test scores. At the time of the Cito-test, 45 (0.6 %) were on treatment with antipsychotics. Children using antipsychotics scored on average 3.6 points lower than the reference peer group (534.5 ± 9.5). Scores were different across gender and levels of household income (p starters were significantly higher than starters within 12 months (533.7 ± 1.7 vs. 524.1 ± 2.6). This first exploration showed that children on antipsychotic treatment have lower school performance compared to the reference peer group at the end of primary school. This was most noticeable for girls, but early starters were less affected than later starters. Due to the observational cross-sectional nature of this study, no causality can be inferred, but the results indicate that school performance should be closely monitored and causes of underperformance despite treatment warrants more research.

  10. Antipsychotic prescribing patterns during and after critical illness: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomichek, Jason E; Stollings, Joanna L; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Ely, E Wesley; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-11-24

    Antipsychotics are used to treat delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite unproven efficacy. We hypothesized that atypical antipsychotic treatment in the ICU is a risk factor for antipsychotic prescription at discharge, a practice that might increase risk since long-term use is associated with increased mortality. After excluding patients on antipsychotics prior to admission, we examined antipsychotic use in a prospective cohort of ICU patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock. We collected data on medication use from medical records and assessed patients for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. Using multivariable logistic regression, we analyzed whether age, delirium duration, atypical antipsychotic use, and discharge disposition (each selected a priori) were independent risk factors for discharge on an antipsychotic. We also examined admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, haloperidol use, and days of benzodiazepine use in post hoc analyses. After excluding 18 patients due to prior antipsychotic use and three who withdrew, we included 500 patients. Among 208 (42%) treated with an antipsychotic, median (interquartile range) age was 59 (49-69) years and APACHE II score was 26 (22-32), characteristics that were similar among antipsychotic nonusers. Antipsychotic users were more likely than nonusers to have had delirium (93% vs. 61%, p antipsychotic users, 172 survived to hospital discharge, and 42 (24%) of these were prescribed an antipsychotic at discharge. Treatment with an atypical antipsychotic was the only independent risk factor for antipsychotic prescription at discharge (odds ratio 17.6, 95% confidence interval 4.9 to 63.3; p antipsychotic. In this study, antipsychotics were used to treat nearly half of all antipsychotic-naïve ICU patients and were prescribed at discharge to 24% of antipsychotic-treated patients. Treatment with an atypical antipsychotic greatly increased the

  11. THE ROLE OF ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DECREASING AGGRESIVENESS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvita Novia Anggraini Maria

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatry disorder accompanying by alteration of mind-set, perception,  thought, and behavior. Symptom of schizophrenia can be positive symptom and negative symptom. The positive symptom often became a fear for the others, that is aggresiveness as violance, suicide, ang homicide. Aggresiveness divided in five category, that is impulsivity, affective instability, anxiety/hyperarousal, cognitive disorganization, predatory/planned aggression. Pharmacology theraphy is a choice in decreasing aggresiveness in schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotic theraphy indicate higher effectivity and fewer side effect than conventional antipsychotic.

  12. Natural oils as skin permeation enhancers for transdermal delivery of olanzapine: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Geeta; Dhawan, Sanju; HariKumar, S L

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility of development of transdermal delivery system of olanzapine utilizing natural oils as permeation enhancers was investigated. Penetration enhancing potential of corn (maize) oil, groundnut oil and jojoba oil on in vitro permeation of olanzapine across rat skin was studied. The magnitude of flux enhancement factor with corn oil, groundnut oil and jojoba oil was 7.06, 5.31 and 1.9 respectively at 5mg/ml concentration in solvent system. On the basis of in vitro permeation studies, eudragit based matrix type transdermal patches of olanzapine were fabricated using optimized concentrations of natural oils as permeation enhancers. All transdermal patches were found to be uniform with respect to physical characteristics. The interaction studies carried out by comparing the results of ultraviolet, HPLC and FTIR analyses for the pure drug, polymers and mixture of drug and polymers indicated no chemical interaction between the drug and excipients. Corn oil containing unsaturated fatty acids was found to be promising natural permeation enhancer for transdermal delivery of olanzapine with greatest cumulative amount of drug permeated (1010.68 μg/cm²/h) up to 24 h and caused no skin irritation. The fabricated transdermal patches were found to be stable. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the final optimized matrix patch (T2) were determined after transdermal application to rabbits. The calculated relative bioavailability of TDDS was 113.6 % as compared to oral administration of olanzapine. The therapeutic effectiveness of optimized transdermal system was confirmed by tranquillizing activity in rotarod and grip mice model.

