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Sample records for antiproton trap hipat

  1. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  2. Design and preliminary testing of a high performance antiproton trap (HiPAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimatter represents the pinnacle of energy density, offering the potential to enhance current fusion/fission concepts enabling various classes of deep space missions. Current production rates are sufficient to support proof-of-concept evaluation of many key technologies associated with antimatter-derived propulsion. Storage has been identified as a key enabling technology for all antimatter-related operations, and as such is the current focus of this NASA-MSFC effort to design and fabricate a portable device capable of holding up to 1012 particles. Hardware has been assembled and initial tests are underway to evaluate the trap behavior using electron gun generated, positive hydrogen ions. Ions have been stored for tens of minutes, limited by observed interaction with background gas. Additionally, radio frequency manipulation is being tested to increase lifetime by stabilizing the stored particles, potentially reducing their interaction with background gas, easing requirements on ultimate trap vacuum and precision mechanical alignment

  3. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  4. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Kheymits, M D; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Wu, J; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; 10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L1

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three ...

  5. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  6. Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    OpenAIRE

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; S. Chapman; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected s...

  7. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  8. Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  9. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; M. Boezio; Bogomolov, E.A.; M. Bongi; Bonvicini, V.; Borisov, S.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; F. Cafagna; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of tr...

  10. Antiproton trapping in various helium media: report of the HELIUMTRAP experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELIUMTRAP (PS205) investigates the recently discovered anomalously long-lived states of antiprotons in various helium media. An overview is given of experiments stopping antiprotons in several phases of helium performed at LEAR in the last two years. (author)

  11. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  12. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  13. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  14. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  15. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  16. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  17. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  18. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  19. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  20. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  1. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  2. Prospects for Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world's most intense source of tagged D^0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  3. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  4. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration at CERN is investigating the anticipated benefit of antiproton radiotherapy. The experimental tasks have been twofold: 1) To quantify the radiobiological properties of the antiproton beam. 2) Perform absolute dosimetry on a pulsed antiproton beam. In order to do define ...

  5. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  6. Polarization of antiprotons by antiproton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of polarized antiproton beams at Fermilab is briefly reviewed. Two types of high-energy anti p polarimeters are described - the Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter and the Primakoff-effect polarimeter. The production of 8.9 GeV/c polarized antiprotons before entering the Fermilab accumulator ring is then discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs

  7. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  8. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  9. AMS-02 Antiprotons Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    Kappl, Rolf; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has released preliminary data on the antiproton fraction in cosmic rays. The surprisingly hard antiproton spectrum at high rigidity has triggered speculations about a possible primary antiproton component originating from dark matter annihilations. In this note, we employ newly available AMS-02 boron to carbon data to update the secondary antiproton flux within the standard two-zone diffusion model. The new background permits a considerably better fit to the measured antiproton fraction compared to previous estimates. This is mainly a consequence of the smaller slope of the diffusion coefficient favored by the new AMS-02 boron to carbon data.

  10. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  11. Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kartavtsev, O. I.

    1995-01-01

    Metastable antiprotonic helium atoms $^{3,4}\\! H\\! e\\bar pe$ have been discovered recently in experiments of the delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium media. These exotic atoms survive for an enormous time (about tens of microseconds) and carry the extremely large total angular momentum $L\\sim 30-40$. The theoretical treatment of the intrinsic properties of antiprotonic helium atoms, their formation and collisions with atoms and molecules is discussed.

  12. The CERN antiproton collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 108 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  13. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  14. Antiprotons at Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Bieber, J W; Engel, R; Gaisser, T K; Roesler, S; Stanev, T; Bieber, John W.; Engel, Ralph; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Roesler, Stefan; Stanev, Todor

    1999-01-01

    New measurements with good statistics will make it possible to observe the time variation of cosmic antiprotons at 1 AU through the approaching peak of solar activity. We report a new computation of the interstellar antiproton spectrum expected from collisions between cosmic protons and the interstellar gas. This spectrum is then used as input to a steady-state drift model of solar modulation, in order to provide predictions for the antiproton spectrum as well as the antiproton/proton ratio at 1 AU. Our model predicts a surprisingly large, rapid increase in the antiproton/proton ratio through the next solar maximum, followed by a large excursion in the ratio during the following decade.

  15. An Improved Antihydrogen Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Rita Rani

    2015-01-01

    The recent demonstration of trapped atomic antihydrogen for 15 to 1000 seconds is a milestone towards precise spectroscopy for tests of CPT invariance. The confinement of a total of 105±21 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap was made possible by several improved methods. Improved accumulation techniques give us the largest numbers of constituent particles yet: up to 10 million antiprotons and several billion positrons. A novel cooling protocol leads to 3.5 K antiprotons, the coldest ever obse...

  16. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  17. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  18. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  19. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  20. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  1. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  2. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  3. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H- ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H- ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼106 to 107 particles

  4. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  5. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  6. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    the volume targeted for irradiation. A major part of this peripheral dose arise from neutrons, which in particular are problematic due to their high RBE for secondary cancer incidence. We have measured the fast and thermal neutron spectrum in different geometrical configurations in order to experimentally...... the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...... the annihilation vertex inside the polystyrene phantom produced a response which corresponds to a neutron fluence of 8000 neutrons/cm2 per 107 antiprotons. This is equivalent to a neutron kerma of 1.4e-9 Gy (adult brain) per 107 antiprotons following ICRU 46. Conclusion: The thermalized part of the neutron...

  7. Portable Pbars, traps that travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of antiproton research utilizing relatively small scale storage devices for very large numbers of these particles opens the possibility of transporting these devices to a research site removed from the accelerator center that produced the antiprotons. Such a portable source of antiprotons could open many new areas of research and make antiprotons available to a new research community. At present antiprotons are available at energies down to 1 MeV. From a portable source these particles can be made available at energies ranging from several tens of kilovolts down to a few millielectron volts. These low energies are in the domain of interest to the atomic and condensed matter physicist. In addition such a source can be used as an injector for an accelerator which could increase the energy domain even further. Moreover, the availability of such a source at a university will open research with antiprotons to a broader range of students than possible at a centralized research facility. This report focuses on the use of ion traps, in particular cylindrical traps, for the antiproton storage device. These devices store the charged antiprotons in a combination of electric and magnet fields. At high enough density and low enough temperature the charged cloud will be susceptible to plasma instabilities. Present day ion trap work is just starting to explore this domain. Our assessment of feasibility is based on what could be done with present day technology and what future technology could achieve. We conclude our report with a radiation safety study that shows that about 1011 antiprotons can be transported safely, however the federal guidelines for this transport must be reviewed in detail. More antiprotons than this will require special transportation arrangements. 28 refs., 8 figs

  8. Primary population of antiprotonic helium states

    OpenAIRE

    Révai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2003-01-01

    A full quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident (lab) energies of the antiproton.

  9. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  10. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  11. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  12. Treatment Plans for Antiproton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus;

    Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the expectat...

  13. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  14. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  15. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  16. Efficient accumulation of antiprotons and positrons, production of slow mono-energetic beams, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) project, particularly the antiproton trapping and slow antiproton production, is discussed. An RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) installed in the ASACUSA beam line has an excellent deceleration efficiency of 25% providing 10-130keV antiprotons, which improves the final accumulation efficiency at least one and half orders of magnitude. The decelerated antiprotons are then injected in a large volume multiring trap, stored, and electron-cooled. About 1 million antiprotons are successfully accumulated per one AD shot and 10-500eV antiprotons are extracted as a mono-energetic beam. A UHV compatible positron accumulation is newly developed combining electron plasma and an ion cloud, which yields an accumulation rate as high as 400e **+s/mCi, two and a half orders of magnitude higher than other UHV compatible schemes. A new scheme to synthesize a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam is also discussed, which will play a vit...

  17. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  18. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  19. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  20. Antiproton Star Observed in Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Chupp, Warren W.; Goldhaber, Gerson; Segre,Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1955-12-01

    In connection with the antiproton investigation at the Bevatron we planned and carried out a photographic-emulsion exposure in a magnetically selected beam of negative particles. The magnetic system was identical to the first half (one deflecting magnet and one magnetic lens) of the system used in the antiproton experiment of Chamberlain, Segre, Wiegand, and Ypsilantis. The selected particles left the copper target in the forward direction with momentum 1.09 Bev/c.

  1. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  2. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  3. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  4. Measurement of Balmer and Lyman X-rays in antiprotonic hydrogen isotopes at pressures below 300 hPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Rohmann, D.; Schneider, M.; Egger, J.; Simons, L.M.; Elsener, K.

    1989-09-01

    X-rays of Balmer and Lyman transitions in antiprotonic hydrogen and of Balmer transitions in antiprotonic deuterium were observed at pressures below 300 hPa using Si(Li) semiconductor detectors. The measurement was performed at the LEAR-facility at a beam momentum of 202 MeV/c. In order to stop antiprotons in a low pressure gaseous target with high efficiency, a novel technique, the cyclotron trap has been used. Absolute yields were determined and compared with cascade calculations. A distinct difference in the cascade of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium is found. The parameters of strong interaction in antiprotonic hydrogen are determined to be /epsilon//sub 1s/=-(620+-100) eV, /Gamma//sub 1s/=(1130+-170) eV and /Gamma//sub 2p/=(32+-10) meV. (orig.).

  5. Low Energy Antiproton Ring experimental area

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The experimental area at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is seen. This set up was used to slow down antiprotons which had been produced by colliding a proton beam with a solid target. The experiments in the hall then took antiprotons from LEAR to perform antimatter studies. One such experiment, PS210, produced the world's first antihydrogen atoms.

  6. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  7. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  8. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force since acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, we have no direct knowledge of the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data taken by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: namely, the scattering length (f0) and effective range (d0). As direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, our result provides a fundamental ingr...

  9. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  10. X-rays from antiprotonic3He and4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Blüm, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D.; Egger, J.; Simons, L. M.; Elsener, K.

    1991-06-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si (Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be ɛ2p=(-17±4) eV, Γ2p=(25±9) eV and Γ3d=(2.14 ±0.18) meV for ¯p3He and ɛ2p=(-18±2) eV, Γ2p =(45±5) eV and Γ3d=(2.36±0.10) meV for ¯p4He.

  11. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  12. Detection of Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hydomako, Richard Allan

    The ALPHA experiment is an international effort to produce, trap, and perform precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen (the bound state of a positron and an antiproton). Based at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN, the ALPHA experiment has recently magnetically confined antihydrogen atoms for the first time. A crucial element in the observation of trapped antihydrogen is ALPHA’s silicon vertexing detector. This detector contains sixty silicon modules arranged in three concentric layers, and is able to determine the three-dimensional location of the annihilation of an antihydrogen atom by reconstructing the trajectories of the produced annihilation products. This dissertation focuses mainly on the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the software algorithms used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks are presented along with the routines used to estimate the annihilation location from the convergence of the identified tracks. It is shown...

  13. Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shochet, Melvyn J.

    1995-01-01

    Comment: Summary of the 10th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, Fermilab, May 9-13, 1995. Postscript file (34 pages with 82 embedded figures; 5.7 MB) available at http://www-cdf.fnal.gov/physics/conf95/cdf3225_pbarp_wkshp_summary.ps

  14. Example of an Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, O.; Chupp, W.W.; Ekspong, A.G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Lofgren, E.J.; Segre, E.; Wiegand, C.; Amaldi, E.; Baroni,G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-02-27

    The existence of antiprotons has recently been demonstrated at the Berkeley Bevatron by a counter experiment. The antiprotons were found among the momentum-analyzed (1190 Mev/c) negative particles emitted by a copper target bombarded by 6.2-Bev protons. Concurrently with the counter experiment, stacks of nuclear emulsions were exposed in the beam adjusted to 1090 Mev/c negative particles in an experiment designed to observe the properties of antiprotons when coming to rest. This required a 132 g/cm2 copper absorber to slow down the antiprotons sufficiently to stop them in the emulsion stack. Only one antiproton was found in stacks in which seven were expected, assuming a geometric interaction cross section for antiprotons in copper. It has now been found that the cross section in copper is about twice geometric, which explains this low yield.

  15. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  16. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  17. Physics with Antiprotons at PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PANDA experiment is part of the core project of the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany)[1]. One major component of the upgraded accelerator complex is the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) which will provide a high quality antiproton beam in the momentum range between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. PANDA, a fixed target experiment directly implemented in the HESR, will investigate antiproton annihilations with the aim to explore fundamental questions in the cross over region of the non perturbative and the strong QCD. Due to the planned extensive physics program a multipurpose detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, proper particle identification over a large momentum range, and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is required. After an overview about the goals and the detector design of the PANDA experiment major parts of the planned physics program will be discussed, namely the meson spectroscopy and the search for exotics in the charmonium and open charm region

  18. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  19. Ultra-low Energy Antiprotons at FLAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Welsch, C.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R; Orlov, D.; Wolf, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Accelerator Facility for Beams of Ions and Antiprotons at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. So far it is foreseen to accelerate the antiprotons to high energies (3-15 GeV) for meson spectroscopy and other nuclear and particle physics experiments in the HESR (High Energy Storage Ring). Within the planned complex of storage rings, it is possible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the possibility to create low en...

  20. Heating due to momentum transfer in low-energy positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, M.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of unexpectedly large elastic cross sections for the scattering of low-energy antiprotons from n ≤3 positronium (Ps) on the experimental implementation of antihydrogen formation via Ps-antiproton collisions. The integrated elastic cross sections, obtained using the two-center convergent close-coupling theory, can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than their counterparts for antihydrogen formation. The differential momentum transfer cross sections, which suppress the large cross sections at forward scattering angles, show remarkably rich behavior across all scattering angles. We discuss the implications of these findings for the heating, via momentum transfer, of clouds of trapped antiprotons that are typically used for the creation of antihydrogen.

  1. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  2. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  3. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  4. That was LEAP 05! or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-01

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  5. Antiproton--Proton Scattering Experiments with Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lenisa, P; Lenisa, Paolo; Rathmann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The document describes the physics case of the PAX experiment using polarized antiprotons, which has recently been proposed for the new Facility for Antiprotons and Ions Research (FAIR) at GSI--Darmstadt. Polarized antiprotons provide access to a wealth of single-- and double--spin observables, thereby opening a new window to physics uniquely accessible at the HESR. The polarized antiprotons would be most efficiently produced by spin--filtering in a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring (APR) using an internal polarized hydrogen gas target. In the proposed collider scenario of the PAX experiment, polarized protons stored in a COSY--like Cooler Storage Ring (CSR) up to momenta of 3.5 GeV/c are bombarded head--on with 15 GeV/c polarized antiprotons stored in the HESR. This asymmetric double--polarized antiproton--proton collider is ideally suited to map, e.g., the transversity distribution in the proton. The proposed detector consists of a large--angle apparatus optimized for the detection of Drell--Yan electron ...

  6. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  7. Interaction of antiproton with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hrtánková, J

    2015-01-01

    We performed fully self-consistent calculations of $\\bar{p}$-nuclear bound states within the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The G-parity motivated $\\bar{p}$-meson coupling constants were adjusted to yield potentials consistent with $\\bar{p}$-atom data. We confirmed large polarization effects of the nuclear core caused by the presence of the antiproton. The $\\bar{p}$ absorption in the nucleus was incorporated by means of the imaginary part of a phenomenological optical potential. The phase space reduction for the $\\bar{p}$ annihilation products was taken into account. The corresponding $\\bar{p}$ width in the medium significantly decreases, however, it still remains considerable for the $\\bar{p}$ potential consistent with experimental data.

  8. The Penning trap system used by the BASE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN's AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles.

  9. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  10. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    AMS-02 is a multi-purpose high-precision particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiprotons measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small fraction of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is needed. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector and the time-of-flight system help to separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The strategies to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement in different energy regions are presented. Methods to suppress and the effect of the backgrounds to the antiproton-to-proton ratio are discussed.

  11. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  12. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  13. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  14. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  15. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  16. Low energy antiproton possibilities at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical feasibility of creating a pure antiproton beam at the AGS has been studied. The scheme involves an antiproton target station and transport back to the Booster synchrotron, which acts as both a purifier and accelerator/decelerator. This proposal would be very attractive to the user community since this operation could run parasitically (transparently) to the AGS operating modes. The energy range of antiprotons can be as low as 2 MeV to as high as 5 GeV. The intensity of the beam is estimated to be 7 x 107/sec above 2.5 GeV/c and 4 x 104/sec at 200 MeV/c

  17. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  18. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-08-01

    We present calculations for the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in p-bar-Cu and in p-bar-Ag collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the antibinding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross sections for protons.

  19. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  20. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver;

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...... for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Finally we compare the antiproton depth-dose curve with that of protons, and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons....

  1. Antiproton-proton resonant like channels in J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Loiseau, B

    2005-01-01

    The BES collaboration has recently observed a strong enhancement close to the proton-antiproton threshold in the J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton. Such a structure can be explained by a traditional nucleon-antinucleon model. The near threshold 1S0 bound state and/or the well-established 3P0 resonant state found in this nucleon-antinucleon interaction can adequately describe the BES data.

  2. Ionization in antiproton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing the semiclassical approximation we calculate within the coupled-state formalism the ionization probability in antiproton-hydrogen (anti p+H) collisions. In particular we investigate the adiabatic ionization at the distance of closest approach in almost central collisions. Striking differences in the electron excitation probability compared with proton-hydrogen (p+H) collisions are predicted. (orig.)

  3. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    -LET components resulting from the annihilation. Though, the calculations of dose-averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity. Materials and Methods Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating...

  4. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first e...

  5. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  6. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  7. X-ray transitions from antiprotonic noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of antiprotonic X-ray transitions at high principal quantum numbers and the occurrence of electronic X-ray in antiprotonic argon krypton, and xenon is analysed with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The shell by shell ionisation by Auger electron emission, characterised by appearance and disappearance of X-ray lines, is followed through the antiprotonic cascade by considering transition and binding energies of both the antiproton and remaining electrons. A number of additional lines in the X-ray spectra have been tentatively assigned to electronic transitions caused by electronic de-excitation after Auger emission during the antiprotonic cascade. A few lines remain unexplained so far or are not unambiguously assigned. The complexity of the electronic states cannot be resolved with semiconductor detectors. Hopefully, in future high resolution devices like crystal spectrometers and Auger electron spectroscopy at antiproton at GSI will resolve this complexity

  8. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  9. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies

  10. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  11. Search For Magnetic Monopoles Possibly Produced By Proton-antiproton Collisions At The Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles can be used to explain the quantization of electric charge, and are predicted by gauge field theory. If monopoles exist, they could have been produced by the proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider—the highest energy accelerator existing in the world, and trapped in the CDF and DØ detectors. We took Al, Be, and Pb samples from the Tevatron and used the induction technique with SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) to detect monopoles in the samples. We did not find monopoles, but we have set new limits for the monopole mass and the relavant cross section based on a Drell-Yan model and Monte Carlo calculation.

  12. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  13. Shielding calculations for the antiproton target area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations performed in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab antiproton target hall are summarized. The following radiological considerations were examined: soil activation, residual activity of components, and beam-on radiation. In addition, at the request of the designers, the energy deposition in the proposed graphite beam dump was examined for several targeting conditions in order to qualitatively determine its ability to survive

  14. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with PAMELA

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles, and especially antiparticles, in the cosmic radiation. The apparatus is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite which was launched on 15 June 2006. PAMELA has been traveling around the earth along an elliptical and semi-polar orbit for almost five years. It mainly consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, a time of flight system and an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, which allows antiprotons to be ...

  15. Looking for new gravitational forces with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quite general arguments based on the principle of equivalence and modern field theory show that it is possible for the gravitational acceleration of antimatter to be different than that for matter. Further, there is no experimental evidence to rule out the possibility. In fact, some evidence indicates there may be unexpected effects. Thus, the planned experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons is of fundamental importance. 20 refs., 3 figs

  16. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined. (author)

  17. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  18. Antiproton production in relativistic Si-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured antiproton production cross sections as functions of centrality in collisions of 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon 28Si ions with targets of Al, Cu, and Pb. For all targets, the antiproton yields increase linearly with the number of projectile nucleons that have interacted, and show little target dependence. We discuss the implications of this result on the production and absorption of antiprotons within the nuclear medium

  19. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  20. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  1. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  2. A study of the reactions antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ- at 14.6 GeV/c and a study of charged multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of two reactions on deuterium has been performed with incident antiprotons of 14.6 GeV/c: antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ-. The final states are dominated by Δ(1236) resonance production and in the coherent reaction the d* effect is observed as at lower incident momenta. At 14.6 GeV/c, it seems that the diffraction dissociation process as well for the incident particle as for the target takes a large part of the production mechanism for the two reactions. A study of charged multiplicity distributions in antiproton-neutron interactions is presented at 5.5, 9.3 and 14.6 GeV/c. The topological cross sections as well as various statistical moments obtained from the charged multiplicities are studied as functions of the incident momentum. A comparison between our results and antiproton-proton and pp data shows, that in the range of incident momenta used, a scaling function which describes antiproton-N and proton-proton interactions does not exist as expected from the KNO model (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen model)

  3. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  4. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  5. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quint, Wolfgang; Vogel, Manuel (eds.) [GSI Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    The individual topics are covered by leading experts in the respective fields of research. Provides readers with present theory and experiments in this field. A useful reference for researchers. This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  6. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  7. An Update on the Depth-Dose Curve of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Knudsen, Helge;

    Purpose: The CERN AD-4/ACE project aims to measure the relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons. We have revisited previously published data for the antiproton depth-dose curve [1], where the relative dose deposition normalized to a point in the plateau region was plotted. In this revision...... we refine the experimental set-up to obtain absolute dose per primary particle, and compare these with simulations. Materials and Methods: Scrutinizing the geometrical setup, we could calculate beam scattering along the antiproton beam, which enables replotting the depth-dose curve as absolute dose...... is annihilating on. Precise modelling of the detector is therefore inevitable. The missing energy in the annihilation peak remains to be explained, but may be related to an overestimation of inelastic cross sections of the antiprotons. [1] Bassler, N., et al., The antiproton depth-dose curve in water, Phys. Med...

  8. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  9. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  10. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime

  11. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  12. Demonstration of the Double Penning Trap Technique with a Single Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Mooser, A; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Nagahama, H.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2013-01-01

    Spin flips of a single proton were driven in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. For the spin-state analysis the proton was transported into a second Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic bottle, and the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect was applied. This first demonstration of the double Penning trap technique with a single proton suggests that the antiproton magnetic moment measurement can potentially be improved by three orders of magnitude or more.

  13. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  14. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons...... significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...

  15. Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics and Penning traps

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yunhua

    2016-01-01

    The prospects are explored for testing Lorentz- and CPT-violating quantum electrodynamics in experiments with Penning traps. We present the Lagrange density of Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics with operators of mass dimensions up to six, and we discuss some of its properties. The theory is used to derive Lorentz- and CPT-violating perturbative shifts of the energy levels of a particle confined to a Penning trap. Observable signals are discussed for trapped electrons, positrons, protons, and antiprotons. Existing experimental measurements on anomaly frequencies are used to extract new or improved bounds on numerous coefficients for Lorentz and CPT violation, using sidereal variations of observables and comparisons between particles and antiparticles.

  16. Prospects for antiproton physics, my perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelert, Walter, E-mail: w.oelert@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    These closing remarks are not supposed to be a summary talk, for this please have a look to the individual contributions to be published in the proceedings, but rather some considerations on future prospects for antiproton physics. However, first I would like to appreciate the organizers idea for giving me the opportunity to thank them for a well balanced, exciting and interesting conference LEAP-2011 in this marvelous city of Vancouver. I am sure we all loved to be here and enjoyed the hospitality and the bond of friendship we could experience during these days. We appreciate the patience and help of all the local organizers where I especially would like to mention Jana Thomson for her endless and helpful assignment. Thank you all-the participants, the speakers, the conference chair, the sponsors-for making this conference a success and we are looking forward to the next occasion in this series of meetings which will be celebrated in Uppsala.

  17. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  18. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy: astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date ap measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different as...

  19. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  20. Cosmic Antiproton Constraints on Effective Interactions of the Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  1. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  2. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments

  3. Low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations were performed using the impact parameter method for antiproton and proton collisions with alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen molecules. The targets are described as effective one-electron systems using appropriate model potentials. The proton data verify the employed method while the results for antiprotons improve the literature on these systems considerably. Cross sections for ionization and excitation as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping power will be presented.

  4. X-rays from antiprotonic sup 3 He and sup 4 He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Egger, J.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-02-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si(Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-17{plus minus}4) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(25{plus minus}9) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.14{plus minus}0.18) meV for anti p{sup 3}He and {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-18{plus minus}2) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(45{plus minus}5) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.36{plus minus}0.10) meV for anti p{sup 4}He. (orig.).

  5. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  6. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  7. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  8. Antiproton-impact ionization of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization processes in antiproton collisions with H2 are studied by direct solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a one-electron 3D wavefunction in the field of H+2 is used to calculate single-ionization cross sections at incident energies ranging from 50 keV to 1.5 MeV. Averaging over the molecular orientations, the single-ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with time-dependent basis set calculations and experiment. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a two-electron 6D wavefunction in the field of H2+2 is used to calculate single- and double-ionization cross sections at an incident energy of 100 keV. Initiatory 6D results for the H+2 production cross section range are somewhat lower than experiment, while the H+ production cross section range brackets experiment.

  9. Elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last two years very interesting results have been collected at LEAR on both the elementary pantip and the antip nucleus interactions. A review of all the interesting experimental results already available is far beyond the scope of the present talk. Its topic will be essentially limited to report on the new experimental informations dealing with the knowledge of the fundamental properties of the antip p elementary interaction and the determination of the characteristics of the antip nucleus interaction. The results of the antip p cross sections measured at low momenta by the PS173 and PS172 experiments are discussed. The antip nucleus elastic scattering angular distributions collected by the PS184 experiment have significantly contributed to define the properties of the p nucleus optical potential and stimulated a lot of microscopic calculations. The results are reviewed. A comparison to the informations obtained from the measurements of X-rays in antiprotonic atoms done by the PS176 and PS186 experiments is given. The interpretation of the inelastic scattering data measured for the 12C(antip, antip)12C* system at 47 and 180 MeV for various discrete states is presented: special emphasis will be given to the study of spin-flip transitions to unnatural parity states which would provide significant constant on the isovector tensor component of the NantiN interaction. Status on the experimental study of the (antip, p) reaction is discussed

  10. Precision Comparison of $\\bar{p}$ and $ p $ Masses in a Penning Trap

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    PS196 : Precision Comparison of $\\bar{p}$ and p Masses in a Penning Trap For the first time, antiprotons with energies 10$^{10}$ times lower than those in LEAR can be stored and studied over long times in a small apparatus. The first measurement at this new, low energy frontier is a 1000-fold improvement in the measured antiproton mass. The mass dependent cyclotron frequencies, first for antiprotons then for protons orbiting in the same magnetic field, are compared to establish that the antiproton and proton masses are the same to at least 4~parts in 10$^8$. This is the most stringent test of whether a baryon system is invariant under CPT transformations. A special trap geometry and a superconducting solenoid which cancels fluctuations in the magnetic field in the accelerator hall were crucial to this greatly improved measurement. The current objective is to improve the precision by one or two orders of magnitude. Antiprotons from LEAR at 5.9~MeV, slow below 3~keV via collisions in a thin metal window, and ar...

  11. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  12. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  13. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and pionic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiproton) experiment of CERN has observed two-photon spectroscopy by making non-linear transitions of the antiprotons which have occupied highly excited levels. The metastable antiproton helium atoms are studied by irradiating two laser light photons propagating in the counter direction. As the result, the spectrum of narrow line width was observed by making the Doppler width of the resonant transition to decrease. And the anti-proton helium transition frequency was measured with the accuracy of (2.3∼5) X10-9. The mass ratio of the antiproton and the electron has been decided to be Mp/me =1836.152674(23) from the comparison of quantum electrodynamics calculation and the present experimental result. The pion-Helium experiment instrument has been also constructed at the ring cyclotron of PSI (Paul Sherer Institute) toward the successful laser spectroscopy of this atom. When this atom is observed, the π- mass can be obtained with the accuracy higher than 6∼8 orders of magnitude which may contribute to the direct measurement of the upper limit value of muon neutrino mass in the Particle Data Book Mass although various difficulties may be encountered. This report describes briefly the laser spectroscopy at first and then the recent situation of the experiments. (S. Funahashi)

  14. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  15. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  16. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with highenergy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature’s fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 1014 for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational be...

  17. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    purpose/objective The AD-4/ACE collaboration has recently performed experiments to directly measure the RBE of antiprotons. Antiprotons have very similar stopping power compared to protons, but when they come to rest, antiprotons will annihilate on a target nucleus and thereby release almost 2 Ge...

  18. Many Facets of Strangeness Nuclear Physics with Stored Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Pochodzalla, Josef; Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Rojo, Marta Martinez; Steinen, Marcell; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharova, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent a unparalleled factory for hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of strange hadronic systems with unprecedented precision. The behavior of hyperons and -- for the first time -- of antihyperons in nuclear systems can be studied under well controlled conditions. The exclusive production of $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ pairs in antiproton-nucleus interactions probe the neutron and proton distribution in the nuclear periphery and will help to sample the neutron skin. For the first time, high resolution $\\gamma$-spectroscopy of doubly strange nuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of double hypernuclei with mesons beams at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange $\\Xi$-atoms are feasible and even the pr...

  19. Antiproton-Nucleus Interaction and Coulomb Effect at High Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; WU Qing; GU Yun-Ting; MA Wei-Xing; TAN Zhen-Qiang; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The Coulomb effect in high energy antiproton-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering from 12C and 16O is studied in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory for five kinetic energies ranged from 0.23 to 1.83 GeV.A microscopic shell-model nuclear wave functions, Woods-Saxon single-particle wave functions, and experimental pN amplitudes are used in the calculations. The results show that the Coulomb effect is of paramount importance for filling up the dips of differential cross sections. We claim that the present result for inelastic scattering of antiproton-12C is sufficiently reliable to be a guide for measurements in the very near future. We also believe that antiproton nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering may produce new information on both the nuclear structure and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, in particular the p-neutron interaction.

  20. The PANDA Experiment at FAIR - Subatomic Physics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction leads to spectacular phenomena, such as the formation of hadronic matter, color confinement, and the generation of the mass of visible matter. To get deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms remains one of the most challenging tasks within the field of subatomic physics. The antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt (PANDA) collaboration has the ambition to address key questions in this field by exploiting a cooled beam of antiprotons at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) combined with a state-of-the-art and versatile detector. This contribution will address some of the unique features of PANDA that give rise to a promising physics program together with state-of-the-art technological developments.

  1. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  2. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  3. Improvements to Antiproton Accumulator to Recycler Transfers at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, J.P.; Drendel, B.; Vander Muelen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since 2005, the Recycler has become the sole storage ring for antiprotons used in the Tevatron Collider. The operational role of the Antiproton Source has shifted to exclusively producing antiprotons for periodic transfers to the Recycler. The process of transferring the antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Recycler has been greatly improved, leading to a dramatic reduction in the transfer time. The reduction in time has been accomplished with both an improvement in transfer efficiency and an increase in average stacking rate. This paper will describe the improvements that have streamlined the transfer process and other changes that contributed to a significant increase in the number of antiprotons available to the Collider.

  4. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.;

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 Ge......V. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of similar...

  5. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  6. Beam Diagnostics for Measurements of Antiproton Annihilation Cross Sections at Ultra-low Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todoroki K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons collaboration of CERN is currently attempting to measure the antiproton-nucleus in-flight annihilation cross sections on thin target foils of C, Pd, and Pt at 130 keV of kinetic energy. The low-energy antiprotons were supplied by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD and a radio-frequency quadrupole decelerator. For this measurement, a beam profile monitor based on secondary electron emission was developed. Data from this monitor was used to ensure that antiprotons were precisely tuned to the position of an 80-mm-diameter experimental target, by measuring the spatial profile of 200-ns-long beam pulses containing 105 − 106 antiprotons with an active area of 40 mm × 40 mm and a spatial resolution of 4 mm. By using this monitor, we succeeded in finely tuning antiproton beams on the target, and observed some annihilation events originating from the target.

  7. Secondary antiprotons as a Galactic Dark Matter probe

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel determination of the astrophysical uncertainties associated to the secondary antiproton flux originating from cosmic-ray spallation on the interstellar gas. We select a set of propagation models compatible with the recent B/C data from PAMELA, and find those providing minimal and maximal antiproton fluxes in different energy ranges. We use this result to determine the most conservative bounds on relevant Dark Matter (DM) annihilation channels: We find that the recent claim of a DM interpretation of a gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Center region cannot be ruled out by current antiproton data. Finally, we discuss the impact of the recently released preliminary data from AMS-02. In particular, we provide a reference model compatible with proton, helium and B/C spectra from this experiment. Remarkably, the main propagation parameters of this model are in perfect agreement with the best fit presented in our earlier statistical analyses. We also show that the antiproton-to-proton ratio does not...

  8. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  9. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  10. Beam Measurement Systems for the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Odier, P; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Spickermann, T

    2001-01-01

    The new, low-energy antiproton physics facility at CERN has been successfully commissioned and has been delivering decelerated antiprotons at 100 MeV/c since July 2000. The AD consists of one ring where the 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced from a production target are injected, rf manipulated, stochastically cooled, decelerated (with further stages involving additional stochastic and electron cooling and rf manipulation) and extracted at 100 MeV/c. While proton test beams of sufficient intensity could be used for certain procedures in AD commissioning, this was not possible for setting-up and routine operation. Hence, special diagnostics systems had to be developed to obtain the beam and accelerator characteristics using the weak antiproton beams of a few 10E7 particles at all momenta from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c. These include systems for position measurement, intensity, beam size measurements using transverse aperture limiters and scintillators and Schottky-based tools. This paper gives an overall view of...

  11. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  12. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  13. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-13

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H(-)) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton (q/m)p- to that for the proton (q/m)p and obtain (q/m)p-/(q/m)p − 1 =1(69) × 10(-12). The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of <720 parts per trillion. By following the arguments of ref. 11, our result can be interpreted as a stringent test of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity using baryonic antimatter, and it sets a new limit on the gravitational anomaly parameter of |α − 1| < 8.7 × 10(-7). PMID:26268189

  14. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  15. Secondary electron emission in antiproton-carbon foil collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K. (Inst. of Physics, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Andersen, L.H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. (orig.).

  16. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  17. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  18. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  19. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  20. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation: antiprotons vs. pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c bar p and π- beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z ≅ 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code

  1. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  2. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  3. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  4. Current status of antiproton impact ionization of atoms and molecules: theoretical and experimental perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Tom; Knudsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical progress in the field of antiproton-impact-induced ionization of atoms and molecules is reviewed. We describe the techniques used to measure ionization cross sections and give an overview of the experimental results supplemented by tables of all existing data. An...... status of our understanding of antiproton impact ionization. The related issues of energy loss measurements and antiproton therapy are briefly described and directions for possible future work are pointed out as well....

  5. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  6. Search for antiproton-{sup 15}N bound state in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dexu [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Larionov, Alexei; Mishustin, Igor [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ma, Yue [RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Maas, Frank [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the antiproton-nucleus potential (antimatter-mater potential), and prepare a possible experiment for the PANDA spectrometer at FAIR facility, we carried out a calculation with the Giessen-Boltzman-Uehling-Uhlenbeck(GiBUU) model. The calculation was performed for an antiproton beam energy 1.5 GeV and an {sup 16}O target. The interesting events, which provide information about the antiproton-{sup 15}N potential, are required to have one knocked-out proton in forward direction and two or more pions from the antiproton annihilation at rest. Preliminary results of these studies are presented.

  7. Single and double ionization of helium by fast antiproton and proton impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Mo-dash-barller, S.P.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.H.; Uggerho-dash-barj, E.

    1986-10-27

    The first ion-atom--collision data obtained with antiprotons are presented. We measured the single- and double-ionization cross section for 0.5-5-MeV antiprotons and protons colliding with helium. For ion energies above --2 MeV, the single-ionization cross section is the same for protons and antiprotons. However, surprisingly, the double-ionization cross section for antiprotons is approximately a factor of 2 larger than that for protons. The present data constitute a challenge for future theoretical models of charged-particle--atom collisions.

  8. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Charged pion albedo induced by cosmic antiproton interactions with the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the calculations of the energy spectra and fluxes of single and double albedo charged pions generated by cosmic proton and antiproton interactions with the lunar surface. Properties of such spectra and related fluxes are investigated in order to clarify some important facets of the antiproton detection via charged pion albedo flux from the lunar surface. Pion albedo measurement may represent a novel approach for the identification of cosmic antiprotons using the lunar surface as a calorimeter. Future scientific programs on the Moon designed to measure antiproton flux may benefit from the results of these calculations. (author)

  10. Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics and Penning traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunhua; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2016-09-01

    The prospects are explored for testing Lorentz- and C P T -violating quantum electrodynamics in experiments with Penning traps. We present the Lagrange density of Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics with operators of mass dimensions up to 6, and we discuss some of its properties. The theory is used to derive Lorentz- and C P T -violating perturbative shifts of the energy levels of a particle confined to a Penning trap. Observable signals are discussed for trapped electrons, positrons, protons, and antiprotons. Existing experimental measurements on anomaly frequencies are used to extract new or improved bounds on numerous coefficients for Lorentz and C P T violation, using sidereal variations of observables and comparisons between particles and antiparticles.

  11. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H -J; Winters, D F A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying a single trapped radioactive ion, its nuclear decay can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Such experiments on highly charged ions at extremely low energy will become possible by the HITRAP facility which is currently being built up at GSI. Also the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be briefly described which is expected to be operational by 2014.

  12. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  13. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  14. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-01-01

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation$^{1}$ is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry—that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime—although it is model dependent$^{2}$. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests—using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others—have been performed$^{3}$, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available$^{4, 5, 6, 7, 8}$. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H$^−$) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare th...

  15. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  16. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  17. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-06

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge. (orig.).

  18. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Slevin, J. [Department of Experimental Physics, St. Patrick`s College, Maynooth (Ireland); Charlton, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-4234 (Switzerland)

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  19. Comparison of Optimized Single and Multifield Irradiation Plans of Antiproton, Proton and Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Karaiskos, Pantelis;

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotons have been suggested as a possibly superior modality for radiotherapy, due to the energy released when antiprotons annihilate, which enhances the Bragg peak and introduces a high-LET component to the dose. However, concerns are expressed about the inferior lateral dose distribution...

  20. Antiproton small momentum transfer charge exchange scattering on protons at 30 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton charge exchange scattering on protons anti pp→anti nn is investigated with 30 GeV/c antiprotons at the IHEP accelerator. The experiment confirms the existence of a structure at small angles in the angular distribution of this reaction at high energies, observed earlier

  1. FAIR: The accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkov, Boris [FAIR JCR GSI, Darmstad (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation outlines the current status of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). It is expected that the actual construction of the facility will commence in 2010 as the project has raised more than one billion euro in funding. The sequence and scope of the construction of the accelerator modules in accordance with modularized start version are described. Outstanding research opportunities offered by the modularized start version for all scientific FAIR communities from early on will allow to bridge the time until FAIR's completion with a world-leading research program. The green paper outlining a realistic path to achieve this goal is discussed.

  2. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  3. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  4. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  5. Measurement of 0.25 endash 3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balloon-borne isotope matter-antimatter experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on 16 endash 17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 GeV. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of ∼107 yr. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Study of doubly strange systems using stored antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Olshevskiy, A.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfarth, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martìnez Rojo, M.; Marta, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espì, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.

    2016-10-01

    Bound nuclear systems with two units of strangeness are still poorly known despite their importance for many strong interaction phenomena. Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent an unparalleled factory for various hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of systems which contain two or even more units of strangeness at the P ‾ ANDA experiment at FAIR. For the first time, high resolution γ-spectroscopy of doubly strange ΛΛ-hypernuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of ΛΛ-hypernuclei at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange Ξ--atoms will be feasible and even the production of Ω--atoms will be within reach. The latter might open the door to the | S | = 3 world in strangeness nuclear physics, by the study of the hadronic Ω--nucleus interaction. For the first time it will be possible to study the behavior of Ξ‾+ in nuclear systems under well controlled conditions.

  7. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  8. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  9. zTrap: zebrafish gene trap and enhancer trap database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Akira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed genetic methods in zebrafish by using the Tol2 transposable element; namely, transgenesis, gene trapping, enhancer trapping and the Gal4FF-UAS system. Gene trap constructs contain a splice acceptor and the GFP or Gal4FF (a modified version of the yeast Gal4 transcription activator gene, and enhancer trap constructs contain the zebrafish hsp70l promoter and the GFP or Gal4FF gene. By performing genetic screens using these constructs, we have generated transgenic zebrafish that express GFP and Gal4FF in specific cells, tissues and organs. Gal4FF expression is visualized by creating double transgenic fish carrying a Gal4FF transgene and the GFP reporter gene placed downstream of the Gal4-recognition sequence (UAS. Further, the Gal4FF-expressing cells can be manipulated by mating with UAS effector fish. For instance, when fish expressing Gal4FF in specific neurons are crossed with the UAS:TeTxLC fish carrying the tetanus neurotoxin gene downstream of UAS, the neuronal activities are inhibited in the double transgenic fish. Thus, these transgenic fish are useful to study developmental biology and neurobiology. Description To increase the usefulness of the transgenic fish resource, we developed a web-based database named zTrap http://kawakami.lab.nig.ac.jp/ztrap/. The zTrap database contains images of GFP and Gal4FF expression patterns, and genomic DNA sequences surrounding the integration sites of the gene trap and enhancer trap constructs. The integration sites are mapped onto the Ensembl zebrafish genome by in-house Blat analysis and can be viewed on the zTrap and Ensembl genome browsers. Furthermore, zTrap is equipped with the functionality to search these data for expression patterns and genomic loci of interest. zTrap contains the information about transgenic fish including UAS reporter and effector fish. Conclusion zTrap is a useful resource to find gene trap and enhancer trap fish lines that express GFP

  10. Pumped helium system for cooling positron and electron traps to 1.2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrubel, J.; Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Larochelle, P.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Borbely, J. S.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2011-06-01

    Extremely precise tests of fundamental particle symmetries should be possible via laser spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen ( H¯) atoms. H¯ atoms that can be trapped must have an energy in temperature units that is below 0.5 K—the energy depth of the deepest magnetic traps that can currently be constructed with high currents and superconducting technology. The number of atoms in a Boltzmann distribution with energies lower than this trap depth depends sharply upon the temperature of the thermal distribution. For example, ten times more atoms with energies low enough to be trapped are in a thermal distribution at a temperature of 1.2 K than for a temperature of 4.2 K. To date, H¯ atoms have only been produced within traps whose electrode temperature is 4.2 K or higher. A lower temperature apparatus is desirable if usable numbers of atoms that can be trapped are to eventually be produced. This report is about the pumped helium apparatus that cooled the trap electrodes of an H¯ apparatus to 1.2 K for the first time. Significant apparatus challenges include the need to cool a 0.8 m stack of 37 trap electrodes separated by only a mm from the substantial mass of a 4.2 K Ioffe trap and the substantial mass of a 4.2 K solenoid. Access to the interior of the cold electrodes must be maintained for antiprotons, positrons, electrons and lasers.

  11. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  12. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  13. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap-ni...

  14. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...... compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. The results are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities....

  15. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  16. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  17. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  18. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  19. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  20. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape;

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  1. Technical design report for the PANDA (AntiProton Annihilations at Darmstadt) Straw Tube Tracker. Strong interaction studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Q.; Xu, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Aab, A.; Albrecht, M.; Becker, J.; Csapo, A.; Feldbauer, F.; Fink, M.; Friedel, P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Held, T.; Klask, L.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Leiber, S.; Leyhe, M.; Motzko, C.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pychy, J.; Roth, B.; Schroeder, T.; Schulze, J.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Trifterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J. [Universitaet Bochum I. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Beck, R.; Bianco, S.; Brinkmann, K.T.; Hammann, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Kaiser, D.; Kliemt, R.; Kube, M.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Schnell, R.; Thoma, U.; Vlasov, P.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H.G. [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bianconi, A. [Universita di Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pantelica, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Serbina, L.; Tarta, P.D. [Institutul National de C and D pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' , Bukarest-Magurele (Romania); Kaplan, D. [IIT, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago (United States); Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K. [AGH, University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)] [and others

    2013-02-15

    This document describes the technical layout and the expected performance of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT), the main tracking detector of the PANDA target spectrometer. The STT encloses a Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) for the inner tracking and is followed in beam direction by a set of GEM stations. The tasks of the STT are the measurement of the particle momentum from the reconstructed trajectory and the measurement of the specific energy loss for a particle identification. Dedicated simulations with full analysis studies of certain proton-antiproton reactions, identified as being benchmark tests for the whole PANDA scientific program, have been performed to test the STT layout and performance. The results are presented, and the time lines to construct the STT are described. (orig.)

  2. Measurements of the Decays $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$, and $B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions of $B^0$ decays to multi-body final states containing protons, based on 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. We measure the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.13\\pm0.06\\pm0.08)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.01\\pm0.10\\pm0.09)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(3.38\\pm0.14\\pm0.29)\\times 10^{-4}$, and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(4.81\\pm0.22\\pm0.44)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We present a search for the charmed pentaquark state, $\\Theta_c(3100)$ observed by H1 and put limits on the branching fraction ${\\cal B} (B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c \\to D^{*-}\\proton)<14\\times10^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c\\to D^-\\proton)<9\\time...

  3. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; /Carleton U.; Phillips, Thomas J.; /Duke U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Hbar Technol., West Chicago /IIT, Chicago /CHEP, Taegu /Luther Coll. /Michigan U. /Northwestern U. /Notre Dame U. /St. Xavier U., Chicago

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  4. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0. 2 and 3 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The ''Z{sub 1}{sup 3} contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made. (orig.).

  5. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0.2 and 3 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The " Z13 contribution" to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made.

  6. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  7. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  8. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  9. Excitons in Electrostatic Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Hammack, A. T.; Gippius, N. A.; Andreev, G. O.; Butov, L. V.; Hanson, M.; Gossard, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider in-plane electrostatic traps for indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells, where the traps are formed by a laterally modulated gate voltage. An intrinsic obstacle for exciton confinement in electrostatic traps is an in-plane electric field that can lead to exciton dissociation. We propose a design to suppress the in-plane electric field and, at the same time, to effectively confine excitons in the electrostatic traps. We present calculations for various classes of electrostatic ...

  10. Duponchelia water-trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deventer, van P.

    2008-01-01

    How can the harmful Duponchelia insect best be trapped for optimum detection? A water trap was found to be most effective in a field test by Plant Research International. Another advantage is the low maintenance required by this trap. The composition of the Duponchelia sex pheromone was identified j

  11. Do poverty traps exist ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kraay, Aart; McKenzie, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on the existence of poverty traps, understood as self-reinforcing mechanisms through which poor individuals or countries remain poor. Poverty traps have captured the interest of many development policy makers, because poverty traps provide a theoretically coherent explanation for persistent poverty. They also suggest that temporary policy intervent...

  12. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  13. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelke, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fornengo, N. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Masiero, A. [Pavoa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Pietroni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  14. Antiproton Flux in Cosmic Ray Propagation Models with Anisotropic Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grajek, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Recently a cosmic ray propagation model has been introduced, where anisotropic diffusion is used as a mechanism to allow for $\\mathcal{O}(100)$ km/s galactic winds. This model predicts a reduced antiproton background flux, suggesting an excess is being observed. We implement this model in GALPROP v50.1 and perform a $\\chi^2$ analysis for B/C, $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be, and the recent PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ datasets. By introducing a power-index parameter $\\alpha$ that dictates the dependence of the diffusion coefficient $D_{xx}$ on height $|z|$ away from the galactic plane, we confirm that isotropic diffusion models with $\\alpha=0$ cannot accommodate high velocity convective winds suggested by ROSAT, while models with $\\alpha=1$ ($D_{xx}\\propto |z|$) can give a very good fit. A fit to B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be data predicts a lower $\\bar{p}/p$ flux ratio than the PAMELA measurement at energies between approximately 2 GeV to 20 GeV. A combined fit including in addition the $\\bar{p}/p$ data is marginal, suggesting only a...

  15. Studying the potential of antihyperons in nuclei with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between an antibaryon and a nucleus may shed light on the short range antibaryon-baryon force in a unique way. However, because of the deep imaginary part of the nuclear potential of antibaryons, the physics of antihyperons in nuclei is hitherto an uncharted territory. Recently it was proposed to use transverse momentum correlations of exclusively produced antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-nucleus collisions to obtain information on the antihyperon potentials relative to that of the corresponding hyperon. In the present study we use the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling- Uhlenbeck Transportmodell (GiBUU) to explore the production of exclusive hyperon-antihyperon pairs close to threshold. Unlike the schematic calculation, these GiBBU simulations take e.g. important rescattering effects into account. In case of anti p + 20Ne → anti ΛΛ+X we confirm a significant sensitivity of transverse momentum correlations to the nuclear potential of Λs. We also explore the feasibility of such measurements at the PANDA experiment of the international facility FAIR.

  16. Near-threshold behavior of positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Bray, A. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    Using the convergent close-coupling theory we study the threshold behavior of cross sections for positronium (Ps) of energy E scattering on antiprotons. In the case of Ps (1 s ) elastic scattering, simple power laws are observed for all partial waves studied. The partial-wave summed cross section is nearly constant, and dominates the antihydrogen formation cross section at all considered energies, even though the latter is exothermic and behaves as 1 /E1 /2 . For Ps (2 s ), oscillations spanning orders of magnitude on top of the 1 /E behavior are found in the elastic and quasielastic cross sections. The antihydrogen formation is influenced by dipole-supported resonances below the threshold of inelastic processes. Resonance energies form a geometric progression relative to the threshold. The exothermic antihydrogen formation cross sections behave as 1 /E at low energies, but are oscillation free. We demonstrate that all these rich features are reproduced by the threshold theory developed by Gailitis [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15, 3423 (1982), 10.1088/0022-3700/15/19/012].

  17. Elastic scattering, polarization and absorption of relativistic antiprotons on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B

    2016-01-01

    We perform Glauber model calculations of the antiproton-nucleus elastic and quasielastic scattering and absorption in the beam momentum range $\\sim 0.5\\div10$ GeV/c. A good agreement of our calculations with available LEAR data and with earlier Glauber model studies of the $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering allows us to make predictions at the beam momenta of $\\sim 10$ GeV/c, i.e at the regime of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The comparison with the proton-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections shows that the diffractive minima are much deeper in the $\\bar p A$ case due to smaller absolute value of the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the elementary elastic amplitude. Significant polarization signal for $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering at 10 GeV/c is expected. We have also revealed a strong dependence of the $\\bar p A$ absorption cross section on the slope parameter of the transverse momentum dependence of the elementary $\\bar pN$ amplitude. The $\\bar p A$ optical potential is discussed.

  18. Antiproton constraints on dark matter annihilations from internal electroweak bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion, annihilations into two fermions and one gauge boson could have, for some choices of the parameters of the model, a non-negligible cross-section. Using a toy model of leptophilic dark matter, we calculate the constraints on the annihilation cross-section into two electrons and one weak gauge boson from the PAMELA measurements of the cosmic antiproton-to-proton flux ratio. Furthermore, we calculate the maximal astrophysical boost factor allowed in the Milky Way under the assumption that the leptophilic dark matter particle is the dominant component of dark matter in our Universe. These constraints constitute very conservative estimates on the boost factor for more realistic models where the dark matter particle also couples to quarks and weak gauge bosons, such as the lightest neutralino which we also analyze for some concrete benchmark points. The limits on the astrophysical boost factors presented here could be used to evaluate the prospects to detect a gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilations at currently operating IACTs as well as in the projected CTA

  19. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  20. Multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast protons and antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Sorensen, A.H.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.; Uggerhoj, E.

    1987-10-15

    Single and multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar has been studied experimentally by impact of fast protons and antiprotons. The single-ionization cross sections obtained with protons and antiprotons are found to be the same. The double-ionization cross sections obtained with antiprotons, however, are much larger than those obtained with protons at equal velocity. This difference is found for all three gases but the effect is largest for He and Ne, where the difference is about a factor of 2 at 1 MeV/amu. The difference is discussed in terms of interference between two collision mechanisms which both result in double-electron escape. Experimental information on the magnitude of the interference term is obtained by inclusion of double-ionization data, partly obtained in this work, for fast electron and ..cap alpha..-particle impact. For triple ionization of Ne, we also find that antiprotons yield much larger cross sections than protons do. Identical cross sections, however, are found for triple ionization of Ar with protons and antiprotons. This is believed to be due to the fact that triple ionization of Ar is mainly a consequence of a single vacancy produced in an inner shell followed by electronic rearrangement. This observation supports the interpretation that the observed charge effect is due to an interference effect in the outermost shell.

  1. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, N.; Aghion, S.; Alozy, J.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Campbell, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lawler, G.; Lebrun, P.; Llopart, X.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Tlustos, L.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  2. Antiproton Production in 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    E687 Collaboration; al, T. A. Armstrong et

    1997-01-01

    We present the first results from the E864 collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10% central 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4

  3. Measurements of Electron Spectra in the Forward Direction in Slow-Antiproton Carbon-Foil Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Kuroki, Kenro; Komaki, Ken-Ichiro; Andersen, Lars H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, Erik; Hvelplund, Preben; Knudsen, Helge; M{ø}ller, S{ø}ren P.; Uggerh{ø}j, Erik; Elsener, Konrad

    1990-08-01

    The spectrta of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wake-riding state.

  4. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  5. A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from \\PAMELA\\ have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleading but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the \\AMS\\ experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by \\AMS. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy depe...

  6. Measurements of electron spectra in the forward direction in slow-antiproton carbon-foil collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wakeriding state. (author)

  7. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  8. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2015-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high Dark Matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma rays have been observed by different telescopes, although its origin is not clear. In this work, we constrain the possible antiproton flux component associated to this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess, since the theoretical uncertainties corresponding to the mentioned background are small. The constraints depend on the diffusion model and the spectral features of the source. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production.

  9. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  10. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  11. Analysis of Subthreshold Antiproton Production in p-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions in the RBUU Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Teis, S; Maruyama, T; Mosel, U; Teis, Stefan; Cassing, Wolfgang; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Mosel, Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant RBUU approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the pbar differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton selfenergies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector selfenergies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density rho > rho_0 we examine the differential pbar spectra as a function of the antiproton selfenergy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean-field at normal nuclear matter density rho_0 which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  12. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  13. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  14. Single ionization of helium by 40--3000-keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoj, E. (Institute of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (PSI, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  15. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  16. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  17. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Gattuso, C.; Joireman, P.W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique.

  18. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  19. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Corradini, M. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Salvador, D. De [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hori, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Kobayashi, T. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy); Seiler, D. [TUM Department of Physics E12 (Germany); Soter, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Todoroki, K. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Vallazza, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Venturelli, L., E-mail: venturelli@bs.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ∼125 keV.

  20. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV.......A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  1. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    Purpose  Radiotherapy with antiprotons is still being investigated as a possible new beam modality. Antiprotons behave much like protons until they come to rest, where they will annihilate with a target nucleus, thereby releasing additional energy. This can potentially lead to a favourable  depth...... of elements with higher Z, may lead to heavier fragments, which in turn may increase the LET and be beneficial in radiotherapy context. Also, it was speculated whether the addition of elements with high thermal neutron cross section to the target material may or may not boost the locally deposited energy from...

  2. Antiproton and proton collisions with the alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, and K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Single-electron ionization and excitation cross sections as well as cross sections for excitation into the first excited p state of the alkali-metal atoms Li(2s), Na(3s), and K(4s) colliding with antiprotons and protons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. For antipro......Single-electron ionization and excitation cross sections as well as cross sections for excitation into the first excited p state of the alkali-metal atoms Li(2s), Na(3s), and K(4s) colliding with antiprotons and protons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach...

  3. The ratio Ri for nondissociative ionization of molecular hydrogen by antiproton/proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical ratio Ri of antiproton/proton cross sections for nondissociative ionization of hydrogen molecule has been obtained as a function of the impact energy E in the range 30 ≤ E ≤ 2500 keV lab. The required cross sections were computed in the close-coupling formulation of the semiclassical impact parameter theory using a simple one-active electron model for the molecular target. The ratio Ri is important for the analysis of the recent experimental data of Andersen et al. on antiproton scattering and the understanding of the collisional mechanisms in the keV range. (orig.)

  4. Observation of antiproton annihilation in heavy nuclei at 100 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the observation of antiproton annihilation in Mg, Ag, and Au nuclei at 100 GeV/c. The experiment was performed with the Fermilab 30'' bubble chamber spectrometer and associated Downstream Particle Identifiers. By identifying events without a leading anti p or anti n we have determined that (39+-6)% of the antiprotons annihilate in a heavy nucleus. We present this fraction as a function of atomic mass number and discuss the associated charged particle multiplicity. 5 refs., 3 figs

  5. Duponchelia water-trap

    OpenAIRE

    Deventer, van, S.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    How can the harmful Duponchelia insect best be trapped for optimum detection? A water trap was found to be most effective in a field test by Plant Research International. Another advantage is the low maintenance required by this trap. The composition of the Duponchelia sex pheromone was identified just over a year ago and now growers are using pheromone traps on a large scale for a timely detection of this difficult pest insect. The caterpillars of this moth cause damage in all sorts of crops...

  6. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  7. Nonlinear Integrable Ion Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, S

    2011-01-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  8. A new method to measure the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton at very low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new possible method to measure in lab the gravitational acceleration ''g'' of the antiproton is presented assuming that very low energy particles can be used. A schematic lay-out is described and preliminary results on ''g'' obtained by a simple simulation are given. The features of the method and its possible experimental problems are discussed

  9. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  10. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Gammaldi, V.; Maroto, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high dark matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma-rays have been observed by different telescopes, although their origin is not clear. In this work, we estimate the possible antiproton flux component associated with this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess. We estimate the sensitivity of PAMELA to this new primary antiproton source, which depends on the diffusion model and its spectral features. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production. This latter spectrum is typical in the production from annihilating or decaying dark matter. We pay particular attention to the case of a heavy dark matter candidate, which could be associated with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) data observed from the J1745-290 source.

  11. Antiproton-to-proton ratios for ALICE heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A., E-mail: atawfik@cern.ch [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-06-01

    Assuming that the final state of hadronization takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant entropy density, the antiproton-to-proton ratios produced in heavy-ion collisions are studied in framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. A phase transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadrons, a hadronization, has been conjectured in order to allow modifications in the phase-space volume and thus in the single-particle distribution function. Implementing both modifications in the grand-canonical partition function and taking into account the experimental acceptance in the heavy-ion collisions, the antiproton-to-proton ratios over center-of-mass energies {radical}(s) ranging from AGS to RHIC are very well reproduced by the HRG model. Comparing with the same particle ratios in pp collisions results in a gradually narrowing discrepancy with increasing {radical}(s). At LHC energy, the ALICE antiproton-to-proton ratios in the pp collisions turn to be very well described by the HRG model as well. It is likely that the ALICE AA-program will produce the same antiproton-to-proton ratios as the pp-one. Furthermore, the ratio gets very close to unity indicating that the matter-antimatter asymmetry nearly vanishes. The chemical potential calculated at this energy strengthens the assumption of almost fully matter-antimatter symmetry up to the LHC energy.

  12. Properties of Antiprotons and Antihydrogen, and the Study of Exotic Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of exotic atoms, of antiprotons and of antihydrogen atoms provides many windows into the investigation of fundamental symmetries, of interactions between particles and nuclei, of nuclear physics and of atomic physics. This field appeared at CERN simultaneously with the first accelerators, and has advanced over the decades in parallel with improvements and advances in its infrastructure.

  13. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.;

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...

  14. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  15. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  16. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico (United States); Sobolevsky, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Thomsen, Bjarne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bassler, Niels, E-mail: bassler@phys.au.dk [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  17. Study of the anti-hydrogen atom and ion formation in the collisions antiproton-positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future CERN experiment called GBAR intends to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter on Earth using cold (neV) anti-hydrogen atoms undergoing a free fall. The experiment scheme first needs to cool anti-hydrogen positive ions, obtained thanks to two consecutive reactions occurring when an antiproton beam collides with a dense positronium cloud.The present thesis studies these two reactions in order to optimise the production of the anti-ions. The total cross sections of both reactions have been computed in the framework of a perturbation theory model (Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State), in the range 0 to 30 keV antiproton kinetic energy; several excited states of positronium have been investigated. These cross sections have then been integrated to a simulation of the interaction zone where antiprotons collide with positronium; the aim is to find the optimal experimental parameters for GBAR. The results suggest that the 2P, 3D or, to a lower extend, 1S states of positronium should be used, respectively with 2, less than 1 or 6 keV antiprotons. The importance of using short pulses of antiprotons has been underlined; the positronium will have to be confined in a tube of 20 mm length and 1 mm diameter. In the prospect of exciting the 1S-3D two-photon transition in positronium at 410 nm, a pulsed laser system had already been designed. It consists in the frequency doubling of an 820 nm pulsed titanium-sapphire laser. The last part of the thesis has been dedicated to the realisation of this laser system, which delivers short pulses (9 ns) of 4 mJ energy at 820 nm. (author)

  18. On Antiproton Production in 158 GeV/c Proton-Carbon Collisions and Nuclear Temperature of Interacting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multisource thermal model is used in this paper to analyze the antiproton (p¯ production process in high-energy proton-carbon (p-C collisions. The transverse momentum, Feynman variable, and rapidity distributions of antiprotons in the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass system are calculated by using the model. The modeling results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data measured by the NA49 Collaboration at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. As a parameter, the nuclear temperature of interacting system extracted from the antiproton spectrum is estimated to be about 150 MeV.

  19. 1985-86 Trapping Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1985-1986 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  20. Optimal Proton Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, K J

    2006-01-01

    In a neutron lifetime experiment conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, protons produced by neutron decay events are confined in a Penning trap. In each run of the experiment, there is a trapping stage of duration $\\tau$. After the trapping stage, protons are purged from the trap. A proton detector provides incomplete information because it goes dead after detecting the first of any purged protons. Further, there is a dead time $\\delta$ between the end of the trapping stage in one run and the beginning of the next trapping stage in the next run. Based on the fraction of runs where a proton is detected, I estimate the trapping rate $\\lambda$ by the method of maximum likelihood. I show that the expected value of the maximum likelihood estimate is infinite. To obtain a maximum likelihood estimate with a finite expected value and a well-defined and finite variance, I restrict attention to a subsample of all realizations of the data. This subsample excludes an exceedingly rare realization...

  1. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  2. Optothermal Molecule Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Thermophoresis moves molecules along temperature gradients, typically from hot to cold. We superpose fluid flow with thermophoretic molecule flow under well defined microfluidic conditions, imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA is trapped and accumulated 16-fold in regions where both flows move in opposite directions. Strong 800-fold accumulation is expected, however with slow trapping kinetics. The experiment is equally described by a three-dimensional and one-dimensional analytical model. ...

  3. Fractal Poverty Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Christopher B.; Swallow, Brent M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper offers an informal theory of fractal poverty traps that lead to chronic poverty at multiple scales of socio-spatial aggregation. Poverty traps result from nonlinear processes at individual, household, community, national and international scales that cause the coexistence of high and low equilibrium levels of productivity and income and high and low rates of economic growth. Multiple equilibria result from key threshold effects that exist at all scales due to market failures and no...

  4. Instrumentation for measurement of in-flight annihilations of 130 keV antiprotons on thin target foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, K.; Barna, D.; Hayano, R. S.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Sótér, A.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Prest, V.; Vallazza, L.; De Salvador, D.; Hori, M.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the instrumentation for an experiment to measure the cross sections of antiprotons with kinetic energies of 130±10 keV annihilating on carbon, palladium, and platinum target foils of sub-100 nm thicknesses. A 120 ns long pulsed beam containing 105 -106 antiprotons was allowed to traverse the foils, and the signal annihilations that resulted from this were isolated using a time-of-flight method. Backgrounds arose from Rutherford scattering of the antiprotons off the target foils, their annihilations in the target chamber walls, and π → μ → e decay of the charged pions that emerged from the annihilations. Some antiprotons slowed down and annihilated in the contamination on the target surfaces. This reduced the signal-to-background ratio of the measurement.

  5. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  6. Structural traps 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains studies of fields that exist because of the presence of tectonic faulting. Tectonic faulting occurs because of the release of crustal stresses. Nontectonic faulting is due to other factors, such as salt solution and collapse or detachment from sedimentary loading and slumping. The traps responsible for the fields in this volume are related either directly or indirectly to a fault block. The traps of Amposta, Cano Limon, Ninian, Renqiu, and Sarir are directly related to a fault block. Brent and Magnus fields are the result of traps formed by an unconformity truncation and a tilted fault block. Mobeetie field is the result of a trap indirectly related to a fault block. The anticline associated with the trap formed by differential compaction over a basement fault block. Red Oak field comprises traps both in a fault block and in an overlying anticline formed by differential compaction over the same fault block. With the exception of Cano Limon, all the fault blocks associated with these fields formed mainly under tensional stresses. The fault block associated with Cano Limon field formed by shearing in a strike-slip environment. Another aspect described in each field study is the history of its exploration and development.

  7. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  8. Mathematical Descriptions of Axially Varying Penning Traps for the Antimatter Experiment: gravity, Interferometry, and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanie, Brown

    2015-01-01

    Antimatter, though proposed in 1933, is still not well understood. AEgIS aims to study the interaction of antihydrogen with the earth's gravitational field. This information will add to our understanding of the matter-antimatter asymmetry present in our universe. This paper discusses a Penning-Malmberg with a magnetic mirror that will hold $C_{2}^{-}$ that will be used for sympathetic cooling of antiprotons before the antihydrogen is created. The trap, which is critical to the cooling process of the antihydrogen, can be characterized by the separatrix between trapped and untrapped particles. This paper applies analytical processes used to define the separatrix of pure electron plasmas to a molecular plasma. Our work is based on the desire conditions (density, particle number, field strength, trap size) of the high field region. The initial application of a semi-analytical method applied to our trap defines the trap potential difference at \\~ 0.6V. The separatrix is defined in both the high and low fiel...

  9. Further studies of double ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast and slow antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-12-01

    Measurements of the ratio R between double- and single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on He, Ne, and Ar targets are reported for impact energies ranging from 65 keV to 20 MeV. At high energies the results are found to merge with proton results at around 20 MeV, and the high-energy limit of the common ratio is in good agreement with recent first-Born-calculation results for the helium target. The large difference previously observed in the ratio R for protons and antiprotons at energies between 0.5 and 5 MeV is found to persist down to the lowest energies investigated here.

  10. Further studies of double ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast and slow antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoj, E. (Institute of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (PSI, CH-5234 Villigen, (Switzerland))

    1989-12-15

    Measurements of the ratio {ital R} between double- and single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on He, Ne, and Ar targets are reported for impact energies ranging from 65 keV to 20 MeV. At high energies the results are found to merge with proton results at around 20 MeV, and the high-energy limit of the common ratio is in good agreement with recent first-Born-calculation results for the helium target. The large difference previously observed in the ratio {ital R} for protons and antiprotons at energies between 0.5 and 5 MeV is found to persist down to the lowest energies investigated here.

  11. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  12. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  13. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the lifetime of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowsik, Ramanath

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ~ 1-100 GeV by BESS, PAMELA and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ~ 2.5 +/-0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components like positrons and Boron, and conclude with general remarks about the origins and propagation of cosmic rays.

  14. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  15. Investigation of silicon sensors for their use as antiproton annihilation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics and Technology, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [University of Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, via Valleggio 11, Como (Italy); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-11-21

    We present here a new application of silicon sensors aimed at the direct detection of antinucleons annihilations taking place inside the sensor's volume. Such detectors are interesting particularly for the measurement of antimatter properties and will be used as part of the gravity measurement module in the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. One of the goals of the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen with 1% precision. Three different silicon sensor geometries have been tested with an antiproton beam to investigate their properties as annihilation detection devices: strip planar, 3D pixels and monolithic pixel planar. In all cases we were successfully detecting annihilations taking place in the sensor and we were able to make a first characterization of the clusters and tracks.

  16. Anti- and Hypermatter Research at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheimer, J.; Xu, Z.; Rau, P.; Sturm, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2013-07-01

    Within the next six years, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is built adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt, Germany. Thus, the current research goals and the technical possibilities are substantially expanded. With its worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, FAIR will provide a wide range of unprecedented fore-front research in the fields of hadron, nuclear, atomic, plasma physics and applied sciences which are summarized in this article. As an example this article presents research efforts on strangeness at FAIR using heavy ion collisions, exotic nuclei from fragmentation and antiprotons to tackle various topics in this area. In particular, the creation of hypernuclei, metastable exotic multi-hypernuclear objects (MEMOs) and antimatter is investigated.

  17. Ionization of helium by slow antiproton impact: total and differential cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Borbély, S; Nagele, S; Tőkési, K; Nagy, L; Burgdörfer, J

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the single and double ionization of the He atom by antiproton impact for projectile energies ranging from $3$~keV up to $1000$~keV. We obtain accurate total cross sections by directly solving the fully correlated two-electron time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and by performing classical trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations. The obtained quantum-mechanical results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Along with the total cross sections, we also present the first fully \\textit{ab initio} doubly differential data for single ionization at 10 and 100~keV impact energies. In these differential cross sections we identify the binary-encounter peak along with the anticusp minimum. Furthermore, we also point out the importance of the post-collisional electron-projectile interaction at low antiproton energies which significantly suppresses electron emission in the forward direction.

  18. Scattered antiproton polarization in pp elastic scattering at 220 MeV in bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsugi, T

    1973-01-01

    The polarization of antiproton scattering in pp elastic collision has been measured in the four intervals of the CM scattering angle theta /sup */ less than 90 degrees by means of double scattering in a bubble chamber. The analysis has been performed on the basis of 999 double elastic events which have been found in about 100K pictures of the 81- cm Saclay hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to a 0.7 GeV/c antiproton beam from the CERN PS. The obtained values of polarization show the maximum value 0.52+or-0.19 at theta /sup */=56 degrees . The polarization for pp scattering seems to be larger than that for pp scattering. The results are also compared with the potential model by Bryan and Phillips (1968) and with the modified diffraction model by Frahn and Venter (1964). Possible systematic errors in the present experiment are discussed in detail. (17 refs).

  19. Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, at the GSI site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2006-11-01

    FAIR is a new large-scale particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research pursued at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, as well as high density plasma physics, atomic and antimatter physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. The working horse of FAIR will be a 1.1km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of short-lived radioactive ions or antiprotons. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experimental facilities are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  20. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  1. Diffraction slopes for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at low momentum transfer values. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slopes is approximated by various analytic functions. The expanded "standard" logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range reasonably. Various approximations differ from each other both in the low energy and very high...

  2. 8 GeV beam line optics optimization for the rapid antiproton transfers at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaslaev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Morgan, J.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Tevatron Run-II upgrade requires a significant increase of the efficiency and speed of the antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Recycler. The goal for the total transfer time is challenging a reduction from 1 hour down to a few minutes. Here we discuss the beam line optics aspects of this project. Results of lattice measurements and optimization are analyzed in terms of transport efficiency and stability.

  3. Neutral strange particle production in antiproton-nucleus annihilation at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the Λ- and KS0-meson production in antiproton annihilation on nuclei at low energies (Epbar- and K-meson rescattering, Λ production in reactions with π- and ω-mesons is also considered. It is shown that these processes ensure a significant Λ-production even in the low energy region well below the ΛΛ-bar-threshold. 18 refs.; 1 tab

  4. Unified interpretation of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton recent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use our numerical code, DRAGON, to study the implications and the impact of recent CREAM and PAMELA data on our knowledge of the propagation properties of cosmic ray nuclei with energy >or similar 1 GeV/n in the Galaxy. We will show that B/C (as well as N/O and C/O) and anti p/p data (especially including recent PAMELA results) can consistently be matched within a unique diffusion-reacceleration model. The requirement that light nuclei and anti p data are both reproduced within experimental uncertainties places stringent limits on suitable propagation parameters. In particular, we find the allowed range of the diffusion coefficient spectral index to be 0.38A ≅15 kms-1) is allowed. Furthermore, we do not need to introduce any ad hoc break in the injection spectrum of primary cosmic rays. If antiproton data are not used to constrain the propagation parameters, a larger set of models is allowed. In this case, we determine which combinations of the relevant parameters maximize and minimize the antiproton flux under the condition of still fitting light nuclei data at 95% C.L. These models may then be used to constrain a possible extra antiproton component arising from astrophysical or exotic sources (e.g. dark matter annihilation or decay). (orig.)

  5. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  6. Measurements of Wake-Riding Electrons in Antiproton-Carbon-Foil Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When a charged particle passes through dielectric media, e.g. a thin carbon foil, a ``wake'' is induced. The characteristic wake-potential shows an oscillatory behaviour, with a wavelength of about $ 2 \\pi v _{p} / \\omega _{p} _{l} $ where $ v _{p} $ is the projectile velocity and $ \\omega _{p} _{l} $ the plasmon energy of the target. This induced wake potential is superimposed on the Coulomb potential of the projectile, the latter leading to a pronounced ``cusp'' of electrons leaving the solid at $ v _{e} app v _{p} $ for positively charged projectiles in the MeV region. Correspondingly, an ``anti-cusp'' is expected for antiprotons. \\\\ \\\\ In the solid, the wake-potential leads to an attractive force on electrons, and a dynamic electronic state is predicted both for proton and antiproton projectiles. In the solid, the wake-riding electrons are travelling with the projectile speed $ v _{p} $ Upon exit of the foil, the electron released from the wake-riding state of an antiproton will suddenly find itself in th...

  7. Antiproton-to-Proton Ratios for ALICE Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the final state of hadronization takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant entropy density, the antiproton-to-proton ratios produced in heavy-ion collisions are studied in framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. A phase transition from quark--gluon plasma to hadrons, a hadronization, has been conjectured in order to allow modifications in the phase space volume and thus in single--particle distribution function. Implementing both modifications in the grand--canonical partition function and taking into account the experimental acceptance in heavy-ion collisions, the antiproton-to-proton ratios over center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ ranging from AGS to RHIC are very well reproduced by the HRG model. Comparing with the same particle ratios in $pp$ collisions results in a gradually narrowing discrepancy with increasing $\\sqrt{s}$. At LHC energy, the ALICE antiproton-to-proton ratios in $pp$ collisions turn to be very well described by HRG model as well. It is l...

  8. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional $SO(5) \\times U(1)$ gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW^+W^- and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for $m_H > m_W$. The most dominant annihilation channel is $H H \\to W^+ W^-$ followed by the subsequent decays of the $W$ bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70-90 GeV.

  9. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman; Song, Jeonghyeon [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: jeonghyeon.song@gmail.com, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-01

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW{sup +}W{sup −} and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for m{sub H} > m{sub W}. The most dominant annihilation channel is HH → W{sup +}W{sup −} followed by the subsequent decays of the W bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70–90 GeV.

  10. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW+W− and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for mH > mW. The most dominant annihilation channel is HH → W+W− followed by the subsequent decays of the W bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70–90 GeV

  11. Application of high quality antiproton beam to study charmonium and exotics above DD-bar threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of charmonium and exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. It is a good testing tool for theories of strong interactions including QCD in both perturbative and non-perturbative regime, lattice QCD, potential models and phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of charmonium and charmed hybrid spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimental data in the above DD-bar threshold region are considered. Experiments using antiproton beam take advantage of the intensive production of particle-antiparticle pairs in antiproton-proton annihilations. Experimental data from different collaboration are analyzed with special attention given to new states with hidden charm that were discovered recently. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-laying S, P and D wave charmonium states. But much more data on different decay modes are needed before firmer conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c. (authors)

  12. Limits on dark matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    Herein we derive limits on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs), which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high-energy positron/antiproton fraction/ratio data. We parametrize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the galprop code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95% confidence level upper limits of possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Under the assumption taken in this work, we find that our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma ray Pass 8 data observation on the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime for mχ100 GeV ), where mχ is the rest mass of dark matter particles. We also find that constrains on DM parameters from AMS-02 data would become more stringent when the solar modulation is weak. Using these results, we also put limits on the effective field theory of dark matter.

  13. Penning trap at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerypo, J. E-mail: jerzy.szerypo@phys.jyu.fi; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Nieminen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-22

    The IGISOL facility at the Department of Physics of the University of Jyvaeskylae (JYFL) is delivering radioactive beams of short-lived exotic nuclei, in particular the neutron-rich isotopes from the fission reaction. These nuclei are studied with the nuclear spectroscopy methods. In order to substantially increase the quality and sensitivity of such studies, the beam should undergo beam handling: cooling, bunching and isobaric purification. The first two processes are performed with the use of an RFQ cooler/buncher. The isobaric purification will be made by a Penning trap placed after the RF-cooler element. This contribution describes the current status of the Penning trap project and its future prospects. The latter comprise the precise nuclear mass measurements, nuclear spectroscopy in the Penning trap interior as well as the laser spectroscopy on the extracted beams.

  14. A new calculation of the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum in the Galaxy and heliospheric modulation effects on this spectrum using a drift plus wavy current sheet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected interstellar antiproton spectrum arising from cosmic-ray interactions in the Galaxy is recalculated, and the modulation of both antiprotons and protons is calculated using a two-dimensional modulation model incorporating gradient and curvature drifts and a wavy current sheet as well as the usual diffusion, convection, and energy-loss effects. Significant differences in the antiproton/proton ratio for different solar magnetic field polarities are predicted as well as a 'low-energy' component for antiprotons below about 1 GeV. 28 refs

  15. PAMELA results on the cosmic-ray antiproton flux from 60 MeV to 180 GeV in kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Hofverberg, P; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2010-01-01

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio which extends previously published measurements down to 60 MeV and up to 180 GeV in kinetic energy. During 850 days of data acquisition approximately 1500 antiprotons were observed. The measurements are consistent with purely secondary production of antiprotons in the galaxy. More precise secondary production models are required for a complete interpretation of the results.

  16. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  17. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  18. The Honey Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    Michael F. Wagner: The Honey Trap –The democratization of leisure through automobilism The automobile has achieved a central position in modern everyday life as an essential artefact to mobility. This raises the question how automobiles have been mediated for mass consumption? The central thesis...

  19. The Universal Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Paul

    The compulsory system of education is criticized on the grounds that it has become a regimented "universal trap" antithetical to democracy. In contrast to the Jeffersonian concept of education in the service of citizen initiative for the preservation of freedom, current compulsory education is a tool of industrialism and of a rigidly stratified…

  20. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  1. Optical trapping of absorbing particles

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H; Friese, M E J; Heckenberg, N R

    1998-01-01

    Radiation pressure forces in a focussed laser beam can be used to trap microscopic absorbing particles against a substrate. Calculations based on momentum transfer considerations show that stable trapping occurs before the beam waist, and that trapping is more effective with doughnut beams. Such doughnut beams can transfer angular momentum leading to rotation of the trapped particles. Energy is also transferred, which can result in heating of the particles to temperatures above the boiling point of the surrounding medium.

  2. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; GENG; Tao; YAN; Shubin; LI; Gang; ZHANG; Jing; WANG; Junmin; PENG; Kunchi; ZHANG; Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  3. Coherence in Microchip Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Treutlein, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter; Steinmetz, Tilo; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of $4-130 \\mu$m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the microtrap is independent of atom-surface distance and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Due to the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the $10^{-13}$ range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near-fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

  4. Phosphorous trapped within buckminsterfullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, J. A.; Greer, J. C.; Harneit, W.; Weidinger, A.

    2002-05-01

    Under normal circumstances, when covalent molecules form, electrons are exchanged between atoms to form bonds. However, experiment and theoretical computations reveal exactly the opposite effect for the formation of group V elements nitrogen and phosphorous encapsulated within a buckminsterfullerene molecule. The C60 carbon cage remains intact upon encapsulation of the atom, whereas the electronic charge cloud of the N or P atom contracts. We have studied the chemical, spin, and thermodynamic properties of endohedral phosphorous (P@C60) and have compared our results with earlier findings for N@C60. From a combined experimental and theoretical vantage, we are able to elucidate a model for the interaction between the trapped group V atom and the fullerene cage. A picture emerges for the electronic structure of these complexes, whereby an atom is trapped within a fullerene, and interacts weakly with the molecular orbitals of the C60 cage.

  5. Indonesia : Avoiding the Trap

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Within the next two decades Indonesia aspires to generate prosperity, avoid a middle-income trap and leave no one behind as it tries to catch up with high-income economies. These are ambitious goals. Realizing them requires sustained high growth and job creation, as well as reduced inequality. Can Indonesia achieve them? This report argues that the country has the potential to rise and bec...

  6. Trapping of photophoretic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Magiera, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    A trapping mechanism for self-propelled particles based on an inhomogeneous drive is presented and studied analytically as well as by computer simulations. In experiments this method can be realized using photophoretic Janus particles driven by a light source, which shines through a shading mask and leads to an accumulation of the swimmers in the shaded part. The mechanism can be traced back to a finite penetration depth of particles impinging from the illuminated part of the system into the shaded part.

  7. Water-Trapped Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally-locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry-up. Water-tr...

  8. Can we explain AMS-02 antiproton and positron excesses simultaneously by nearby supernovae without pulsars or dark matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Ioka, Kunihito; Fujita, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    We explain the excess of the antiproton fraction recently reported by the AMS-02 experiment by considering collisions between cosmic-ray protons accelerated by a local supernova remnant and the surrounding dense cloud. The same "pp collisions" provide the right ratio of daughter particles to fit the observed positron excess simultaneously in the natural model parameters. The supernova happened in relatively lower metallicity than the major cosmic-ray sources. The cutoff energy of electrons marks the supernova age of {˜ }105 years, while the antiproton excess may extend to higher energy. Both antiproton and positron fluxes are completely consistent with our predictions in an earlier paper [Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Rev. D 80, 063003 (2009) [arXiv:0903.5298 [astro-ph.HE

  9. The Angular Distribution Of Electron-positron Pairs From Exclusive Charmonium Decays In Antiproton-proton Annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    McTaggart, R J

    1998-01-01

    The angular distributions of the charmonium resonances J/ Y (3097) and Y (3686) in their exclusive decay to an electron-positron pair are studied. Experiment 835 at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory produced charmonium resonances by annihilating protons with antiprotons in the Fixed Target Mode of the Antiproton Accumulator: A stochastically cooled antiproton beam collides with a hydrogen gas jet, which forms clusters under the right pressure and low temperature. The charmonium decay products are detected out of a large hadronic background with the help of a segmented lead glass sampling calorimeter, which is sensitive to the high mass electron-positron charmonium decay, and a set of Cerenkov threshold detectors that provide good electron/pion separation. Several factors influence the angular distribution parameter l taken from the angular distribution, including the energy scale of the resonance, the coupling strength of the charmonium atom, and how quarks and gluons interact in the dissolution...

  10. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  11. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-, C; Estrada; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300--318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements.

  12. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  13. Expected Enhancement of the Primary Antiproton Flux at the Solar Minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsui, T.; Maki, K.; Orito, S.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the solar-modulated energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$'s) from two candidate primary sources, i.e., evaporating primordial black holes and the annihilation of neutralino dark matter, as well as for the secondary $\\bar{p}$'s produced by cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar gas. A large enhancement toward the solar minimum phase emerges in the low-energy flux of $\\bar{p}$'s from the primary sources, whereas the flux of the secondary $\\bar{p}$'s, falling steepl...

  14. Antiproton-proton annihilations into four prongs at 7.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annihilation reactions are described in which four charged pions and also maybe uncharged particles are produced. Data was acquired in an antiproton-proton experiment at a beam momentum of 7.2 GeV/c and 220K pictures of the CERN 2m HBC were measured. Cross sections have been determined and angular distributions of the pions and of some resonances are given. Two models that describe annihilation reactions are treated, the so called CLA model and a simple quark model. (C.F./Auth.)

  15. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  16. Ring imaging Cherenkov counter of HERMES for pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Toshi-Aki

    2014-12-01

    RICH of HERMES was built for identification of pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton in the momentum range of 2–15 GeV/c. It was a dual-radiator RICH. The radiators were aerogel and C{sub 4}F{sub 10} gas. Produced hadrons in electron–nucleon deep inelastic scattering were identified by the RICH and spin structure of the nucleon was studied by correlation between the directions of the target spin, scattered electron and produced hadrons.

  17. Effect of static electric field on cross sections in antiproton impact ionization of atomic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the effect of static electric fields in different geometrical features on the collisional ionization of helium atoms by antiproton. The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method with a model interaction potential has been used to simulate the differential and total ionization cross sections in antiproton–helium atom collisions in the energy range of 10–500 keV with and without electric fields. The calculated ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the recently reported experimental and theoretical results. The effects of the external electric fields are seen to be quite prominent.

  18. Antiproton--proton annihilation into pion pairs within effective meson theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ying; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Antiproton--proton annihilation into light mesons is revisited in the few GeV energy domain, in view of a global description of the existing data. An effective meson model is developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees od freedom in $s$, $t$, and $u$ channels. Regge factors are added to reproduce the proper energy behavior and the forward and backward peaked behavior. A comparison with existing data and predictions for angular distributions and energy dependence are done for charged and neutral pion pair production.

  19. Calculation of transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon laser transitions of antiprotonic helium

    OpenAIRE

    HORI, MASAKI; Korobov, Vladimir I.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical ab initio variational calculations of the transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon transitions of antiprotonic helium atoms driven by two counter-propagating laser beams are presented. We found that sub-Doppler spectroscopy is in principle possible by exciting transitions of the type (n,L)->(n-2,L-2) between antiprotonic states of principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n~L-1~35, first by using highly monochromatic, nanosecond laser beams of intensities 10^4...

  20. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  1. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  2. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  3. Countering the stray magnetic field of the CUSP trap by using additional coils

    CERN Document Server

    Thole, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN tries to measure the Hyperfine Structure (HFS) of Antihydrogen (H ̄) using a Rabi spectroscopy set-up. In measuring this HFS it will yield a very precise test of CPT-symmetry. For this set-up to work a homogeneous magnetic field is needed in the cavity where the Hyperfine transition of H ̄ occurs. Due to the stray fields from the CUSP trap, where H ̄ is produced, additional coils are needed to counter these fields. It is found, using COMSOL simulations, that two coils are suitable for this. Leading to a relative standard deviation of the magnetic field of σB/B = 1.06%.

  4. Antiproton and positron signal enhancement in dark matter mini-spikes scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a 'boost factor' that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of ∼100 'mini-spikes' around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value. (authors)

  5. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  6. A possible dark matter annihilation signal in the AMS-02 antiproton data

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A new approach has been adopted to probe the dark matter signal using the latest AMS-02 cosmic ray antiproton flux data. Different from previous studies, we do not assume specific propagation, injection, and solar modulation parameters when calculating the antiproton fluxes, but use the results inferred from the B/C ratio and proton data from the recent PAMELA/AMS-02 measurements instead. A joint likelihood method including the likelihood of these background parameters is established within the Bayesian framework. We find that a dark matter signal is favored with a high test statistic value of $\\sim 70$. The rest mass of the dark matter particles is $\\sim 30-70$ GeV and the velocity-averaged hadronic annihilation cross section is about $(1-6)\\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^{3}$s$^{-1}$, in agreement with that needed to account for the Galactic center GeV excess and/or the weak GeV emission from dwarf galaxies Reticulum 2 and Tucana III. Tight constraints on the dark matter annihilation models are also set in a wide mass...

  7. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  8. Antiproton beam parameters measurement by a new digital-receiver-based system

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Chohan, V; Findlay, A; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Pedersen, F

    2001-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) provides the users with very low intensity beams, in the 107 particles range, hence prompting the development of an innovative measuring system, which was completed in early 2000. This system measures antiproton beam intensity for bunched and debunched beams, together with momentum spread and mean momentum for debunched beams. It uses a state-of-the-art Digital Receiver board, which processes data obtained from two ultra-low-noise, wide-band AC beam transformers. These have a combined bandwidth in the range 0.02 MHz - 30 MHz and are used to measure AC beam current modulation. For bunched beams, the intensity is obtained by measuring the amplitude of the fundamental and second RF Fourier components. On the magnetic plateaus the beam is debunched for stochastic or electron cooling and longitudinal beam properties (intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum) are measured by FFT-based spectral analysis of Schottky signals. The system provides real-time information characterising ...

  9. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezov, R., E-mail: r.berezov@gsi.de; Brodhage, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Ivanova, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ullmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  10. Meas.of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by antiprotons in the energy range $>$~3~MeV. Comparison with already existing proton data will yield information on the mechanisms for double ionization, which could not be extracted from previous comparisons between ratios measured for equivelocity electrons and protons. The most basic information to be obtained from an antiproton experiment will be the amount of correlation existing between the two electrons in the ground-state helium atom.\\\\ \\\\ The equipment consists of a gas cell, which employs slow-ion collection via the so-called condenser-plate method for the absolute sum of partial-ionization cross sections and determination of the relative contribution of multiple charged ions by TOF. The gas cell has movable entrance and exit slits and a grid system to account for secondary emission from the collection of slow ions. Together with a field of 800~V/cm in the collision region, the potentials of the TOF sp...

  11. GAPS - Dark matter search with low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S I; Ong, R A; Perez, K; Zweerink, J

    2015-01-01

    The GAPS experiment is foreseen to carry out a dark matter search by measuring low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons with a novel detection approach. It will provide a new avenue to access a wide range of different dark matter models and masses from about 10GeV to 1TeV. The theoretically predicted antideuteron flux resulting from secondary interactions of primary cosmic rays is very low. Well-motivated theories beyond the Standard Model contain viable dark matter candidates, which could lead to a significant enhancement of the antideuteron flux due to annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. This flux contribution is believed to be especially large at low energies, which leads to a high discovery potential for GAPS. The GAPS low-energy antiproton search will provide some of the most stringent constraints on ~30GeV dark matter, will provide the best limits on primordial black hole evaporation on galactic length scales, and explore new discovery space in cosmic-ray physics. GAPS is designed...

  12. ${\\bar D}D$ meson pair production in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the $\\bar D D$ (${\\bar D}^0 D^0$ and $D^-D^+$) charm meson pair production in antiproton (${\\bar p}$) induced reactions on nuclei at beam energies ranging from threshold to several GeV. Our model is based on an effective Lagrangian approach that has only the baryon-meson degrees of freedom and involves the physical hadron masses. The reaction proceeds via the $t$-channel exchanges of $\\Lambda_c^+$, $\\Sigma_c^+$, and $\\Sigma_c^{++}$ baryons in the initial collision of the antiproton with one of the protons of the target nucleus. The medium effects on the exchanged baryons are included by incorporating in the corresponding propagators, the effective charm baryon masses calculated within a quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. The wave functions of the bound proton have been determined within the QMC model as well as in a phenomenological model where they are obtained by solving the Dirac equation with appropriate scalar and vector potentials. The initial- and final-state distortion effects have been approx...

  13. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  14. Novel dark matter constraints from antiprotons in the light of AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Korsmeier, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate dark matter (DM) limits from cosmic-ray antiproton observations using the recent precise AMS-02 measurements. We properly take into account cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties fitting at the same time DM and propagation parameters, and marginalizing over the latter. We find a significant (~4.5 sigma) indication of a DM signal for DM masses near 80 GeV, with a hadronic annihilation cross-section close to the thermal value, sigma v ~3e-26 cm3s-1. Intriguingly, this signal is compatible with the DM interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess. Confirmation of the signal will require a more accurate study of the systematic uncertainties, i.e., the antiproton production cross-section, and modelling of the solar modulation effect. Interpreting the AMS-02 data in terms of upper limits on hadronic DM annihilation, we obtain strong constraints excluding a thermal annihilation cross-section for DM masses below about 50 GeV and in the range between approximately 150 and 500 GeV, even for conservat...

  15. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  16. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham Stokes

    2006-06-30

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{bar p}p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p{bar p}. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is {sigma} = 33 {+-} 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c{sup 2} is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  17. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  18. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos. PMID:27610839

  19. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  20. Temporal Windowing of Trapped States

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, L M

    2001-01-01

    Trapped state definition for 3-level atoms in Lambda configuration, is a very restrictive one, and for the case of unpolarized beams, this definition no longer holds.We introduce a more general definition by using a reference frame rotating with the frequency of the control field, obtaining a temporal windowing for the trapped population.This amounts to a time quantization of the coherent population transfer, making possible to study the phase coherence in trapped light.

  1. Trapped-Electron Runaway Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, E; Fisch, N J; Peysson, Y

    2015-01-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch towards the tokamak center. As they pinch towards the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have very a different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  2. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies — the anticyclotron A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.-P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L. M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F.

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron — deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined.

  3. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies - the anticyclotron. A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, D.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L.M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F. (KFKI Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary) Pisa Univ. (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy) Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland) Univ. di Udine (Italy) Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) ETH Zuerich, Villigen (Switzerland) KFKI Research Inst. for Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary) Genova Univ. (Italy) INFN, Genova (Italy))

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron - deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined. (orig.)

  4. Non-dissociative and dissociative ionisation of H sub 2 by 50-2000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoej, E. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Physics); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-08-14

    A beam of antiprotons with energies between 50 keV and 2 MeV has been used for measurements of non-dissociative ionisation and dissociative ionisation cross sections of H{sub 2}. The results are compared with cross sections for equivelocity protons and electrons, and the role of interference effects in two-electron processes is discussed. (author).

  5. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  6. Antiproton annihilation physics annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data...

  7. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 30 MeV and 180 MeV antiprotons on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports on the first measurements of angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons from nuclei, which have been performed, using the beam delivered by LEAR and the spectrometer SPES II, over a wide angular range and with good precision. Angular distributions for elastic scattering of 50 MeV antiprotons from 12C, 40Ca, 208Pb and 180 MeV antiprotons from 12C, 16O, 18O, 40Ca, 208Pb have been measured. Data on the inelastic 4.4 MeV and 9.6 MeV excited states of 12C and 1.98 MeV excited state of 18O have also been collected. The diffractive angular distributions are first analysed in terms of a fuzzy black disk model, which confirms that the antiproton is strongly absorbed (annihilation) by the nuclei. Optical model analysis, with Woods-Saxon geometry, shows that the real potential is attractive and shallow. The potentials are only determined at the nuclear surface, around the strong absorption radius, where /W(R)/ > 2 /V(R)/. Main characteristics of the antip-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections are well described within microscopic models using the free elementary antiN N interaction, like KMT which have no free parameters. Possibility for test of spin-isospin dependence of the elementary amplitude antiN-N from the measurement of unnatural parity states is also studied

  8. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.;

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms...

  9. Search for narrow lines in photon spectra from proton-antiproton annihilations at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusive photon spectra from annihilation of antiprotons stopped in a liquid hydrogen target were measured at LEAR (CERN) with a magnetic pair spectrometer. The FWHM energy resolution of the spectrometer in the region from 100-700 MeV was in the range from 2 to 4.5%. A total number of about 4.8.106 events with energies up to 1 GeV have been reconstructed. The photon spectra were scanned for possible lines with widths comparable to spectrometer resolution indicating the existence of bound nucleon-antinucleon states. No such structures were found with branching ratios greater than 4 to 8.10-4 at 95% confidence level. Results of former experiments could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  10. Full two-electron calculations of antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Total cross sections for single ionization and excitation of molecular hydrogen by antiproton impact are presented over a wide range of impact energies from 1 keV to 6.5 MeV. A nonperturbative time-dependent close-coupling method is applied to fully treat the correlated dynamics of the electrons...... is demonstrated. The present findings provide benchmark results which might be useful for the development of molecular models........ Good agreement is obtained between the present calculations and experimental measurements of single-ionization cross sections at high energies, whereas some discrepancies with the experiment are found around the maximum. The importance of the molecular geometry and a full two-electron description...

  11. Stopping power of antiprotons in H, H2, and He targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The stopping power of antiprotons in atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium was calculated in an impact-energy range from 1 keV to 6.4 MeV. In the case of H2 and He the targets were described with a single-active electron model centered on the target. The collision process was treated...... of the corrections to the first-order stopping number, the average energy transferred to the target electrons, and the relative importance of the excitation and the ionization process for the energy loss of the projectile was determined. Finally, the stopping powers of the H, H2, and He targets were directly...

  12. FNAL main ring to energy save antiproton transfer system for Tevatron I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for antiproton beam transfer from the Main Ring to the Energy Saver for colliding beam operations has been designed and fabricated. The system is similar to the existing proton beam transfer system used for fixed target operation of the Energy Saver. Using a fast kicker in the Main Ring, one or several bunches of 150 GeV pbars will be kicked horizontally across the septa of two Lambertsons into a short transfer line. At the end of this line, they are injected into the Energy Saver through two more Lambertsons and kicked onto a closed orbit by a second fast kicker. For commissioning and tune-up, the system will be operated in reverse, extracting 150 GeV protons from the Energy Saver to the Main Ring. In addition to a description of the design of the system and its components, the status of the installation and commissioning will also be discussed

  13. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  14. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  15. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  16. Using Pitfall Traps to Monitor Insect Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Laub, Curtis A., 1955-; Youngman, R. R. (Roger Ray); Love, Kenner; Mize, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the use of pitfall traps to monitor insect populations. Describes how to install the traps, and how to process and store insect specimens. Notes some concerns about killing and preserving agents used in the pitfall traps.

  17. 1986-87 Annual Trapping Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1986-87 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver, muskrat, raccoon,...

  18. An explanation of the elliptic flow difference between proton and anti-proton from the UrQMD model with hadron potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaobao; Shen, Caiwan

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution of both proton and anti-proton $v_2$ flows from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=7.7 GeV are examined by using both pure cascade and mean-field potential versions of the UrQMD model. Due to a stronger repulsion at the early stage introduced by the repulsive potentials and hence much less annihilation probabilities, anti-protons are frozen out earlier with smaller $v_2$ values. Therefore, the experimental data of anti-proton $v_2$ as well as the flow difference between proton and anti-proton can be reasonably described with the potential version of UrQMD.

  19. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  20. Collisional trap losses of cold, magnetically-trapped Br atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, J; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Near-threshold photodissociation of Br$_2$ from a supersonic beam produces slow bromine atoms that are trapped in the magnetic field minimum formed between two opposing permanent magnets. Here, we quantify the dominant trap loss rate due to collisions with two sources of residual gas: the background limited by the vacuum chamber base pressure, and the carrier gas during the supersonic gas pulse. The loss rate due to collisions with residual Ar in the background follows pseudo first-order kinetics, and the bimolecular rate coefficient for collisional loss from the trap is determined by measurement of this rate as a function of the background Ar pressure. This rate coefficient is smaller than the total elastic collision rate coefficient, as it only samples those collisions that lead to trap loss, and is determined to be $\\langle\

  1. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  2. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  3. Acoustic trapping of active matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Sho C; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently 'explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  4. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  5. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massiczek, O., E-mail: oswald.massiczek@cern.ch [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedreich, S.; Juhasz, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for {sup 4}He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised {sup 3}He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the {sup 3}He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  6. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2003-10-24

    We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5antiprotons. They show a centrality-scaling behavior different from that of pions. The pmacr;/pi and p/pi ratios are enhanced compared to peripheral Au+Au, p+p, and e(+)e(-) collisions. This enhancement is limited to p(T)<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to pi(0) measured in the range 1.5

  7. Thermal excitation of heavy nuclei with 5-15 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Hsi, W C; Lefort, T; Pienkowski, L; Korteling, R G; Wang, G; Back, B B; Bracken, D S; Breuer, H; Cornell, E A; Gimeno-Nogues, F; Ginger, D S; Gushue, S; Huang, M J; Laforest, R; Lynch, W G; Martin, E; Morley, K B; Ramakrishnan, E; Remsberg, L P; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Tsang, M B; Viola, V E; Winchester, E M; Xi, H; Yennello, S J

    1999-01-01

    Excitation-energy distributions have been derived from measurements of 5.0-14.6 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion reactions with $^{197}$Au target nuclei, using the ISiS 4$\\pi$ detector array. The maximum probability for producing high excitation-energy events is found for the antiproton beam relative to other hadrons, $^3$He and $\\bar{p}$ beams from LEAR. For protons and pions, the excitation-energy distributions are nearly independent of hadron type and beam momentum above about 8 GeV/c. The excitation energy enhancement for $\\bar{p}$ beams and the saturation effect are qualitatively consistent with intranuclear cascade code predictions. For all systems studied, maximum cluster sizes are observed for residues with E*/A $\\sim$ 6 MeV.

  8. Beam-spin asymmetry of pion, kaon, proton and antiproton production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-spin asymmetries in the azimuthal distribution of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) extracted from 2000-2007 HERMES data are presented. The asymmetries were measured in the kinematic region Q2>1 GeV2, W2 > 10 GeV2, 0.1 antiprotons are shown. Assuming that the SIDIS cross section factorizes to distribution (DF) and fragmentation (FF) functions that dependent on transverse quark momentum (TMD functions), one can obtain novel information about the spin-orbit correlations inside the nucleon and orbital angular momentum of quarks.

  9. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  10. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  11. Trapping, self-trapping and the polaron family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earliest ideas of the polaron recognized that the coupling of an electron to ionic vibrations would affect its apparent mass and could effectively immobilize the carrier (self-trapping). We discuss how these basic ideas have been generalized to recognize new materials and new phenomena. First, there is an interplay between self-trapping and trapping associated with defects or with fluctuations in an amorphous solid. In high dielectric constant oxides, like HfO2, this leads to oxygen vacancies having as many as five charge states. In colossal magnetoresistance manganites, this interplay makes possible the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) observation of polarons. Second, excitons can self-trap and, by doing so, localize energy in ways that can modify the material properties. Third, new materials introduce new features, with polaron-related ideas emerging for uranium dioxide, gate dielectric oxides, Jahn-Teller systems, semiconducting polymers and biological systems. The phonon modes that initiate self-trapping can be quite different from the longitudinal optic modes usually assumed to dominate. Fourth, there are new phenomena, like possible magnetism in simple oxides, or with the evolution of short-lived polarons, like muons or excitons. The central idea remains that of a particle whose properties are modified by polarizing or deforming its host solid, sometimes profoundly. However, some of the simpler standard assumptions can give a limited, indeed misleading, description of real systems, with qualitative inconsistencies. We discuss representative cases for which theory and experiment can be compared in detail

  12. Ion traps for high resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As applications of ion traps, direct mass measurement and laser spectroscopy are reported. The advantages of ion traps for high resolution spectroscopy are mentioned. Double resonance method for hfs measurement and problems on ion injection into trap are explained. The planning of laser and microwave spectroscopy, using an ion trap and ISOL at Tohoku cyclotron, is described. (author)

  13. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  14. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  15. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  16. Comparison of emergence traps of different shape and translucency in the trapping of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kroischke, F; Timmermann, E; Kiel, E

    2016-06-15

    Various types of emergence traps are available for investigations of the breeding habitats of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). In order to assess the potential impact of the trap design on the trapping success, we compared the efficiency of opaque and white (more translucent) emergence traps and two trap shapes (cone-shaped and quadratic), to sample Culicoides emerging from cowpats. Significantly higher numbers of Culicoides chiopterus and Culicoides dewulfi were trapped with opaque traps, while there was no obvious effect of the trap shape. There were no distinct differences in the microclimate among different trap types. PMID:27198792

  17. Neutron Trapping using a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Eighty years after Chadwick discovered the neutron, physicists today still cannot agree on how long the neutron lives. Measurements of the neutron lifetime have achieved the 0.1% level of precision (~ 1 s). However, results from several recent experiments are up to 7 s lower than the (pre-2010) particle data group (PDG) value. Experiments using the trap technique yield lifetime results lower than those using the beam technique. The PDG urges the community to resolve this discrepancy, now 6.5 sigma. Measuring the absolute neutron lifetime is difficult because of several limitations: the low energy of the neutron decay products, the inability to track slow neutrons, and the fact that the neutron lifetime is long (880.1 +/- 1.1 s). Slow neutrons are susceptible to many loss mechanisms other than beta-decay, such as upscattering and absorption on material surfaces. Often, these interactions act on time scales comparable to the neutron beta-decay, making the extraction of the beta-decay lifetime particularly challenging. We will revisit this measurement by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a hybrid magnetic-gravitational trap. The trap consists of a Halbach array of permanent magnets, which can levitate UCN up to 50 neV. These neutrons are also confined vertically up to 0.5 m by gravity. Such a trap minimizes the chance of neutron interactions with material walls. In addition, the open-top geometry allows room to implement novel schemes to detect neutrons and decay particles in-situ. The UCN τ experiment aims to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron lifetime measurement to below 1 second. In this talk, I will report results of our first attempt to trap UCN in 2013 and discuss plans to quantify systematic effects. The work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1306942.

  18. Design of a mosquito trap support pole for use with CDC miniature light traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher L; Wozniak, Arthur; McKenna, Bruce; Vaughan, David R; Dowda, Michael C

    2005-03-01

    A mosquito trap support pole constructed from polyvinyl chloride and aluminum pipes was designed to hang a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light trap and dry ice container. Miniature light traps normally hang from tree branches. The trap support pole is designed to hang traps and dry ice bait in areas where no suitable trees exist. PMID:15825774

  19. A comparison of pitfall traps with bait traps for studying leaf litter ant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Strazanac, J; Butler, L

    2001-06-01

    A comparison of pitfall traps with bait traps for sampling leaf litter ants was studied in oak-dominated mixed forests during 1995-1997. A total of 31,732 ants were collected from pitfall traps and 54,694 ants were collected from bait traps. They belonged to four subfamilies, 17 genera, and 32 species. Bait traps caught 29 species, whereas pitfall traps caught 31 species. Bait traps attracted one species not found in pitfall traps, but missed three of the species collected with pitfall traps. Collections from the two sampling methods showed differences in species richness, relative abundance, diversity, and species accumulation curves. Pitfall traps caught significantly more ant species per plot than did bait traps. The ant species diversity obtained from pitfall traps was higher than that from bait traps. Bait traps took a much longer time to complete an estimate of species richness than did pitfall traps. Little information was added to pitfall trapping results by the bait trapping method. The results suggested that the pitfall trapping method is superior to the bait trapping method for leaf litter ant studies. Species accumulation curves showed that sampling of 2,192+/-532 ants from six plots by pitfall traps provided a good estimation of ant species richness under the conditions of this study. PMID:11425034

  20. Double antikaonic nuclear clusters in antiproton-{sup 3}He annihilation at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Fuminori, E-mail: sakuma@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Curceanu, Catalina [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); Iwasaki, Masahiko [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Kienle, Paul [Technische Universiat Munchen (Germany); Ohnishi, Hiroaki [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Tokuda, Makoto [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Tsukada, Kyo [Tohoku University, Department of Physics (Japan); Widmann, Eberhard [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fuer Subatomare Physik (Austria); Yamazaki, Toshimitsu [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Zmeskal, Johannes [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fuer Subatomare Physik (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    We search for double anti-kaon nuclear bound states in the p-bar annihilation reaction in {sup 3}He nuclei at rest. In view of the strongly attractive K-bar N interaction, the existence of nuclear clusters with more than one K{sup }- has been predicted theoretically. The double anti-kaon production in elementary antiproton annihilation at rest is forbidden because of the negative Q-value; however, a double anti-kaon nuclear bound state, such as K{sup }- K{sup }- pp, with deep binding energy would enable double anti-kaon production in the nuclei. In order to investigate the K{sup }- K{sup }- pp production in the p-bar + {sup 3}He {yields} K{sup +} + K{sup 0} + X (X = K{sup -} K{sup -} pp) channel, the produced K{sup }- K{sup }- pp cluster is identified both using missing mass spectroscopy via the K{sup + }K{sup 0} channel with a {Lambda}-tag, and invariant mass analysis of the expected decay particles from the K{sup }- K{sup }- pp cluster such as {Lambda}{Lambda}. We propose to perform the experiment at the existing K1.8BR beam line at J-PARC with the E15 spectrometer.

  1. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  2. A self-consistent model for the Galactic cosmic ray, antiproton and positron spectra

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In this talk I will present the escape model of Galactic cosmic rays. This model explains the measured cosmic ray spectra of individual groups of nuclei from TeV to EeV energies. It predicts an early transition to extragalactic cosmic rays, in agreement with recent Auger data. The escape model also explains the soft neutrino spectrum 1/E^2.5 found by IceCube in concordance with Fermi gamma-ray data. I will show that within the same model one can explain the excess of positrons and antiprotons above 20 GeV found by PAMELA and AMS-02, the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range and the plateau in cosmic ray dipole anisotropy in the 2-50 TeV energy range by adding the effects of a 2 million year old nearby supernova.

  3. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  4. Dark Matter with multi-annihilation channels and AMS-02 positron excess and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Heng; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2015-01-01

    AMS-02 provided the unprecedented statistics in the measurement of the positron fraction from cosmic rays. That may offer a unique opportunity to distinguish the positron spectrum coming from various dark matter (DM) annihilation channels, if DM is the source of this positron excess. Therefore, we consider the scenario that the DM can annihilate into leptonic, quark, and massive gauge boson channels simultaneously with floating branching ratios to test this hypothesis. We also study the impacts from MAX, MED, and MIN diffusion models as well as from isothermal, NFW, and Einasto DM density profiles on our results. We found that under this DM annihilation scenario it is difficult to fit the AMS-02 $\\frac{e^+}{e^++e^-}$ data while evading the PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ constraint, except for the combination of MED diffusion model with the Einasto density profile, where the DM mass between 450 GeV to 1.2 TeV can satisfy both data sets at 95\\% CL. Finally, we compare to the newest AMS-02 antiproton data.

  5. Antihyperon-hyperon production in antiproton-proton annihilations with PANDA at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Michael [Department of Nuclear Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The production of antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-proton annihilations involves the annihilation of at least one light (u,d) quark-antiquark pair and the creation of a heavier (s,c,b) pair. Production of strange hyperons occur in an energy region in which QCD is difficult to predict. By studying hyperon production we learn about the strong interaction in this energy region, i.e. the confinement domain. It is an open question what the relevant degrees of freedom are: quarks and gluons, or hadrons. Spin observables is an excellent tool in order to better understand the physical processes. These are accessible via the weak, parity violating decay of the hyperon which results in an angular asymmetry of the decay products. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR is going to be ideally suited to study spin physics on hyperons with both high precision and high statistics. Since hyperons decay weakly and thus have long life-times, their decay vertices are displaced with respect to the production point. This sets high demands on precise track reconstruction. A pattern recognition algorithm is currently under development, with the ability to reconstruct tracks originating in displaced vertices. Simulation studies done by the Uppsala group as well as the status of the development will be presented and discussed.

  6. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  7. Unified treatment of hadronic annihilation and protonium formation in slow collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-07-01

    Antiproton (p¯) collisions with hydrogen atoms, resulting in the hadronic process of particle-antiparticle annihilation and the atomic process of protonium (p¯p) formation (or p¯ capture), are investigated theoretically. As the collision energy decreases, the collision time required for the p¯ capture becomes necessarily longer. Then, there is the possibility that the p¯-p annihilation occurs significantly before the p¯ capture process completes. In such a case, one can no longer consider the annihilation decay separately from the p¯ capture process. The present study develops a rigorous unified quantum-mechanical treatment of the annihilation and p¯ capture processes. For this purpose, an R-matrix approach for atomic collisions is extended to have complex-valued R-matrix elements allowing for the hadronic annihilation. Detailed calculations are carried out at low collision energies ranging from 10-8 to 10-1 eV, and the annihilation and the p¯ capture (total and product-state selected) cross sections are reported. Consideration is given to the difference between the direct annihilation occurring during the collision and the annihilation of p¯p occurring after the p¯ capture. The present annihilation process is also compared with the annihilation in two-body p¯+p collisions.

  8. Formation spectra of charmed meson--nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Nieves, J; Salcedo, L L; Tolos, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson--nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson--nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The $\\bar{D}$ mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the $\\bar{D} N$ pair. Employing an effective model for the $\\bar{D} N$ and $D N$ interactions and solving the Klein--Gordon equation for $\\bar{D}$ and $D$ in finite nuclei, we find that the $D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system has $1 s$ and $2p$ mesic nuclear states and that the $D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system binds in a $1s$ state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the $[D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ and $[D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a ${}^{12} \\rm{C}$ target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the $2 p$ $D^{-}...

  9. Fibre Optic Notch Filter For The Antiproton Decelerator Stochastic Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Simmonds, Max Vincent John

    2016-01-01

    The project scope included reverse engineering, upgrading, and recovering the operational conditions of an existing fibre optic notch filter. Once operational, tests were to be preformed to confirm the performance of the temperature stabilisation. The end goal is to use said notch filter in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN to help aid antimatter research. The notch filter was successfully reverse engineered and then documented. Changes were made in order to increase performance and reliability, and also allow easy integration into the AD. An additional phase was added whereby the notch filter was to be controller via a touchscreen computer, situated next to the filter, allowing engineers to set-up each of the electronic devices used. While one of the devices (Motorised Delay Line) can be controlled by the touchscreen computer, the other two cannot.Due to time constraints and difficulties with the Beckhoff TwincatII programming language, the USB devices were not able to be controlled via the To...

  10. Exclusive Central $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Maria [Julich, Forschungszentrum

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^{=}\\pi^{-}$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < $\\eta$ < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < $\\eta$ < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < $y$ < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M($\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = 5000 MeV/$c^2$. Resonance structures consistent with $f_0$ and $f_2$(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  11. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  12. Dark matter annihilations into two light fermions and one gauge boson. General analysis and antiproton constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2011-12-15

    We study in this paper the scenario where the dark matter is constituted by Majo- rana particles which couple to a light Standard Model fermion and an extra scalar via a Yukawa coupling. In this scenario, the annihilation rate into the light fermions with the mediation of the scalar particle is strongly suppressed by the mass of the fermion. Nevertheless, the helicity suppression is lifted by the associated emission of a gauge boson, yielding annihilation rates which could be large enough to allow the indirect detection of the dark matter particles. We perform a general analysis of this scenario, calculating the annihilation cross section of the processes {chi}{chi} {yields} f anti fV when the dark matter particle is a SU(2){sub L} singlet or doublet, f is a lepton or a quark, and V is a photon, a weak gauge boson or a gluon. We point out that the annihilation rate is particularly enhanced when the dark matter particle is degenerate in mass to the intermediate scalar particle, which is a scenario barely constrained by collider searches of exotic charged or colored particles. Lastly, we derive upper limits on the relevant cross sections from the non-observation of an excess in the cosmic antiproton-to-proton ratio measured by PAMELA. (orig.)

  13. Bayesian analysis of spatial-dependent cosmic-ray propagation: astrophysical background of antiprotons and positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jie; Oliva, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The AMS-02 experiment has reported a new measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio in Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In the energy range $E\\sim\\,$60-450 GeV, this ratio is found to be remarkably constant. Using recent data on CR proton, helium, carbon, 10Be/9Be, and B/C ratio, we have performed a global Bayesian analysis based on a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo sampling algorithm under a "two halo model" of CR propagation. In this model, CRs are allowed to experience a different type of diffusion when they propagate in the region close of the Galactic disk. We found that the vertical extent of this region is about 900 pc above and below the disk, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient scales with energy as $D\\sim\\,E^{0.15}$, describing well the observations on primary CR spectra, secondary/primary ratios and anisotropy. Under this model we have carried out improved calculations of antiparticle spectra arising from secondary CR production and their corresponding uncertainties. We made use of Monte-Carlo generato...

  14. Dark matter annihilations into two light fermions and one gauge boson: general analysis and antiproton constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study in this paper the scenario where the dark matter is constituted by Majorana particles which couple to a light Standard Model fermion and an extra scalar via a Yukawa coupling. In this scenario, the annihilation rate into the light fermions with the mediation of the scalar particle is strongly suppressed by the mass of the fermion. Nevertheless, the helicity suppression is lifted by the associated emission of a gauge boson, yielding annihilation rates which could be large enough to allow the indirect detection of the dark matter particles. We perform a general analysis of this scenario, calculating the annihilation cross section of the processes χχ→f f-bar V when the dark matter particle is a SU(2)L singlet or doublet, f is a lepton or a quark, and V is a photon, a weak gauge boson or a gluon. We point out that the annihilation rate is particularly enhanced when the dark matter particle is degenerate in mass to the intermediate scalar particle, which is a scenario barely constrained by collider searches of exotic charged or colored particles. Lastly, we derive upper limits on the relevant cross sections from the non-observation of an excess in the cosmic antiproton-to-proton ratio measured by PAMELA

  15. The phenomenology of trapped inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Lauren; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Trapped inflation is a mechanism in which particle production from the moving inflaton is the main source of friction in the inflaton equation of motion. The produced fields source inflaton perturbations, which dominate over the vacuum ones. We employ the set of equations for the inflaton zero mode and its perturbations which was developed in the original work on trapped inflation, and which we extend to second order in the perturbations. We build on this study by updating the experimental constraints, and by replacing the existing approximate solutions with more accurate ones. We obtain a different numerical value for the amplitude of the scalar power spectrum, and a parametrically different result for the bispectrum. This has implications for the allowed region of parameter space in models of trapped inflation, and for some of the phenomenological results obtained in this region. The main results in the allowed region are the following: monomial inflaton potentials, such as $V \\propto \\varphi,\\, \\varphi^2$ ...

  16. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol for using trapped ions to measure rotations via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry. The trap allows the interferometer to enclose a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without losing contrast. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, thermal states with many phonons should be sufficient for operation.

  17. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  18. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  19. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, C D J; Curtis, E A; Hall, B V; Garcia, I L; Eriksson, S; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A

    2005-01-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1 microkelvin allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  20. Optical trapping in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.; Criante, L.; Bracalente, F.; Aieta, F.

    2010-08-01

    Optical trapping and manipulation of micrometric silica particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal is reported. Several kind of samples are considered: homeotropic and planar undoped cells and homeotropic and planar cells doped by a small amount of the azo-dye Methyl-Red. The incident light intensity is over the threshold for optical reorientation of the molecular director. The refractive index of the dispersed particles is lower than the ones of the liquid crystal therefore the usual conditions for laser trapping and manipulation are not fulfilled. Nevertheless optical trapping is possible and is closely related to the optical nonlinearity of the hosting liquid crystal1. Trapping in doped and undoped cells are compared and it is shown that in the first case intensity lower by more than one order of magnitude is required as compared to the one needed in undoped samples. The effect is faster and the structural forces are of longer range. The formation of bubble-gum like defects in doped samples under certain experimental conditions is also reported and discussed.

  1. Quantum Games in ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided

  2. The rise of trapped populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April T Humble

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As border security increases and borders become less permeable, cross-border migration is becoming increasingly difficult, selective and dangerous. Growing numbers of people are becoming trapped in their own countries or in transit countries, or being forced to roam border areas, unable to access legal protection or basic social necessities.

  3. Optical trapping of coated microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bormuth, V.; Jannasch, A.; Ander, M.; van Kats, C.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Howard, J.; Schäffer, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering a

  4. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  5. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (antiproton production at large transverse momentum in p–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2016-09-01

    At intermediate pT the (antiproton RpPb shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high pT the charged pion, kaon and (antiproton RpPb are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  6. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, C E; Brown, K R; Chuang, I L; Leibrandt, D R; Mallard, W J

    2005-01-01

    Chiaverini et al. [Quant. Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of 0.44 micron diameter charged particles in a vacuum of 15 Pa (0.1 torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through in...

  7. A Portable Root-door Hog Trap

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Since the early 1960's, over 4,500 wild hogs have been relocated through Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission trapping operations. The trap now used by the...

  8. Furbearer Trapping Plan : Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge Trapping Plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a...

  9. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Seyedeh Hamideh; Mahmoud, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The optical trapping techniques have been extensively used in physics, biophysics, micro-chemistry, and micro-mechanics to allow trapping and manipulation of materials ranging from particles, cells, biological substances, and polymers to DNA and RNA molecules. In this Letter, we present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named trap split, in a conventional four-level double-$\\Lambda$ atomic system driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can be always achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating the particles and generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  10. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  11. Study of the K Kπ meson resonances produced in antiproton proton annihilations at 750 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present an analysis of the antiproton proton annihilations into strange particles at 700 and 750 MeV/c, restricted to the four and five body final states. We study in detail the resonances decaying into the K Kπ; system, in particular the D and E mesons. For the D meson we present a determination of i ts mass, width, isospin, G-parity, C-parity and spin. For the E meson we present parametrizations of the complete final state which decrease its statistical significance in this type of production. (Author)

  12. Measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight over antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K; Fuke, H; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2012-02-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p calculations. Cosmologically primary p's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p spectra. BESS-Polar II data show no evidence of primary p's from the evaporation of primordial black holes. PMID:22400920

  13. The W boson transverse momentum spectrum in proton-antiproton collisions at radical s = 1. 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, B.L.

    1991-02-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was used to measure the transverse momentum distribution of W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider. The W bosons were identified by the decay W {yields} e{nu}. The results are in good agreement with a next-to-leading order calculation. The cross section for W production with P{sub T} > 50 GeV/c is 423 {plus minus} 58 (stat.) {plus minus} 108 (sys.) pb. 58 refs., 53 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Coupled-Channel Investigation of the Collision of Protons and Antiprotons with Hydrogen- Like Atoms in the 2s States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reda S. Tantawi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the electric charge of both the projectile and the target nucleus on the cross section of the inelastic collision of protons and antiprotons with atoms is investigated at energies ranging from i to 2500 KeV. The impact parameter method is used to analyse the cross sections of the excitation of the n = 3 states of H atom and He+, Li2+ ions being initially in the excited 2s states. The calculated cross sections for hydrogen atoms are compared with the other theoretical results based on coupled-channels methods.

  15. Fragmentation properties of jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jet fragmentation properties have been studied in collisions of protons and antiprotons at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV, using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The fractional momentum distribution of charged particles within jets is presented and compared with Monte-Carlo predictions. With increasing di-jet invariant mass from 60 to 200 GeV/c2 the fragmentation is observed to soften as predicted by scale breaking effects in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The charged multiplicity in the jet core is observed to rise with di-jet invariant mass. 57 refs

  16. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Xu, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Taeschner, A. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Klehr, F.; Wuestner, P. [Elektronik und Analytik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Juelich (Germany); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90 {sup circle} are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment. (orig.)

  17. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  18. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90$^{\\circ}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Q; Gillitzer, A; Grzonka, D; Khoukaz, A; Klehr, F; Lehrach, A; Prasuhn, D; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Stockmann, T; Täschner, A; Wuestner, P; Xu, H

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90$^{\\circ}$ are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  19. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  20. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  1. An analytical study of total cross-section of proton-proton and proton-antiproton interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explain and to predict the experimental data, different models and parameterizations have been proposed, which are discussed in the previous work. The present work is devoted to calculate the total cross-sections and, the difference between these two cross-sections, Δσ, and the ratio ρ of the real part to the imaginary part of the scattering amplitude. A new approach of geometrical fitting of the data is introduced in the present work to parameterize the total cross-section of hadron-hadron interactions. The modified form of the fitting of the total cross-section is used for proton-proton and proton-antiproton interactions

  2. Non-dissociative and dissociative ionization of N2, CO, CO2, and CH4 by impact of 50-6000 keV protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the cross section for non-dissociative single ionization and the cross sections for the creation of charged fragments have been performed for 50-6000 keV antiproton and proton impact on N2, CO, CO2, and CH4. The results support the understanding of the ionization phenomenon that has been achieved via measurements with fundamental charged particles on atoms. The present high-energy antiproton fragmentation data supply a stringent test of the validity of the published electron-impact fragmentation data which, unfortunately, most of them fail. (Author)

  3. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vuletic, Vladan; Schleier-Smith, Monika H

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  4. Superdense Coding via Hot Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Tao; FENG Mang; GAO Ke-Lin

    2004-01-01

    Superdense coding plays an important role in quantum information and can be performed with trapped ions. By confining the ions in a linear trap or a trap-cavity setup, we propose schemes to implement a reliable superdense coding by means of bichromatic radiation method. Experimental feasibility and reliability for achieving our schemes is discussed in detail.

  5. Revealing trap depth distributions in persistent phosphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Eeckhout, K.; Bos, A.J.J.; Poelman, D.; Smet, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent luminescence or afterglow is caused by a gradual release of charge carriers from trapping centers. The energy needed to release these charge carriers is determined by the trap depths. Knowledge of these trap depths is therefore crucial in the understanding of the persistent luminescence m

  6. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 1012 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 1018. While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  7. Tachyon Physics with Trapped Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E; Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    It has been predicted that particles with imaginary mass, called tachyons, would be able to travel faster than the speed of light. So far, there has not been any experimental evidence for tachyons in either natural or engineered systems. Here, we propose how to experimentally simulate Dirac tachyons with trapped ions. Quantum measurement on a Dirac particle simulated by a trapped ion causes it to have an imaginary mass so that it may travel faster than the effective speed of light. We show that a Dirac tachyon must have spinor-motion entanglement in order to be superluminal. We also show that it exhibits significantly more Klein tunneling than a normal Dirac particle. We provide numerical simulations with realistic ion systems and show that our scheme is feasible with current technology.

  8. Magnetic trapping of ultracold neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Brome, C. R.; Butterworth, J. S.; Dzhosyuk, S. N.; Mattoni, C. E. H.; McKinsey, D. N.; Doyle, J. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Dewey, M. S.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Greene, G. L.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Coakley, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic confinement of neutrons is reported. Neutrons are loaded into an Ioffe-type superconducting magnetic trap through inelastic scattering of cold neutrons with 4He. Scattered neutrons with sufficiently low energy and in the appropriate spin state are confined by the magnetic field until they decay. The electron resulting from neutron decay produces scintillations in the liquid helium bath that results in a pulse of extreme ultraviolet light. This light is frequency dow...

  9. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  10. Trapped Surfaces in Vacuum Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Beig, R

    1994-01-01

    An earlier construction by the authors of sequences of globally regular, asymptotically flat initial data for the Einstein vacuum equations containing trapped surfaces for large values of the parameter is extended, from the time symmetric case considered previously, to the case of maximal slices. The resulting theorem shows rigorously that there exists a large class of initial configurations for non-time symmetric pure gravitational waves satisfying the assumptions of the Penrose singularity theorem and so must have a singularity to the future.

  11. Poverty Traps and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Tol, Richard S.J.

    2011-01-01

    We use a demo-economic model to examine the question of whether climate change could widen or deepen poverty traps. The model includes two crucial mechanisms. Parents are risk averse when deciding how many children to have; fertility is high when infant survival is low. High fertility spreads scarce household resources thin, resulting in children being poorly educated. At the macro level, technological progress is slow because of decreasing returns to scale in agriculture. With high populatio...

  12. Improvement of the axial trapping effect using azimuthally polarised trapping beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xue-Cong; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    A dual optical tweezers system, which consists of a doughnut mode optical tweezer (DMOT) with the azimuthally polarised trapping beam and a solid mode optical tweezer (SMOT) with the Gauss trapping beam was constructed to compare the axial trapping effect of DMOT and SMOT. The long-distance axial trapping of ST68 microbubbles (MBs) achieved by DMOT was more stable than that of SMOT. Moreover the axial trapping force measured using the viscous drag method, was depended on the diameter of the particle, the laser power, and the numerical aperture (NA) of the objective lens. The measurement of the axial trapping force and the acquisition of CCD images of trapping effect confirmed that the DMOT showed excellent axial trapping ability than SMOT. A simple and effective method is developed to improve axial trapping effect using the azimuthally polarized beam as trapping beam. This is helpful for the long-distance manipulating of particles especially polarised biological objects in axial direction.

  13. HITRAP - a facility for experiments on heavy highly charged ions and on antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andjelkovic, Z; Barth, W; Brantjes, N P M; Braeuning-Demian, A; Dahl, L; Herfurth, F; Kester, O; Kluge, H J; Koszudowski, S; Kozhuharov, C; Maero, G; Noertershaeuser, W [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Birkl, G [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Blank, I; Goetz, S [Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Blaum, K [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bodewits, E; Hoekstra, R [KVI Groningen (Netherlands); Church, D [Texas AM University, Texas (United States); Pfister, J, E-mail: w.quint@gsi.d [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2009-11-01

    HITRAP is a facility for very slow highly-charged heavy ions at GSI. HITRAP uses the GSI relativistic ion beams, the Experimental Storage Ring ESR for electron cooling and deceleration to 4 MeV/u, and consists of a combination of an interdigital H-mode (IH) structure with a radiofrequency quadrupole structure for further deceleration to 6 keV/u, and a Penning trap for accumulation and cooling to low temperatures. Finally, ion beams with low emittance will be delivered to a large variety of atomic and nuclear physics experiments. Presently, HITRAP is in the commissioning phase. The deceleration of heavy-ion beam from the ESR storage ring to an energy of 500 keV/u with the IH structure has been demonstrated and studied in detail. The commissioning of the RFQ structure and the cooler trap is ongoing.

  14. Dynamic array of dark optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, V.R.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic array of dark optical traps is generated for simultaneous trapping and arbitrary manipulation of multiple low-index microstructures. The dynamic intensity patterns forming the dark optical trap arrays are generated using a nearly loss-less phase-to-intensity conversion of a phase......-encoded coherent light source. Two-dimensional input phase distributions corresponding to the trapping patterns are encoded using a computer-programmable spatial light modulator, enabling each trap to be shaped and moved arbitrarily within the plane of observation. We demonstrate the generation of multiple dark...

  15. In-trap conversion electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, L. E-mail: weissman@nscl.msu.edu; Ames, F.; Aeysto, J.; Forstner, O.; Reisinger, K.; Rinta-Antila, S

    2002-10-21

    The Penning trap REXTRAP at ISOLDE was used to test the feasibility of in-trap conversion electron spectroscopy. The results of simulations, experiments with solid conversion electron sources as well as first on-line tests with trapped radioactive ions are presented. In addition to obtaining high-resolution spectroscopic data, the detection of conversion electrons was found to be a useful tool for the diagnostics of the trap operation. The tests proved the feasibility of in-trap spectroscopy but also revealed some potential problems to be addressed in the future.

  16. In-trap conversion electron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Äystö, J; Forstner, O; Reisinger, K; Rinta-Antila, S

    2002-01-01

    The Penning trap REXTRAP at ISOLDE was used to test the feasibility of in-trap conversion electron spectroscopy. The results of simulations, experiments with solid conversion electron sources as well as first on-line and tests with trapped radioactive ions are presented. In addition to obtaining high-resolution spectroscopic data, the detection of conversion electrons was found to be a useful tool for the diagnostics of the trap operation. The tests proved the feasibility of in-trap spectroscopy but also revealed some potential problems to be addressed in the future.

  17. Energy dependence of proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes measurements of proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering with the scattered particles emerging at small angles in the centre of mass (CM) system. These measurements have been performed at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The direct comparison of pp and anti pp scattering in this energy range is of considerable interest. This is because measurements on pp scattering alone, have revealed that in the ISR energy range both elastic- and total pp cross-sections increase with increasing energy. It is the subject of this thesis to check the prediction that the proton-antiproton cross section will do the same. The present experiment measures the angular distribution of pp and anti pp elastic scattering at small angles (typically 1-10 mrad) and at different energies. From these measurements a comparison of the energy behaviour of the pp and anti pp forward nuclear scattering amplitudes is obtained. This behaviour can be described in terms of three parameters: the total cross-section, the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude and a parameter, the slope, characterising the dependence of the process on the squared four-momentum transfer between the incident and the scattered particle. (Auth.)

  18. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ninno, G

    1999-07-01

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had tobe designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  19. Indirect Evidence for the Supersymmetric Nature of Dark Matter from the Combined Data on Galactic Positrons, Antiprotons and Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim; Sander, C; Zhukov, V

    2003-01-01

    Two new observations have strengthened the case for the supersymmetric nature of the Cold Dark Matter component in our universe: First, it was shown that new data on the nuclear abundance, B/C - and 10Be/9Be ratios constrain the diffusion parameters in Galactic Models so strongly, that they lead to a clear deficiency in the production of diffuse hard gamma rays, antiprotons and hard positrons, if no anomalous sources or anomalous energy dependence of the diffusion coefficients are postulated. Second, from the precise relic density measurement by WMAP the WIMP annihilation cross section can be determined in a model independent way. If the WIMPS are postulated to be the neutralinos of Supersymmetry, then only a limited region of parameter space matches this annihilation cross section. It is shown that the resulting positrons, antiprotons and gamma rays from the neutralino annihilation (mainly into b-quarks) provide the correct shape and magnitude for the missing fluxes in the Galactic Models. The probability of...

  20. Calculation of transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon laser transitions of antiprotonic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical ab initio variational calculations of the transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon transitions of antiprotonic helium atoms driven by two counter-propagating laser beams are presented. We found that sub-Doppler spectroscopy is, in principle, possible by exciting transitions of the type (n,L)→(n-2,L-2) between antiprotonic states of principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n∼L-1∼35, first by using highly monochromatic, nanosecond laser beams of intensities 104-105 W/cm2, and then by tuning the virtual intermediate state close (e.g., within 10-20 GHz) to the real state (n-1,L-1) to enhance the nonlinear transition probability. We expect that ac Stark shifts of a few MHz or more will become an important source of systematic error at fractional precisions of better than a few parts in 109. These shifts can, in principle, be minimized and even canceled by selecting an optimum combination of laser intensities and frequencies. We simulated the resonance profiles of some two-photon transitions in the regions n=30-40 of the p4He+ and p3He+ isotopes to find the best conditions that would allow this.

  1. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had to be designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  2. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  3. Trapped

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how the Muslim Sunni Women in the city of Tripoli- Lebanon perceive the the inequity in the rights of women in terms of those of men within the Personal Status codes practiced today in the Sunni Muslim Sharīʻa Courts in the country. Lebanese women and men in general are subject to an imbalanced patronage as a result of the patriarchal conditions dominating the Lebanese society and its various communities. This project further explores the factors that have led to the failu...

  4. Multipole Traps as Tools in Environmental Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M; Giurgiu, Liviu C; Groza, Andreea; Surmeian, Agavni; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Vasilyak, Leonid; Pecherkin, Vladimir; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Syrovatka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles, nanoparticles and aerosols is an issue of major interest for physics and chemistry. We present a setup intended for microparticle trapping in multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure (SATP) conditions. A 16-electrode linear trap geometry has been designed and tested, with an aim to confine a larger number of particles with respect to quadrupole traps and thus enhance the signal to noise ratio, as well as to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. Experimental tests and numerical simulations suggest that multipole traps are very suited for high precision mass spectrometry measurements in case of different microparticle species or to identify the presence of certain aerosols and polluting agents in the atmosphere. Particle traps represent versatile tools for environment monitoring or for the study of many-body Coulomb systems and dusty plasmas.

  5. Optical wire trap for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2014-01-01

    We propose a trap for cold neutral atoms using a fictitious magnetic field induced by a nanofiber-guided light field. In close analogy to magnetic side-guide wire traps realized with current-carrying wires, a trapping potential can be formed when applying a homogeneous magnetic bias field perpendicular to the fiber axis. We discuss this scheme in detail for laser-cooled cesium atoms and find trap depths and trap frequencies comparable to the two-color nanofiber-based trapping scheme but with one order of magnitude lower powers of the trapping laser field. Moreover, the proposed scheme allows one to bring the atoms closer to the nanofiber surface, thereby enabling efficient optical interfacing of the atoms with additional light fields. Specifically, optical depths per atom, $\\sigma_0/A_{\\rm eff}$, of more than 0.4 are predicted, making this system eligible for nanofiber-based nonlinear and quantum optics experiments.

  6. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  7. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  8. Temperature and trapping characterization of an acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers--towards in-trap temperature regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Linda; Evander, Mikael; Lilliehorn, Tobias; Almqvist, Monica; Nilsson, Johan; Laurell, Thomas; Johansson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    An acoustic trap with miniaturized integrated transducers (MITs) for applications in non-contact trapping of cells or particles in a microfluidic channel was characterized by measuring the temperature increase and trapping strength. The fluid temperature was measured by the fluorescent response of Rhodamine B in the microchannel. The trapping strength was measured by the area of a trapped particle cluster counter-balanced by the hydrodynamic force. One of the main objectives was to obtain quantitative values of the temperature in the fluidic channel to ensure safe handling of cells and proteins. Another objective was to evaluate the trapping-to-temperature efficiency for the trap as a function of drive frequency. Thirdly, trapping-to-temperature efficiency data enables identifying frequencies and voltage values to use for in-trap temperature regulation. It is envisioned that operation with only in-trap temperature regulation enables the realization of small, simple and fast temperature-controlled trap systems. The significance of potential gradients at the trap edges due to the finite size of the miniaturized transducers for the operation was emphasized and expressed analytically. The influence of the acoustic near field was evaluated in FEM-simulation and compared with a more ideal 1D standing wave. The working principle of the trap was examined by comparing measurements of impedance, temperature increase and trapping strength with impedance transfer calculations of fluid-reflector resonances and frequencies of high reflectance at the fluid-reflector boundary. The temperature increase was found to be moderate, 7°C for a high trapping strength, at a fluid flow of 0.5mms(-1) for the optimal driving frequency. A fast temperature response with a fall time of 8s and a rise time of 11s was observed. The results emphasize the importance of selecting the proper drive frequency for long term handling of cells, as opposed to the more pragmatic way of selecting the

  9. About the creation of proton-antiproton pair at electron-positron collider in the energy range of ψ(3770) mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadov, A.I., E-mail: ahmadov@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Science, Baku (Azerbaijan); Bystritskiy, Yu.M., E-mail: bystr@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kuraev, E.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Wang, P., E-mail: wangp@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physic, Chinese Academy of Science (China)

    2014-11-15

    The process of electron-positron annihilation into proton-antiproton pair is considered within the vicinity of ψ(3770) resonance. The interference between the pure electromagnetic intermediate state and the ψ(3770) state is evaluated. It is shown that this interference is destructive and the relative phase between these two contributions is large (ϕ{sub 0}≈250°)

  10. V-79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with antiprotons, a study of peripheral damage due to medium and long range components of the annihilation radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Sandra; Bassler, Niels; Hartley, Oliver;

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of cancer carries a perceived risk of inducing secondary cancer and other damage due to dose delivered to normal tissue. While expectedly small, this risk must be carefully analysed for all modalities. Especially in the use of exotic particles like pions and antiprotons, which...

  11. About the creation of proton–antiproton pair at electron–positron collider in the energy range of ψ(3770 mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Ahmadov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of electron–positron annihilation into proton–antiproton pair is considered within the vicinity of ψ(3770 resonance. The interference between the pure electromagnetic intermediate state and the ψ(3770 state is evaluated. It is shown that this interference is destructive and the relative phase between these two contributions is large (ϕ0≈250°.

  12. Status and Outlook of CHIP-TRAP: the Central Michigan University High Precision Penning Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Redshaw, Matthew; Hawks, Paul; Gamage, Nadeesha D; Hunt, Curtis; Kandegedara, Rathnayake M E B; Ratnayake, Ishara S; Sharp, Lance

    2015-01-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP)that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/?filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m=q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  13. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  14. The composite insect trap: an innovative combination trap for biologically diverse sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo

    Full Text Available Documentation of insect diversity is an important component of the study of biodiversity, community dynamics, and global change. Accurate identification of insects usually requires catching individuals for close inspection. However, because insects are so diverse, most trapping methods are specifically tailored to a particular taxonomic group. For scientists interested in the broadest possible spectrum of insect taxa, whether for long term monitoring of an ecosystem or for a species inventory, the use of several different trapping methods is usually necessary. We describe a novel composite method for capturing a diverse spectrum of insect taxa. The Composite Insect Trap incorporates elements from four different existing trapping methods: the cone trap, malaise trap, pan trap, and flight intercept trap. It is affordable, resistant, easy to assemble and disassemble, and collects a wide variety of insect taxa. Here we describe the design, construction, and effectiveness of the Composite Insect Trap tested during a study of insect diversity. The trap catches a broad array of insects and can eliminate the need to use multiple trap types in biodiversity studies. We propose that the Composite Insect Trap is a useful addition to the trapping methods currently available to ecologists and will be extremely effective for monitoring community level dynamics, biodiversity assessment, and conservation and restoration work. In addition, the Composite Insect Trap will be of use to other insect specialists, such as taxonomists, that are interested in describing the insect taxa in a given area.

  15. Aid Volatility and Poverty Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Richard Agénor; Joshua Aizenman

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the impact of aid volatility in a two-period model where production may occur with either a traditional or a modern technology. Public spending is productive and "time to build" requires expenditure in both periods for the modern technology to be used. The possibility of a poverty trap induced by high aid volatility is first examined in a benchmark case where taxation is absent. The analysis is then extended to account for self insurance (taking the form of a first-period c...

  16. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  17. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (anti)proton production at large transverse momentum in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$= 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073687; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; 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Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    The production of charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons has been measured at mid-rapidity ($-0.5 10$ GeV/$c$), the particle ratios are consistent with those reported for pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies. At intermediate $p_{\\rm T}$ the (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high $p_{\\rm T}$ the charged pion, kaon and (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  18. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (anti)proton production at large transverse momentum in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

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T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kostarakis, P.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shahzad, M. I.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-09-01

    The production of charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons has been measured at mid-rapidity (- 0.5 10 GeV / c), the particle ratios are consistent with those reported for pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies. At intermediate pT the (anti)proton RpPb shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high pT the charged pion, kaon and (anti)proton RpPb are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  19. Antiproton-proton elastic scattering at 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/C; Difusion elastica antiproton-proton a 3,0 y 4,0 GeV/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unamuno, S.

    1965-07-01

    This paper presents the results-obtained in studying the two-prong interactions observed in the Saclay 81 cm hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to the 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/c antiproton beams from CERN Proton-Synchroton. Total elastic cross-sections corresponding to both energies are given. The results are given. The results are compared with those of p-p scaterring at different energies and with those of p-p scattering. Several optical-models, from the simples one (the black disk model) to a rather elaborated, four-parameters model have been applied. These models can explain some of the experimental results but fail in predicting the angular distribution of large angle scattering. (Author)

  20. Case Study: Trap Crop with Pheromone Traps for Suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say, can disperse from source habitats, including corn, Zea mays L., and peanut, Arachis hypogaea L., into cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Therefore, a 2-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench spp. bicolor trap crop, with or without Euschistus spp. pheromone traps, to suppress dispersal of this pest to cotton. In 2004, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops (with or without pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Similarly, in 2006, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops and pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Thus, the combination of the sorghum trap crop and pheromone traps effectively suppressed dispersal of E. servus into cotton. Inclusion of pheromone traps with trap crops potentially offers additional benefits, including: (1 reducing the density of E. servus adults in a trap crop, especially females, to possibly decrease the local population over time and reduce the overwintering population, (2 reducing dispersal of E. servus adults from the trap crop into cotton, and (3 potentially attracting more dispersing E. servus adults into a trap crop during a period of time when preferred food is not prevalent in the landscape.

  1. Orientation of Culex mosquitoes to carbon dioxide-baited traps: flight manoeuvres and trapping efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperband, M F; Cardé, R T

    2006-03-01

    Females of Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Culex tarsalis Coquillet (Diptera: Culicidae) in the host-seeking stage were released and video recorded in three dimensions in a large field wind tunnel as they flew to four kinds of CO2-baited mosquito traps. The trapping efficiency (number of mosquitoes approaching compared to the number caught) was determined for each trap type. The Encephalitis Virus Surveillance (EVS), Mosquito Magnet Freedom (MMF) and Mosquito Magnet Liberty (MML) traps captured only 13-16% of approaching Cx. quinquefasciatus females, whereas the Mosquito Magnet-X (MMX) trap captured 58%. Similar results were obtained for Cx. tarsalis. Orientation behaviour and flight parameters of mosquitoes approaching the four traps were compared. Mosquitoes spent the most time orienting to the EVS trap. Flight speed decreased as mosquitoes entered the vicinity of each trap and a large portion of their time was spent within 30 cm downwind of the traps. Flights became highly tortuous downwind of the poorly performing traps and just upwind of the MMX trap. Differences between traps and possible explanations for the superior performance of the MMX trap are considered.

  2. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of a magneto-optical trap for caesium atoms is presented. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving high spatial number densities and low temperatures. Optimizing both of these together enables efficient evaporative cooling from a conservative trap, a procedure which has recently led to the first observations of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic vapour. The behaviour of a magneto-optical trap is nomina...

  3. Radionuclide trap studies using porous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards import substitute, an attempt has been made to synthesise porous carbon by acidic sucrose solution route for use as trap material for cesium isotopes. The radionuclide trap experiments have been carried out to study the uptake of fission product cesium (137Cs) using reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and home made porous carbon (HMPC) in static sodium system. The trapping efficiency and distribution coefficient have been measured and compared. (author)

  4. Optimization of microfluidic microsphere-trap arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Sarder, Pinaki; Li, Zhenyu; Nehorai, Arye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray devices are powerful for detecting and analyzing biological targets. However, the potential of these devices may not be fully realized due to the lack of optimization of their design and implementation. In this work, we consider a microsphere-trap array device by employing microfluidic techniques and a hydrodynamic trapping mechanism. We design a novel geometric structure of the trap array in the device, and develop a comprehensive and robust framework to optimize the values of the...

  5. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  6. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (2 despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H2 is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H2 molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H2+, and H2 as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H2, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed comparison of the present findings for p impacts and for anti p+He collisions with literature data. On the other hand, total and differential cross sections for ionization and excitation of the targets by anti p impact complement the sparse literature data of this kind. Results gained from different targets as well

  7. Active Stabilization of Ion Trap Radiofrequency Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K G; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2016-01-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a rf Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to better than 10 Hz, or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  9. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  10. Ion trapping for quantum information processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Jin-yin; WANG Yu-zhu; LIU Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the recent pro-gresses on the ion trapping for quantum information process-ing and quantum computation. We have first discussed the basic principle of quantum information theory and then fo-cused on ion trapping for quantum information processing.Many variations, especially the techniques of ion chips, have been investigated since the original ion trap quantum compu-tation scheme was proposed. Full two-dimensional control of multiple ions on an ion chip is promising for the realization of scalable ion trap quantum computation and the implemen-tation of quantum networks.

  11. Exploration of Subtle Trap in Jiyang Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiPilong; ZhangShanwen; XiaoHuanqin; WangYongshi; QiuGuiqiang

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses the procedure of exploration of the Tertiary subtle trap in Jiyang depression and divides the Tertiary subtle trap into 3 types (lithologic reservoir, stratigraphic reservoir and fractured reservoir) and 8 groups, then summarizes the common feature and founding discipline of the subtle trap and finds 4 accumulating modes including steep slope mode, depression mode, center anticline mode and gentle slope mode. Its main exploration methods are explicated from the viewpoint of reservoir geological modeling, description of recognizing traps and comprehensive evaluation of reservoir and so on.

  12. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tae Min [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Properties of W + jet events in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, R. B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-11-22

    W boson + QCD Jet events, produced in 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), were used to measure the center-of-mass production angle of the W + jet system, and were also used to place limits on the production of excited quark states. The center-of-mass production angular distribution agrees well with leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Excited quark states were searched for in the reaction q + g {yields} q* {yields} q + W. Upper limits on the q* cross section, as a function of the q* mass, are shown. Comparison with a theoretical prediction for q* production excludes excited quark states with a mass in the range 150--530 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence.

  14. Signatures of a Two Million Year Old Supernova in the Spectra of Cosmic Ray Protons, Antiprotons, and Positrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachelrieß, M; Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-10-30

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above ~20  GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active approximately two million years ago and has injected (2-3)×10^{50} erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited ^{60}Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust. PMID:26565453

  15. Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow($v_1$) measurements for charged pions, protons and antiprotons near mid-rapidity ($y=0$) are reported in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au + Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  16. Antiproton-proton elastic scattering at 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results-obtained in studying the two-prong interactions observed in the Saclay 81 cm hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to the 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/c antiproton beams from CERN Proton-Synchroton. Total elastic cross-sections corresponding to both energies are given. The results are given. The results are compared with those of p-p scaterring at different energies and with those of p-p scattering. Several optical-models, from the simples one (the black disk model) to a rather elaborated, four-parameters model have been applied. These models can explain some of the experimental results but fail in predicting the angular distribution of large angle scattering. (Author)

  17. Transverse velocity dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio as a signature of the QCD critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, M; Bass, S A; Müller, B; Nonaka, C

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the mu_B-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity (beta_T) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual beta_T dependence of the [over]p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  18. Phenomenological study of exclusive binary light particle production from antiproton-proton annihilation at FAIR/PANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Exclusive binary annihilation reactions induced by antiprotons of momentum from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c can be extensively investigated at FAIR/PANDA [1]. We are especially interested in the channel of charged pion pairs. Whereas this very probable channel constitutes the major background for other processes of interest in the PANDA experiment, it carries unique physical information on the quark content of proton, allowing to test different models (quark counting rules, statistical models,..). To study the binary reactions of light meson formation, we are developing an effective Lagrangian model based on Feynman diagrams which takes into account the virtuality of the exchanged particles. Regge factors [2] and form factors are introduced with parameters which may be adjusted on the existing data. We present preliminary results of our formalism for different reactions of light meson production leading to reliable predictions of cross sections, energy and angular dependencies in the PANDA kinematical range.

  19. Signatures of a two million year old supernova in the spectra of cosmic ray protons, antiprotons and positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M; Semikoz, D V

    2015-01-01

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above $\\sim 20$ GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active $\\sim 2$ Myr ago and has injected $(1-2)\\times 10^{50}$ erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited $^{60}$Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust.

  20. Optimizing Trap Design and Trapping Protocols for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, Justin M; Buitenhuis, Rosemarije; Hallett, Rebecca H

    2014-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a recent invasive pest of fruit crops in North America and Europe. Carpophagous larvae render fruit unmarketable and may promote secondary rot-causing organisms. To monitor spread and develop programs to time application of controls, further work is needed to optimize trap design and trapping protocols for adult D. suzukii. We compared commercial traps and developed a new, easy-to-use plastic jar trap that performed well compared with other designs. For some trap types, increasing the entry area led to increased D. suzukii captures and improved selectivity for D. suzukii when populations were low. However, progressive entry area enlargement had diminishing returns, particularly for commercial traps. Unlike previous studies, we found putting holes in trap lids under a close-fitting cover improved captures compared with holes on sides of traps. Also, red and black traps outperformed yellow and clear traps when traps of all colors were positioned 10-15 cm apart above crop foliage. In smaller traps, attractant surface area and entry area, but not other trap features (e.g., headspace volume), appeared to affect D. suzukii captures. In the new, plastic jar trap, tripling attractant volume (360 vs 120 ml) and weekly attractant replacement resulted in the highest D. suzukii captures, but in the larger commercial trap these measures only increased by-catch of large-bodied Diptera. Overall, the plastic jar trap with large entry area is affordable, durable, and can hold high attractant volumes to maximize D. suzukii capture and selectivity. PMID:26470076