  13. A Flexible-Dose Study of Paliperidone ER in Patients With Nonacute Schizophrenia Previously Treated Unsuccessfully With Oral Olanzapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOTLER, MOSHE; DILBAZ, NESRIN; ROSA, FERNANDA; PATERAKIS, PERIKLIS; MILANOVA, VIHRA; SMULEVICH, ANATOLY B.; LAHAYE, MARJOLEIN

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to explore the tolerability, safety, and treatment response of switching from oral olanzapine to paliperidone extended release (ER). Methods: Adult patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had been treated unsuccessfully with oral olanzapine were switched to flexible doses of paliperidone ER (3 to 12 mg/d). The primary efficacy outcome was a ≥20% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores from baseline to endpoint for patients who switched medications because of lack of efficacy with olanzapine and noninferiority versus previous olanzapine treatment (mean endpoint change in PANSS total scores vs. baseline of ≤5 points) for patients who switched for reasons other than lack of efficacy. Safety and tolerability were assessed by monitoring adverse events, extrapyramidal symptoms, and weight change. Results: Of 396 patients, 65.2% were men, mean age was 40.0±12.0 years, and 75.5% had paranoid schizophrenia. Among the patients whose main reason for switching was lack of efficacy, an improvement in the PANSS total score of ≥20% occurred in 57.4% of patients. Noninferiority was confirmed for each subgroup of patients whose main reason for switching was something other than lack of efficacy. Paliperidone ER was generally well tolerated. Extrapyramidal symptoms as measured by total Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale scores showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements at endpoint, the average weight decreased by 0.8±5.2 kg at endpoint, and a clinically relevant weight gain of ≥7% occurred in 8.0% of patients. Conclusion: Paliperidone ER flexibly-dosed over 6 months was well tolerated and associated with a meaningful clinical response in patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had previously been unsuccessfully treated with oral olanzapine. PMID:26813484

  14. A Flexible-Dose Study of Paliperidone ER in Patients With Nonacute Schizophrenia Previously Treated Unsuccessfully With Oral Olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Moshe; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Rosa, Fernanda; Paterakis, Periklis; Milanova, Vihra; Smulevich, Anatoly B; Lahaye, Marjolein; Schreiner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the tolerability, safety, and treatment response of switching from oral olanzapine to paliperidone extended release (ER). Adult patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had been treated unsuccessfully with oral olanzapine were switched to flexible doses of paliperidone ER (3 to 12 mg/d). The primary efficacy outcome was a ≥ 20% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores from baseline to endpoint for patients who switched medications because of lack of efficacy with olanzapine and noninferiority versus previous olanzapine treatment (mean endpoint change in PANSS total scores vs. baseline of ≤ 5 points) for patients who switched for reasons other than lack of efficacy. Safety and tolerability were assessed by monitoring adverse events, extrapyramidal symptoms, and weight change. Of 396 patients, 65.2% were men, mean age was 40.0 ± 12.0 years, and 75.5% had paranoid schizophrenia. Among the patients whose main reason for switching was lack of efficacy, an improvement in the PANSS total score of ≥ 20% occurred in 57.4% of patients. Noninferiority was confirmed for each subgroup of patients whose main reason for switching was something other than lack of efficacy. Paliperidone ER was generally well tolerated. Extrapyramidal symptoms as measured by total Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale scores showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements at endpoint, the average weight decreased by 0.8 ± 5.2 kg at endpoint, and a clinically relevant weight gain of ≥ 7% occurred in 8.0% of patients. Paliperidone ER flexibly-dosed over 6 months was well tolerated and associated with a meaningful clinical response in patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had previously been unsuccessfully treated with oral olanzapine.

  15. Publication bias in antipsychotic trials: an analysis of efficacy comparing the published literature to the US Food and Drug Administration database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick H Turner

    Full Text Available Publication bias compromises the validity of evidence-based medicine, yet a growing body of research shows that this problem is widespread. Efficacy data from drug regulatory agencies, e.g., the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, can serve as a benchmark or control against which data in journal articles can be checked. Thus one may determine whether publication bias is present and quantify the extent to which it inflates apparent drug efficacy.FDA Drug Approval Packages for eight second-generation antipsychotics-aripiprazole, iloperidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, risperidone long-acting injection (risperidone LAI, and ziprasidone--were used to identify a cohort of 24 FDA-registered premarketing trials. The results of these trials according to the FDA were compared with the results conveyed in corresponding journal articles. The relationship between study outcome and publication status was examined, and effect sizes derived from the two data sources were compared. Among the 24 FDA-registered trials, four (17% were unpublished. Of these, three failed to show that the study drug had a statistical advantage over placebo, and one showed the study drug was statistically inferior to the active comparator. Among the 20 published trials, the five that were not positive, according to the FDA, showed some evidence of outcome reporting bias. However, the association between trial outcome and publication status did not reach statistical significance. Further, the apparent increase in the effect size point estimate due to publication bias was modest (8% and not statistically significant. On the other hand, the effect size for unpublished trials (0.23, 95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.39 was less than half that for the published trials (0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.54, a difference that was significant.The magnitude of publication bias found for antipsychotics was less than that found previously for antidepressants

  16. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest