WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiproton stopping powers

  1. Optical-data model for the stopping power of condensed matter for protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the energy-loss function of a medium that is based on optical data (∼zero momentum transfer) and a quadratic extension into the momentum-transfer plane is used to evaluate the stopping power of the medium for protons and antiprotons. Energies less than ∼40 MeV are considered for which radiative energy losses and density-effect corrections are negligible. 'Higher-order' corrections to the stopping power proportional to the incident particle charge to the third power, Barkas effect, and to the fourth power, Bloch correction, are included. Calculations are presented for aluminum, carbon, copper and polystyrene. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the optical-data model, plus higher-order corrections, provides an excellent description of energy loss for proton energies from ∼100 keV to several tens of MeV. (author)

  2. Interaction of antiprotons with Rb atoms and a comparison of antiproton stopping powers of the atoms H, Li, Na, K, and Rb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Fischer, Nicolas; Saenz, Alejandro

    Ionization and excitation cross sections as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping powers of the alkali metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb colliding with antiprotons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. An impact-energy range from 0.25 to 4000 keV was considered. The...... target atoms are treated as effective one-electron systems using a model potential. The results are compared with calculated cross sections for antiproton-hydrogen atom collisions....

  3. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV.......A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  4. Gold fragmentation induced by stopped antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Lubinski, P.; Grochulska, A.; von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F. J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Kurcewicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.; Stolarz, A.; Trzcinska, A.

    2002-01-01

    A natural gold target was irradiated with the antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN. Antiprotons of 200 MeV/c momentum were stopped in a thick target, products of their annihilations on Au nuclei were detected using the off-line gamma-ray spectroscopy method. In total, yields for 114 residual nuclei were determined, providing a data set to deduce the complete mass and charge distribution of all products with A > 20 from a fitting procedure. The contribution of evaporatio...

  5. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  6. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the...

  7. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  8. Current stopping power analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified Bethe-Bloch stopping power theory permits fairly accurate calculation of energy losses over a broad interval of projectile velocity v = νc insofar as several parameters appearing in the revised Bethe-Bloch formula have been corectly evaluated. Since the parameters cannot in general be ascertained by calculation from first principles, fits of theory to measurement remain the best method of evaluation. The parameters alluded to are: the target mean excitation energy; the shell correction scaling parameters; the composite single free parameter of the Barkas (projectile-z3) effect correction formalism, and the strength of the correction term; the high velocity density effect correction parameter; and the low velocity charge state parameter. These parameters are discussed

  9. Stopping powers for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report re-examines the prospects for a general heavy-ion stopping power table in the light of new experimental stopping power measurements. The question of oscillations in the dependence of the stopping powers on both the projectile, Z1, and the material, Z2, is examined. We can find no evidence for higher order corrections such as the Z13-effect. (author)

  10. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  11. Stopping Power for Degenerate Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    This is a first attempt at calculating the BPS stopping power with electron degeneracy corrections. Section I establishes some notation and basic facts. Section II outlines the basics of the calculation, and in Section III contains some brief notes on how to proceed with the details of the calculation. The remaining work for the calculation starts with Section III.

  12. Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  13. Proceedings of the 10 May 1989 Antiproton Technology Workshop: Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1989-09-01

    Antiprotons are particles of antimatter which release highly penetrating radiation when they are stopped in normal matter. According to presentations at the Antiproton Technology Workshop this radiation can be used, in very small quantities, to image objects and determine their composition and density. In larger amounts, the radiation could be used to kill cancer tumors or produce highly localized heating and shock waves. Titles of presentations include: Stopping Power of MeV Proton and Antiproton Beams; Recent Simulation Results of ASTER; Pbar Testing of Hydrogen Effects in Sealed Carbon-Carbon Composites; Potential for Antiprotons in Radiation Oncology; Prospects for a Commercial Antiproton Source; Prospects for Exciting Extreme States in Nuclear Matter with Intense Antiproton Beams; Status of AL Studies Relating to condensed Antimatter; Electromagnetic Traps for Atomic Antihydrogen; Antihydrogen Production; Antiproton Catalyzed Fusion; Antiproton Induced Fusion Reaction; Modeling Antiproton-Plasma Interactions; Introduction to CP Violation Studies with Pbars; and Antiproton Production Calculation by the Multistring Model VENUS.

  14. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  15. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammash, T.

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that “at rest” annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  16. Antiproton-induced fission for space power and propulsion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gasdynamic Mirror[GDM] fusion reactor is investigated for use as a bi-modal propulsion device when driven by antiprotons.The deuterium-tritium[DT] fusion reactions in the device will be initiated by the heating provided by the fission fragments and annihilation products resulting from the 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in U-238 target nuclei.The energetic pions and muons of the proton-antiproton[or neutron]annihilation in the U-238 nucleus can heat a DT plasma to several keV during their relatively short lifetimes.The remaining heating to about 10 keV is provided by the fission fragments.Fissioning of U-238 by 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons has been shown to be 100% efficient,and the process can thus be effectively used in heating a suitable plasma to thermonuclear temperatures.With GDM as a steady state fusion reactor,and assuming certain efficiencies for the various components of the system,we calculate the energy multiplication factor 'Q' needed to sustain the steady-state operation for either the 'propulsive' mode or the 'power-producing' mode.With the aid of a system and mission analyses,we find that approximately 3.5 micrograms of antiprotons are required to accomplish a round mission to Mars in about 59 days.A similar amount is required to initiate and sustain the power-producing mode where gigawatts of electric power may be generated.Although roughly nanograms of antiprotons are currently produced annually,it is expected that hundreds of milligrams or even several grams will be produced annually in the next decade or so when Mars missions may be contemplated

  17. Relativistic corrections to stopping powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relativistic corrections to the nonrelativistic Bethe-Bloch formula for the stopping power of matter for charged particles are traditionally computed by considering close collisions separately from distant collisions. The close collision contribution is further divided into the Mott correction appropriate for very small impact parameters, and the Bloch correction, computed for larger values. This division of the region of close collisions leads to a very cumbersome result if one generalizes the original Bloch procedure to relativistic energies. The authors avoid the resulting poorly specified scattering angle theta/sub o/ that divides the Mott and Bloch correction regimes by using the procedure suggested by Lindhard and applied by Golovchenko, Cox and Goland to determine the Bloch correction for relativistic velocities. 25 references, 2 figures

  18. Shell corrections in stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichsel, H.

    2002-05-01

    One of the theories of the electronic stopping power S for fast light ions was derived by Bethe. The algorithm currently used for the calculation of S includes terms known as the mean excitation energy I, the shell correction, the Barkas correction, and the Bloch correction. These terms are described here. For the calculation of the shell corrections an atomic model is used, which is more realistic than the hydrogenic approximation used so far. A comparison is made with similar calculations in which the local plasma approximation is utilized. Close agreement with the experimental data for protons with energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV traversing Al and Si is found without the need for adjustable parameters for the shell corrections.

  19. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  20. Stopping power for ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During these two decades, the researches of the stopping power for ions in solids have made several progresses in the fields of atomic collisions in solids, radiation physics, nuclear fusion and related regions of ion-solid interactions. In the case of the stopping power for light ions at high energy region, the detailed analyses of the mean ionization energy were performed for many kinds of solids. The experimental analyses of the Z13 and Bloch corrections were also made to measure the higher order contributions quantitatively. The experimental formula and data tables of stopping power for H and He ions covered over the region from low to high energies were derived by use of the parameterization methods. As far as the heavy ions concern, the theoretical analyses of the effective charge for stopping power were performed, and it turned to be able to analyze the experimental data within the resolution of +-10--20%. (author)

  1. Stopping-power calculations for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method developed by Brandt and Reinheimer which explicitly includes the effect of the semiconductor gap has been used to calculate the proton and α-particle stopping powers of the valence-electron gas of C (diamond), ZnTe, and U. These values, as well as those existing for Si and Ge, have been combined with the stopping contribution of the electronic core obtained from the statistical atomic model of Bonderup. Stopping powers have also been calculated using the statistical model alone. The calculated curves, which are valid for all incident projectile energies, reproduce the overall features of the semiempirical slowing-down curves, but not always the absolute values

  2. Real time imaging of stopping distributions in biological targets for antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellner, Stefan; Boll, Rebecca; Tegami, Sara [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, Carsten P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Antiprotons are interesting particles that have special properties when used in possible cancer particle therapy. They behave almost the same as protons in the entrance channel but deposit additional annihilation energy when they come to rest in the Bragg peak region. Thus, the number of antiprotons can be reduced while still delivering the same target dose to the tumor. Healthy tissue in the entrance channel is finally less harmed compared to protons which is a ultimate goal for good cancer treatment. Additionally, annihilation energy partially goes into the creation of new particles, especially pions. They exit the body mostly non-interacting and can be detected with an external detector, enabling a real time supervision of the irradiation process. This is currently not possible in any particle treatment method. In our contribution we present model calculations for a low-cost real time detector setup and compare these to results from the recent experiment carried out with the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) Collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN as well as develop improved set-ups for future experiments.

  3. Inner-shell ionization and stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For better understanding of various aspects in stopping phenomena such as Z13-dependence, shell correction, geometrical effect, direction dependence etc., it seems to be helpful to examine theoretically and experimentally the elementary processes which include plasmon excitation, single electron excitation and inner-shell excitation/ionization. In the present, impact-parameter dependent stopping power is discussed in connection with inner-shell ionization

  4. Determination of Barkas correction and general formula for stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our work was to measure stopping power for alpha particles in different gases and obtaining thc general formula for stopping power. The precise measurement of alpha particle stopping power in gases has been performed with maximal error of 0.7%. The accurate values of stopping power obtained in these measurements enable extraction of Barkas correction term and complete of general stopping power formula. The obtained formula was used for comparison of alpha stopping powers particles in different media. A good agreement we obtained with stopping power measurements in solids (author)

  5. Proton Stopping Power in Warm Dense Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Drew; Chen, Sophia; Atzeni, Stefano; Gauthier, Maxence; Mangia, Feliciana; Marquès, Jean-Raphaël; Riquier, Raphaël; Fuchs, Julien

    2013-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) research is fundamental to many fields of physics including fusion sciences, and astrophysical phenomena. In the WDM regime, particle stopping-power differs significantly from cold matter and ideal plasma due to free electron contributions, plasma correlation effects and electron degeneracy. The creation of WDM with temporal duration consistent with the particles probes is difficult to achieve experimentally. The short-pulse laser platform allows for the production of WDM along with relatively short bunches of protons compatible of such measurements, however, until recently, the intrinsic broadband proton spectrum was not well suited to investigate the stopping power directly. This difficulty has been overcome using a novel magnetic particle selector (ΔE/E = 10%) to select protons (in the range 100-1000 keV) as demonstrated with the ELFIE laser in LULI, France. These protons bunches probe high-density (5 × 1020 cm-3) gases (H, He) heated by a nanosecond laser to reach estimated temperatures above 100 eV. Measurement of the proton energy loss within the heated gas allows the stopping power to be determined quantitatively. The experimental results in cold matter are compared to preexisting models to give credibility to the measurement technique. The results from heated matter show that the stopping power of 450 keV protons is dramatically reduced within heated hydrogen plasma.

  6. Seismic stops for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the regulated world of nuclear power, the need to have analytical proof of performance in hypothetical design-basis events such as earth quakes has placed a premium on design configurations that are mathematically tractable and easily analyzed. This is particularly true for the piping design. Depending on how the piping analyses are organized and on how old the plant is, there may be from 200 to 1000 separate piping runs to be designed, analyzed, and qualified. In this situation, the development of snubbers seemed like the answer to a piping engineer's prayer. At any place where seismic support was required but thermal motion had to be accommodated, a snubber could be specified. But, as experience has now shown, the program was solved only on paper. This article presents an alternative to conventional snubbers. These new devices, termed Seismic Stops are designed to replace snubbers directly and look like snubbers on the outside. But their design is based on a completely different principle. The original concept has adapted from early seismic-resistant pipe support designs used on fossil power plants in California. The fundamental idea is to provide a space envelope in which the pipe can expand freely between the hot and cold positions, but cannot move outside the envelope. Seismic Stops are designed to transmit any possible impact load, as would occur in an earthquake, away from the pipe itself to the Seismic Stop. The Seismic Stop pipe support is shown

  7. Proton stopping powers in various gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton stopping powers of H2, He, N2, O2, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe were measured for proton energies between 60 and 800 keV with an accuracy of about 2%. The protons were scattered off a thin gold foil mounted in the center of a gas-filled scattering chamber. The energy loss in the gas is given by the shift of the elastic peak measured with and without gas filling. The experimental data were fitted using the semi-empirical five-parameter formula of Andersen and Ziegler. Shell corrections were calculated from the measured stopping powers and compared to the theoretical shell-correction calculations of Bonderup which are based on the Lindhard-Scharff model. (orig.)

  8. Proceedings of the Antiproton Technology Workshop held in Upton, New York on 10 May 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1989-05-01

    Titles of presentations included: Stopping Power of MeV Proton and Antiproton Beams; Recent Simulation Results of ASTER; Pbar Testing of Hydrogen Effects in Sealed Carbon-Carbon Composites; Potential for Antiprotons in Radiation Oncology; Prospects for a Commercial Antiproton Source; Prospects for Exciting Extreme States in Nuclear Matter with Intense Antiproton Beams; Status of AL Studies Relating to Condensed Antimatter; Electromagnetic Traps for Atomic Antihydrogen; Antihydrogen Production; Headquarters DoE Antiproton Activities; Antiproton Catalyzed Fusion; Antiproton Induced Fusion Reaction; Options for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility; Modeling Antiproton-Plasma Interactions; Concepts for Experimental Determination of Radiation Shielding and Metal Clad Pellet Performance; Introduction to CP Violation Studies with Pbars; Search for CP Violation in Pbar-P to J/psi; Studies of Rare Models of Pbar-P Annihilation; and Antiproton Production Calculation by the Multistring Model VENUS Computer Code.

  9. Stopping-power ratios for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the absorbed dose at a specified location in a medium irradiated with an electron or photon beam normally consists of two steps: (1) the determination of the mean absorbed dose to a detector by using a calibration factor or performing an absolute measurement, (2) the determination of the absorbed dose to the medium at the point of interest by calculations based on the knowledge of the absorbed dose to the detector and the different stopping and scattering properties of the medium and the detector material. When the influence of the detector is so small that the electron fluence in the medium is not modified, the ratio of the mass collision stopping power of the two materials accounts for the differences in energy deposition, and provides a conversion factor to relate the absorbed dose in both materials. Today, all national and international dosimetry protocols and codes of practice are based on such procedures, and the user easily can carry out these steps using tabulated data to convert a measured quantity to absorbed dose in the irradiated medium at the location of interest. Effects due to the spatial extension of the detector are taken into account using perturbation correction factors. The Monte Carlo method has become the most common and powerful calculational technique for determining the electron fluence (energy spectra) under different irradiation conditions. Cavity theory is then used to calculate stopping-power ratios. In this chapter, the different steps needed to evaluate s-ratios will be considered, emphasizing the different types of cavity-theory integrals and the Monte Carlo techniques used to derive the necessary electron spectra in the range of energies commonly used in radiation dosimetry, i.e., photon and electron beams with energies up to 50 MeV

  10. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  11. The phase effect of electronic stopping power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaZhong-Quan; ZhengYu-Feng

    1998-01-01

    A corrective factor(φ(E,ρ)≤1) dependent on ion energy and mass density of material for energy loss has been introduced into Bethe-Bloch formula,so that the energy deposition process of fast ion penetrating through the allotropic solid films are well discussed with the two-component assumption.An analysis expression of electronic stopping power for different phase structures has been derived from the contribution of "valence ”and “Core” electrons.The two thirds of inelastic scattering arisen from valence electron was revealed by comparing the theoretical calculation and experimental results on both random and oriented lattice site.THe corrective factor representative to the role of inner electrons increases with the projectile energy but decreases with mass density of solids.

  12. Stopping power, its meaning, and its general characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This essay presents remarks on the meaning of stopping, power and of its magnitude. More precisely, the first set of remarks concerns the connection of stopping power with elements of particle-transport theory, which describes particle transport and its consequences in full detail, including its stochastic aspects. The second set of remarks concerns the magnitude of the stopping power of a material and its relation with the material's electronic structure and other properties

  13. Ion Stopping Powers and Ranges Whenever You Need Them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Christensen, Casper; Tørresø, Jesper Rosholm

    is needed for a given ion range in a given material. The app is available on Google Play for free, and does only require SD-card storage access for saving the stopping power tables. No network connection is needed, making the app usable even when in WiFi free zones. The app is based on the stopping power...

  14. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  15. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ya [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: weijiang@hust.edu.cn [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yi, Lin [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  16. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  17. Low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations were performed using the impact parameter method for antiproton and proton collisions with alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen molecules. The targets are described as effective one-electron systems using appropriate model potentials. The proton data verify the employed method while the results for antiprotons improve the literature on these systems considerably. Cross sections for ionization and excitation as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping power will be presented.

  18. Nuclear stopping power at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent p + A → p + X data are analyzed within the context of the multi-chain and additive quark models. We deduce the average energy loss of a baryon as a function of distance traversed in nuclear matter. Consistency of the multi-chain model is checked by comparing the predictions for p + A → π+- + X with data. We discuss the space-time development of baryon stopping and show how longitudinal growth limits the energy deposition per unit length. Predictions are made for the proton spectra to be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and BNL. Finally, we conclude that the stopping domain for central collisions of heavy ions extends up to center of mass kinetic energies KEsub(em) asymptotically equals 3 +- 1 AGev. (author)

  19. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); Gauthier, Maxence [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-01-15

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  20. Calculation of the relativistic Bloch correction to stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Bloch's technique of joining the nonrelativistic Bethe and Bohr stopping-power expressions by taking into account wave-packet effects for close collisions is extended to the relativistic case. It is found that Bloch's nonrelativistic correction term must be modified and that charge asymmetric terms appear. Excellent agreement is observed by comparing the results of these calculations to recent data on the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions.

  1. Solid-vapor differences of electronic stopping powers for protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By applying the recently-developed wave packet theory and the Lindhard-Winther (LW) theory to estimation of the stopping powers of bound electrons and conduction electrons, respectively, the solid-vapor differences in the electronic stopping of target materials for protons are estimated quantitatively over the energy range from 1 keV/amu to 10 MeV/amu. Here, comparison was made of current theoretical predictions with each other. The wave packet theory shows that the solid-vapor difference of stopping cross sections are enhanced for low-energy protons because of the binding effect. (author)

  2. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Introduction Antiprotons as a new beam modality in radiotherapy are being investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration since 2002. A beam of antiprotons hitting a water phantom exhibit a similar depth-dose curve as that known from protons, except that the Bragg-peak is significantly pronounced due...... primary particles, the increased stopping power of the secondary causes an increase in the dose averaged LET. The maximum LET is recorded in the peak as 19 keV/µm. Discussion The dose-average LET in the plateau region may result in a RBE different from unity in the plateau region. RBE measurements of...

  3. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10-10 torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. PROTON STOPPING POWER OF DIFFERENT DENSITY PROFILE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first instance, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of a ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as a function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  5. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  6. Ab initio electronic stopping power of protons in bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukri, Abdullah Atef; Bruneval, Fabien; Reining, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The electronic stopping power is a crucial quantity for ion irradiation: it governs the deposited heat, the damage profile, and the implantation depth. Whereas experimental data are readily available for elemental solids, the data are much more scarce for compounds. Here we develop a fully ab initio computational scheme based on linear response time-dependent density-functional theory to predict the random electronic stopping power (RESP) of materials without any empirical fitting. We show that the calculated RESP compares well with experimental data, when at full convergence, with the inclusion of the core states and of the exchange correlation. We evaluate the unexpectedly limited magnitude of the nonlinear terms in the RESP by comparing with other approaches based on the time propagation of time-dependent density-functional theory. Finally, we check the validity of a few empirical rules of thumbs that are commonly used to estimate the electronic stopping power.

  7. Stopping power of diamond for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models used to describe the interaction of electrons with the valence band of insulators are discussed. Results for the application of these models to calculate stopping power and mean-free path of low-energy electrons (< 10 KeV) in diamond are presented. The influence of core polarizability, oscillator strength coupling between core and valence electrons, and exchange corrections is included. The contributions to the mean-free path and stopping power from ionization of inner shells have been evaluated from sum-rule-constrained classical binary-collision model. (author)

  8. Stopping powers of metallic elements for high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of metallic elements have been measured for 55, 65 and 73 MeV protons and for 13 MeV/u 4He and 12C ions using a high resolution magnetic spectrograph. Analyzing experimental data for protons with the Bethe-Bloch formula, we deduced mean excitation energies for 10 metallic elements. The magnitude of the Barkas correction was extracted from the stopping power difference for 4He and 12C ions at the same velocity which was found to consistent with that measured in previous experiments. (Author)

  9. New developments in stopping power for fast ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the available stopping power tables and codes, and new experimental methods. Among the semi-empirical stopping power tables, SRIM and MSTAR describe experimental data best. Of the recent theoretical stopping codes CasP, PASS, TCS and dielectric formalism, all describe some data well. PASS is the only theoretical code with an extended table for many ions and targets, but on the average, its predictive value at low energies is less than that of SRIM or MSTAR. The first-principle extended classical trajectory Monte Carlo method is very promising. The ToF-E ERDA arrangements have made it possible to produce accurate data for many ion-target combinations. A new liquid jet target method promises data for liquid water which is an important substance for medical dosimetry

  10. Plasma Stopping Power Measurements Relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Aaron; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hoffman, Nelson; Schmitt, Mark; Rubery, Michael; Garbett, Warren; Horsfield, Colin; Gales, Steve; Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Petrasso, Richard; Marshall, Frederic; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments may be achieved if the alpha particle energy deposition results in a thermonuclear burn wave induced in the dense DT fuel layer surrounding the hotspot. As such, understanding the physics of particle energy loss in a plasma is of critical importance to designing ICF experiments. Experiments have validated various stopping power models under select ne and Te conditions, however there remain unexplored regimes where models predict differing rates of energy deposition. An upcoming experiment at the Omega laser facility will explore charged particle stopping in CH plastic capsule ablators across a range of plasma conditions (ne between 1024 cm-3 and 1025 cm-3 and Te on the order of hundreds of eV). Plasma conditions will be measured using x-ray and gamma ray diagnostics, while plasma stopping power will be measured using charged particle energy loss measurements. Details on the experiment and the theoretical models to be tested will be presented.

  11. Stopping power modeling in warm and hot dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is presented to calculate the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Comparisons with experiment in the cold dense regime are presented and discussed. Further, we present results from the warm dense matter regime and the field of high energy density physics. (authors)

  12. Proton stopping powers in some low-Z elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharada, K S

    1993-12-01

    For some calculations, the proton stopping power in tissue must be known accurately. The composition of tissue was assumed to be constituted of 11 elements; the proton stopping powers were available for hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Those for the remaining 7 elements for the energy range 0.5 to 10 MeV at intervals of 0.5 MeV are evaluated and presented in this paper. Corrections such as the Barkas effect correction, Bloch's correction, and shell correction are evaluated and used in the calculation of proton stopping powers. Corrections for the Bethe formula for heavy ions were suggested by Barkas et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 11, 26, 1963) when they observed that the stopping powers for positive ions were larger than those for the negative ions with identical velocities. They suggested that a charge-dependent correction term be incorporated in the Bethe formula. Theoretical estimates of this correction derived by Ashley et al. (Phys. Rev. 85, 2392-2397, 1972) were used in the calculation of the Barkas effect. The Barkas effect correction depends on projectile velocity and Z. It decreases with energy. To account for the discrepancy between the classical and the quantum mechanical treatment of the Bethe formula, Bloch (Ann. Phys. 285, Chap. 18, 1933) suggested a correction to the stopping-power formula; this correction is also evaluated in this paper. Bloch's correction also decreases with energy. The shell correction needed for the binding of the electrons in the target atom is also calculated using Walske's asymptotic formula taking into account the screening effect of the atomic electrons of the K and L shells of the target atom. A computer program was written to calculate the stopping powers of protons with all these corrections for seven low-Z elements which are part of the tissue composition. These values are compared with those of other authors, and fairly good agreement is found. The lack of sufficient experimental information and uncertainty in the mean

  13. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.; Hansen, Jens Leonhart; Sørensen, H.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...... studied. This proves that the gas/solid difference for argon predicted in recent stopping-power tabulations is significantly overestimated. With high-order Z1 correction terms included in the theoretical description, calculated shell corrections based on the Lindhard-Scharff model are in good agreement...

  14. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  15. Dielectric description of wakes and stopping powers in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Abril Sánchez, Isabel; García Molina, Rafael; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; Pérez Pérez, F. Javier; Arista, Néstor R.

    1998-01-01

    The dielectric description of the dynamical potential induced by swift protons in solids and the related stopping power is analyzed, using a combination of Mermin-type dielectric functions, which are fitted to available experimental data, to describe the optical properties of various materials. We apply this method to represent the energy loss functions of aluminum, silicon, amorphous carbon, and copper on a wide range of energy and momentum transfers. Using these functions we calculate the s...

  16. Stopping power of Mylar for heavy ions up to copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Annu; Kumar, Shyam E-mail: search@vidja.kuk.ernet.insearch@granth.kuk.ernet.in; Sharma, S.K.; Diwan, P.K.; Nath, N.; Mittal, V.K.; Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D.K

    2000-10-01

    The stopping powers of Mylar for several heavy ions covering Z=11 to 29 in the energy range {approx}0.3 to 2.3 MeV/n have been measured using the elastic recoil detection technique and twin detector system. The technique provided a unique method to generate a variety of variable energy ion species utilizing a fixed energy 140 MeV Ag{sup 13+} primary beam from the Pelletron accelerator facility at Nuclear Science Center, New Delhi, India. Most of these measurements are new. The experimentally measured stopping power values have been compared with those calculated using LSS theory, Ziegler et al. formulation and Northcliffe and Schilling tabulations. Merits and demerits of these formulations are highlighted. Stopping power calculations using the Hubert et al. formulation have been extended successfully beyond its recommended range of validity, i.e. 2.5-500 MeV/n down to energies as low as 0.5 MeV/n.

  17. Calculation of stopping power ratios for carbon ion dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithner, Oksana; Andreo, P.; Sobolevsky, N.; Hartmann, G.; Jäkel, O.

    2006-05-01

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used, which is a newly developed version where substantial modifications were implemented on its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1 (Gudowska et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1933-58). The code was completely rewritten replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe-Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. In addition, the code includes optionally MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data. The fragmentation model was verified and its parameters were also adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. It has been used to compute the physical quantities needed for the calculation of stopping power ratios, swater,air, of carbon beams. Compared with the recommended constant value given in the IAEA Code of Practice, the differences found in the present investigations varied between 0.5% and 1% at the plateau region, respectively for 400 MeV/u and 50 MeV/u beams, and up to 2.3% in the vicinity of the Bragg peak for 50 MeV/u.

  18. Stopping power for heavy ions in solids at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of various interaction processes and evaluation of the associated energy loss when heavy ions pass through matter have widespread and well known applications in diverse disciplines. In many of the experiments involving heavy ions, interpretation of the data requires reliable and precise values of stopping power for heavy ions. In the present work, this formulation to lower energies as low as upto ∼ 0.5 MeV/n have been successfully applied for several projectiles in variety of elemental and complex media

  19. Calculation of runaway electrons stopping power in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy loss rate of runaway electrons (RE) was analysed for ITER plasma facing components materials (Be and W). The stopping power, the energy deposition profiles, and the material erosion are estimated by using the codes MEMOS and ENDEP. The latter has been updated by including the effect of the target's polarizability. Our calculations show that this effect is significant for high RE energies and low Z materials such as Be. We also find that the conversion of the RE's magnetic energy into heat can explain the temperature rise on dump plate in JET. In the case of ITER, the calculated heat deposition due to RE is almost two times the melting threshold energy of Be but well below that of W.

  20. Stopping Power for Strong Beam-Plasma Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Dirk O.

    2001-10-01

    The slowing down process of charged particles in plasma targets is investigated for the case of strong beam-plasma coupling. Strong beam-plasma correlations can be considered using the collision operator of the quantum Boltzmann equation. As a first step, dynamic screening is included in the first Born approximation. This approach gives good results for moderate beam-plasma coupling (Zb Γ^3/2 Bethe-formula, the standard model of the stopping power (Bethe plus Bloch corrections and Barkas terms), the Li & Petrasso formula and simulation data (MD and PIC), is given. This comparison clearly shows the advantage of the proposed model: it smoothly interpolates between the classical low velocity regime, where strong coupling effects occur, and the high velocity quantum regime, where collective modes are important. In the latter case, the experimentally proven Bethe-formula is obtained. Furthermore, it matches the simulation data for moderate as well as strong beam-plasma coupling.

  1. New stopping power formula for intermediate energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hasan

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a new stopping power (SP) formula for electrons. In the modified Bethe-Bloch SP expression, analytical expressions for the effective charge and effective mean excitation energies (EMEE) of target atoms are used, while for the effective charge of incoming electrons, Sugiyama's semiempirical formula from Peterson and Green is used. An analytical expression for practical SP calculations is obtained using the Bethe approximation and a Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. The calculated results of the SP for electrons in some materials, such as H(2)O, H(2), CO(2), N(2), and O(2), are compared with experimental data, together with Penelope code results and a number of other semiempirical and analytical calculations. PMID:18586505

  2. An improved formula for stopping power at low incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of Bohr on the energy loss of heavy charged particle passing through matter is a good start for the study of stopping power. In the Bohr's theory, the electrons inside the matter are assumed to be at rest, and their interaction with the projectile is treated according to the distance between the electron and the projectile. The electrons in the close zone make Coulomb collision with the projectile, whereas those in the distant zone interact through electric field. This theory works well for incident energy above 1MeV, whereas it collapses at incident energy around 0.1 MeV. There have been attempts to repair the theory at low-energy limit. For example, P. Sigmund takes the equality of the contributions from the distant and close zone as the criterion to determine the boundary between the two zones, and thus a collapse of Bohr's formula at around 0.1 MeV is avoided. However, the physical basis of the criterion is unclear. In this work we modify the Bohr's theory by considering the motion of electrons in the matter. When a projectile passes through the matter, the electrons in the distant zone can move into the close zone and consequently results in an enlargement of close zone. While this enlargement is insignificant for projectiles with higher energy, it makes substantial difference for protons at low energy limit. With a phenomenological formula for the boundary between the close and distant-zone, the stopping power is calculated

  3. Recent results in stopping power for positive ions, and some critical comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of developments in the field of stopping power during the last few years, with particular emphasis on cases that seem to require further work. We discuss experimental results showing that stopping power for low energy protons, in metals and insulators, is not necessarily proportional to velocity. We mention that there is no discrepancy between the mean ionization potential derived from optical data or from stopping power. The problem of the stopping power of liquid water is discussed, considering both experiment and theory, and we find that recent experimental results and one of the theories are apparently too low. We discuss various types of theories for stopping power. We stress that in analyzing bulk backscattering spectra for stopping power, a low energy limit of validity must be stated. Using statistical analysis of experimental data for heavy ions in elemental solids, we find that the ATIMA and SRIM programs and the Hubert table are best in different regions of specific energy.

  4. Measurement of stopping power ratios for 60 MeV positive or negative pions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, J A; Henkelman, R M

    1979-07-01

    Pion stopping power ratios are essential parameters for pion radiotherapy treatment planning. The validity of scaling proton stopping powers to pions is called into question since the pion mass is intermediate between the electron and proton masses. Direct measurements of stopping power ratios with respect to water were made for 60 MeV pions of both charges in Teflon, Plexiglas, nylon, paraffin, gelatine, tissue-equivalent plastic (Shonka A150), graphite, aluminium, steel and copper. Corrections for multiple scattering and energy dependence of the stopping power are applied. Measured stopping power ratios at an accuracy of 0.6% are in agreement to within the limits of experimental error with stopping power ratios calculated from the Bethe-Bloch equation using elemental I-values and Bragg additivity. PMID:112597

  5. Stopping powers of energetic electrons penetrating condensed matter--theory and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhen-Yu; XIA Yue-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, the motivation of studying inelastic energy loss for energetic electrons penetrating through matter and the corresponding technological importance have been outlined. The theoretical development and method for the calculation of stopping powers are described. The stopping power data tables for a group of polymers and bioorganic compounds are presented, and the application aspects of the stopping power data are briefly discussed.

  6. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 124 Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  7. Simulation of phosphorus implantation into silicon with a single-parameter electronic stopping power model

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, D.; Snell, C. M.; Beardmore, K. M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-01-01

    We simulate dopant profiles for phosphorus implantation into silicon using a new model for electronic stopping power. In this model, the electronic stopping power is factorized into a globally averaged effective charge Z1*, and a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. There is only a single adjustable parameter in the model, namely the one electron radius rs0 which controls Z1*. By fine tuning this parameter, we obtain excellent agreement between simulated dopa...

  8. Stopping power of thermal plasma to heavy ions with low velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power of thermal plasma to heavy ions with low velocity is studied by using quantum scattering theory and dielectric response theory. Calculation shows that the linear electronic stopping power of plasma is much larger than that of cold matter. The Z1 oscillation of the electronic stopping power of thermal plasma is found. The Z1 oscillation amplitude of the electronic stopping power of the plasma at relatively low temperature is larger than that of cold matter. The 1 oscillation becomes flat as the temperature increases

  9. Improved evaluation of relative collision stopping powers for electrons in dosimetric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty of relative stopping powers of cavity chamber materials have been reduced for dosietry of high energy X-rays and gamma-rays. The proton stopping powers of nitrogen, oxygen, and air have been compared with experimental results relative to Bichsel and Porter's estimate. Relative deviations of electron collision stopping powers are compared for water, carbon and air with previous values. One can measure absorbed dose, energy fluence, and exposure with improved uncertainty than previously by using the present revised mass stopping powers. (author)

  10. Stopping power calculation for polycarbonate, cellulose nitrate, cellulose acetate, polyester, and polyvinyl alcohol under heavy ion bombardment (A<=40)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power of organic compounds used as radiation detector materials has been calculated as a function of the energy of the heavy ions to be detected. The calculation of the stopping power of a chemical compound was carried out assuming the stopping effect results from an addition of the stopping power of the individual elements

  11. Modified predictive formula for the electron stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an improved predictive formula for the electron stopping power (SP) based on an analysis and fit of SPs and electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) calculated from optical data for 37 elemental solids and energies between 200 eV and 30 keV. The formula is a function of energy, density, and IMFP, and is recommended for solids with atomic numbers larger than 6. While the mean deviation between predicted and calculated SPs was 7.25%, larger deviations were found for four additional materials, Li (22.2%), Be (17.9%), graphite (15.3%), and diamond (15.7%). The predictive SP formula can be applied to multicomponent materials. Test comparisons for two compounds, guanine and InSb, showed average deviations of 16.0% and 19.1%, respectively. The improved SP formula is expected to be useful in simulations of electron trajectories in solids with the continuous slowing-down approximation (e.g., in Auger-electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis)

  12. Mean excitation energy for the stopping power of light elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Shiles, E.

    2006-09-01

    We have evaluated the mean excitation energy or I value for Coulomb excitations by swift charged particles passing through carbon, aluminum and silicon. A self-consistent Kramers-Kronig analysis was used to treat X-ray optical spectra now available from synchrotron light sources allowing us to carry out Bethe's original program of evaluating I from the observed dielectric response. We find that the K and L shell are the dominant contributors to I in these light elements and that the contribution of valence electrons is relatively small, primarily because of their low binding energy. The optical data indicate that Si and Al have nearly equal I values, in contrast to Bloch's Thomas-Fermi result, I ∝ Z. The optically based I values for C and Al are in excellent agreement with experiment. However, the dielectric-response I value for Si is 164 ± 2 eV, at variance with the commonly quoted value of 173 ± 3 eV derived from stopping-power measurements.

  13. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  14. An experimental investigation of charge-dependent deviations from the Bethe stopping power formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Simonsen, H.; Sørensen, H.

    1969-01-01

    The stopping powers of aluminiun and tantalum for 5–13.5 MeV protons and deuterons and 8–20 MeV 3He and 4He have been measured. At identical velocities, the ratio between the stopping powers for the double-charged and the single-charged ions is systematically higher than the factor four predicted...

  15. Modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters for a wide range of elements and compounds. This formula maintains the generality of the Bethe formula and gives reasonable agreement in comparing the predicted stopping powers for 15 elements and 6 compounds with the experimental data and those calculated within dielectric theory including the exchange effect. Use of the stopping power obtained from this formula for hydrogen silsesquioxane in Monte Carlo simulation gives the energy deposition distribution in consistent with the experimental data. - Highlights: • We propose a modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters. • Our formula is found based on the stopping power calculated by the dielectric theory including the exchange effect. • We calculate the energy deposition distribution of 3 keV electrons in 15 nm HSQ resist layer on Si substrate

  16. Values of modified Bethe-Bloch stopping power parameters for polysulfone extracted from stopping power measurements with light projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements of the stopping powers of polysulfone for 0.66-1.74 MeV protons and 1.04-3.20 MeV alpha particles have been analyzed in terms of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory in order to extract values of the parameters characterizing the formalism utilized. Resulting values of mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b), respectively, were 83.3 eV and 1.05 for proton data, and 81.1 eV and 1.38 for alpha particle data. The lower energy alpha particle data were included by employing a single effective charge parameter (λ) evaluated at 1.63. The composite weighted value of mean excitation energy, 82.9 eV, lies some 6% above the additivity-based estimate, whereas the corresponding value of Barkas-effect parameter, 1.22, agrees quite well with the prescribed interval of 1.4±0.1

  17. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  18. Implications of different stopping power models on target heating simulations using HYDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Barnard, John; Henestroza, Enrique; Kerbel, Gary; Marinak, Marty

    2007-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of ion driven Warm Dense Matter experiments requires accurate models of stopping powers for targets with temperatures up to a few eV. For finite temperature targets, energy loss of beam ions is comprised of contributions from nuclear stopping, bound electron stopping, and free electron stopping. We compare two different stopping power algorithms and the implications on target heating for two different beams corresponding to the current Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) and proposed NDCX II experiments. The NDCX I beam has a beam energy much lower than the Bragg peak while the NDCX II beam is designed to enter the target just above the Bragg peak, and exit just below. The first stopping power algorithm is based on the classical Bethe-Bloch formulation as is currently implemented in the HYDRA simulation code. The second algorithm is based on rescaling of experimental protonic stopping powers as developed by Brandt and Kitagawa for nuclear and bound electronic stopping, and free electron stopping following the model developed by Peter and Meyer-ter-Vehn.

  19. Calculations on the stopping power of a heterogeneous Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Schnürer, Matthias; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Morales, Roberto; González-Gallego, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is estimated by means of the individual contributions of free electrons and bound electrons existing in this special kind of matter, located between classical and degenerate plasmas. For free electrons, the dielectric formalism, well described in previous works of our research group, is used to estimate free electron stopping power. For bound electrons, mean excitation energy of ions is used. Excitation energies are obtained through atomic calculations of the whole atom or, shell by shell in order to estimate their stopping power. Influence of temperature and density is analyzed in case of an impinging projectile. This influence became important for low projectile velocities and negligible for high ones. Using both analysis, the stopping power of an extended WDM is inferred from a dynamical calculation of energy transferred from the projectile to the plasma, where the Bragg peak and stopping range are calculated. Finally, this theoretical framework is used to stud...

  20. Example of an Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, O.; Chupp, W.W.; Ekspong, A.G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Lofgren, E.J.; Segre, E.; Wiegand, C.; Amaldi, E.; Baroni,G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-02-27

    The existence of antiprotons has recently been demonstrated at the Berkeley Bevatron by a counter experiment. The antiprotons were found among the momentum-analyzed (1190 Mev/c) negative particles emitted by a copper target bombarded by 6.2-Bev protons. Concurrently with the counter experiment, stacks of nuclear emulsions were exposed in the beam adjusted to 1090 Mev/c negative particles in an experiment designed to observe the properties of antiprotons when coming to rest. This required a 132 g/cm2 copper absorber to slow down the antiprotons sufficiently to stop them in the emulsion stack. Only one antiproton was found in stacks in which seven were expected, assuming a geometric interaction cross section for antiprotons in copper. It has now been found that the cross section in copper is about twice geometric, which explains this low yield.

  1. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  2. Comment on Stopping power of nonmonochromatic heavy-ion clusters with two-ion correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the results of Lontano and Raimondi [Phys. Rev. E 51, R2755 (1995)] within the full random-phase approximation. We show that the correlation and also velocity dispersion of the cluster ions enhance and reduce the stopping power, respectively. Nevertheless, the enhancement of energy losses due to ionic correlation is much stronger than that obtained by Lontano and Raimondi, and furthermore, the projectile velocity dependence of the stopping power is strictly monotonic, presenting no oscillations. We also did not obtain negative values for the cluster stopping power, as did Lontano and Raimondi. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Influence of electron motion in target atom on stopping power for low-energetic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stopping power was calculated, representing the electrons of the target atom as an assembly of quantum oscillators. It was considered that the electrons in the atoms have some velocity before interaction with the projectile, which is the main contribution of this paper. The influence of electron velocity on stopping power for different projectiles and targets was investigated. It was found that the velocity of the electron stopping power has the greatest influence at low energies of the projectile.

  4. Antiproton trapping in various helium media: report of the HELIUMTRAP experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELIUMTRAP (PS205) investigates the recently discovered anomalously long-lived states of antiprotons in various helium media. An overview is given of experiments stopping antiprotons in several phases of helium performed at LEAR in the last two years. (author)

  5. New method for measuring stopping powers using ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for measuring the stopping power of matter for ions is presented. The techniques used are those developed for use in trace element analysis by proton induced x-ray emission. This new method has been validated by comparing the measured stopping powers for copper, silver, and gold at 100 keV with those reported by Allison and Warshaw for free standing foils. The agreement is excellent: +-1% for both copper and silver and +-2% for gold

  6. Range and stopping power tables for 2.5-12MeV/nucleon heavy ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semi-empirical procedure to compute heavy ion stopping powers is presented. The calculations use recent stopping power values for alpha particles and a new parameterization for the effective charge taking into account the effect to the stopping medium. Stopping powers and ranges are tabulated for moving ions of atomic number 2<=Z<=45 in the energy region 2.5<=E/A<=12 MeV/nucleon for 18 solid materials

  7. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  8. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  9. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  10. On manual stop of No.1 plant in Tsuruga Power Station, Japan Atomic Power Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No. 1 plant in Tsuruga Power Station, Japan Atomic Power Co., is a BWR plant with rated output of 357 MWe, and while it was operated at the rated output, the functional test on high pressure water injection system was carried out on January 5, 1990. After 10:00 a.m., the flow rate of the high pressure water injection system pump decreased suddenly, and the diesel engine driving the pump stopped automatically. As the result of checkup, damage was observed in the speed increasing gear connecting the diesel engine and the pump. It is considered that long time is required for the restoration, therefore, the lowering of power output was begun at 0:00 a.m., January 10, and the reactor was manually shut down at 8:00 a.m.. (K.I.)

  11. Charged Particle Stopping Power in Dense Plasmas: Improvements, Validation, and Practical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Charged particle stopping power is an important quantity that arises in thermonuclear burn, particle beam experiments, and fast ignition. Because stopping power models arise from kinetic theory collision operators and stopping power is a velocity-resolved non-equilibrium statistical mechanics problem, exact values of stopping power are ideal quantities for validating collision models. By directly comparing classical molecular dynamics simulations with stopping models derived from both linear response and binary cross section pictures, we have quantified the accuracy of these models and determined which physics is needed as a function of Coulomb coupling, projectile charge, and velocity. We have found that for divergent linear response theories, a velocity-dependent cutoff works better than a simpler temperature-dependent cutoff, but both fail when the velocity of the projectile is low and the Coulomb coupling is large. This problem is somewhat rectified by the inclusion of local field corrections. Alternatively, one can use a binary cross section in constructing a collision operator for better inclusion of strong scattering. We find that low-velocity stopping can be significantly improved by including non-linear screening of the target particles when calculating this cross section. We extend this knowledge to the quantum case, giving the relative contributions of Heisenberg uncertainty, degeneracy, and quantum scattering. This work was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 09-SI-011.

  12. A critical overview of recent stopping power programs for positive ions in solid elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Helmut, E-mail: Helmut.Paul@jku.at [Atomic Physics and Surface Science, Institute for Experimental Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, Linz A-4040 (Austria); Sánchez-Parcerisa, Daniel [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiation Oncology, TRC 4 West, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Several tables exist in the literature containing stopping power data for different targets and projectile ions. Moreover, Monte Carlo transport codes often incorporate their own implementation of electronic stopping power. In this article, we compare recent stopping power publications to our large collection of experimental stopping data for positive ions, in order to test their validity. We consider stopping codes by Barbui et al., Javanainen, and Diwan et al., and also the stopping power descriptions built into Monte Carlo transport codes: “Bethe” in libdEdx/SHIELD-HIT, Geant4-DNA, FLUKA, and MNCPX. We use graphical comparisons for significant single ion/target combinations, and we use our statistical program “Judge” to analyse larger data sets for those ions and targets where many experimental results are available. Only solid elemental targets are considered. The performance of the codes is evaluated in terms of how well they describe the available experimental data, in comparison with previously analyzed programs. Although interesting new approaches have been used in some of the codes, both SRIM and MSTAR still seem to be slightly better at reproducing the available data.

  13. One-stop shopping behavior, buyer power, and upstream merger incentives

    OpenAIRE

    von Schlippenbach, Vanessa; Wey, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We analyze how consumer preferences for one-stop shopping affect the bargaining relationship between a retailer and its suppliers. One-stop shopping preferences create demand complementarities among otherwise independent products which lead to two opposing effects on upstream merger incentives: first a standard double mark-up problem and second a bargaining effect. The former creates merger incentives while the later induce suppliers to bargain separately. When buyer power becomes large enoug...

  14. Monte Carlo Simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2009-01-01

    ratio, which is important in clinical dosimetry of proton and ion beams. For energies ranging from 50  to  330  MeV/u and for one spread out Bragg peak, the authors compare the impact of the I value on the water-to-air stopping power ratio. The authors calculate ratios from different ICRU stopping power...... power ratio increases by up to 6% in the last few tenths of a mm toward the Bragg peak. For a spread out Bragg peak of 13.5  mm width at 130  mm depth, the stopping power ratio increases by about 1% toward the distal end....

  15. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, sw,m, have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm2. Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of sw,m calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, sw,m changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of sw,m, reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung

  16. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases

  17. The stopping power and carbon ion ranges in elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of the heavy ions stopping cross sections calculation are discussed. The stopping ppower and C12 ions ranges are evaluated using the protons stopping data in matter and Pirson's and Blanns formula for the effectvive charge. The energy losses due to the elastic collisions with atoms have been taken into account in low energies. The RBregg's rule was used to calculate the stopping power of compounds. The comparison with the evailable data showed a good agreement. The C12 ions ranges with energies from 0.01 to 10 NMeV/nucleon for elements from hydrogen to uranium and several compounds are tabulated. The C12 ions energy losses in the layers of definite thickness can be determined using these tables

  18. Optical oscillator strengths, mean excitation energy, shell corrections and experimental values for stopping power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Helmut [Atomic and Surface Physics, Institute for Experimental Physics, Johannes-Kepler-University, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: helmut.paul@jku.at; Grande, Pedro L. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smith, D.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Vermont, 82 University Place, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)

    2009-08-01

    In a recent paper, Smith, Inokuti, Karstens and Shiles discussed optical oscillator strengths (OOS) of graphite, Al and Si and compared the mean excitation energy I obtained by integration to that from stopping power measurements. They found agreement for graphite and Al, but disagreement for Si. In this paper, we discuss the OOS of Al, Si, Cu and Au and compare the stopping powers calculated from these OOS (or from a single I-value), using program CasP40, directly to experimental stopping power values for protons between 10 and 80 MeV. We find that the choice of proper shell corrections is essential: since the shell correction built into CasP is too small, we take the correction for Al, Si and Cu from the BEST program of Berger and Bichsel. For Au, better results are obtained using Bonderup's shell correction. With these choices, we find fair agreement between experimental and calculated stopping data, both with the I-values from ICRU Report 49 and with OOS. Even in the case of Si, the stopping curve based on OOS is not in conflict with experimental data. In all cases, the curves calculated using SRIM are in good agreement with the data.

  19. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšová, Romana; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Slepička, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 354, JUL (2015), s. 205-209. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : stopping power * heavy ions * polypropylene * silicon nitride Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  20. Stopping powers of gases for ions of energy below 200 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been renewed interest in the stopping power of matters for ions in low energy region. But there is not an established theory in this energy region, and experimental data did not coincide with the curves in some data books. Therefore, precise experimental measurement is still necessary. In present neutron dosimetry, tissues are the object of measurement of absorbed dose. In this experiment, it was intended to use tissue equivalent gas as a target gas. In the experimental apparatus, ions come from the Cockcroft-Walton accelerator are applied to the cell, in which the target gas is admitted from gas source. Gas in the cell is observed with the electrostatic energy analyzer. Stopping power is calculated from the results of energy loss measurement. In this report, only the preliminary results are shown. The tissue equivalent gas is composed of CH4, CO2 and N2, each percentage is 64.95, 32.2 and 2.85, respectively. It seems that the stopping powers of noble gases will be useful for the developments of the theory, and the stopping power for He+ ions was measured. The results are shown in a figure, and the errors were estimated to be less than 1.5%. At the end of the report, some discussions among a few persons are added. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Power in discursive practices: The case of the STOP EPAs campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Felice, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Transnational activism has increased in relation to international trade and development politics in the past decades, yet their power has been inadequately studied. This article analyses the STOP EPAs campaign (2004-2009) which aimed to influence the negotiations of Economic Partnership Agreements b

  2. Stopping powers for MeV Ge ions in Al foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Stopping powers for Ge ions (3.5MeV~8.0MeV) in Al foil were measured with RBS (Rutherford backscattering) technique and determined with a new method. Our results are much smaller than the values predicted by the TRIM code and LSS theory.

  3. Stopping Power and Energy Straggling of Channeled He-Ions in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaN epitaxial layers are usually grown on sapphire substrates. To avoid disastrous effect of the large lattice mismatch a thin polycrystalline nucleation layer is grown at 500 oC followed by the deposition of thick GaN template at much higher temperature. Remnants of the nucleation layer were visualized by transmission electron microscopy as defect agglomeration at the GaN/sapphire interface and provide a very useful depth marker for the measurement of channeled ions stopping power. Random and aligned spectra of He ions incident at energies ranging from 1.7 to 3.7 MeV have been measured and evaluated using the Monte Carlo simulation code McChasy. Impact parameter dependent stopping power has been calculated for channeling direction and its parameters have been adjusted according to experimental data. For virgin, i.e. as grown, samples, the ratio of channeled to random stopping power is constant and amounts to 0.7 in the energy range studied. Defects produced by ion implantation largely influence the stopping power. For channeled ions the variety of possible trajectories leads to different energy loss at a given depth, thus resulting in much larger energy straggling than that for the random path. Beam energy distributions at different depths have been calculated using the McChasy code. They are significantly broader than those predicted by the Bohr formula for random direction. (author)

  4. Compilation of realistic stopping powers for 4He ions in selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains stopping powers for 4He ions in the energy range 400 keV to 20 MeV for some 21 materials, from beryllium to lead. In all cases, the numbers are based directly on experimental determinations. (author)

  5. Inventory of nuclear power plants and research reactors temporary or definitively stopped in industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data and information on the end of the life of nuclear reactors. One deals more particularly with installations of industrialized countries. This report gives the motivations which have involved the definitive shut down of nuclear power plants and of research reactors in the concerned countries. A schedule of definitive reactor shutdowns is presented. Then, one deals with nuclear power plants of which the construction has been stopped. The reasons of these situations are also given. The temporary difficulties met during the construction or the starting of nuclear power plants these last years are mentioned. Most times, there are economical or political considerations, or safety reasons. Finally, the nuclear power plants stopped for more than two years are mentioned

  6. Simple polynomial approximation to modified Bethe formula low-energy electron stopping powers data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently published detailed and exhaustive paper on cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons clearly shows that electron phenomena occurring in parallel with X-ray processes may have been dramatically overlooked for many years, mainly when low atomic number species are involved since, in these cases, the fluorescence coefficient is smaller than the Auger yield. An immediate problem is encountered while attempting to tackle the issue. Accounting for electron phenomena requires the knowledge of the stopping power of electrons within, at least, a reasonably small error. Still, the Bethe formula for stopping powers is known to not be valid for electron energies below 30 keV, and its use leads to values far off experimental ones. Recently, a few authors have addressed this problem and both detailed tables of electron stopping powers for various atomic species and attempts to simplify the calculations, have emerged. Nevertheless, its implementation in software routines to efficiently calculate keV electron effects in materials quickly becomes a bit cumbersome. Following a procedure already used to establish efficient methods to calculate ionisation cross-sections by protons and alpha particles, it became clear that a simple polynomial approximation could be set, which allows retrieving the electronic stopping powers with errors of less than 20% for energies above 500 eV and less than 50% for energies between 50 eV and 500 eV. In this work, we present this approximation which, based on just six parameters, allows to recover electron stopping power values that are less than 20% different from recently published experimentally validated tabulated data

  7. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development

  8. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development.

  9. Stopping Power of Be, Al, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au for 5-12-MeV Protons and Deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Hanke, C.; Sørensen, H.; Vajda, P.

    1967-01-01

    Recent measurements on stopping power of aluminum have been continued with the stopping materials Be, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au. The method of measuring stopping powers utilizing a thermometric compensation technique working at liquid-helium temperature has been used. Results are obtained with a standard...... deviation of 0.3%, and agree with other published experimental results and with Bichsel's tabulated values within their stated errors....

  10. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02 g/cm3 and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17 eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas

  11. Calculation of water/air stopping-power ratios using EGS4 with explicit treatment of electron-positron differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation program, a general purpose code has been written to calculate Bragg--Gray and Spencer--Attix stopping-power ratios for use in radiation dosimetry. The stopping-power ratios can be calculated in any material in any region in a general cylindrical geometry with a large number of source geometries possible. The calculations take into account for the first time the differences between the stopping powers and the inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons. The results show that previous calculations ignoring these effects were accurate. The present results agree, typically within 0.1%, with the Spencer--Attix water-to-air stopping-power ratios for broad parallel beams of electrons given in the AAPM and IAEA protocols except at the surface where the present calculations follow the buildup of secondary electrons in more detail and see a 2% reduction in the stopping-power ratios

  12. Electronic stopping powers for Be, Ca and Ti in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy loss of ions in matter is fundamental to many applications dependent on the transport of ions in matter. In spite of a long history of studies, the electronic stopping power is not adequately described over all ranges of ions, energies and targets, particularly in the case of heavy ions or compound targets. In this study, stopping powers for Be, Ca and Ti in SiC have been determined using a time-of-flight energy elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA) set-up. In transmission geometry, the energy loss of heavy ions in a self-supporting SiC foil was measured over a continuous range of energies using the ToF data that was tagged by a Si detector with and without the stopping foil. By essentially calibrating the Si detector for each channel over the measured energy region based on TOF spectrometry, measurement uncertainties of less than 4% are achieved. In comparing with the experimental data, both the SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code and the binary theory provide reasonable predictions

  13. A high-intensity low-momentum separated antiproton beam for the study of annihilations at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schmitt, F M; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1977-01-01

    The main features of the low-momentum separated antiproton beam built at the CERN Proton Synchrotron to allow the stopping of a large number of antiprotons are described. An effective stopping rate of 1000 antiproton per 10/sup 12/ protons on the Ps internal target is obtained. Results of the measurement of the rate of reaction pp to h /sup +/h/sup -/ in a 50 cm long liquid hydrogen target are given to illustrate the stopping and monitoring techniques. (6 refs).

  14. Electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    Atomistic calculations of the electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles are demonstrated without relying on linear response theory. The computational approach is based on nonequilibrium simulation of the electronic response using real-time time-dependent density functional theory. By quantifying the velocity dependence of the steady-state charge of the projectile proton and α particle from nonequilibrium electron densities, we examine the extent to which linear response theory is applicable. We further assess the influence of the exchange-correlation approximation in real-time time-dependent density functional theory on the stopping power with range-separated and regular hybrid functionals with exact exchange.

  15. Measuring the stopping power of α particles in compact bone for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power of α particles in thin films of decalcified sheep femur, in the range of 1.5 to 5.0 MeV incident energy, was measured by transmission of a backscattered beam from a heavy target. Additionally, the film elemental composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These data will be used to measure boron concentration in thin films of bone using a spectrometry technique developed by the University of Pavia, since the concentration ratio between healthy tissue and tumor is of fundamental importance in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The present experimental data are compared with numerical simulation results and with tabulated stopping power data of non-decalcified human bone

  16. Range distributions and electronic stopping power of nitrogen ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation the authors wish to report on some recent data, developed at the Naval Surface Weapons Center, that pertain to range distributions and electronic stopping powers of nitrogen ions in solid elemental targets. They had previously inferred electronic stopping powers of nitrogen in the energy region to 800 keV in targets having atomic numbers Z2 = 22 to 32 and 40 to 52, as well as in C, Si, Ta, Au, and Pb. The general feature of the Z2 oscillations were observed, with minima occurring at the positions of the closed d shells. In particular, the measured data show minima occurring near Cu and Ag. The motivation of the present investigation was to determine if a minimum also occurs near Au, as theory predicts, as well as to study the regions about the rare earth materials, to verify the maxima predicted. 9 references, 5 figures

  17. Tunable proton stopping power of deuterium-tritium by mixing heavy ion dopants for fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. B.; Hu, L. X.; Wang, W. Q.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zhang, G. B.; Ouyang, J. M.; Shao, F. Q.; Zhuo, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical model of charged-particle stopping power for the Coulomb logarithm lnΛb ≥ 2 plasma [Phys. Rev. Lett., 20, 3059 (1993)] is extended to investigate the transport of the energetic protons in a compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) pellet mixed with heavy ion dopants. It shows that an increase of mixed-ion charge state and density ratio results in the substantial enhancement of the proton stopping power, which leads to a shorter penetration distance and an earlier appearance of the Bragg peak with a higher magnitude. The effect of hot-spot mix on the proton-driven fast ignition model is discussed. It is found that ignition time required for a small mixed hot-spot can be significantly reduced with slightly increased beam energy. Nevertheless, the ignition cannot maintain for a long time due to increasing alpha-particle penetration distance and energy loss from mechanical work and thermal conduction at high temperatures.

  18. The Barkas-Effect Correction to Bethe-Bloch Stopping Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    A brief history of the discovery of the Barkas-effect correction to the Bethe-Bloch stopping power formula is presented, followed by a recounting of the initial theoretical calculations prepared as a quantitative explanation. A current version of the modified Bethe-Bloch formula is described in detail. An overview of the current capability to assess the validity of several existing formalisms for calculating the Barkas-effect correction term is provided, in the course of which discussion of numerous sources of uncertainty ensues. Finally, an opinion on the significance of this departure from Bethe-Bloch theory is offered, along with a presentation of a few recent developments and of some areas for focus in future exploration in the field of the stopping power of matter for charged particles.

  19. Charged Particle Stopping Power Effects on Ignition: Some Results from an Exact Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton Jr, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    A completely rigorous first-principles calculation of the charged particle stopping power has recently been performed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). This calculation is exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma number density, including an exact treatment of two-body quantum scattering. The BPS calculation is therefore extremely accurate in the plasma regime realized during the ignition and burn of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. For deuterium-tritium fusion, t...

  20. The Barkas effect and other higher-order Z1-contributions to the stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental evidence for contributions to the stopping power proportional to Z13 (Barkas effect) and Z14 (Bloch correction) at velocities around 10 v0 is reviewed. Quantitative evidence is found for both terms but it is not possible experimentally to discern whether hard collisions contribute to the Barkas term. Evidence from single-collision events are drawn into the discussion and some experiments which may turn out to be decisive are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Ion energy loss at maximum stopping power in a laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of this thesis, a new experimental setup for the measurement of the energy loss of carbon ions at maximum stopping power in a hot laser-generated plasma has been developed and successfully tested. In this parameter range where the projectile velocity is of the same order of magnitude as the thermal velocity of the plasma free electrons, large uncertainties of up to 50% are present in the stopping-power description. To date, no experimental data are available to perform a theory benchmarking. Testing the different stopping theories is yet essential for inertial confinement fusion and in particular for the understanding of the alpha-particle heating of the thermonuclear fuel. Here, for the first time, precise measurements were carried out in a reproducible and entirely characterized beam-plasma configuration. It involved a nearly fully-stripped ion beam probing a homogeneous fully-ionized plasma. This plasma was generated by irradiating a thin carbon foil with two high-energy laser beams and features a maximum electron temperature of 200 eV. The plasma conditions were simulated with a two-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic code, while the ion-beam charge-state distribution was predicted by means of a Monte-Carlo code describing the charge-exchange processes of projectile ions in plasma. To probe at maximum stopping power, high-frequency pulsed ion bunches were decelerated to an energy of 0.5 MeV per nucleon. The ion energy loss was determined by a time-of-flight measurement using a specifically developed chemical-vapor-deposition diamond detector that was screened against any plasma radiation. A first experimental campaign was carried out using this newly developed platform, in which a precision better than 200 keV on the energy loss was reached. This allowed, via the knowledge of the plasma and of the beam parameters, to reliably test several stopping theories, either based on perturbation theory or on a nonlinear T-Matrix formalism. A preliminary

  2. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  <1% when using the MA function. The impact of these range errors on clinical dose distributions is demonstrated using treatment plans for a non-small cell lung cancer patient. The change in stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%–2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process. (paper)

  3. Monte Carlo calculated stopping power ratio water/air for clinical proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to compute stopping-power ratios water/air for use in clinical proton dosimetry a Monte Carlo code has been developed. The main difference between the present code and other codes for proton transport is the inclusion of the detailed production of secondary electrons along the proton track. For this purpose the code is a Class-II type, where single proton-electron collisions yielding energy losses larger than a specific cut-off are considered individually. Proton multiple scattering is sampled from the complete Moliere distribution. To take into account in an approximate way the effect of inelastic nuclear collisions the fraction of the incident energy that is converted to kinetic energy of charged particles in the interaction is deposited on the spot. The energy that goes to neutral particles is assumed to leave the scoring geometry without any energy deposition. Stopping-power ratios are calculated in-line, i.e. during the transport, thereby reducing the uncertainty of the calculated value. The production and transport of the secondary electrons is used to determine an additional contribution to the stopping-power ratios obtained using the proton spectra alone

  4. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A.; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  impact of these range errors on clinical dose distributions is demonstrated using treatment plans for a non-small cell lung cancer patient. The change in stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  5. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  6. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  7. Polarization of antiprotons by antiproton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of polarized antiproton beams at Fermilab is briefly reviewed. Two types of high-energy anti p polarimeters are described - the Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter and the Primakoff-effect polarimeter. The production of 8.9 GeV/c polarized antiprotons before entering the Fermilab accumulator ring is then discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs

  8. Evidences of the influence of the electronic stopping power in the elastic energy loss in thin films of amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of deepness of implanted ions in carbon films, show the possibility that the energy elastic component given to the medium, could be affected by the ineslastic stopping parcel, which could cause a total stopping power, smaller than the expected. (A.C.A.S.)

  9. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons as a Test of Stopping Power in Degenerate Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C; Schulz, A E; Boswell, M; Fowler, M M; Grim, G; Klein, A; Rundberg, R S; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF ($E_n>$ 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about $10^{-4}$ of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled $(\\Gamma\\sim$0.6) and electron degenerate $(\\theta_\\mathrm{Fermi}/\\theta_e\\sim$4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. We find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions and some models are ruled out b...

  10. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 12C3+ and 16O3+ ions with energies between 4.5 and 7.8 MeV in a 0.166-μm-thin silicon nitride and in 4-μm-thin polypropylene foils were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered PIPS detector. Ions scattered from a thin gold layer under a scattering angle of 150° were used. The energy spectra of back-scattered and decelerated ions were registered and evaluated simultaneously. The measured stopping powers were compared with the theoretical predictions simulated by SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes. SRIM prediction of energy stopping is reasonably close to the experimentally obtained values comparing to MSTAR values. Better agreement between experimental and predicted data was observed for C3+ ion energy losses comparing to O3+ ions. The experimental data from Paul’s database and our previous experimental data were also discussed. The obtained experimental energy-straggling data were compared to those calculated by using Bohr’s, Yang’s models etc. The predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment within a frame of uncertainty of 25%

  11. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Schulz, A. E.; Boswell, M.; Fowler, M. M.; Grim, G.; Klein, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, D.; Cerjan, C.; Schneider, D.; Sepke, S. M.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-08-01

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF ( En> 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about 10-4 of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule, and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled (Γ˜ 0.6) and electron degenerate (θFermi/θe˜ 4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. We find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions, and some models are ruled out by our analysis of these experiments.

  12. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  13. Supra-thermal electron beam stopping power and guiding in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast-electron beam stopping mechanisms in media ranging from solid to warm dense matter have been investigated experimentally and numerically. Laser driven fast electrons have been transported through solid Al targets and shock compressed Al and plastic foam targets. Their propagation has been diagnosed via rear-side optical self-emission and Kα X-rays from tracer layers. Comparison between measurements and simulations shows that the transition from collision dominated to resistive field-dominated energy loss occurs for a fast-electron current density ∼5*1011 A cm-2. The respective increases in the stopping power with target density and resistivity have been detected in each regime. Self-guided propagation over 200 μm has been observed in radially compressed targets due to ∼1 kT magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients at the converging shock front. (authors)

  14. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  15. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In ion beam therapy electronic stopping power data enter in different disciplines, e.g., dose planning, dosimetry, and radiobiology. However, relevant stopping power data are only known within an accuracy of 2%-10%. We started the software library project libdEdx to unify data from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library is programmed in the language C to provide broad portability and high performance. A clean API provides full access to the underlying functions and thread safety in multi-threaded applications. The possibility to define arbitrary materials complements the list of predefined ICRU materials. Furthermore, we introduced a collection of tools, e.g., inverse stopping power look-up as well as CSDA range calculation and its inverse. Results: On a standard desktop PC libdEdx calculates 22 million look-ups/sec. A web GUI (available at http://dedx.au.dk) provides easy access to libdEdx and download of stopping data and graphs. For compounds, we observe that stopping power data are robust for variations in the mean excitation potential of the constituents as long as the total mean excitation potential is fixated. Conclusion: We released libdEdx (version number 1.2.1: http://sf.net/projects/libdedx/) with a web-based GUI. Future development will focus on implementing further stopping powers sources (e.g., for electrons and nuclear stopping) and relativistic effects.

  16. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild;

    2015-01-01

    development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling of...... detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Results. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors...

  17. Stopping power of palladium for protons in the energy range 0.300-3.100 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P. A.; Sepúlveda, A.; Morales, J. R.; Rodriguez, T.; Burgos, E.; Fernández, H.

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of palladium for protons has been measured using the transmission method with an overall uncertainty of around 5% over the energy range Ep=(0.300-3.100) MeV. These stopping power data are then compared to stopping power values calculated by the SRIM-2010 code and to those derived from a model based on the dielectric formalism. Subsequently, and within the framework of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory, this stopping power data were used for extracting Pd target mean excitation and ionization potential, (I = 468 ± 5 eV), and Barkas effect parameter, (b = 1.51 ± 0.06). A good agreement is found between the obtained results and values reported in literature.

  18. Measurement of stopping powers of gases for heavy ions of 3 to 13 MeV by nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of gases have been measured for incident 10Ne, 18Ar, 29Cu, 36Kr and 47Ag ions of 3 to 13 MeV/u. These measurements have confirmed the existence of a gas-solid difference for the stopping powers (the stopping power of solids being larger than that of gazes). Such a difference was theoretically postulated by Bohr and Lindhard in 1954, and experimentally observed for the first time by Geissel in 1982. This effect can be qualitatively interpreted by a difference in the ion's effective charge in stopping power. However, the determination of charge state distribution for Ar and Fe ions in two particular cases (Ar + Nsub(2s)or Nsub(2g) and (Fe + Csub(s) or Csub(g)) from a theoric model and experimental cross sections for atomic collisions don't quantitatively account for observed differences

  19. Quiet: The Power of Introvert in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Schat

    2012-01-01

    Do you pay attention to the differences between extroversion and introversion? It can be fascinating to consider who is and is not aware of  the distinction between the two, as well as the significant formative role they both play in daily perceptions and interactions.  In my experience, more often than not it is the introverts who recognize and appreciate the difference, while too many extroverts remain unaware. In  Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking(2012), Sus...

  20. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Atzeni, S [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D.P [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Mangia, F. [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Marques, J-R; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-11

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  1. Damage induced by the electronic stopping power of swift heavy ions in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When swift heavy ions penetrate through the matter, they release their energy by interaction with the target electron gas (electronic stopping power). The released energy reaches values as high than several ten keV per nanometer of path, so there is production of a high density of electronic excitations and ionizations. We shall present a general description of the track morphologies deduced from Moessbauer spectroscopy, channeling Rutherford backscattering experiment, high resolution electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The efficiency of the damage production has been also determined by macroscopic measurements such as electrical conductivity. Phenomenological models, developed to interpret the damage efficiency, will be discussed. (author). 15 figs., 2 figs

  2. Simulations of the energy loss of ions at the stopping-power maximum in a laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Ortner, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Basko, M. M.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Deppert, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Hallo, L.; Knetsch, A.; Kraus, D.; Malka, G.; Pépitone, K.; Schaumann, G.; Schlegel, T.; Schumacher, D.; Tauschwitz, An.; Vorberger, J.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    Simulations have been performed to study the energy loss of carbon ions in a hot, laser-generated plasma in the velocity region of the stopping-power maximum. In this parameter range, discrepancies of up to 30% exist between the various stopping theories and hardly any experimental data are available. The considered plasma, created by irradiating a thin carbon foil with two high-energy laser beams, is fully-ionized with a temperature of nearly 200 eV. To study the interaction at the maximum stopping power, Monte-Carlo calculations of the ion charge state in the plasma are carried out at a projectile energy of 0.5 MeV per nucleon. The predictions of various stopping-power theories are compared and experimental campaigns are planned for a first-time theory benchmarking in this low-velocity range.

  3. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  4. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  5. Stopping power of fluorides and semiconductor organic films for low-velocity protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the energy loss of protons in fluorides and organic films is presented. The measurements were performed in fresh AlF3, LiF, and N,N'-bis(1-ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxdiimide (EP-PTCDI) evaporated in situ on self-supported C or Ag foils, covering the very low energy range from 25 keV down to 0.7 keV. The transmission method is used in combination with time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometry. In the case of fluorides with large band gap energies (AlF3 and LiF), the experimental stopping power increases almost linearly with the mean projectile velocity showing a velocity threshold at about 0.1 a.u. These features are well reproduced by a model based on quantum scattering theory that takes into account the velocity distribution and the excitation of the active 2p electrons in the F- anions, and the properties of the electronic bands of the insulators. In the case of the semiconductor organic film with a lower gap, the experimental stopping power increases linearly with the mean projectile velocity without presenting a clear threshold. This trend is also reproduced by the proposed model.

  6. Analytical expressions for stopping-power ratios relevant for accurate dosimetry in particle therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lühr, Armin; Jäkel, Oliver; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2010-01-01

    In particle therapy, knowledge of the stopping-power ratios (STPRs) of the ion beam for air and water is necessary for accurate ionization chamber dosimetry. Earlier work has investigated the STPRs for pristine carbon ion beams, but here we expand the calculations to a range of ions (1 <= z <= 18) as well as spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) and provide a theoretical in-depth study with a special focus on the parameter regime relevant for particle therapy. The Monte Carlo transport code SHIELD-HIT is used to calculate complete particle-fluence spectra which are required for determining STPRs according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We confirm that the STPR depends primarily on the current energy of the ions rather than on their charge z or absolute position in the medium. However, STPRs for different sets of stopping-power data for water and air recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) are compared, including also the...

  7. The stopping powers and energy straggling of heavy ions in polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 7Li, 12C and 16O ions in thin poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) foils were measured in the incident beam energy range of 9.4–11.8 MeV using an indirect transmission method. Ions scattered from a thin gold target at an angle of 150° were registered by a partially depleted PIPS detector, partly shielded with a polymer foil placed in front of the detector. Therefore, the signals from both direct and slowed down ions were visible in the same energy spectrum, which was evaluated by the ITAP code, developed at our laboratory. The ITAP code was employed to perform a Gaussian-fitting procedure to provide a complete analysis of each measured spectrum. The measured stopping powers were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes and with previous experimental data. The energy straggling data were compared with those calculated by using Bohr’s, Lindhard–Scharff and Bethe–Livingston theories

  8. Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kartavtsev, O. I.

    1995-01-01

    Metastable antiprotonic helium atoms $^{3,4}\\! H\\! e\\bar pe$ have been discovered recently in experiments of the delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium media. These exotic atoms survive for an enormous time (about tens of microseconds) and carry the extremely large total angular momentum $L\\sim 30-40$. The theoretical treatment of the intrinsic properties of antiprotonic helium atoms, their formation and collisions with atoms and molecules is discussed.

  9. Antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into two mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branching ratios for antiproton-proton annihilations at rest into two mesons are given. The data were obtained at LEAR by stopping antiprotons in a liquid hydrogen target. Both charged and neutral annihilation products were detected in the Crystal Barrel detector. Representative data are presented, and their bearing on the general picture of annihilation dynamics is discussed. In addition, preliminary branching ratios for two-body radiative annihilations are given. (orig.)

  10. The CERN antiproton collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 108 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  11. Study of the stopping power and straggling for alpha particles and protons in organic solids, liquids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power and straggling for 5.5 MeV alpha particles in liquid and vapour phases of water, methanol, ethanol, propanol, h-hexane, n-octane and cyclohexane, and those for low energy protons in ethylene, styrene and propylene and their polymers, have been measured. Range-energy data have been fitted with inverse stopping power functions to give the cross sections. In each case, five parameters have been adjusted to obtain the best fit. The value of chi-squared per degree of freedom has been calculated, together with the parameters. The theoretical stopping cross section has been considered employing the Bethe-Bloch expression together with various corrections (shell correction using Walske and Bichsel procedure, Z13 contribution according to Ashley and Bloch correction based on Lindhard formalism). The existence of a phase effect has been clearly demonstrated for the stopping of both alpha particles and protons. (author)

  12. An antiproton catalyst for inertial confinement fusion propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Raymond A.; Newton, Richard; Smith, Gerald A.; Toothacker, William S.; Kanzleiter, Randall J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an inertial confinement fusion propulsion system involving an antiproton catalyst (for antiproton-induced fission). It is argued that, when the two processes, fusion and antimatter annihilation, are combined into one system, a viable candidate propulsion system for planetary exploration emerges. It is shown that as much as 7.6 GW of power, well within the requrements for interplanetary travel, can be achieved using existing driver technologies and available quantities of antiprotons.

  13. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Ingram, W. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Robertson, Daniel [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Beddar, Sam, E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent.

  14. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    relative biological effect (RBE) has already been beam measured in spread out Bragg peaks of antiprotons, relative to that found in the plateau region. However, the antiproton annihilation process is associated with a substantial release of secondary particles which contribute to the dose outside the...

  15. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  16. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    investigated the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte...

  17. Stopping power for arbitrary angle between test particle velocity and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the longitudinal dielectric function derived previously for charged test particles in helical movement around magnetic field lines, the numerical convergence of the series involved is found and the double numerical integrations on wave vector components are performed yielding the stopping power for arbitrary angle between the test particle velocity and magnetic field. Calculations are performed for particle Larmor radius larger and shorter than Debye length, i.e., for protons in a cold magnetized plasma and for thermonuclear α particles in a dense, hot, and strongly magnetized plasma. A strong decrease is found for the energy loss as the angle varies from 0 to π/2. The range of thermonuclear α particles as a function of the velocity angle with respect to the magnetic field is also given

  18. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A. F.; Mesa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 101 eV - 1010 eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  19. Charged Particle Stopping Power Effects on Ignition: Some Results from an Exact Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Singleton, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    A completely rigorous first-principles calculation of the charged particle stopping power has recently been performed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). This calculation is exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma number density, including an exact treatment of two-body quantum scattering. The BPS calculation is therefore extremely accurate in the plasma regime realized during the ignition and burn of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. For deuterium-tritium fusion, the 3.5 MeV alpha particle range tends to be 20-30% longer than most models in the literature have predicted, and the energy deposition into the ions tends to be smaller. Preliminary numerical simulations indicate that this increases the rho-R required to achieve ignition.

  20. Mean excitation energies for use in Bethe's stopping-power formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review has been made of the mean excitation energies that can be derived from the analysis of stopping-power and range measurements, and from semi-empirical dipole oscillator-strength distributions for gases and dielectric-response functions for solids. On the basis of this review, mean excitation energies have been selected for 43 elemental substances and 54 compounds. Additivity rules have also been considered which allow one to estimate the mean excitation energies for compounds for which no direct data are available. These additivity rules are based on the use of mean excitation energies for atomic constituents which, to a certain extent, take into account the effects of chemical binding and physical aggregation

  1. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED = a HUscH + b HUscL + c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc = HU + 1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions.

  2. Forward Lambda Production and Nuclear Stopping Power in d+Au Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, F

    2005-01-01

    Using the forward time projection chambers of STAR we measure the centrality dependent Lambda and Anti-Lambda yields in d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN} = 200 GeV at forward and backward rapidities. The contributions of different processes to particle production and baryon transport are probed exploiting the inherent asymmetry of the d+Au system. While the d side appears to be dominated by multiple independent nucleon-nucleon collisions, nuclear effects contribute significantly on the Au side. Using the constraint of baryon number conservation, the rapidity loss of baryons in the incoming deuteron can be estimated as a function of centrality. This is compared to a model and to similar measurements in Au+Au, which gives insights into the nuclear stopping power at relativistic energies.

  3. Antiprotons at Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Bieber, J W; Engel, R; Gaisser, T K; Roesler, S; Stanev, T; Bieber, John W.; Engel, Ralph; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Roesler, Stefan; Stanev, Todor

    1999-01-01

    New measurements with good statistics will make it possible to observe the time variation of cosmic antiprotons at 1 AU through the approaching peak of solar activity. We report a new computation of the interstellar antiproton spectrum expected from collisions between cosmic protons and the interstellar gas. This spectrum is then used as input to a steady-state drift model of solar modulation, in order to provide predictions for the antiproton spectrum as well as the antiproton/proton ratio at 1 AU. Our model predicts a surprisingly large, rapid increase in the antiproton/proton ratio through the next solar maximum, followed by a large excursion in the ratio during the following decade.

  4. Damage induced by swift heavy ions in insulators by electronic stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift heavy ions with an energy larger than 100 keV/a.m.u., penetrating into matter lose their energy mainly by interaction with the target electrons. In most insulators, above an electronic excitation threshold (a few keV per angstrom of ion range), an extended damage is induced along the ion path: the so-called latent track. The damage mechanism is still unclear. In this work, we study the defects formed by swift heavy ions in magnetic oxides and quartz. Moessbauer spectrometry, Rutherford Backscattering Ion Channelling and High and Medium resolution electron microscopy are used to determine the extent of the damage. On the one hand, we have determined the electronic stopping power threshold of damage creation in yttrium iron garnet. On the second hand, we have outlined the velocity effect. Up to now, the damage creation has been linked to the linear energy transfer, but so far the lateral distribution of the energy deposition has not been taken into account. In fact, the energy loss dE/dx can be identical for one ion at two different incident energies, or for different ions at various incident energies. The experimental results show that for a given projectile ion, the damage is higher at low velocity than at high velocity at constant dE/dx. Consequently, the electronic stopping power is not the only key parameter to account for the creation of the ion tracks. Moreover, the thermal spike model has been applied to ion-irradiated quartz in order to calculate the radii of the observed tracks taking into account this velocity effect. (author). 172 refs., 51 figs., 15 tabs

  5. Phenomenological electronic stopping-power model for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is crucial to have a good phenomenological model of electronic stopping power for modeling the physics of ion implantation into crystalline silicon. In the spirit of the Brandt-Kitagawa effective charge theory, we develop a model for electronic stopping power for an ion, which can be factorized into (i) a globally averaged effective charge taking into account effects of close and distant collisions by target electrons with the ion, and (ii) a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. This phenomenological model is implemented into both molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. There is only one free parameter in the model, namely, the one electron radius r0s for unbound electrons. By fine tuning this parameter, it is shown that the model can work successfully for both boron and arsenic implants. We report that the results of the dopant profile simulation for both species are in excellent agreement with the experimental profiles measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) over a wide range of energies and with different incident directions. We point out that the model has wide applicability, for it captures the correct physics of electronic stopping in ion implantation. This model also provides a good physically based damping mechanism for molecular dynamics simulations in the electronic stopping power regime, as evidenced by the striking agreement of dopant profiles calculated in our molecular dynamics simulations with the SIMS data. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 0.2-3.0 MeV He ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Izarra, C; Lulli, G; Summonte, C

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 200 keV-3 MeV He ions has been evaluated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and a semiempirical stopping power curve is proposed in this energy range. The curve is parameterized using the Andersen and Ziegler's formula, allowing for an easy implementation in any simulation program. The estimated accuracy of the present stopping power curve is of the order of 2%. Samples used for the measurements consist of thin SiO sub 2 films grown by wet thermal oxidation of Si(1 0 0) wafers. The thickness of each sample was independently determined by reflectance spectroscopy. The fitting of the experimental RBS spectra was performed using full Monte Carlo calculation of trajectories in the binary collision approximation.

  7. ESTAR, PSTAR, ASTAR. A PC package for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PC package is documented for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions in matter for energies from 1 keV up to 10 GeV. Stopping powers and ranges for electrons can be calculated for any element, compound or mixture. Stopping powers and ranges of protons and helium ions can be calculated for 74 materials (26 elements and 48 compounds and mixtures). The files are stored on two HD diskettes in compressed form. Both executable files for IBM PC and Fortran-77 source files are provided. All three programs require 5.2 Mb of disk space. This set of two diskettes with detailed documentation is available upon request, cost free, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author). 25 refs, 4 tabs

  8. Determination of the stopping power of 4He using Bayesian inference with the Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the experimental determination of stopping powers based on Bayesian Inference with the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm has been devised. This method avoids the difficulties related to thin target preparation. By measuring the RBS spectra for a known material, and using the known underlying physics, the stopping powers are determined by best matching the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra. Using silicon, SiO2 and Al2O3 as test cases, good agreement is obtained between calculated and experimental data. (author)

  9. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2014-01-01

    is programmed in the language C to provide broad portability and high performance. A clean API provides full access to the underlying functions and thread safety in multi-threaded applications. The possibility to define arbitrary materials complements the list of predefined ICRU materials. Furthermore, we...... from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library...

  10. Theoretical study of the channeling effect in the electronic stopping power of silicon carbide nanocrystal for low-energy protons and helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excited-states ab initio molecular dynamics model is employed to study the electronic stopping power of cubic silicon carbide nanocrystal when low-energy protons and helium ions are hyperchanneling in the 〈1 0 0〉,〈1 1 0〉 and 〈1 1 1〉 major crystal axes. The energy transfer processes between the ions and the electronic subsystem of the cubic silicon carbide nanocrystalline are studied. The channeling effect in the electronic stopping power is determined by the unique electronic structure of these channels. The velocity-proportional stopping power is predicted for both protons and helium ions in the low-energy region. The calculated stopping power is in a quantitative agreement with the experimental data up to the stopping power maximum. The deviations of the stopping power of helium ions from the linear proportionality are attributed to the electron transfer at higher velocities

  11. Molecular-orbital theory for the stopping power of atoms in the low velocity regime:the case of helium in alkali metals

    OpenAIRE

    Dorado, Jose J.; Flores, F.

    1993-01-01

    A free-parameter linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals approach is presented for analyzing the stopping power of slow ions moving in a metal. The method is applied to the case of He moving in alkali metals. Mean stopping powers for He present a good agreement with local-density-approximation calculations. Our results show important variations in the stopping power of channeled atoms with respect to their mean values.

  12. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed

  13. Quiet: The Power of Introvert in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Schat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Do you pay attention to the differences between extroversion and introversion? It can be fascinating to consider who is and is not aware of  the distinction between the two, as well as the significant formative role they both play in daily perceptions and interactions.  In my experience, more often than not it is the introverts who recognize and appreciate the difference, while too many extroverts remain unaware. In  Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking(2012, Susan Cain reminds us of the potency and power of the gift of introversion.  She challenges her readers to recognize and celebrate the unique insights and contributions that may be latent in communities and organizations—present, but hidden from view, and likely to remain so unless given the space to flourish and to find a voice. She also suggests that creating a space for the introvert voice may bring unforeseen blessings to an organization or community.

  14. Stopping power of the elements Z=20 through Z=30 for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Hanke, C.C.; Simonsen, H.; Sørensen, H.; Vajda, P.

    1968-01-01

    The stopping power for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons of Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn has been measured. For most of the materials, the accuracy is ±0.3%. For Ca, Sc, Cr, and Mn, which were rather difficult to handle, the results are somewhat less accurate. The results have been...

  15. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: tosaki@barium.rirc.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Isozumi, Yasuhito [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 {mu}m. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm{sup 3}) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm{sup 3}) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  16. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 μm. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm3) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm3) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  17. Stopping power of 1.0-3.0 MeV helium in Mylar, Makrofol and Kapton foils

    CERN Document Server

    Chekirine, M

    1999-01-01

    The stopping powers of 1.0-3.0 MeV of helium ( sup 4 He) in Makrofol KG, Mylar and Kapton were measured. The results were compared with scanty experimental data in the literature and with values predicted by both Bragg's rule and cores-and-bonds model. These values agree with each other within the uncertainties; maximum deviations are <5%.

  18. Stopping power of palladium for protons in the energy range 0.300–3.100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P.A., E-mail: pjmirand@gmail.com; Sepúlveda, A.; Morales, J.R.; Rodriguez, T.; Burgos, E.; Fernández, H.

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of palladium for protons has been measured using the transmission method with an overall uncertainty of around 5% over the energy range E{sub p}=(0.300–3.100) MeV. These stopping power data are then compared to stopping power values calculated by the SRIM-2010 code and to those derived from a model based on the dielectric formalism. Subsequently, and within the framework of the modified Bethe–Bloch theory, this stopping power data were used for extracting Pd target mean excitation and ionization potential, (I = 468 ± 5 eV), and Barkas effect parameter, (b = 1.51 ± 0.06). A good agreement is found between the obtained results and values reported in literature. It is worth mentioning that these are the first reported results for protons on palladium over this energy range, which is often used in IBA applications, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE)

  19. Nuclear physics with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of antiproton beams in Nuclear Physics has been until now limited to a few total and reaction cross section measurements and to the study of antiprotonic atoms. This situation is presently about to change with the advent of the low Energy Antiproton Ring ''LEAR'' at CERN which started to deliver antiprotons for Physics experiments in July 1983. But what can we learn from Nuclear Physics with antiprotons. To answer this question I will first review basic and simple features of the low energy antiN-N interaction and their energy dependence. I will show that the antiproton is an interesting probe to explore the nucleus and bring informations complementary to that already provided by the other usual probe like e, p, π, α particles etc... I will in turn point out a few points that make a nucleus a very useful laboratory to study the antiN-N elementary interaction and get informations that are not available in the free antiN-N interaction

  20. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internal contamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy 109 Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 π proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin 109 Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  1. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental verification of stopping-power-ratio (SPR) prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) with potential use for dose planning in proton and ion therapy. The approach is based on DECT images converted to electron density relative to water ϱe/ϱe, w and effective atomic number Zeff. To establish a parameterization of the I-value by Zeff, 71 tabulated tissue compositions were used. For the experimental assessment of the method we scanned 20 materials (tissue surrogates, polymers, aluminum, titanium) at 80/140Sn kVp and 100/140Sn kVp (Sn: additional tin filtration) and computed the ϱe/ϱe, w and Zeff with a purely image based algorithm. Thereby, we found that ϱe/ϱe, w (Zeff) could be determined with an accuracy of 0.4% (1.7%) for the tissue surrogates with known elemental compositions. SPRs were predicted from DECT images for all 20 materials using the presented approach and were compared to measured water-equivalent path lengths (closely related to SPR). For the tissue surrogates the presented DECT approach was found to predict the experimental values within 0.6%, for aluminum and titanium within an accuracy of 1.7% and 9.4% (from 16-bit reconstructed DECT images). (paper)

  2. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-21

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED=a HUscH+b HUscL+c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc=HU+1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions. PMID:25360874

  3. Getting deeper insight into stopping power problems in radiation physics using the Noether's theorem corollary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The theories that combine two different approaches in dealing with interacting objects, for instance, treating electromagnetic laser field classically, and the interacting atom as a quantum object, have some ambiguities and, as such, they should be labeled as “mixed”. From the Noether's Theorem Corollary, which we proved earlier, about the conservation laws of energy, momentum and angular momentum in mixed theories, follows that the aforementioned theories do not support the law of angular momentum/spin conservation (to be precise, the obtained result does not imply that the law of conservation of angular momentum and spin is not valid generally, but rather that mixed theories can produce the results which might violate this law. In present paper, an additional explanation following our Corollary is given to why the calculation of the stopping power in the fully quantized theory gives better results than those that were obtained in mixed theories, which further confirms the predictions of our Corollary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171021: The experimental and theoretical research in radiation physics and radioecology

  4. Surface stopping power for 0.2 MeV/amu H2+ fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H2+ ion (0.2 MeV/amu) was incident upon the clear surface of SnTe(001). An energy loss of H+ fragment emitted was observed under the condition of mirror reflection. As dissociating, the average value of energy loss of both fragments accepted upon the parallel repulsion and the unparallel repulsion to the moving direction of the incidence of ion beam was about 20% larger than that of H+ with uniform velocity. The dependence of the energy losses of H+ ion with uniform velocity and H+ fragment on the angle of incidence of H2+ ion was not observed. The difference between both energy losses showed proximity effect of fragment on the stopping power. When the angles of incidence were not the same, the internuclear distances near the surface atomic plane were different. But the difference did not affect on the results. The above fact showed that the dependance of the proximity effect on the internuclear distance was counteracted by that on the distance from the surface atomic plane. (S.Y.)

  5. Intriguing results of stopping power measurements with light ions traversing several organic (Co) polymer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    2001-07-01

    Previously published measurements of stopping powers of four organic (co)polymers for protons, alpha particles, and 7Li ions have been analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory. This procedure allows extraction of values of various parameters which constitute an integral part of the formalism, most notably the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b). Normally one can expect the extracted I-value to exceed by a few per cent the value based on the additivity assumption (IB), whereas the extracted b-value should lie within the expected interval of about 1.3-1.5. Results of one series of measurements with the same experimental arrangement, utilizing thin target foils of formvar (a polyvinylformyl resin), polysulfone, kapton (a polymide), and vyns (a vinylchloride-vinylacetate copolymer), yielded results quite consistent with expectation except that the extracted I-value for formvar lay about 20% below the value of IB. This salient anomaly will be examined in detail. Moreover, trends in extracted I- and b-values suggesting a dependence on projectile will be considered.

  6. Reconciling Particle-Beam and Optical Stopping-Power Measurements in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, William; Shiles, E. J.; Smith, David Y.

    A swift, charged particle passing through matter loses energy to electronic excitations via the electro-magnetic transients experienced by atoms along its path. Bethe related this process to the matter's frequency-dependent dielectric function ɛ (ℏω) through the energy-loss function, Im[-1/ ɛ (ℏω) ]. The matter's response may be summarized by a single parameter, the mean excitation energy, or I value, that combines the optical excitation spectrum and excitation probability. Formally, ln I is the mean of ln ℏω weighted by the energy-loss function. This provides an independent optical check on particle energy-loss experiments. However, a persistent disagreement is found for silicon: direct particle-beam studies yield 173.5elements suggests 165 eV. An independent determination from optical data in 1986 gave 174 eV supporting the higher values. However, recent x-ray measurements disclosed short comings in the 1986 optical data: 1. Measurements by Ershov and Lukirskii underestimated the L-edge strength, and 2. A power-law extrapolation overestimated the K-edge strength. We have updated these data and find I = 162 eV, suggesting that silicon's recommended I value should be reconsidered. While this 5% change in I value changes the stopping power by only 1%, it is significant for precision measurements with Si detectors. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. ACOL, CERN'S upgrade of the antiproton accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At its present best the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) produces 6 x 10/sup 9/ p-bar's/hour. In routine operation this amounts to around 10/sup 11/ p-bar's/day including anadvertent stops of all the systems involved. Post ACOL performance aims at increasing these rates tenfold

  8. SU-E-J-149: Secondary Emission Detection for Improved Proton Relative Stopping Power Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J; Musall, B; Erickson, A [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This research investigates application of secondary prompt gamma (PG) emission spectra, resulting from nuclear reactions induced by protons, to characterize tissue composition along the particle path. The objective of utilizing the intensity of discrete high-energy peaks of PG is to improve the accuracy of relative stopping power (RSP) values available for proton therapy treatment planning on a patient specific basis and to reduce uncertainty in dose depth calculations. Methods: In this research, MCNP6 was used to simulate PG emission spectra generated from proton induced nuclear reactions in medium of varying composition of carbon, oxygen, calcium and nitrogen, the predominant elements found in human tissue. The relative peak intensities at discrete energies predicted by MCNP6 were compared to the corresponding atomic composition of the medium. Results: The results have shown a good general agreement with experimentally measured values reported by other investigators. Unexpected divergence from experimental spectra was noted in the peak intensities for some cases depending on the source of the cross-section data when using compiled proton table libraries vs. physics models built into MCNP6. While the use of proton cross-section libraries is generally recommended when available, these libraries lack data for several less abundant isotopes. This limits the range of their applicability and forces the simulations to rely on physics models for reactions with natural atomic compositions. Conclusion: Current end-of-range proton imaging provides an average RSP for the total estimated track length. The accurate identification of tissue composition along the incident particle path using PG detection and characterization allows for improved determination of the tissue RSP on the local level. While this would allow for more accurate depth calculations resulting in tighter treatment margins, precise understanding of proton beam behavior in tissue of various

  9. The gaseous emission of polymers under swift heavy ion irradiation: effect of the electronic stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis contributes to a better understanding of the damaging processes, which occur in polymers under swift heavy ion irradiation. The present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power, (dE/dx)e, on the molecular emission under irradiation. The irradiated polymers are polyethylene, polypropylene and poly-butene. The (dE/dx)e of the projectiles used varies from 3.5*10-3 MeV.mg-1.cm2 (electron) to 39 MeV.mg-1.cm2 (58Ni). We used two different experimental approaches in order to identify the nature of the emitted gases: mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. The first technique is non selective, therefore, we could detect the emission of H2 and heavy molecules; it also gives information on the diffusion kinetics of the molecules formed. The use of infrared spectroscopy for this kind of analysis is new and the technique was developed at the laboratory. It enables us to identify, without any ambiguity, molecules with up to three carbon atoms. The experimental spectra are analysed by using reference spectra of pure gases, measured in our laboratory. We have quantified precisely each identified gas, and we have followed the evolution of the radiochemical yields with increasing (dE/dx)e. The results, obtained at different (dE/dx)e, inform us on the different mechanisms of gas molecules formation, for example the side group departure and, at high (dE/dx)e, the fragmentation of the main chain which is due to multiple ionisation of the macromolecule. (author)

  10. SU-E-J-149: Secondary Emission Detection for Improved Proton Relative Stopping Power Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This research investigates application of secondary prompt gamma (PG) emission spectra, resulting from nuclear reactions induced by protons, to characterize tissue composition along the particle path. The objective of utilizing the intensity of discrete high-energy peaks of PG is to improve the accuracy of relative stopping power (RSP) values available for proton therapy treatment planning on a patient specific basis and to reduce uncertainty in dose depth calculations. Methods: In this research, MCNP6 was used to simulate PG emission spectra generated from proton induced nuclear reactions in medium of varying composition of carbon, oxygen, calcium and nitrogen, the predominant elements found in human tissue. The relative peak intensities at discrete energies predicted by MCNP6 were compared to the corresponding atomic composition of the medium. Results: The results have shown a good general agreement with experimentally measured values reported by other investigators. Unexpected divergence from experimental spectra was noted in the peak intensities for some cases depending on the source of the cross-section data when using compiled proton table libraries vs. physics models built into MCNP6. While the use of proton cross-section libraries is generally recommended when available, these libraries lack data for several less abundant isotopes. This limits the range of their applicability and forces the simulations to rely on physics models for reactions with natural atomic compositions. Conclusion: Current end-of-range proton imaging provides an average RSP for the total estimated track length. The accurate identification of tissue composition along the incident particle path using PG detection and characterization allows for improved determination of the tissue RSP on the local level. While this would allow for more accurate depth calculations resulting in tighter treatment margins, precise understanding of proton beam behavior in tissue of various

  11. Interaction of antiprotons with nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 945, JAN (2016), s. 197-215. ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * antiproton annihilation * antiproton nuclear bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.202, year: 2014

  12. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for α particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for α particles at very high temperatures (T = 5 keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the α particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the α particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of α particles, than that of a lower Z plasma

  13. Electronic interactions and nuclear scattering effects in the stopping power of carbon for fragmented H2+ projectiles

    OpenAIRE

    Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Arista, Néstor R.

    1998-01-01

    The stopping power of amorphous carbon for fragmented swift H2+ molecular ions has been carried out using a Molecular Dynamics code to follow the trajectory of each fragment proton as it moves through the target. We consider the interaction of each proton with the target electrons, the Coulomb repulsion between both protons and the vicinage effects due to the wake potential created by its partner proton. The nuclear scattering with the target nuclei was also taken into account using a Monte C...

  14. Polycarbonate, Mylar and Havar stopping powers for 1.0-3.25 MeV/nucleon 40Ar-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopping powers of polycarbonate, Mylar and Havar for 1.0-3.25 MeV/nucleon 40Ar-ions have been determined by the transmission method in two geometries. The stopping power values were obtained within uncertainty of 2.1-4.5% for the various materials. The present results are compared with the predictions obtained by the most commonly used procedures employed in obtaining stopping powers. These include the Northcliffe and Schilling model, semi-empirical parametrization of Ziegler et al (SRIM2000) with and without the cores and bonds model and the Hubert et al formulation. SRIM2000 values were in good agreement in case of Mylar and Havar, on average within 3% of present results. For polycarbonate the differences were less than 6% on average. The cores and bonds (CAB) model improved the parametrization values slightly. The Northcliffe and Schilling model and the Hubert et al formulation both yielded values within 5% or less for Mylar and polycarbonate. For the Havar the Hubert et al formulation and the present results disagreed by 10% on average. (author)

  15. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Ibañez, Irene L.; Behar, Moni; Grasselli, Mariano; Bermúdez, Gerardo García

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2-22.1 MeV cm2 mg-1 and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  16. The influence of magnetic fields on the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate how a magnetic field affects the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in plasmas. The corresponding density of plasma electrons is investigated. At a weak magnetic field, the wakes exhibit typical V-shaped cone structures. As the magnetic field strengthens, the wakes spread and lose their typical V-shaped structures. At a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the wakes exhibit conversed V-shaped structures. Additionally, strengthening the magnetic field reduces the stopping power in regions of low and high beam density. However, the influence of the magnetic field becomes complicated in regions of moderate beam density. The stopping power increases in a weak magnetic field, but it decreases in a strong magnetic field. At high beam density and moderate magnetic field, two low-density channels of plasma electrons appear on both sides of the incident beam pulse trajectory. This is because electrons near the beam pulses will be attracted and move along with the beam pulses, while other electrons nearby are restricted by the magnetic field and cannot fill the gap

  17. Cancer Therapy with Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Ad-4 Collaboration

    2005-10-01

    Starting in 2003 the AD-4/ACE collaboration has studied the biological effects of antiprotons annihilating in a human tissue like material on live V-79 Chinese Hamster cells. The main goal of the work is to prove the efficacy of antiprotons for cancer therapy. In this report we discuss a critical point to be considered carefully for all particle beam radiation therapies, namely the loss of primary particles from the beam on the way to a tumor seated some distance below the surface.

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  19. Mean excitation energies extracted from stopping power measurements of protons in polymers by using the modified Bethe Bloch formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammi, H.; Zemih, R.; Mammeri, S.; Allab, M.

    2005-04-01

    Recent stopping power measurements in thin polymeric films have been performed for protons of 0.4-3.5 MeV energies using the indirect transmission technique [H. Ammi, S. Mammeri, M. Chekirine, B. Bouzid, M. Allab, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 198 (2002) 5]. Experimental stopping data have been analyzed with the modified Bethe-Bloch formula and the mean excitation energies I have been then extracted from the data. Resulting values for each thin film are 76 ± 1 eV in Mylar, 70.8 ± 1 eV in Makrofol, 82.2 ± 1.2 eV in LR-115 and 55.4 ± 1 eV in Polypropylene. The I-extracted values are compared to those IB calculated by using the Bragg's rule.

  20. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H- ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H- ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼106 to 107 particles

  1. Reaction-in-Flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Cerjan, C. J.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M. M.; Gooden, M. E.; Grim, G. P.; Henry, E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sepke, S. M.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Singleton, R. L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenically cooled inertial confinement fusion capsule designs are suitable for studies of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons. RIF neutrons occur when energetically up-scattered ions undergo DT reactions with a thermal ion in the plasma, producing neutrons in the energy range 9-30 MeV. The knock-on ions lose energy as they traverse the plasma, which directly affects the spectrum of the produced RIF neutrons. Here we present measurements from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of RIF neutrons produced in cryogenic capsules, with energies above 15 MeV. We show that the measured RIFs probe stopping under previously unexplored degenerate plasma conditions and constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions.

  2. Stopping power measurements with 17-GeV/c protons at the AGS or inclusive proton spectra from proton-nucleus interactions at 17 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of nuclear stopping power and its importance to the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies was brought to general attention one year ago at Quark Matter 83 by Busza and Goldhaber. In this context, nuclear stopping power can be thought of as the rate of energy (or rapidity) loss of a proton traversing nuclear matter. It does not directly address the important question of energy deposition. Busza and Goldhaber showed that knowledge of nuclear stopping power is needed to estimate the minimum center-of-mass energy required in nucleus-nucleus collisions to ensure the production of very high temperatures at low baryon density. At cm energies of about 1 to 10 GeV/A, the stopping power is important in the estimation of the maximum baryon densities attainable in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The data presented are more relevant to this latter point

  3. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  4. Monte Carlo calculated stopping-power ratios, water/air, for clinical proton dosimetry (50-250 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of stopping power ratios, water to air, for the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical proton beams using ionization chamber measurements have been undertaken using the Monte Carlo method. A computer code to simulate the transport of protons in water (PETRA) has been used to calculate Sw,air-data under different degrees of complexity, ranging from values based on primary protons only to data including secondary electrons and high-energy secondary protons produced in nonelastic nuclear collisions. All numerical data are based on ICRU 49 proton stopping powers. Calculations using primary protons have been compared to the simple continuous slowing-down approximation (c.s.d.a.) analytical technique used in proton dosimetry protocols, not finding significant differences that justify elaborate Monte Carlo simulations except beyond the mean range of the protons (the far side of the Bragg peak). The influence of nuclear nonelastic processes, through the detailed generation and transport of secondary protons, on the calculated stopping-power ratios has been found to be negligible. The effect of alpha particles has also been analysed, finding differences smaller than 0.1% from the results excluding them. Discrepancies of up to 0.6% in the plateau region have been found, however, when the production and transport of secondary electrons are taken into account. The large influence of nonelastic nuclear interactions on proton depth-dose distributions shows that the removal of primary protons from the incident beam decreases the peak-to-plateau ratio by a large factor, up to 40% at 250 MeV. It is therefore emphasized that nonelastic nuclear reactions should be included in Monte Carlo simulations of proton beam depth-dose distributions. (author)

  5. Primary population of antiprotonic helium states

    OpenAIRE

    Révai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2003-01-01

    A full quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident (lab) energies of the antiproton.

  6. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show that the...... theory after having presented a summary of recent results on the projectile- and charge-state dependence of forward and backward electron yields gamma(F) and gamma(B) and the Meckbach factor R = gamma(F)/gamma(B). A simple extension of the yield equations is proposed and several assumptions are justified...

  7. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet into......At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...

  8. ABLATION OF A DEUTERIUM PELLET IN A FUSION PLASMA VIEWED AS A STOPPING POWER PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the...

  9. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  10. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  11. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  12. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  13. Semi empirical formula for electronic stopping power determination of 24Mg, 27Al and 28Si ions crossing Formvar foil in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined continuous stopping power of heavy ions in thin Formvar foil for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions over an energy range of (0.1–0.5) MeV/nucleon. Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique coupled with time of flight (ToF) spectrometer has been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in this thin absorber. Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) theory compared with the corresponding determined stopping values in Formvar, shows significantly large deviations. However, a novel semi empirical expression has been proposed here and tested for better stopping power calculations at low velocity in the ion energy domain of LSS theory for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions crossing thin Formvar foil. The results were compared to the obtained experimental stopping power data, predictions of LSS theory and also to those generated by SRIM-2010 computer code. The obtained results exhibit good agreement with experimental data. - Highlights: • Experimental stopping data has been obtained by using Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis technique with Time of Flight spectrometer. • A new semi-empirical stopping formula based on LSS theory has been proposed for 28Si, 27Al and 24 Mg ions in Formvar foil. • This expression well fit the experimental stopping data at low energy in LSS domain

  14. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy: astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date ap measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different as...

  15. Chemical bond effects on the low energy electronic stopping power: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the applicability of a modified version of the Firsov model to account for the low-energy electronic stopping cross section (Se) due to molecular targets. We employ floating spherical Gaussian orbitals (FSGO), which reproduce major trends in electronic and geometrical structure of molecules. Two advantages of using FSGO are: i) each localized orbital is classified as inner shell, bonding and lone-pair species, hence a natural partitioning of Se from each type of orbital is possible and ii) a simple analytical expression for the orbital contribution to Se is obtained after averaging over all molecular orientations. Our results show an explicit dependence of Se on the geometric structure of the molecule as well as on the core and bond character. (orig.)

  16. A practical scattering power for Gaussian beam model of heavy charged particles stopping in tissue-like matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Dose calculation in treatment planning of radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions deals with a large volume of path integrals involving a scattering power of body tissue. This work provides a simple formulation for such demanding applications. Empirical linearity between RMS end-point displacement and range of incident particles in water was translated into a linear formula, from which a simple scattering power was derived. The simplicity enabled analytical formulation for ions stopping in water, which was designed to be equivalent with the extended Highland model and agreed with measurements better than 2% or 0.02 cm in RMS displacement. The simplicity will also improve the efficiency of numerical path integrals in the presence of heterogeneity.

  17. Dirty tricks: how the nuclear lobby stopped the development of wave power in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is claimed that by misrepresentation of the economic analysis of wave power generation of electricity the nuclear lobby in Britain has prevented development work to continue on wave power, in favour of nuclear power generation. The United Kingdom Department of Energy and the Central Electricity Generating Board, in favour of nuclear power, have not allowed the cost estimation of electricity from wave power generators, especially Salter's Ducks (a wave power generator generated by Professor Salter at Ednburgh University) to be known. Instead the cost (estimated at 4-12p/kWh) has been deliberately exaggerated. This has resulted in wind power becoming the favoured alternative renewable energy source of the future. (UK)

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...

  19. Unraveling resistive versus collisional contributions to relativistic electron beam stopping power in cold-solid and in warm-dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results on laser-driven relativistic electron beam propagation through aluminum samples, which are either solid and cold or compressed and heated by laser-induced shock. A full numerical description of fast electron generation and transport is found to reproduce the experimental absolute Kα yield and spot size measurements for varying target thicknesses, and to sequentially quantify the collisional and resistive electron stopping powers. The results demonstrate that both stopping mechanisms are enhanced in compressed Al samples and are attributed to the increase in the medium density and resistivity, respectively. For the achieved time- and space-averaged electronic current density, 〈jh〉∼8×1010 A/cm2 in the samples, the collisional and resistive stopping powers in warm and compressed Al are estimated to be 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. By contrast, for cold and solid Al, the corresponding estimated values are 1.1 keV/μm and 0.6 keV/μm. Prospective numerical simulations involving higher jh show that the resistive stopping power can reach the same level as the collisional one. In addition to the effects of compression, the effect of the transient behavior of the resistivity of Al during relativistic electron beam transport becomes progressively more dominant, and for a significantly high current density, jh∼1012 A/cm2, cancels the difference in the electron resistive stopping power (or the total stopping power in units of areal density) between solid and compressed samples. Analytical calculations extend the analysis up to jh=1014 A/cm2 (representative of the full-scale fast ignition scenario of inertial confinement fusion), where a very rapid transition to the Spitzer resistivity regime saturates the resistive stopping power, averaged over the electron beam duration, to values of ∼1 keV/μm

  20. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  1. Low energy antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the present experimental and theoretical status of antinucleon-nucleon (bar NN) interactions at low energy (below 2 GeV/c). The authors discuss elastic scattering, hyperon pair production, and annihilation into mesonic channels, including the search for exotic meson states in the annihilation debris. New results from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN, from KEK in Japan, and from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are now available. Some of the experiments and their comparison to theoretical predictions have been reviewed earlier. The authors extend these reviews to more recent data and theoretical calculations

  2. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  3. Improvements of the Bethe stopping power theory and their application to problems involving radiation in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinky, Hussein Mohammed

    The latest advances in radiation oncology emphasizes the importance of the theory of energy loss of charged particles through matter. Since the development of the Bethe-Bloch stopping power for heavy charged incident particles in 1930, many corrections have been proposed to improve this equation's theoretical approximation. The region of applicability of this formula, with respect to the velocity and the charge of the incident particle as well as the characteristics of the target, is restricted by the validity of the approximation adopted. One of the major unsolved problems is the relativistic treatment of the inner-shell electrons for medium and heavy target elements. The stopping power theory treats atomic electrons non-relativistically for these targets which put serious limitation on the theory because the basic sum rules on which the theory relies are not amenable to vigorous relativistic generalization as pointed out by Fano. To solve this problem we assume completeness by employing the Dirac Hamiltonian, and then present a semi-relativistic approach to order v 2/c2 following the Foldy-Wouthuysen-Transformation (FWT) to exclude the contributions from the negative-energy states. To establish this goal we developed a very elegant, practical, and accurate step-by-step procedure using Baker-Hausdroff Lemma to do the FWT to any desired order for any functions of coordinate or momentum operator, or to any entire functions of both coordinate and momentum operators. We applied this procedure to general function of position where the result is then applied to find the TRK and Bethe sum rules by using semirelativistic Hamiltonian. This procedure can be used to find any desired sum rule by doing more computation relations of the transformed Hamiltonian of the system with the transformed function of position. For example, Sk sum rule will require k times commutation relations to be calculated. The resulting Bethe sum rule relativistic correction is then used to find the

  4. Slowing-down times and stopping powers for ˜2-MeVμ+ in low-pressure gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senba, Masayoshi; Arseneau, Donald J.; Pan, James J.; Fleming, Donald G.

    2006-10-01

    The times taken by positive muons (μ+) to slow down from initial energies in the range ˜3 to 1MeV , to the energy of the last muonium formation, ≈10eV , at the end of cyclic charge exchange, have been measured in the pure gases H2 , N2 , Ar , and in the gas mixtures Ar-He , Ar-Ne , Ar-CF4 , H2-He , and H2-SF6 , by the muon spin rotation (μSR) technique. At 1atm pressure, these slowing-down times, τSD , in Ar and N2 , vary from ˜14ns at the highest initial energies of 2.8MeV to 6.5ns at 1.6MeV , with much longer times, ˜34ns , seen at this energy in H2 . Similar variations are seen in the gas mixtures, depending also on the total charge and nature of the mixture and consistent with well-established (Bragg) additivity rules. The times τSD could also be used to determine the stopping powers, dE/dx , of the positive muon in N2 , Ar , and H2 , at kinetic energies near 2MeV . The results demonstrate that the μ+ and proton have the same stopping power at the same projectile velocity, as expected from the historic Bethe-Bloch formula, but not previously shown experimentally to our knowledge for the muon in gases at these energies. The energy of the first neutralization collision forming muonium (hydrogen), which initiates a series of charge-exchanging collisions, is also calculated for He , Ne , and Ar . The formalism necessary to describe the stopping power and moderation times, for either muon or proton, in three energy regimes—the Bethe-Bloch, cyclic charge exchange, and thermalization regimes—is developed and discussed in comparison with the experimental measurements reported here, and elsewhere. The slowing-down times through the first two regimes are controlled by the relevant ionization and charge-exchange cross sections, whereas the final thermalization regime is most sensitive to the forwardness of the elastic scattering cross sections. In this regime the slowing-down times (to kT ) at nominal pressures are expected to be ≲100ns .

  5. Stopping Gluinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvanitaki, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Pierce, A.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, S.; Wacker, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-29

    Long lived gluinos are the trademark of split susy. They form R-hadrons that, when charged, efficiently lose energy in matter via ionization. Independent of R-spectroscopy and initial hadronization, a fraction of R-hadrons become charged while traversing a detector. This results in a large number of stopped gluinos at present and future detectors. For a 300 GeV gluino, 10{sup 6} will stop each year in LHC detectors, while several hundred stop in detectors during Run II at the Tevatron. The subsequent decays of stopped gluinos produce distinctive depositions of energy in calorimeters with no activity in either the tracker or the muon chamber.

  6. Optimization of the Profiles in MeV Implanted Silicon Through the Modification of Electronic Stopping Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chae Jung

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The elements B, P and As can each be implanted in silicon; for the fabrication of integrated semiconductor devicesand the wells in CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor. The implanted range due to different implantedspecies calculated using TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter simulation results was considered. The profiles ofimplanted samples could be measured using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the comparison betweenthe measured and simulated data, some deviations were shown in the profiles of MeV implanted silicon. The Moliere,C-Kr, and ZBL potentials were used for the range calculations, and the results showed almost no change in the MeVenergy region. However, the calculations showed remarkably improved results through the modification of theelectronic stopping power. The results also matched very well with SIMS data. The calculated tolerances of Rp and ΔRpbetween the modified Se of TRIM and SIMS data were remarkably better than the tolerances between the TRIM andSIMS data.

  7. Calibration of a stopping power model for silicon based on analysis of neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure the boron concentration versus depth profile within a silicon sample with four delta-doped planes by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In a neutron depth profiling (NDP) experiment, we illuminate the sample with a neutron beam. Nuclear reactions between the boron nuclei and neutrons produce alpha particles. Based on the measured boron concentration profile and models for the stopping power of the silicon sample, energy straggling, multiple scattering, and the observed energy resolution of the alpha particle detector, we predict the observed energy spectrum of the detected alpha particles. We predict the stopping power of silicon using the stopping and range of ions in matter code SRIM-2000. The predicted locations of the NDP energy peaks are consistently at lower energies than the locations of the observed peaks. This discrepancy is consistent with the claim that SRIM-2000 overestimates the actual stopping power of silicon. Empirically, we estimate a stopping power reduction factor to be 5.06%±1.06%. When we reduce the SRIM-2000 prediction by this factor, we get good agreement between the observed and predicted NDP measurements

  8. Treatment Plans for Antiproton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus;

    Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the expectat......Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the...... expectation of an enhanced RBE of this additional dose. Starting in 2003 the AD-4 collaboration at CERN has studied biological effects of antiproton beams on V79 Chinese Hamster cells and human FaDu cells. The AD-4 collaboration has developed relative and absolute dosimetry for pulsed antiproton beams. Data...... from these measurements were used to benchmark the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, which then has been used for calculations of physical dose inside and outside of the primary antiproton beam. From clonogenic survival studies on the different cell lines mentioned above we have determined biological effective...

  9. Stopping power of gases for heavy ions. Gas-solid effect II. 2-6 MeV/u Cu, Kr and Ag projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of twelve gaseous media (from H2 to Xe) have been measured for 2-6 MeV/u Cu, 2-5 MeV/u Kr, and 3-4 MeV/u Ag projectiles. The results are compared to the most common tabulations which appear to be in fair agreement with the data, except for the lightest gases (H2, He) for which the calculated values are too low. The stopping powers in Xe are also underestimated for energies lower than 4 MeV/u. A significant gas-solid effect is observed, the gas stopping powers being lower than those of solid media. This effect, which is higher for the lightest degraders, is attributed to an enhancement of the effective charge of the ions inside solid degraders which is itself due to a density effect

  10. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  11. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water

    OpenAIRE

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Kyriakou, I.; Abril, I.; Nikjoo, H.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dis...

  12. Court lifts injunction to stop construction of Isar 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A press release of the Bavarian Court of Administration No. 22 CS 84 A. 453 referring to the case Franziska Beck against the Free State of Bavaria, states the following: Upon the hearing of March 27, 1984, the 22nd Senate of the Bavarian Court of Administration decided to lift the injunction of January 16, 1984 of the Regensburg Administrative Court, and to allow further construction of Isar II nuclear power plant. The main reasons underlying this decision are given. (orig./HP)

  13. Construction stop for Isar-2 nuclear power plant cancelled - constitutional complaint filed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Higher Administrative Court regards the result of the lawsuit on its merits as open. The arguments of the Administrative Court against the lawfulness of the permits could not persuade the Higher Administrative Court of the obvious justification of the action. Reservations against the clear definition of the permits cannot be made. If the result of the lawsuit on the merits remains open it has to be considered whose interests claim priority until a legal decision has been taken on the merits. In this case the interests of the applicant have to come second. In any case, urgent public interests in the security of the Bavarian energy supplies up to the end of this decade speak for the immediate continuation of the construction of the Isar-2 nuclear power plant. The submitted electricity demand forecasts, which show a power deficit of several 100 MW, are plausible. Due to the importance of these interests the applicant can be expected to accept the nuclear power plant during the period in which no final legal decision has been taken on his objections. (orig./HSCH)

  14. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  15. Stopping powers of LiF thin films deposited onto self-supporting Al foils for swift protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damache, Smail [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Moussa, Djamel [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, Saâd, E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-08-01

    The energy losses of ∼(0.273–3.334) MeV protons in LiF thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation onto self-supporting Al foils have been measured using the transmission method. The thicknesses of selected and used LiF/Al target samples were accurately determined via systematic energy loss measurements for alpha particles from a very thin mixed {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu/{sup 233}U radioactive source. The samples were investigated in detail for their stoichiometry and their impurity contents by backscattering Rutherford spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. Then, LiF stopping powers have been determined with overall relative uncertainty of less than 2.7% arising mainly from errors in the determination of target sample thicknesses. These S(E) data are reported and discussed in comparison to previous experimental data sets from the literature and to values calculated by the Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory both for molecular LiF, and for the LiF compound assuming Bragg–Kleeman’s additivity rule. Our S(E) data show to be in excellent agreement with the latter theory for molecular LiF over the whole proton energy range explored, which supports the use of modified electronic hydrogen wave functions for evaluating atomic shell corrections in the case of low-Z{sub 2} target materials. In contrast, they exhibit a slightly increasing deviation from theoretical values derived for the LiF compound with assuming stopping force additivity as the proton energy decreases from E ≈ 400 keV towards lower proton velocities. This deviation in excess relative to experimental data, amounting only up to (at most) ∼2.5%, can be ascribed to strong effects of 2s-state valence electrons of Li atoms within the LiF compound. Besides, the comparison to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 computer code indicates that this program satisfactorily accounts for our S(E) data above E ≈ 1.30 MeV but underestimates them with substantially increasing deviations (up to

  16. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  17. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  18. A Time of Flight-Energy spectrometer for stopping power measurements in Heavy Ion-ERD analysis at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msimanga, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)], E-mail: mandla@tlabs.ac.za; Comrie, C.M. [University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, CPUT, Cape Town (South Africa); Murray, S.; Bark, R. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Dollinger, G. [TU Muenchen, Physik Department E 12, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The quantitative analysis of thin layers using Heavy Ion-Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) can be reliably performed if the stopping powers of the probing ions and recoils in a given target matrix are known accurately. Unfortunately for many projectile/target combinations experimental data is limited and where available, deviations of up to 50% between experiment and theory have been reported. This presentation describes the assembly of a Time of Flight-Energy (ToF-E) detector system developed for HI-ERD analysis and adapted for stopping power measurements at iThemba LABS. First results from energy loss measurements of 0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon {sup 28}Si and {sup 84}Kr ions in ZrO{sub 2} are presented and compared with predictions of the widely used SRIM2003 (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter)

  19. A Time of Flight-Energy spectrometer for stopping power measurements in Heavy Ion-ERD analysis at iThemba LABS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative analysis of thin layers using Heavy Ion-Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) can be reliably performed if the stopping powers of the probing ions and recoils in a given target matrix are known accurately. Unfortunately for many projectile/target combinations experimental data is limited and where available, deviations of up to 50% between experiment and theory have been reported. This presentation describes the assembly of a Time of Flight-Energy (ToF-E) detector system developed for HI-ERD analysis and adapted for stopping power measurements at iThemba LABS. First results from energy loss measurements of 0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon 28Si and 84Kr ions in ZrO2 are presented and compared with predictions of the widely used SRIM2003 (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter).

  20. Fusion Energy and Stopping Power in a Degenerate DT Pellet Driven by a Laser-Accelerated Proton Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrangiz, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Jafari, S.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have improved the fast ignition scheme in order to have more authority needed for high-energy-gain. Due to the more penetrability and energy deposition of the particle beams in fusion targets, we employ a laser-to-ion converter foil as a scheme for generating energetic ion beams to ignite the fusion fuel. We find the favorable intensity and wavelength of incident laser by evaluating the laser-proton conversion gain. By calculating the source-target distance, proton beam power and energy are estimated. Our analysis is generalized to the plasma degeneracy effects which can increase the fusion gain several orders of magnitude by decreasing the ion-electron collisions in the plasma. It is found that the wavelength of 0.53 μm and the intensity of about 1020 W/cm2, by saving about 10% conversion coefficient, are the suitable measured values for converting a laser into protons. Besides, stopping power and fusion burn calculations have been done in degenerate and non-degenerate plasma mediums. The results indicate that in the presence of degeneracy, the rate of fusion enhances. Supported by the Research Council of University of Guilan

  1. Antiproton Star Observed in Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Chupp, Warren W.; Goldhaber, Gerson; Segre,Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1955-12-01

    In connection with the antiproton investigation at the Bevatron we planned and carried out a photographic-emulsion exposure in a magnetically selected beam of negative particles. The magnetic system was identical to the first half (one deflecting magnet and one magnetic lens) of the system used in the antiproton experiment of Chamberlain, Segre, Wiegand, and Ypsilantis. The selected particles left the copper target in the forward direction with momentum 1.09 Bev/c.

  2. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  3. Monte Carlo-based Spencer-Attix and Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer-Attix (SA) and Bragg-Gray (BG) mass-collision-stopping-power ratios of tissue-to-air are calculated using a modified version of EGSnrc-based SPRRZnrc user-code for the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) beta sources such as 147Pm, 85Kr, 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh. The ratios are calculated at 5 and 70 μm depths along the central axis of the unit density ICRU-4-element tissue phantom as a function of air-cavity lengths of the extrapolation chamber l = 0.025-0.25 cm. The study shows that the BG values are independent of l and agree well with the ISO-reported values for the above sources. The overall variation in the SA values is ∼0.3 % for all the investigated sources, when l is varied from 0.025 to 0.25 cm. As energy of the beta increases the SA stopping-power ratio for a given cavity length decreases. For example, SA values of 147Pm are higher by ∼2 % when compared with the corresponding values of 106Ru/106Rh source. SA stopping-power ratios are higher than the BG stopping-power ratios and the degree of variation depends on type of source and the value of l. For example, the difference is up to 0.7 % at l = 0.025 cm for the 90Sr/90Y source. (authors)

  4. Electron stopping power and mean free path in organic compounds over the energy range of 20-10,000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Feng; Huang, Boda; Ji, Yanju

    2004-07-01

    An empirical method to obtain optical energy loss functions is presented for a large number of organic compounds, for which optical data are not available, on the basis of structure feature analysis of the existed optical energy loss functions for certain organic compounds. The optical energy loss functions obtained by using this method are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the Penn's statistical model, a set of systematic expressions have been given for the calculation of the stopping powers and mean free paths of electrons penetrating into the organic compounds in the energy range of E⩽10 keV. Detailed comparison of the calculated data with other theoretical results is presented. The stopping powers and mean free paths for a group of important polymers, without available optical data, have been calculated. In the calculations, three different cases have been considered, i.e. exchange correction not being considered, Ashley exchange correction being involved, and Born-Ochkur exchange correction being included. The results indicate that for these compounds the calculated stopping powers agree well with those obtained by using Bethe-Bloch theory at high-energy limit E=10 keV, as expected for a stopping power theory that should be converged to Bethe-Bloch theory at high energies.

  5. Unraveling resistive versus collisional contributions to relativistic electron beam stopping power in cold-solid and in warm-dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauzour, B. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Debayle, A. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Vaisseau, X.; Hulin, S.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; D' Humières, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Santos, J. J., E-mail: santos.joao@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Baton, S. D.; Yahia, V. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Batani, D. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); Honrubia, J. J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Jarrot, L. C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Benocci, R.; Volpe, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); and others

    2014-03-15

    We present results on laser-driven relativistic electron beam propagation through aluminum samples, which are either solid and cold or compressed and heated by laser-induced shock. A full numerical description of fast electron generation and transport is found to reproduce the experimental absolute K{sub α} yield and spot size measurements for varying target thicknesses, and to sequentially quantify the collisional and resistive electron stopping powers. The results demonstrate that both stopping mechanisms are enhanced in compressed Al samples and are attributed to the increase in the medium density and resistivity, respectively. For the achieved time- and space-averaged electronic current density, 〈j{sub h}〉∼8×10{sup 10} A/cm{sup 2} in the samples, the collisional and resistive stopping powers in warm and compressed Al are estimated to be 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. By contrast, for cold and solid Al, the corresponding estimated values are 1.1 keV/μm and 0.6 keV/μm. Prospective numerical simulations involving higher j{sub h} show that the resistive stopping power can reach the same level as the collisional one. In addition to the effects of compression, the effect of the transient behavior of the resistivity of Al during relativistic electron beam transport becomes progressively more dominant, and for a significantly high current density, j{sub h}∼10{sup 12} A/cm{sup 2}, cancels the difference in the electron resistive stopping power (or the total stopping power in units of areal density) between solid and compressed samples. Analytical calculations extend the analysis up to j{sub h}=10{sup 14} A/cm{sup 2} (representative of the full-scale fast ignition scenario of inertial confinement fusion), where a very rapid transition to the Spitzer resistivity regime saturates the resistive stopping power, averaged over the electron beam duration, to values of ∼1 keV/μm.

  6. Large amounts of antiproton production by heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To produce large amounts of antiprotons, on the order of several grams/year, use of machines to produce nuclear collisions are studied. These can be of either proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus in nature. To achieve high luminosity colliding beams, on the order of 1041 m/cm2, a self-colliding machine is required, rather than a conventional circular colliding type. The self-colliding machine can produce additional antiprotons through successive collisions of secondary particles, such as spectator nucleons. A key problem is how to collect the produced antiprotons without capture by beam nuclei in the collision zone. Production costs for anti-matter are projected for various energy source options and technology levels. Dedicated facilities using heavy ion collisions could produce antiproton at substantially less than 1 million $/milligram. With co-production of other valuable products, e.g., nuclear fuel for power reactors, antiproton costs could be reduced to even lower values

  7. Optimization of the stopping-power-ratio to Hounsfield-value calibration curve in proton and heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Matthias; Zink, Klemens [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz - IMPS, Giessen (Germany); Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Weber, Uli [Rhoen-Klinikum AG, Marburg (Germany); Kellner, Daniel [Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Inst. for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology

    2015-07-01

    For CT-based dose calculation in ion therapy a link between the attenuation coefficients of photons and the stopping-power of particles has to be provided. There are two commonly known approaches to establish such a calibration curve, the stoichiometric calibration and direct measurements with tissue substitutes or animal samples. Both methods were investigated and compared. As input for the stoichiometric calibration the data from ICRP-report 23 were compared to newly available data from ICRP-report 110. By employing the newer data no relevant difference could be observed. The differences between the two acquisition methods (direct measurement and stoichiometric calibration) were systematically analyzed and quantified. The most relevant change was caused by the exchange of carbon and oxygen content in the substitutes in comparison to the data of the ICRP-reports and results in a general overshoot of the Bragg peak. The consequence of the differences between the calibration curves was investigated with treatment planning studies and iso-range surfaces. Range differences up to 6 mm in treatment plans of the head were observed. Additionally two improvements are suggested which increase the accuracy of the calibration curve.

  8. Patient-specific stopping power calibration for proton therapy planning based on single-detector proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple robust optimizer has been developed that can produce patient-specific calibration curves to convert x-ray computed tomography (CT) numbers to relative stopping powers (HU-RSPs) for proton therapy treatment planning. The difference between a digitally reconstructed radiograph water-equivalent path length (DRRWEPL) map through the x-ray CT dataset and a proton radiograph (set as the ground truth) is minimized by optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve. The function of the optimizer is validated with synthetic datasets that contain no noise and its robustness is shown against CT noise. Application of the procedure is then demonstrated on a plastic and a real tissue phantom, with proton radiographs produced using a single detector. The mean errors using generic/optimized calibration curves between the DRRWEPL map and the proton radiograph were 1.8/0.4% for a plastic phantom and −2.1/ − 0.2% for a real tissue phantom. It was then demonstrated that these optimized calibration curves offer a better prediction of the water equivalent path length at a therapeutic depth. We believe that these promising results are suggestive that a single proton radiograph could be used to generate a patient-specific calibration curve as part of the current proton treatment planning workflow. (paper)

  9. Assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for 109Cd conversion electrons using a pressurized 4π proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the absorbed dose in external and internal contamination due to radionuclides is not easy, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 keV in skin and in mucous membrane. In this paper we work with a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polylvinyl chloride-acetate) absorbers, for the 32.5 keV and 84-88 keV energy 109 Cd conversion electrons, with a 4 φ proportional pressurized detector. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves was used to obtain a spectrum of a thin 109 Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses of absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum absorber from the spectrum without absorber and both were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by a ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  10. Delta-electron spectra, inelastic cross sections, and stopping powers of ions in silicon: Comparison between different models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkerman, A.; Murat, M., E-mail: michael@soreq.gov.il; Barak, J.

    2014-02-15

    The energy spectrum of the δ-electrons ejected by an ion moving in the bulk of a solid is the origin of numerous effects which follow the transport of these electrons. This spectrum cannot be measured directly. Therefore, it should be derived theoretically. The present work aims to investigate the uncertainties introduced when applying commonly used theoretical approaches like BEA, CDFT, and PWBA to calculate δ-electron spectrum. Our calculations show that, above a certain δ-electron energy, the energy spectra of the δ-electrons obtained using the various approaches behave similarly. Below this energy, the spectra found using these approaches differ significantly due to the manner in which the solid state character of the target material is taken into account in each approach. This results in differences in the inelastic cross sections and stopping powers for the ions, which in turn result in different ion track structures. Also discussed in this paper is the effect of the uncertainty in the effective ion charge on the accuracy of ion track calculations. The results obtained for silicon allow estimating the possible uncertainties of the calculated ion track properties and related effects.

  11. Stopping power of GaAs for swift protons: Dielectric function and optical-data model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy-loss-function (ELF) of GaAs determined from optical data has been used to calculate the electronic stopping power (SP) of swift protons in the Born approximation. Along the lines of the Ritchie-Howie scheme, a sum of Drude-type ELFs with finite damping was used to obtain an analytic representation of the experimental data at the optical limit of zero momentum transfer. Consistency was ensured by satisfying both the KK- and f-sum-rule to better than 1%. The mean excitation energy (I-value) of GaAs was calculated at 349 eV which is about 3% higher than the recent estimate of Heredia-Avalos and co-workers [S. Heredia-Avalos, J.C. Moreno-Marin, I. Abril, R. Garcia-Molina, Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 230 (2005) 118]. A simple quadratic dispersion relation used to extend the ELF to arbitrary momentum transfers was found adequate for SP calculations above ∼300 keV where our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other sources in the literature. The limitation of the present scheme at lower proton energies is discussed.

  12. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Kyriakou, I.; Abril, I.; Nikjoo, H.

    2009-06-01

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dispersion schemes based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) can result in sizeable errors due to the neglect of damping and local field effects that lead to a momentum broadening and shifting of the energy-loss function. Low-energy Born corrections for the Barkas, Bloch and charge-state effects practically cancel out down to 100 keV proton energies. Differences with ICRU Report 49 stopping power values and earlier calculations are found to be at the ~20% level in the region of the stopping maximum. The present work overcomes the limitations of the Bethe formula below 1 MeV and improves the accuracy of previous calculations through a more consistent account of the dielectric response properties of liquid water.

  13. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  14. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  15. Remote antiproton sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiprotons are well on their way to becoming a standard laboratory commodity. Heavy utilization of LEAR is ushering in a new era where p's achieve their logical potential, equal to that of e-,e+,H-, as controlled probes and experimental building blocks. The uniqueness and usefulness of - /SUB p/ 's for studies at low (table top) energies is well documented. The main stumbling block to universal pursuit of such studies is the overhead of - /SUB p/ production. The stability of the - /SUB p/ thus makes cogent an investigation of possibilities and limits to transporting - /SUB p/ 's in quantity. I base my discussion on LEAR as the source of - /SUB p/ 's for bottling, since it is the only concrete example to work with at present. Two other lines of contemporary research then, largely in atomic physics, pioneered by Dehmelt and collaborators, aimed at precision studies of clouds of, or single e /SUP +or-/ ,p /SUP +or-/ , or ions in large storage time traps. Second, there is work, experimental and theoretical, from the plasma physics tradition aimed at characterizing non neutral plasmas

  16. Stopping power measurements of heavy ions (3 {<=} Z{sub 1} {<=} 14) in Mylar foil by time-of-flight spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammi, H., E-mail: hakim_ammi@yahoo.f [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, CPUT, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Mammeri, S. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Msimanga, M. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Ourabah, S.; Dib, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2011-02-01

    Heavy ions elastic recoil detection analysis coupled with time of flight spectrometer (HIERDA{sub T}oF-E) have been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in thin absorber. The stopping power of heavy ions has been determined in Mylar for {sup 28}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 19}F, {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C and {sup 7}Li ions over a continuous range of energies 0.14-0.80 MeV/nucleon. The ions were recoils from the bombardment of different samples (Si, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LiF and C) with a 27.5 MeV Kr{sup +} beam. The energy loss of the recoil atoms is measured with and without additional foils placed in front of a Surface Barrier Detector (SBD). The energy of individual ions is determined from its ToF data; the exit energy after the stopping foil is measured using the SBD detector. We have compared our stopping values to those predicted by SRIM-2008 computer code, ICRU-73 stopping data tables, MSTAR calculations and to the published data from literature. The results show good agreement with limited existing data but indicate a large deviation among the predicted theoretical values at the low energy side of the stopping maximum peak.

  17. On manual stop of No.1 plant in Fukushima No.2 Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No. 1 plant in Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station is a BWR plant with rated output of 1100 MWe. Its regular inspection has been carried out since September 24, 1989, and the adjustment operation was begun on December 24. While the power output was increased, the leak of control oil was observed in the turbine system, therefore the reactor was manually shut down at 4:41 p.m., December 27. As the result of checkup, it was found that control oil leaked due to the defective fixing of the flanges connecting the pressure tank and a piping. The flanges were fixed surely, and the soundness of the similar parts was confirmed, thus the reactor was started up again at the noon of December 29. At 11:33 a.m., January 2, 1990, the alarm 'Oil level is high in the reactor recirculation pump motor B' was issued, and the reactor was manually shut down at 1:42 a.m., January 3. As the result of checkup, it was found that the oil level detector for the lower bearing of the motor acted mistakenly. The detector was replaced with new one, and the reactor was started up again at 6:00 p.m., January 4. (K.I.)

  18. Illuminating dark matter and primordial black holes with an interstellar antiproton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstellar antiproton fluxes can arise from dark matter annihilating or decaying into quarks or gluons that subsequently fragment into antiprotons. Evaporation of primordial black holes also can produce a significant antiproton cosmic-ray flux. Since the background of secondary antiprotons from spallation has an interstellar energy spectrum that peaks at 2 GeV and falls rapidly for energies below this, low-energy measurements of cosmic antiprotons are useful in the search for exotic antiproton sources. However, measurement of the flux near the earth is challenged by significant uncertainties from the effects of the solar wind. We suggest evading this problem and more effectively probing dark-matter signals by placing an antiproton spectrometer aboard an interstellar probe currently under discussion. We address the experimental challenges of a light, low-power-consuming detector, and present an initial design of such an instrument. This experimental effort could significantly increase our ability to detect, and have confidence in, a signal of exotic, nonstandard antiproton sources. Furthermore, solar modulation effects in the heliosphere would be better quantified and understood by comparing results to inverse modulated data derived from existing balloon and space-based detectors near the earth

  19. Capture of slow antiprotons by helium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Revai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2004-01-01

    A consistent quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. For the four-body scattering wave function, corresponding to the initial state, as well as for the antiprotonic helium wave function, appearing in the final tate, adiabatic approximations was used. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident energies of the antiproton. Obtained energy dependances of som...

  20. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  1. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  2. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force since acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, we have no direct knowledge of the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data taken by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: namely, the scattering length (f0) and effective range (d0). As direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, our result provides a fundamental ingr...

  3. Antiproton annihilation in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-proton annihilation has a number of important advantages as a probe of QCD in the low energy domain. Exclusive reaction in which complete annihilation of the valance quarks occur. There are a number of exclusive and inclusive /bar p/ reactions in the intermediate momentum transfer domain which provide useful constraints on hadron wavefunctions or test novel features of QCD involving both perturbative and nonperturbative dynamics. Inclusive reactions involving antiprotons have the advantage that the parton distributions are well understood. In these lectures, I will particularly focus on lepton pair production /bar p/A → /ell//bar /ell//X as a means to understand specific nuclear features in QCD, including collision broadening, breakdown of the QCD ''target length condition''. Thus studies of low to moderate energy antiproton reactions with laboratory energies under 10 GeV could give further insights into the full structure of QCD. 112 refs., 40 figs

  4. Calculations of stopping powers of 100 eV-30 keV electrons in 31 elemental solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present calculated electron stopping powers (SPs) for 31 elemental solids (Li, Be, glassy C, graphite, diamond, Na, Mg, K, Sc, Ti, V, Fe, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, In, Sn, Cs, Gd, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Bi). These SPs were determined with an algorithm previously used for the calculation of electron inelastic mean free paths and from energy-loss functions (ELFs) derived from experimental optical data. The SP calculations were made for electron energies between 100 eV and 30 keV and supplement our earlier SP calculations for ten additional solids (Al, Si, Cr, Ni, Cu, Ge, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au). Plots of SP versus atomic number for the group of 41 solids show clear trends. Multiple peaks and shoulders are seen that result from the contributions of valence-electron and various inner-shell excitations. Satisfactory agreement was found between the calculated SPs and values from the relativistic Bethe SP equation with recommended values of the mean excitation energy (MEE) for energies above 10 keV. We determined effective MEEs versus maximum excitation energy from the ELFs for each solid. Plots of effective MEE versus atomic number showed the relative contributions of valence-electron and different core-electron excitations to the MEE. For a maximum excitation energy of 30 keV, our effective MEEs agreed well for Be, graphite, Na, Al, and Si with recommended MEEs; a difference for Li was attributed to sample oxidation in the SP measurements for the recommended MEE. Substantially different effective MEEs were found for the three carbon allotropes (graphite, diamond, and glassy C)

  5. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0–3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction. (paper)

  6. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Zhu, X. Ronald; Park, Peter C.; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe; Virshup, Gary; Clayton, James E.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0-3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction.

  7. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the 120Sn(14N, 5n)129La, 120Sn(11B, 4n)127Cs and 118Sn(11B, 4n)125Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm2) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe–Bloch formula has no application

  8. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, A. A.; Sankowska, I.; Tucholski, A.; Srebrny, J.; Morek, T.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Sałata, M.; Mierzejewski, J.; Kisieliński, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Perkowski, J.; Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Stonert, A.; Jagielski, J.; Gawlik, G.; Kownacki, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Korman, A. A.; Płóciennik, W.; Ruchowska, E.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.

    2015-02-01

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the 120Sn(14N, 5n)129La, 120Sn(11B, 4n)127Cs and 118Sn(11B, 4n)125Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm2) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe-Bloch formula has no application.

  9. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasternak, A.A. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersbourg (Russian Federation); Sankowska, I. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electron Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Tucholski, A., E-mail: andrzej.tucholski@fuw.edu.pl [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Srebrny, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Morek, T.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Sałata, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzejewski, J. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Kisieliński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kowalczyk, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Perkowski, J. [University of Łódź, Łódź (Poland); Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Stonert, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jagielski, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Gawlik, G. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kownacki, J.; Kordyasz, A. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2015-02-21

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the {sup 120}Sn({sup 14}N, 5n){sup 129}La, {sup 120}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n){sup 127}Cs and {sup 118}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n){sup 125}Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm{sup 2}) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe–Bloch formula has no application.

  10. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  11. Quality factors, ambient and personal dose equivalent for neutrons, based on the new ICRU stopping power data for protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality factors and fluence-to-ambient and fluence-to personal-dose equivalent conversion factors for neutrons have been recalculated for neutrons with energies ranging from thermal to 20 MeV. The new calculations are based on the recommendations given in ICRU Publication 60 for the quality factor and on stopping power data for protons and alpha particles as recommended in the ICRU report 49. (author)

  12. Experimental study of ion stopping power in warm dense matter: charge-state distribution measurements of ions leaving warm dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination if the ion slowing down process (or stopping power) in warm dense matter is essential especially in the frame of inertial confinement fusion. During my thesis, our interest was driven by the modification of the charge state of ion beam emerging from warm dense matter, this quantity playing a major role in ion stopping power calculation. We took advantage of the properties exhibited by ion beams produced by high intensity short pulse lasers to study during two experiments performed at ELFIE and TITAN facilities, the charge state modification of a carbon and helium ion beams emerging from an aluminum foil isochorically heated by an energetic proton beam. In the first two chapters are presented the major challenges regarding the subject from both a theoretical and experimental point of view. Here are exposed the different simulation tools used during the thesis. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the property of laser-produced ion beams in the scope of our experiments aiming at studying the stopping power. We have studied in particular ion beams generated using lower-than-solid density targets during two experiments: helium gas jet and laser-exploded target. In the last chapter are presented the set-ups and results of the two experiments on the charge state of ion beam emerging from warm dense matter. The data we measured in solid-density cold aluminum are successfully compared with the results already obtained in conventional accelerators. (author)

  13. Some prospects for antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the possibilities for fruitful research with antiprotons are outlined below. Special emphasis is placed on the possibility of learning about quark spectroscopy and dynamics using highly precise and intense anti p beams such as LEAR. It is urged that any discussion of LAMPF II give very careful consideration to the construction of a facility competitive with LEAR

  14. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    A new experiment, AD-4/ACE (antiproton cell experiment), has been approved by the CERN Research Board. The experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in June and continue through the 2003 run cycle. The experiment is designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating...

  15. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  16. Antiproton Stacking in the Recycler

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2003-01-01

    Possibilities to accumulate antiprotons in the Recycler are considered for three different cases: with current stochastic cooling, with upgraded stochastic cooling and with electron cooling. With stochastic cooling only, even upgraded, Recycler looks hardly useful. However, with electron cooling at its goal parameters and reasonably good vacuum in the Recycler, this machine would be efficient.

  17. Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shochet, Melvyn J.

    1995-01-01

    Comment: Summary of the 10th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, Fermilab, May 9-13, 1995. Postscript file (34 pages with 82 embedded figures; 5.7 MB) available at http://www-cdf.fnal.gov/physics/conf95/cdf3225_pbarp_wkshp_summary.ps

  18. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Federič, Pavol; Chaloupka, P.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, David; Trzeciak, B. A.; Vértési, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 527, č. 7578 (2015), s. 345-348. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20841S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * antiprotons * protons Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 41.456, year: 2014

  19. Comparison of x ray computed tomography number to proton relative linear stopping power conversion functions using a standard phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adequate evaluation of the results from multi-institutional trials involving light ion beam treatments requires consideration of the planning margins applied to both targets and organs at risk. A major uncertainty that affects the size of these margins is the conversion of x ray computed tomography numbers (XCTNs) to relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs). Various facilities engaged in multi-institutional clinical trials involving proton beams have been applying significantly different margins in their patient planning. This study was performed to determine the variance in the conversion functions used at proton facilities in the U.S.A. wishing to participate in National Cancer Institute sponsored clinical trials. Methods: A simplified method of determining the conversion function was developed using a standard phantom containing only water and aluminum. The new method was based on the premise that all scanners have their XCTNs for air and water calibrated daily to constant values but that the XCTNs for high density/high atomic number materials are variable with different scanning conditions. The standard phantom was taken to 10 different proton facilities and scanned with the local protocols resulting in 14 derived conversion functions which were compared to the conversion functions used at the local facilities. Results: For tissues within ±300 XCTN of water, all facility functions produced converted RLSP values within ±6% of the values produced by the standard function and within 8% of the values from any other facility's function. For XCTNs corresponding to lung tissue, converted RLSP values differed by as great as ±8% from the standard and up to 16% from the values of other facilities. For XCTNs corresponding to low-density immobilization foam, the maximum to minimum values differed by as much as 40%. Conclusions: The new method greatly simplifies determination of the conversion function, reduces ambiguity, and in the future could promote

  20. Measurements of output factors with different detector types and Monte Carlo calculations of stopping-power ratios for degraded electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate three different detector types (a parallel-plate ionization chamber, a p-type silicon diode and a diamond detector) with regard to output factor measurements in degraded electron beams, such as those encountered in small-electron-field radiotherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate mass collision stopping-power ratios between water and the different detector materials for these complex electron beams (nominal energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV). The diamond detector was shown to exhibit excellent properties for output factor measurements in degraded beams and was therefore used as a reference. The diode detector was found to be well suited for practical measurements of output factors, although the water-to-silicon stopping-power ratio was shown to vary slightly with treatment set-up and irradiation depth (especially for lower electron energies). Application of ionization-chamber-based dosimetry, according to international dosimetry protocols, will introduce uncertainties smaller than 0.3% into the output factor determination for conventional IORT beams if the variation of the water-to-air stopping-power ratio is not taken into account. The IORT system at our department includes a 0.3 cm thin plastic scatterer inside the therapeutic beam, which furthermore increases the energy degradation of the electrons. By ignoring the change in the water-to-air stopping-power ratio due to this scatterer, the output factor could be underestimated by up to 1.3%. This was verified by the measurements. In small-electron-beam dosimetry, the water-to-air stopping-power ratio variation with field size could mostly be ignored. For fields with flat lateral dose profiles (>3 x 3 cm2), output factors determined with the ionization chamber were found to be in close agreement with the results of the diamond detector. For smaller field sizes the lateral extension of the ionization chamber hampers

  1. Antiproton production in Au + Au collisions at 11.7 A·GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the dependence of antiproton yields on the number of wounded projectile nucleons (Nproj). The dN/dy/Nproj of antiprotons with the beam energy correction is almost constant from p+A to Si+A collisions, while it decreases in Au+Au collisions to 30-60% of the constant. Next, we have compared dependence of ratios of dN/dy, p-bar/π-, p/π-, K-/π-, K+/π-, and π+/π- at 1.2proj in Au+Au collisions. Only the ratio of p-bar/π- decreases rapidly, while the ratios of p/π-, K+/π-, and K-/π- increase, and π+/π- stays constant. These observations suggest that in the AGS energy regime, the absorption effect of antiprotons in Au+Au collisions is much stronger than in p+A and Si+A collisions. We have compared the antiproton data with the RQMD model. In RQMD, antiprotons are produced initially from multi-step excitation processes and some of them are absorbed by nucleons with free NN-bar annihilation cross sections. RQMD reproduces overall tendencies of antiproton yields from p+A to Au+Au collisions within 50%. Finally, we explored the relation between baryon densities and antiproton yields in A+A collisions. We used a model in a static participant volume with the RQMD initial production and the absorption length with the free NN-bar annihilation cross section. In the model, only the antiprotons produced around the surface of the participant volume can survive. The model reproduces the scaling of experimental antiproton yields with the 2/3 power of the number of participants. By comparing the model with the experimental data, it is found that the ratio of the mean baryon density to the surface baryon density is 3-4 independent of collision systems. (J.P.N.). 109 refs

  2. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  3. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  4. Interaction of antiproton with nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    Vol. 234. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015, s. 93-98. ISSN 0304-3843. [5th International Conference on Exotic Atoms and Related Topics (EXA). Vienna (AT), 15.09.2014-19.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/2126 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * RMF model * G-parity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  5. Stopping power of Ni, Ag, Au and Pb for approx. 7 MeV/n α-particles and carbon ions (Z13 proportional deviation from the Bethe formula)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the end of the 1960's, Andersen, Simonsen and Sorensen carried out the measurements of stopping powers of a number of elements for protons, deuterons and α-particles using the calorimetric-compensation technique and showed sone Z13 proportional deviations from the Bethe formula. Recently, Andersen and his co-workers again made the measurements of stopping power of several elements for protons, α-particles and lithium ions in order to perform a more detailed investigation on the deviation from the Bethe formula. To ascertain the Z13 deviation of stopping power for heavier ions, it is desirable to make precise experiments using projectiles more massive than lithium ions, which are almost completely ionized. Recently, we attempted to measure the stopping powers of several metals for approx. 7 MeV/n α-particles and carbon ions, although thus obtained data need a small correction for effective charge. Results are presented and discussed

  6. Search for Polarization Effects in the Antiproton Production Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam, various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization, a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described

  7. Physics with Antiprotons at PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PANDA experiment is part of the core project of the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany)[1]. One major component of the upgraded accelerator complex is the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) which will provide a high quality antiproton beam in the momentum range between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. PANDA, a fixed target experiment directly implemented in the HESR, will investigate antiproton annihilations with the aim to explore fundamental questions in the cross over region of the non perturbative and the strong QCD. Due to the planned extensive physics program a multipurpose detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, proper particle identification over a large momentum range, and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is required. After an overview about the goals and the detector design of the PANDA experiment major parts of the planned physics program will be discussed, namely the meson spectroscopy and the search for exotics in the charmonium and open charm region

  8. Ultra-low Energy Antiprotons at FLAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Welsch, C.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R; Orlov, D.; Wolf, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Accelerator Facility for Beams of Ions and Antiprotons at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. So far it is foreseen to accelerate the antiprotons to high energies (3-15 GeV) for meson spectroscopy and other nuclear and particle physics experiments in the HESR (High Energy Storage Ring). Within the planned complex of storage rings, it is possible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the possibility to create low en...

  9. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  10. Design study of an Antiproton Collector for the Antiproton Accumulator (ACOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Report gives a full description of an Antiproton Collector Ring which, placed around the existing Antiproton Accumulator at CERN, would enhance the antiproton flux available to both the SPS and LEAR by a factor of ten. The new ring and the focusing devices which precede it are designed to accept a much larger fraction of the antiproton production cone from the target. Each pulse of particles will be pre-cooled before being fed to the Antiproton Accumulator, where improved stochastic cooling systems will build up the stack. A full list of parameters is included. (orig.)

  11. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  12. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  13. Stopping power and mean free path for low-energy electrons in ten scintillators over energy range of 20–20,000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic calculations of the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for 20–20,000 eV electrons in a group of 10 important scintillators have been carried out. The calculations are based on the dielectric model including the Born–Ochkur exchange correction and the optical energy loss functions (OELFs) are empirically evaluated because of the lack of available experimental optical data for the scintillators under consideration. The evaluated OELFs are examined by both the f-sum rule and the calculation of mean ionization potential. The SP and IMFP data presented here are the first results for the 10 scintillators over the energy range of 20–20,000 eV, and are of key importance for the investigation of liquid scintillation counting. - Highlights: ► Scintillators are important materials used in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). ► Stopping power (SP) and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) are important for LSC. ► SPs and IMFPs for electrons of 20 eV–20 keV in 10 scintillators systematically calculated. ► Dielectric model used and optical energy loss function empirically evaluated. ► SP and IMFP data presented here are the first results for the 10 scintillators.

  14. Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics with the Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TApAS*) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoszek, Larry; /Bartoszek Engineering, Aurora; Piacentino, Giovanni M.; /Cassino U.; Phillips, Thomas J.; /Duke U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Hbar Technologies, West Chicago /Houston U. /IIT, Chicago /IIT, Hyderabad /ITEP /KyungPook National U. /LPI

    2008-01-01

    We propose to assemble a cost-effective, yet powerful, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events and use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, and precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration, with installation occurring during the accelerator downtime following the completion of the Tevatron run, and with funding largely from university research grants. The experiment will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle-physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S.

  15. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  16. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  17. NONLINEAR ION STOPPING IN PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Avilov, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Peter, Th.

    1988-01-01

    We present an exact nonlinear solution of the one-dimensional Coulomb-Vlasov equations describing the stopping power of ions moving through a plasma. The solution is compared with the results of the corresponding linearized equations which are commonly used. We discuss the genuinely nonlinear regime. Nonlinear effects become important for highly charged ions at relatively low velocity. For heavy ion stopping in plasma they are relevant close to the end of the range. The method and the results...

  18. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  19. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  20. Stop smoking support programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... It is hard to quit smoking if you are acting alone. Smokers may have a ... of quitting with a support program. Stop smoking programs ...

  1. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼1012 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  2. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  3. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  4. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  5. Organic materials irradiated at very low temperature and at different stopping powers: examples of polyethylene and of cyclohexane molecules trapped in matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concerns the formation mechanisms of defects created in organic materials during irradiation under vacuum, at very low temperature and at different electronic stopping powers. Analysis have been realised by infrared spectroscopy. The first part concerns polyethylene. Irradiating at 8 K allows to dissociate the direct irradiation effects (in cage reactions) and the radical recombination effects. According to the considered chemical groups, the radical mobility leads to very different changes for the formation radiochemical yields. The second part concerns the irradiation of cyclohexane molecules trapped in a solid argon matrix. We evaluate the contribution of intermolecular and intramolecular reactions. The intermolecular reactions have limited consequences when using low ionising radiations but are crucial for heavy ion irradiations. (author)

  6. Calculations of electron stopping powers for 41 elemental solids over the 50 eV to 30 keV range with the full Penn algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present mass collision electron stopping powers (SPs) for 41 elemental solids (Li, Be, graphite, diamond, glassy C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ge, Y, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Cs, Gd, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, and Bi) that were calculated from experimental energy-loss-function data with the full Penn algorithm for electron energies between 50 eV and 30 keV. Improved sets of energy-loss functions were used for 19 solids. Comparisons were made of these SPs with SPs calculated with the single-pole approximation, previous SP calculations, and experimental SPs. Generally satisfactory agreement was found with SPs from the single-pole approximation for energies above 100 eV, with other calculated SPs, and with measured SPs.

  7. Electron interaction cross sections in Al and Al2O3; calculations of mean free paths, stopping powers, and electron slowing-down spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area of concern in the study of slowing-down spectra and interaction cross sections has been the lack of adequate theoretical information on electron interaction probabilities in solids, particularly in the electron energy region below a few keV. By using previously developed models, new calculations of cross sections for ionization by electrons of inner shells in Al and O atoms and a model insulator theory used to describe the valence band in Al2O3 are discussed. These new calculations are combined with earlier work to provide an improved description of electron interactions in Al metal and in the insulator Al2O3. Some examples of mean free path, stopping power, and electron slowing-down flux calculations for these materials are described. (7 figures) (U.S.)

  8. Analyses of stopping power measurements for 0.90-2.50 MeV protons and deuterons traversing Al 2O 3 targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    2000-09-01

    Recently reported measurements of the stopping power of Al 2O 3 for 0.90-2.50 MeV protons and deuterons have been analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory. Values of the mean excitation energy ( I) and Barkas-effect parameter ( b) have been extracted from the data, yielding results for I and b, respectively, of 176.8 eV and 0.83 for protons, and of 182.7 eV and 1.02 for deuterons. These values of I exceed the additivity-based value by 32% for proton data and by 36% for deuteron data. Moreover, both extracted values of b lie well below the expected interval of 1.3-1.5.

  9. A new calculation on the stopping power and mean free path for low energy electrons in toluene over energy range of 20-10000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhang, Liming

    2009-04-01

    A new calculation of the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for electrons in toluene at energies below 10 keV has been presented. The calculation is based on the dielectric model and on an empirical evaluation approach of optical energy loss function (OELF). The reliability for the evaluated OELFs of several hydrocarbons with available experimental optical data has been systematically checked. For toluene, using the empirical OELF, the evaluated mean ionization potential, is compared with that given by Bragg's rule, and the calculated SP at 10 keV is also compared with the Bethe-Bloch prediction. The present results for SP and IMFP provide an alternative basic data for the study on the energy deposition of low-energy electrons transport through toluene, and also show that the method used in this work may be a good one for evaluating the SP and IMFP for hydrocarbons. PMID:19138526

  10. SU-E-J-83: Ion Imaging to Better Estimate In-Vivo Relative Stopping Powers Using X-Ray CT Prior-Knowledge Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce uncertainties in relative stopping power (RSP) estimates for ions (alpha and carbon) by using Ion radiographic-imaging and X-ray CT prior-knowledge. Methods: A 36×36 phantom matrix composed of 9 materials with different thicknesses and randomly placed is generated. Theoretical RSPs are calculated using stopping power (SP) data from three references (Janni, ICRU49 and Bischel). We introduced an artificial systematic error (1.5%, 2.5% or 3.5%) and a random error (<0.5%) to the SP to simulated patient ion-range errors present in clinic environment. Carbon/alpha final energy for each RSPs set (theoretical and from CT images) is obtained with a ray-tracing algorithm. A gradient descent (GD) method is used to minimize the difference in exit particle energy, between theory and X-ray CT RSP maps, by iteratively correcting the RSP map from X-ray CT. Once a new set of RSPs is obtained for a direction a new optimization is done over other direction using the RSPs from the previous optimization. Theoretical RSPs are compared with experimental RSPs obtained with Gammex Phantom. Results: Preliminary results show that optimized RSP values can be obtained with smaller uncertainties (<1%) than clinical RSPs (1.5% to 3.5%). Theoretical values from three different references show uncertainties, up to 3% from experimental values. Further investigation will consider prior-knowledge from RSP obtained with CT images and ion radiographies from Monte Carlo Simulations. Conclusion: GD and ray-tracing methods have been implemented to reduce RSP uncertainties from values obtained for clinical treatment. Experimental RSPs will be obtained using carbon/alpha beams to consider the existence of material dependent systematic errors. Based on the results, it is hoped to show that using ray-tracing optimization with ion radiography and prior knowledge on RPSs, treatment planning accuracy and cost-effectiveness can be improved

  11. Stopping powers of polycarbonate for 0.36-5.94-MeV protons and 1.0-24.0-MeV α particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, J.; Trzaska, W. H.; Alanko, T.; Lyapin, V.; Porter, L. E.

    2003-08-01

    The stopping powers of polycarbonate for protons of energy 0.6-5.9 MeV and α particles of energy 2.0-24.0 MeV have been measured in a transmission experiment employing thin-foil targets. The essence of the novel experimental method employed in the present measurements is to record both projectile energy and time of flight while constantly alternating measurements with and without the target foil in place. The accuracies of the proton data and α-particle data range from 2.0% to 3.0% and 2.2% to 2.7%, respectively. All of the resulting measurements were analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory in order to extract values of the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b). The composite results for the two projectiles are that I=71.52 eV and b=1.13, the former value lying about one standard deviation below the additivity value and the latter value lying about one standard deviation below the expected value of 1.4±0.1. Previous measurements of the stopping power of polycarbonate for 7Li ions were analyzed by the same method, but with the inclusion of an effective charge parameter (λ). The proton and α-particle data, with a few lower-energy points included, were analyzed for a three-parameter fit, also. Results for the three projectiles studied indicate both internal consistency and agreement with expectations based on modified Bethe-Bloch theory.

  12. SU-E-J-136: Investigation Into Robustness of Stopping Power Calculated by DECT and SECT for Proton Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Penfold, S [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) proton stopping power calibration techniques and quantify the associated errors when imaging a phantom differing in chemical composition to that used during stopping power calibration. Methods: The CIRS tissue substitute phantom was scanned in a CT-simulator at 90kV and 140kV. This image set was used to generate a DECT proton SPR calibration based on a relationship between effective atomic number and mean excitation energy. A SECT proton SPR calibration based only on Hounsfield units (HUs) was also generated. DECT and SECT scans of a second phantom of known density and chemical composition were performed. The SPR of the second phantom was calculated with the DECT approach (SPR-DECT),the SECT approach (SPR-SECT) and finally the known density and chemical composition of the phantom (SPR-ref). The DECT and SECT image sets were imported into the Pinnacle{sup 3} research release of proton therapy treatment planning. The difference in dose when exposed to a common pencil beam distribution was investigated. Results: SPR-DECT was found to be in better agreement with SPR-ref than SPR- SECT. The mean difference in SPR for all materials was 0.51% for DECT and 6.89% for SECT. With the exception of Teflon, SPR-DECT was found to agree with SPR-ref to within 1%. Significant differences in calculated dose were found when using the DECT image set or the SECT image set. Conclusion: The DECT calibration technique was found to be more robust to situations in which the physical properties of the test materials differed from the materials used during SPR calibration. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the DECT and SECT SPR calibration techniques can Result in significantly different calculated dose distributions.

  13. Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    inconsistently from the predictions of Lindhard-Scharff (LS) theory; they also exhibit various forms of exotic velocity dependence. These deviations are primarily due to the fact that the range of validity of BB theory is artificially extended to velocities at which the 'effective-charge' concept is assumed to be applicable. Coupled Z1,2 scaling as in theories of LS or Firsov would be much more appropriate. Overall, the electronic stopping cross sections by SRIM are of unpredictable value and often strongly misleading below 1 MeV/u. (iv) Another consequence of the tight link to the Z1,2 dependence of BB theory is that only 2 × 92 master sets of electronic stopping cross sections were required to generate all conceivable 89 × 92 tables from Se,f-ratios for elemental targets (the tables for H, He and Li projectiles are derived separately). The information contained in the SRIM library at large thus exhibits a highly redundant character. (v) The nuclear stopping cross sections Sn mirror the predictions of the universal potential due by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark, which differ from alternative suggestions typically by less than 15%. With this uncertainty, range distributions may be calculated with the TRIM program of SRIM, but only at energies where Sn dominates so that uncertainties in Se play a minor role. (vi) As a side aspect, an example is presented illustrating the efforts required to identify incorrect experimental data, notably when respected authors are accountable. (vii) Other approaches to establish stopping power tables are shown to be subject to the same problems as SRIM. It is recommended to add a warning to all theses tables, informing users at which energies the data are likely to lack reliability. (viii) The currently unacceptable quality of Se,f-data below 1 MeV/u could be improved significantly in the future if the user friendly TRIM(SRIM) code were modified to allow simulations with a free choice of nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections

  14. Prospects for Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world's most intense source of tagged D^0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  15. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  16. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first...... ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 60Co c-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose and...... particle fluence response relationships were constructed from data in the plateau and Bragg peak regions of the beams and used to assess the biological effectiveness. Results: Due to uncertainties in antiproton dosimetry we defined a new term, called the biologically effective dose ratio (BEDR), which...

  17. A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from \\PAMELA\\ have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleading but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the \\AMS\\ experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by \\AMS. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy depe...

  18. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs

  19. Low Energy Antiproton Experiments -- A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by studying discrete symmetries. Known interactions can be tested precisely and fundamental constants can be extracted from accurate measurements on free antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$'s) and bound two- and ...

  20. Determination of the maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations and its effect on backscattering electron yield in Monte-Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing-down approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations by the full Penn algorithm within the dielectric formalism is determined with taking into account the contribution of electron and plasmon excitations. Use of these calculated electron stopping powers in Monte Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing down approximation gives the backscattering electron yields in much better agreement with experimental data than previous other theoretical results. The muffin-tin model is used to describe the electron elastic scattering by atom bound in solids with taking into account the exchange correlation and polarization effect

  1. Determination of the maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations and its effect on backscattering electron yield in Monte-Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing-down approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Truong, Hieu T. [Faculty of Electronics and Computer Science, Volgograd State Technical University, 28 Lenin Avenue, Volgograd 400131 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-28

    The maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations by the full Penn algorithm within the dielectric formalism is determined with taking into account the contribution of electron and plasmon excitations. Use of these calculated electron stopping powers in Monte Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing down approximation gives the backscattering electron yields in much better agreement with experimental data than previous other theoretical results. The muffin-tin model is used to describe the electron elastic scattering by atom bound in solids with taking into account the exchange correlation and polarization effect.

  2. 5000 Start-stop cycles for testing the endurance of a safety motor in a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High voltage (5.5 kV and 6.6 kV) induction motors have been used for many years to drive almost the whole of the essential auxiliaries (compressors, ventilators, pumps,...) in EDF's power generating stations. These motors with a power ranging from 225 kW to 9000 kW, must have a lifetime of the same order of duration as the whole equipment of the power station, that is to say 30 years. Being sometimes installed in places not easily accessible, they must require a maintenance reduced as much as possible and have at the same time, a very high reliability level to withstand without damage all operating conditions. These operational requirements have a direct influence on: - the specifications and are responsible for the choice of fabrication types (squirrel cage induction motor with closed circuit cooling); - the very accurate definition of certain parameters such as the maximum temperature rise, the pull-out torque, the number of permissible starts, etc

  3. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9-3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damache, S.; Djaroum, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.; Moussa, D.

    2016-09-01

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for Ep ≈ (0.9-3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner's binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the Csbnd H, Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for Ep ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr's collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (Ep 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  4. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  5. Polarized antiproton beam at U-70 accelerator of IHEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurushev, S. B.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, V. I.; Meschanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Rykov, V. L.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized proton and antiproton beam channel is currently under development at the U-70 accelerator of IHEP, Protvino, Russia. An availability of the both, polarized protons and antiprotons provides an exciting opportunity for the comparative studies of spin effects induced by polarized protons and antiprotons in a variety of hadronic reactions. While the proton and antiproton beams are formed by essentially the same method, there is the specific in the antiproton beam shaping and properties compared to protons. In this report, we address some technical details of forming the polarized antiproton beam and describe its main properties.

  6. Antiproton-nucleus potentials from global fits to antiprotonic X-rays and radiochemical data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 761, 3/4 (2005), s. 283-295. ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : antiproton-nuclear interaction * RMF calculations * antiproton X-rays Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.950, year: 2005

  7. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  8. Denosumab--a powerful RANKL inhibitor to stop lytic metastases and other bone loss actions by osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopper, László

    2012-10-01

    Denosumab is a perfect example on the targeted anticancer therapy. The inhibition of RANKL activity suppressed the osteoclasts' resorptive function and so prevented skeletal related events. This effect is useful not only against bone metastases, but also in the treatment of other diseases caused by bone loss. In different solid tumors with bone metastasis the quality of life also improved, although the overall survival usually showed no change. On the market the main competitors for denosumab are still the bisphosphonates (questions of costs and reimbursement are not discussed) and some potential new agents e.g. Src kinases (as dasatinib, saracatinib, bosutinib), cathepsin K inhibitors, (e.g. odanacatib), and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (e.g. bazedoxifene, lasofoxifene). Nevertheless, today denosumab is one of the most powerful agents in bone-saving area. PMID:22588706

  9. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21–2.68) MeV/u 1H+ and 4He+ ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H+ and 4He+ ions have been measured over the energy range E=(206.03–2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S(E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S(E) data for H+ ions together with those for He2+ ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E>1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe–Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas–Andersen parameter, b, for H+ and He+ projectiles, respectively: {(I=164±3)) eV, (b=1.40} and {(I=163±2.5)) eV, (b=1.38}. As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid

  10. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21-2.68) MeV/u 1H+ and 4He+ ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, D.; Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H+ and 4He+ ions have been measured over the energy range E = (206.03- 2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S (E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S (E) data for H+ ions together with those for He2+ ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E > 1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe-Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas-Andersen parameter, b, for H+ and He+ projectiles, respectively: { (I = 164 ± 3) eV, b = 1.40 } and { (I = 163 ± 2.5) eV, b = 1.38 } . As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  11. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21–2.68) MeV/u {sup 1}H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, D., E-mail: djamelmoussa@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions have been measured over the energy range E=(206.03–2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S(E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S(E) data for H{sup +} ions together with those for He{sup 2+} ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E>1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe–Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas–Andersen parameter, b, for H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles, respectively: {(I=164±3)) eV, (b=1.40} and {(I=163±2.5)) eV, (b=1.38}. As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  12. SU-E-J-37: Combining Proton Radiography and X-Ray CT Information to Better Estimate Relative Proton Stopping Power in a Clinical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In standard proton therapy clinical practice, proton stopping power uncertainties are in the order of 3.5%, which affects the ability of placing the proton Bragg peak at the edge of the tumor. The innovating idea of this project is to approach the uncertainty problem in RSP by using combined information from X-ray CT and proton radiography along a few beam angles. In addition, this project aims to quantify the systematic error introduced by the theoretical models (Janni, ICRU49, Bischel) for proton stopping power in media. Methods: A 3D phantom of 36 cm3 composed of 9 materials randomly placed is created. Measured RSP values are obtained using a Gammex phantom with a proton beam. Theoretical RSP values are calculated with Beth-Block equation in combination with three databases (Janni, ICRU49 and Bischel). Clinical RSP errors are simulated by introducing a systematic (1.5%, 2.5%, 3.5%) and a random error (+/−0.5%) to the theoretical RSP. A ray-tracing algorithm uses each of these RSP tables to calculate energy loss for proton crossing the phantom through various directions. For each direction, gradient descent (GD) method is done on the clinical RSP table to minimize the residual energy difference between the simulation with clinical RSP and with theoretical RSP. The possibility of a systematic material dependent error is investigated by comparing measured RSP to theoretical RSP as calculated from the three models. Results: Using 10,000 iterations on GD algorithm, RSP differences between theoretical values and clinical RSP have converged (<1%) for each error introduced. Results produced with ICRU49 have the smallest average difference (0.021%) to the measured RSP. Janni (1.168%) and Bischel (−0.372%) database shows larger systematic errors. Conclusion: Based on these results, ray-tracing optimisation using information from proton radiography and X-ray CT demonstrates a potential to improve the proton range accuracy in a clinical environment

  13. Antiproton Production in Au+Au Collisions at 11.7a GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton production in 11.7A GeV/c Au+Au collisions over a wide transverse-mass coverage was studied using the AGS-E866 experimental apparatus. The mean transverse kinetic energy increases as a function of centrality and is similar to that of protons. The antiproton yields in Si+Al , Si+Au , and Au+Au collisions are consistent with scaling with the 0.7 power of the number of participant nucleons. Copyright 1998, The American Physical Society

  14. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  15. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  16. Ultralow-energy antiprotons for antihydrogen spectroscopy and antimatter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large-scale Penning trap at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Up to 65% of the captured antiprotons have subsequently been electron cooled to energies below 1 eV and have been stored up to one hour. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultralow-energy antiprotons for gravitational physics, as well as for precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen for CPT tests

  17. Monte Carlo-based Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air mass-collision-stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantity of interest in external beta radiation protection is the absorbed dose rate to tissue at a depth of 7 mg/cm2 Dt (7 mg/cm2) in a 4-element ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements) unit density tissue phantom. ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 6980-2 provides guidelines to establish this quantity for beta emitters using an extrapolation chamber as a primary standard. ISO 6980-1 proposes two series of beta reference radiation fields, namely, series 1 and series 2. Series 1 covers 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr, 204Tl and 147Pm sources used with beam flattening filter and Series 2 covers 14C and 106Ru/106Rh sources used with beam flattening filter. Dt (7 mg/cm2) is realized based on measured current and set of corrections including Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air mass-stopping power ratio, (S/ρ)t,a. ISO provides (S/ρ)t,a values which are based on approximate methods. The present study is aimed at calculating (S/ρ)t,a for 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr, 106Ru/106Rh and 147Pm sources using the Monte Carlo (MC) methods and compare the same against the ISO values. By definition, (S/ρ)t,a should be independent of cavity length of the chamber which was verified in the work

  18. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power from 0.8 keV to 10 keV for metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XIE A G; XIAO S Y; WANG L

    2016-05-01

    Based on the range–energy relationship, the characteristics of secondary electron emission, some relationship between the secondary electron yield $\\delta$ and experimental results, the universal formulae for $\\delta_{0.8−2}$ (the subscript indicates that the energy range of primary energy atthe surface W$_{\\rm po}$ is from 0.8 keV to 2 keV) and $\\delta_{2−10}$ for metals were deduced. The $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ calculated with the universal formulae and the$\\delta_{0.8−10}$ measured experimentally were compared, and the scattering of $\\delta$ for the same metal was analysed. Finally, we concluded that the formulae were universal for $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ for metals. On the basis of some relationship between parameters of $\\delta$, wededuce a formula for expressing total stopping power $S_{0.8−10}$ as a function of $S_{10−30}, \\delta_{0.8−10}, \\delta_{10−30}$, backscattered coefficient $\\heta_{0.8−10}, \\heta_{10−30}$ and W$_{\\rm po}. The calculated $S_{0.8−10}$ were compared with the values measured experimentally and it was concluded that the formula to estimate $S_{0.8−10}$ was universal for metals.

  19. Determination of the Stopping Power and Failure-time of Spacecraft Components due to Proton Interaction Using GOES 11 Acquisition Data

    CERN Document Server

    Jibiri, N N; Kio, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the several ways to describe the net effect of charged-particles' interaction is the rate of energy loss along the particles' path. In this study, the mass stopping power (Sp) of selected spacecraft composite materials, through which the particle traverses, its range (R) and the distance (d) travelled (by the particles) through the materials have been calculated and analyzed. The dose (in Gy) as a function of particle flux and deposited energy was also determined. Predictions of their possible effects on space system operations and life-span were made, especially as values exceeded certain threshold (limit). Using GOES 11 acquired data for 3 months, estimations and/or calculations were made to determine the risk and safe period of a satellite in the geosynchronous orbit. Under certain space radiation environmental conditions (without mitigation of any sort), a spacecraft whose body is 20 mm thick and with Al alloy casing, was theoretically estimated to have a safe period of about 3 years and risk perio...

  20. Extrapolation of the Bethe equation for electron stopping powers to intermediate and low electron energies by empirical simulation of target effective mean excitation energy and atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of simple stopping power (SP) formulas, modified from the relativistic Bethe equation, is presented that is based on the concepts of target effective atomic number and mean excitation energy (MEE). The analytical model function is constructed to approximate experimental or calculated SPs at low electron energies and tend asymptotically to the relativistic Bethe function at high energies. The energy dependencies of our effective values, in contrast with theoretical approaches, are defined empirically by parametrization with tuning parameters. A least-squares fitting routine based on the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm was developed. We utilize the material parameters and numerical calculations of SPs from optical data using the full Penn-algorithm. Our formula is thought to be applicable for energies above 60 eV. Our simulations of SPs for 41 elemental solids are found to be in good agreement with published numerical results. The flexibility of a general empirical formula is shown. Shortened formulas were developed that are applicable for particular energy ranges, and effective MEEs are proposed that differ from previously recommended values. The presented formulas may be used for analytical calculation of SPs over a broad projectile energy region

  1. Electron stopping power and inelastic mean free path in amino acids and protein over the energy range of 20-20,000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Xiangdong

    2006-07-01

    Systematic calculations of stopping power (SPs) and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) values for 20-20,000 eV electrons in a group of 15 amino acids and a simple protein have been performed. The calculations are based on the dielectric response model and take into account the exchange effect between the incident electron and target electrons. The optical energy-loss functions for the 15 investigated amino acids and the protein are evaluated by using an empirical approach, because of the lack of experimental optical data. For all the considered materials, the calculated mean ionization potentials are in good agreement with those given by Bragg's rule, and the evaluated SP values at 20 keV converge well to the Bethe-Bloch predictions. The data shown represent the first results of SP and IMFP, for these 15 amino acids and the protein in the energy range below 20 keV, and might be useful for studies of various radiation effects in these materials. In addition, the average energy deposited by inelastic scattering of the electrons on this group of 15 amino acids, on the protein, on Formvar and on DNA, respectively, has been estimated for energies below 20 keV. The dependences of the average energy deposition on the electron energy are given. These results are important for any detailed studies of radiation-induced inactivation of proteins and the DNA. PMID:16733724

  2. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; AD-4/ACE Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for...

  3. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  4. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  5. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  6. Low energy antiproton possibilities at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical feasibility of creating a pure antiproton beam at the AGS has been studied. The scheme involves an antiproton target station and transport back to the Booster synchrotron, which acts as both a purifier and accelerator/decelerator. This proposal would be very attractive to the user community since this operation could run parasitically (transparently) to the AGS operating modes. The energy range of antiprotons can be as low as 2 MeV to as high as 5 GeV. The intensity of the beam is estimated to be 7 x 107/sec above 2.5 GeV/c and 4 x 104/sec at 200 MeV/c

  7. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  8. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  9. Antiproton-proton resonant like channels in J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Loiseau, B

    2005-01-01

    The BES collaboration has recently observed a strong enhancement close to the proton-antiproton threshold in the J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton. Such a structure can be explained by a traditional nucleon-antinucleon model. The near threshold 1S0 bound state and/or the well-established 3P0 resonant state found in this nucleon-antinucleon interaction can adequately describe the BES data.

  10. SU-C-204-02: Improved Patient-Specific Optimization of the Stopping Power Calibration for Proton Therapy Planning Using a Single Proton Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I [Lyon 1 University and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne (France); Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Parodi, K [Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Krah, N [Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing, Heidelberg, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We present an improved method to calculate patient-specific calibration curves to convert X-ray computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) to relative stopping powers (RSP) for proton therapy treatment planning. Methods: By optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve, the difference between a proton radiographic image and a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography (DRR) is minimized. The feasibility of this approach has previously been demonstrated. This scenario assumes that all discrepancies between proton radiography and DRR originate from uncertainties in the HU-RSP curve. In reality, external factors cause imperfections in the proton radiography, such as misalignment compared to the DRR and unfaithful representation of geometric structures (“blurring”). We analyze these effects based on synthetic datasets of anthropomorphic phantoms and suggest an extended optimization scheme which explicitly accounts for these effects. Performance of the method is been tested for various simulated irradiation parameters. The ultimate purpose of the optimization is to minimize uncertainties in the HU-RSP calibration curve. We therefore suggest and perform a thorough statistical treatment to quantify the accuracy of the optimized HU-RSP curve. Results: We demonstrate that without extending the optimization scheme, spatial blurring (equivalent to FWHM=3mm convolution) in the proton radiographies can cause up to 10% deviation between the optimized and the ground truth HU-RSP calibration curve. Instead, results obtained with our extended method reach 1% or better correspondence. We have further calculated gamma index maps for different acceptance levels. With DTA=0.5mm and RD=0.5%, a passing ratio of 100% is obtained with the extended method, while an optimization neglecting effects of spatial blurring only reach ∼90%. Conclusion: Our contribution underlines the potential of a single proton radiography to generate a patient-specific calibration curve and to improve

  11. SU-C-204-02: Improved Patient-Specific Optimization of the Stopping Power Calibration for Proton Therapy Planning Using a Single Proton Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present an improved method to calculate patient-specific calibration curves to convert X-ray computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) to relative stopping powers (RSP) for proton therapy treatment planning. Methods: By optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve, the difference between a proton radiographic image and a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography (DRR) is minimized. The feasibility of this approach has previously been demonstrated. This scenario assumes that all discrepancies between proton radiography and DRR originate from uncertainties in the HU-RSP curve. In reality, external factors cause imperfections in the proton radiography, such as misalignment compared to the DRR and unfaithful representation of geometric structures (“blurring”). We analyze these effects based on synthetic datasets of anthropomorphic phantoms and suggest an extended optimization scheme which explicitly accounts for these effects. Performance of the method is been tested for various simulated irradiation parameters. The ultimate purpose of the optimization is to minimize uncertainties in the HU-RSP calibration curve. We therefore suggest and perform a thorough statistical treatment to quantify the accuracy of the optimized HU-RSP curve. Results: We demonstrate that without extending the optimization scheme, spatial blurring (equivalent to FWHM=3mm convolution) in the proton radiographies can cause up to 10% deviation between the optimized and the ground truth HU-RSP calibration curve. Instead, results obtained with our extended method reach 1% or better correspondence. We have further calculated gamma index maps for different acceptance levels. With DTA=0.5mm and RD=0.5%, a passing ratio of 100% is obtained with the extended method, while an optimization neglecting effects of spatial blurring only reach ∼90%. Conclusion: Our contribution underlines the potential of a single proton radiography to generate a patient-specific calibration curve and to improve

  12. SU-E-J-147: Monte Carlo Study of the Precision and Accuracy of Proton CT Reconstructed Relative Stopping Power Maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The quantification of the intrinsic performances of proton computed tomography (pCT) as a modality for treatment planning in proton therapy. The performance of an ideal pCT scanner is studied as a function of various parameters. Methods: Using GATE/Geant4, we simulated an ideal pCT scanner and scans of several cylindrical phantoms with various tissue equivalent inserts of different sizes. Insert materials were selected in order to be of clinical relevance. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm taking into account the scattering of protons into the phantom. To quantify the performance of the ideal pCT scanner, we study the precision and the accuracy with respect to the theoretical relative stopping power ratios (RSP) values for different beam energies, imaging doses, insert sizes and detector positions. The planning range uncertainty resulting from the reconstructed RSP is also assessed by comparison with the range of the protons in the analytically simulated phantoms. Results: The results indicate that pCT can intrinsically achieve RSP resolution below 1%, for most examined tissues at beam energies below 300 MeV and for imaging doses around 1 mGy. RSP maps accuracy of less than 0.5 % is observed for most tissue types within the studied dose range (0.2–1.5 mGy). Finally, the uncertainty in the proton range due to the accuracy of the reconstructed RSP map is well below 1%. Conclusion: This work explores the intrinsic performance of pCT as an imaging modality for proton treatment planning. The obtained results show that under ideal conditions, 3D RSP maps can be reconstructed with an accuracy better than 1%. Hence, pCT is a promising candidate for reducing the range uncertainties introduced by the use of X-ray CT alongside with a semiempirical calibration to RSP.Supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  13. Stopping powers of havar for 0.63 5.9 MeV protons and 2.6 24 MeV alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.; Trzaska, W. H.; Räisänen, J.; Lyapin, V.

    2004-11-01

    A transmission experiment utilizing thin foil targets has been conducted in order to establish the stopping powers of the cobalt-base alloy, havar, for 0.6-5.9 MeV protons and 2.6-24 MeV alpha particles. The basic technique of the novel experimental method used was to record both the projectile energy and the time of flight while alternating measurements with and without the target in place. The uncertainties of the proton and alpha particle data sets ranged from 1.4 to 2.3% and 1.1 to 1.5%, respectively. Modified Bethe-Bloch theory was applied to the measurements in order to ascertain values of the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b) for each projectile. The extracted values were I = 304.3 ± 2.4 eV and b = 1.37 ± 0.04 for the case of protons, and I = 306.3 ± 2.3 eV and b = 1.47 ± 0.03 for the case of alpha particles. The I-values are somewhat higher than the additivity-based expectation of 295.7 eV, whereas the b-values are clearly consistent with the expected range of 1.4 ± 0.1. The parameter values extracted from the measurements are appraised for compatibility with recently observed trends in values of I and of b with increasing projectile atomic number.

  14. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  15. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  16. Ionization in antiproton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing the semiclassical approximation we calculate within the coupled-state formalism the ionization probability in antiproton-hydrogen (anti p+H) collisions. In particular we investigate the adiabatic ionization at the distance of closest approach in almost central collisions. Striking differences in the electron excitation probability compared with proton-hydrogen (p+H) collisions are predicted. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear power and tomorrow's energy supply. The answer of Jacques Bouchard to Hubert Reeves: ''stop the useless disputes about nuclear power''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an interview given in April 2, 2002 to 'Le Monde' newspaper, the astrophysicist Hubert Reeves draws out a list of the constraints which, according to him, will clog the future development of nuclear energy: depletion of uranium reserves, accumulation of radioactive wastes, increase of production costs, public contestation etc.. Jacques Bouchard, president of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN), and head of the direction of nuclear energy (DEN) of the French atomic energy commission (CEA), contests this analysis and its conclusions and published an answer in the April 11 issue of Le Monde newspaper. This paper is a reprint of J. Bouchard answer who explains why nuclear energy has its place in the world supply of electric power, and how it can contribute to the sustainable development and to the protection of the environment. (J.S.)

  18. Stopping power for heavy ions (3 ≤ Z ≤ 35) in elemental targets (6 ≤ Z ≤ 79) at energies ∼ 0.5 - 2.5 MeV/n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passage of heavy ions through matter and evaluation of associated energy loss have widespread and well-known applications in diverse discipline. The basic input parameter required for heavy ion's stopping power calculation is its effective charge, which is determined using empirical/ semi-empirical relations. In the present work, with the availability of experimental data the fitting parameters have been modified to make it applicable in the energy range ∼ 0.5 to 2.5 MeV/n

  19. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  20. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap

  1. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  2. Compilation, measurements and tabulation of heavy ion stopping data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New stopping power measurements have been carried out with heavy ions in the last 15 years, and they resulted in new stopping power tabulations. A synthesis of these studies is presented and a chronological presentation has been adopted. Low energy (3-6 MeV/u) and intermediate energy (20-100 MeV/u) stopping power measurements are both investigated. (K.A.) 35 refs., 15 figs

  3. SU-C-204-04: Patient Specific Proton Stopping Powers Estimation by Combining Proton Radiography and Prior-Knowledge X-Ray CT Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The material relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the highest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust and systematic method that yields accurate, patient specific, RSP by combining 1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and 2) daily proton radiograph of the patient. Methods: The method is formulated as a linear least-square optimization problem (min||Ax-B||2). The parameter A represents the pathlength crossed by the proton in each material. The RSPs for the materials (water equivalent thickness (WET)/physical thickness) are denoted by x. B is the proton radiograph expressed as WET crossed. The problem is minimized using a convex-conic optimization algorithm with xi

  4. SU-C-204-04: Patient Specific Proton Stopping Powers Estimation by Combining Proton Radiography and Prior-Knowledge X-Ray CT Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins-Fekete, CA [Massachussetts General Hospital, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Aarhus University, Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark); Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Brousmiche, S [Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Hansen, D [Aarhus University, Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark); Beaulieu, L [Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Seco, J [Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The material relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the highest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust and systematic method that yields accurate, patient specific, RSP by combining 1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and 2) daily proton radiograph of the patient. Methods: The method is formulated as a linear least-square optimization problem (min||Ax-B||2). The parameter A represents the pathlength crossed by the proton in each material. The RSPs for the materials (water equivalent thickness (WET)/physical thickness) are denoted by x. B is the proton radiograph expressed as WET crossed. The problem is minimized using a convex-conic optimization algorithm with xi

  5. Atomic approaches in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms. REPLY to 'analysis of the lifetimes and fractions of antiprotons trapped in metastable antiprotonic-helium states' by I. Shimamura and M. Kimura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present note the authors clarify the purpose of YO and complement its essential points, thus showing that the criticisms of SK are inappropriate. The paper YO [1] was aimed at discussing some new aspects related to the metastability of hadronic helium atoms which had been discovered when negative kaons [2], negative pions [3] and antiprotons [4] were stopped in liquid helium. The delayed fraction, time spectrum shape and lifetimes were the observables. Further experimental studies are in progress [5], and as of today there is no successful explanation for these interesting phenomena. So, YO tried to give brief and rather qualitative estimates for the observations in an intuitive way, considering only the leading terms. The following problems are discussed in as simple a manner as possible, starting from the exotic-atom viewpoints of Condo [6] and Russell [7]: i)the atomic core polarization effect, ii)the structure and radiative lifetimes, iii)the non-statistical distribution of the angular momentum and an estimate of the delayed fraction, and iv)the isotope effect, though the title represents only i). To respond to the comments of SK, it is important to consider the correspondence between the atomic approach and the molecular approach for the metastable antiprotonic helium atom of Condo-Russell. We therefore begin this note with a discussion of this aspect. (author)

  6. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Kheymits, M D; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Wu, J; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; 10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L1

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three ...

  7. X-ray transitions from antiprotonic noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of antiprotonic X-ray transitions at high principal quantum numbers and the occurrence of electronic X-ray in antiprotonic argon krypton, and xenon is analysed with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The shell by shell ionisation by Auger electron emission, characterised by appearance and disappearance of X-ray lines, is followed through the antiprotonic cascade by considering transition and binding energies of both the antiproton and remaining electrons. A number of additional lines in the X-ray spectra have been tentatively assigned to electronic transitions caused by electronic de-excitation after Auger emission during the antiprotonic cascade. A few lines remain unexplained so far or are not unambiguously assigned. The complexity of the electronic states cannot be resolved with semiconductor detectors. Hopefully, in future high resolution devices like crystal spectrometers and Auger electron spectroscopy at antiproton at GSI will resolve this complexity

  8. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  9. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies

  10. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  11. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    method are applied in order to describe the target molecule and the collision process. It is shown that three perpendicular orientations of the molecular axis with respect to the trajectory are sufficient to accurately reproduce the ionization cross section calculated by Sakimoto [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062704......Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...... (2005)] reducing the numerical effort drastically. The independent-event model is employed to approximate the cross section for double ionization and H+ production in antiproton collisions with H2....

  12. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  13. Antiproton production in relativistic Si-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured antiproton production cross sections as functions of centrality in collisions of 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon 28Si ions with targets of Al, Cu, and Pb. For all targets, the antiproton yields increase linearly with the number of projectile nucleons that have interacted, and show little target dependence. We discuss the implications of this result on the production and absorption of antiprotons within the nuclear medium

  14. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, S; Rahman, S N

    2003-01-01

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined.

  15. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  16. Shielding calculations for the antiproton target area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations performed in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab antiproton target hall are summarized. The following radiological considerations were examined: soil activation, residual activity of components, and beam-on radiation. In addition, at the request of the designers, the energy deposition in the proposed graphite beam dump was examined for several targeting conditions in order to qualitatively determine its ability to survive

  17. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with PAMELA

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles, and especially antiparticles, in the cosmic radiation. The apparatus is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite which was launched on 15 June 2006. PAMELA has been traveling around the earth along an elliptical and semi-polar orbit for almost five years. It mainly consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, a time of flight system and an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, which allows antiprotons to be ...

  18. Looking for new gravitational forces with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quite general arguments based on the principle of equivalence and modern field theory show that it is possible for the gravitational acceleration of antimatter to be different than that for matter. Further, there is no experimental evidence to rule out the possibility. In fact, some evidence indicates there may be unexpected effects. Thus, the planned experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons is of fundamental importance. 20 refs., 3 figs

  19. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined. (author)

  20. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langanke, K.

    2015-11-01

    In the coming years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and path-breaking research in hadronic, nuclear and atomic physics as well as applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on nuclear physics related to supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  1. Pulsed septum magnet for the Fermilab antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2 meter curved pulsed septum magnet for use in the Fermilab Antiproton Source is described. The magnet produces a peak field of 6 kGauss at a current of 20,000 Amperes within a 0.4 msec long pulse. The field uniformity obtained is ΔB/B<0.2% out to 3.8 cm from the copper septum. Power enters the magnet from the center resulting in very simple ends and the magnet incorporates at 0.5 cm steel guard which reduces the field to <1.4 Gauss in the zero-field region. The total septum thickness is 1.3 cm. The vacuum enclosure doubles as the stacking fixture for the magnet laminations allowing easy assembly of a magnet with a 50 m radius of curvature

  2. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  3. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  4. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  5. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will be infected and ...

  6. Anti-protons in the primary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge of the flux of antiprotons is of value in examining the manner in which cosmic rays propagate, assuming, as is conventional, that the antiprotons arise from interactions in the I.S.M. A comparison of observed and expected anti p/p ratios is made. (Auth.)

  7. Experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration has been formed to measure the acceleration of antiprotons in the earth's gravitational field. The technique is to produce, decelerate, and trap quantities of antiprotons, to cool them to untralow energy, and to measure their acceleration in a time-of-flight experiment. Present plans and the results of initial efforts toward this end are presented

  8. A study of the reactions antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ- at 14.6 GeV/c and a study of charged multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of two reactions on deuterium has been performed with incident antiprotons of 14.6 GeV/c: antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ-. The final states are dominated by Δ(1236) resonance production and in the coherent reaction the d* effect is observed as at lower incident momenta. At 14.6 GeV/c, it seems that the diffraction dissociation process as well for the incident particle as for the target takes a large part of the production mechanism for the two reactions. A study of charged multiplicity distributions in antiproton-neutron interactions is presented at 5.5, 9.3 and 14.6 GeV/c. The topological cross sections as well as various statistical moments obtained from the charged multiplicities are studied as functions of the incident momentum. A comparison between our results and antiproton-proton and pp data shows, that in the range of incident momenta used, a scaling function which describes antiproton-N and proton-proton interactions does not exist as expected from the KNO model (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen model)

  9. Wave Packet Simulations of Antiproton Scattering on Molecular Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Stegeby, Henrik; Kowalewski, Markus; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Karlsson, Hans O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of antiproton scattering on the molecular Hydrogen is investigated by means of wave packet dynamics. The electronically potential energy surfaces of the antiproton H2 system are presented within this work. Excitation and dissociation probabilities of the molecular Hydrogen for collision energies in the ultra low energy regime below 10 eV are computed.

  10. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  11. Sneaky light stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Eifert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  12. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime

  13. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  14. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  15. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  16. Stopping the unstoppable

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How do you stop two very high energy proton beams circulating in opposite directions around a 27-kilometre ring? The answer is the beam dumps. Two tunnels, pointing in opposite directions, are being constructed at point 6 of the LHC. These will allow the beams to be directed into two large beam dumps housed at the ends of the tunnels.

  17. LEAP [Low-Energy Antiproton]: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LEAP (Low-Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic-ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et. al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic-ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at Goddard Space Flight Center, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter designed and built at the University of Arizona. Analysis of flight data performed by the high-energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and Goddard Space Flight Center, 90% confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10-5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10-4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies

  18. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  19. Annihilation of low energy antiprotons in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Canali, C; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Derking, J H; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Haider, S; Harasimovic, J; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Susa, A; Vasquez, M A Subieta; Špacek, M; Testera, G; Welsch, C P; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. To achieve this goal, the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS collaboration will produce a pulsed, cold (100 mK) antihydrogen beam with a velocity of a few 100 m/s and measure the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the beam from a straight path. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1$%$ precision on the measurement of $\\bar{g}$ with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct measurement of antiproton annihilation in a segmented silicon sensor, the first step towards designing a position sensitive silicon detector for the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment. We also pr...

  20. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (2 despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H2 is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H2 molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H2+, and H2 as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H2, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed comparison of the present findings for p impacts and for anti p+He collisions with literature data. On the other hand, total and differential cross sections for ionization and excitation of the targets by anti p impact complement the sparse literature data of this kind. Results gained from different targets as well

  1. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  2. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  3. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectrum of the lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiprotons of the low-energy separated anti p-beam K23 at CERN in Geneva have been stopped in thin (0.6 g/cm2) targets of the Lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li. The characteristic X-rays of the formed antiprotonic atoms were measured with four identical high-resolution Si (Li) detectors. Three lines of the N- series, four lines of the M-series and the 3d-2p transition of the Balmer series were observed. The measured relative intensities of the M- and N-series transitions are well described by the simple cascade model of Eisenberg and Kessler. The 3d-2p transition is considerably influenced by the strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus and thus drastically reduced in intensity. The analysis of this transition yields the shift and width of the 2p level, whereas the width of the 3d level is deduced from intensity considerations. (orig./HSI)

  4. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  5. Search for narrow lines in photon spectra from proton-antiproton annihilations at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusive photon spectra from annihilation of antiprotons stopped in a liquid hydrogen target were measured at LEAR (CERN) with a magnetic pair spectrometer. The FWHM energy resolution of the spectrometer in the region from 100-700 MeV was in the range from 2 to 4.5%. A total number of about 4.8.106 events with energies up to 1 GeV have been reconstructed. The photon spectra were scanned for possible lines with widths comparable to spectrometer resolution indicating the existence of bound nucleon-antinucleon states. No such structures were found with branching ratios greater than 4 to 8.10-4 at 95% confidence level. Results of former experiments could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  6. Should Exam Be Stopped?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢连香

    2006-01-01

    The exam system has come to be the main topic of modern education.As it plays so important a role in the area of education that it is under much discussion as to its use.People who are for it try to develop this system more;those who are against it believe that such a system should be stopped.Should exam be stopped?In my opinion it should be.Firstly,a number of people think that an exam is the only way to test knowledge,but,in fact,that is not true.A few questions given in an exam could in no way cover the ...

  7. The stop on top

    CERN Document Server

    Zakareishvili, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric partners of the top quark have been sought since the top quark has been discovered at the Tevatron. The searches are more easily performed in scenarios where the mass splitting between the top and the stop is large and where differences in kinematics are striking. The region in which top and stop are almost degenerate in mass is more difficult to explore experimentally as the final state kinematics are very similar, apart from angular-related distributions which reflect the spin/parity difference between the two particles. Usually the searches are performed looking for deviations on the measured top-quark pair production cross section with respect to the standard model prediction, or looking to simple variables such as the difference in the azimuthal angle between two leptons produced after top quark decays.

  8. Investigation of RADTRAN Stop Model input parameters for truck stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RADTRAN is a computer code for estimating the risks and consequences as transport of radioactive materials (RAM). RADTRAN was developed and is maintained by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy (DOE). For incident-free transportation, the dose to persons exposed while the shipment is stopped is frequently a major percentage of the overall dose. This dose is referred to as Stop Dose and is calculated by the Stop Model. Because stop dose is a significant portion of the overall dose associated with RAM transport, the values used as input for the Stop Model are important. Therefore, an investigation of typical values for RADTRAN Stop Parameters for truck stops was performed. The resulting data from these investigations were analyzed to provide mean values, standard deviations, and histograms. Hence, the mean values can be used when an analyst does not have a basis for selecting other input values for the Stop Model. In addition, the histograms and their characteristics can be used to guide statistical sampling techniques to measure sensitivity of the RADTRAN calculated Stop Dose to the uncertainties in the stop model input parameters. This paper discusses the details and presents the results of the investigation of stop model input parameters at truck stops

  9. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  10. Computer control of RF-manipulations in the CERN antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERN antiproton accumulator uses a conventional RF system for bunched beam manipulation within the ring. Several different manipulations are needed, often in close succession, so a fast, reliable and accurate method of switching between them is required. This has led to an unconventional computerized beam control system. For a desired set of beam manipulations, the computer calculates the needed voltage and frequency as functions of time, using a mathematical model of the beam and lattice. These are then loaded into function generators which subsequently operate independently of the computer. The RF system, a dual gap, ferrite loaded cavity driven by a 4CX25000 power tetrode, has three main uses: the stacking process to accumulate the antiprotons, the unstacking process to make the accumulated antiprotons available for extraction, and a variety of test and measurement purposes. Two digital function generators control voltage and frequency in the cavity. The voltage function is logarithmic and is fed into an AVC loop which contains a logarithmic detector and modulator to provide high voltage for stacking and low voltage for unstacking. The frequency function controls a 10 to 30 kHz quadrature VCO which is mixed with the output of a quadrature synthesizer producing an 1840 to 1860 kHz frequency range. RF phase and magnet noise were harmful while manipulating low emittance proton and antiproton bunches. A high-pass phase loop acquires beam cavity phase; adding AC corrections to the frequency program eliminated this problem. The cavity tune is maintained by a tuning loop acting on a DC ferrite base. Schematics are provided

  11. Inertial-confinement-fusion applications of ion-stopping theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Bailey, D.S.

    1982-01-22

    Methods were developed to calculate: (1) the stopping power of a hot plasma target, (2) the charge-state of a fast ion projectile, and (3) the final disposition of the deposited energy. The first issue refers to the stopping power for protons. The proton stopping power is altered in high-density or high-temperature targets, especially at velocities below the stopping peak. The second issue concerns the application of a proton stopping curve to the arbitrary projectile. The third topic is more specialized to inertial fusion and concerns the partition of deposited energy between ion (nuclear motion) degrees of freedom and those corresponding to bound and free electrons. The question here is whether a thermal equilibrium plasma is produced.

  12. Baryon stopping and hadronic spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryon stopping and particle production in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon are studied as a function of the collision centrality using new proton, antiproton, charged kaon and charged pion production data measured with the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Stopping, which is measured by the shift in rapidity of net protons or baryons from the initial beam rapidity, increases in more central collisions. This is expected from a geometrical picture of the collisions. The stopping data are quantitatively compared to models incorporating various mechanisms for stopping. In general, microscopic transport calculations which incorporate current theoretical models of baryon stopping or use phenomenological extrapolations from simpler systems overestimate the dependence of stopping on centrality. Approximately, the yield of produced pions scales with the number of nucleons participating in the collision. A small increase in yield beyond this scaling, accompanied by a small suppression in the yield of the fastest pions, reflects the variation in stopping with centrality. Consistent with the observations from central collisions of light and heavy nuclei at the SPS, the transverse momentum distributions of all particles are observed to become harder with increasing centrality. This effect is most pronounced for the heaviest particles. This hardening is discussed in terms of multiple scattering of the incident nucleons of one colliding nucleus as they traverse the other nucleus and in terms of rescattering within the system of produced particles

  13. A new antiproton beam transfer scheme without coalescing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    An effective way to increase the luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron collider program Run2 is to improve the overall antiproton transfer efficiency. During antiproton coalescing in the Main Injector (MI), about 10-15% particles get lost. This loss could be avoided in a new antiproton transfer scheme that removes coalescing from the process. Moreover, this scheme would also eliminate emittance dilution due to coalescing. This scheme uses a 2.5 MHz RF system to transfer antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Main Injector. It is then followed by a bunch rotation in the MI to shorten the bunch length so that it can be captured by a 53 MHz RF bucket. Calculations and ESME simulations show that this scheme works. No new hardware is needed to implement this scheme.

  14. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  15. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  16. Rescattering effects in antiproton deuteron annihilation at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper higher order corrections to the single scattering term for antiproton deuteron annihilation are evaluated. As dominant corrections the initial state interaction of the antiprotons and the rescattering of pions are considered. For low spectator momenta, these corrections cause a strong modulation of the distribution in the invariant mass of the annihilation pions, which could modify the parameters of the resonant baryonium states

  17. Cosmic Antiproton Constraints on Effective Interactions of the Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  18. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  19. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments

  20. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider, a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up-stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo-design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon stop prototype

  1. The Brain Never Stops

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Your brain is doing a lot of work when you are engaged in activities such as sports, playing a game, or watching a movie. Your brain is also a master of associating one thought with another and making your mind wander. But what does your brain do when you are not engaged in particular thoughts or actions? Interestingly, similar to the heart that always keeps beating, the brain never stops its activity. For example, your brain is highly active even when you are fast asleep. In fact, brain cell...

  2. Gentlemen, stop your engines!

    OpenAIRE

    Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2007-01-01

    For fifty years, computer chess has pursued an original goal of Artificial Intelligence, to produce a chess-engine to compete at the highest level. The goal has arguably been achieved, but that success has made it harder to answer questions about the relative playing strengths of man and machine. The proposal here is to approach such questions in a counter-intuitive way, handicapping or stopping-down chess engines so that they play less well. The intrinsic lack of man-machine games may be ...

  3. GMSB with Light Stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. Two possible ways out are: i) To extend GMSB by direct superpotential messenger-MSSM Yukawa couplings to generate sizeable mixing, thus reintroducing the flavor problem; ii) To extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the $\\rho$ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second way by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges $Y=(0,\\pm 1)$, with a tree-level custodial $SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R$ global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the $\\rho$ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of ...

  4. Near-threshold behavior of positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Bray, A. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    Using the convergent close-coupling theory we study the threshold behavior of cross sections for positronium (Ps) of energy E scattering on antiprotons. In the case of Ps (1 s ) elastic scattering, simple power laws are observed for all partial waves studied. The partial-wave summed cross section is nearly constant, and dominates the antihydrogen formation cross section at all considered energies, even though the latter is exothermic and behaves as 1 /E1 /2 . For Ps (2 s ), oscillations spanning orders of magnitude on top of the 1 /E behavior are found in the elastic and quasielastic cross sections. The antihydrogen formation is influenced by dipole-supported resonances below the threshold of inelastic processes. Resonance energies form a geometric progression relative to the threshold. The exothermic antihydrogen formation cross sections behave as 1 /E at low energies, but are oscillation free. We demonstrate that all these rich features are reproduced by the threshold theory developed by Gailitis [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15, 3423 (1982), 10.1088/0022-3700/15/19/012].

  5. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  6. Stop the RIKA BANARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshio

    Children who want to study science & technology are decreasing continuously in Japan. This phenomenon is so called “Rika Banare” meaning literally science apart. Then, the number of students aiming at being engineers is decreasing. This will be a threat for Japanese industry. Many science & technology events are being held everywhere in Japan to overcome Rika Banare. However, most of them leave no sustainable influence over the students who reach to high school age. The reason why Rika Banare takes place is discussed. Then, it is insisted that the promotion of the attractive features of engineering career is important as well as improvement of the education system. In this article, eight proposals to stop Rika Banare are presented. Five of them are related to education system and the rest three to the improvement of social status of engineers.

  7. Binary theory of electronic stopping

    CERN Document Server

    Sigmund, P

    2002-01-01

    Binary stopping theory has been developed to characterize the electronic stopping of swift heavy ions in matter. It is an extension of Bohr's classical theory of 1913 incorporating screening, higher-order-Z sub 1 and shell corrections, high-speed quantum and relativity corrections as well as projectile excitation and ionization. The main numerical input comes from optical properties. The computation of shell corrections involves orbital velocity distributions of target and projectile electrons. Calculated stopping parameters depend on ion charge. Equilibrium stopping forces may be computed by adoption of a suitable model for the equilibrium charge state. This paper summarizes the current status of the theory, in particular the sensitivity of its predictions to pertinent input. Charge-dependent stopping forces have been calculated for selected systems and compared to experimental results. Equilibrium stopping forces calculated for a wide variety of ion-target combinations are compared with experimental data fr...

  8. Measurements and calculation of the activation of the biologic shield of the Lingen BWR power reactor definitively stopped (in view of dismantling)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the dismantling planning of a power reactor, it is important to know among others the depth of activation of the biological shield. A large sampling and measurement program joint to computer calculations, has given data which will allow to avoid in the future high-cost measurement programs. One shows that the calculation of activation induced by neutrons in the median plane of the core, to determine the zone from which concrete is only slightly activated. In the reactor considered, this zone does not reach the external concrete (or first layer of concrete)

  9. Electron cooling for low-energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divergence and size of stored ion beams can be reduced superimposing on them an intense, monoenergetic electron beam with little transverse motion ('electron cooling'). The present work first considers the theoretical foundations of the method and then describes the planning and construction of an electron beam device for cooling antiprotons with MeV energies in the storage ring LEAR and CERN. With respect to the quantitative description of the method, the microscopic processes during the damping of the ion motion, the effect of the damping on an ion in a storage ring, and the properties of the intense, magnetically guided electron beam are discussed. Special attention is paid to the improvement of ion beam cooling due to the magnetic field guiding the electron beam. The electron beam device, operated in ultra-high vacuum, and the experience gained during its construction are described; experiments performed during the test period are presented. The work further develops a numerical simulation of electron cooling on the basis of the theory discussed. Given realistic external parameters, the simulation yields cooling times and equilibrium states of the ion beam during electron cooling in a storage ring. Finally, non-destructive methods for measuring the velocity distribution in the electron beam are described, which may prove helpful for optimizing the beam cooling. (orig.)

  10. Antiproton-impact ionization of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization processes in antiproton collisions with H2 are studied by direct solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a one-electron 3D wavefunction in the field of H+2 is used to calculate single-ionization cross sections at incident energies ranging from 50 keV to 1.5 MeV. Averaging over the molecular orientations, the single-ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with time-dependent basis set calculations and experiment. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a two-electron 6D wavefunction in the field of H2+2 is used to calculate single- and double-ionization cross sections at an incident energy of 100 keV. Initiatory 6D results for the H+2 production cross section range are somewhat lower than experiment, while the H+ production cross section range brackets experiment.

  11. Elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last two years very interesting results have been collected at LEAR on both the elementary pantip and the antip nucleus interactions. A review of all the interesting experimental results already available is far beyond the scope of the present talk. Its topic will be essentially limited to report on the new experimental informations dealing with the knowledge of the fundamental properties of the antip p elementary interaction and the determination of the characteristics of the antip nucleus interaction. The results of the antip p cross sections measured at low momenta by the PS173 and PS172 experiments are discussed. The antip nucleus elastic scattering angular distributions collected by the PS184 experiment have significantly contributed to define the properties of the p nucleus optical potential and stimulated a lot of microscopic calculations. The results are reviewed. A comparison to the informations obtained from the measurements of X-rays in antiprotonic atoms done by the PS176 and PS186 experiments is given. The interpretation of the inelastic scattering data measured for the 12C(antip, antip)12C* system at 47 and 180 MeV for various discrete states is presented: special emphasis will be given to the study of spin-flip transitions to unnatural parity states which would provide significant constant on the isovector tensor component of the NantiN interaction. Status on the experimental study of the (antip, p) reaction is discussed

  12. Delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed annihilation of antiprotons, which was recently discovered in liquid 4He at KEK, has been studied at CERN in gas-phase 4He and 3He. The annihilation time spectra in gas 4He at various pressures were found to be similar to that for liquid 4He. The observed average lifetime in the region t > 1μsec for 3 atm 4He was about 3.2μsec, while for 3 atm 3He gas it was 2.8μsec, i.e. shorter by 15 %. The time spectra show a growth-decay type function, which is indicative of the presence of a series of metastable states. For 4He and 3He they have nearly identical shapes, differing only in the time scale by 14 ± 3 %. These observations are qualitatively consistent with the atomic model of p-bare-He++ proposed by Condo. The time spectra were found to be sensitive to the presence of small amounts (as small as 20 ppm) of H2. No evidence was seen for delayed annihilation in gaseous Ne. 36.10. (author)

  13. Charm production in antiproton-proton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Haidenbauer, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of charmed mesons (D) and baryons (Lambda_c) in antiproton-proton (app) annihilation close to their respective production thresholds. The elementary charm production process is described by either baryon/meson exchange or by quark/gluon dynamics. Effects of the interactions in the initial and final states are taken into account rigorously. The calculations are performed in close analogy to our earlier study on app -> antiLambda-Lambda and app -> antiK-K by connecting the processes via SU(4) flavor symmetry. Our predictions for the antiLambda_c-Lambda_c production cross section are in the order of 1 to 7 mb, i.e. a factor of around 10-70 smaller than the corresponding cross sections for antiLambda-Lambda However, they are 100 to 1000 times larger than predictions of other model calculations in the literature. On the other hand, the resulting cross sections for antiD-D production are found to be in the order of 10^{-2} -- 10^{-1} microbarn and they turned out to be comparable to those ob...

  14. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti)protons by multiple passage through the polarized internal target (PIT). Implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR GSI are discussed

  15. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidinger, David S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the required critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in 238U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fissions. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results, the specific design presented was inadequate. Despite this, the concept of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of thrust warrants further study.

  16. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  17. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and pionic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiproton) experiment of CERN has observed two-photon spectroscopy by making non-linear transitions of the antiprotons which have occupied highly excited levels. The metastable antiproton helium atoms are studied by irradiating two laser light photons propagating in the counter direction. As the result, the spectrum of narrow line width was observed by making the Doppler width of the resonant transition to decrease. And the anti-proton helium transition frequency was measured with the accuracy of (2.3∼5) X10-9. The mass ratio of the antiproton and the electron has been decided to be Mp/me =1836.152674(23) from the comparison of quantum electrodynamics calculation and the present experimental result. The pion-Helium experiment instrument has been also constructed at the ring cyclotron of PSI (Paul Sherer Institute) toward the successful laser spectroscopy of this atom. When this atom is observed, the π- mass can be obtained with the accuracy higher than 6∼8 orders of magnitude which may contribute to the direct measurement of the upper limit value of muon neutrino mass in the Particle Data Book Mass although various difficulties may be encountered. This report describes briefly the laser spectroscopy at first and then the recent situation of the experiments. (S. Funahashi)

  18. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Soter, A; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  19. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  20. From LEAR to HESR: past, present and future of meson spectroscopy with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meson spectroscopy experiments performed using antiproton beams have carried out a deep and systematic study of all the main open problems of strong interaction in the non-perturbative regime. In this review, I will sketch the major achievements obtained by experiments studying antiproton annihilations at the CERN LEAR machine and at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator. Finally I will illustrate which topics might be addressed, in the next future, by the new antiproton machine (HESR) that will be available at GSI

  1. Antiproton induced DNA damage: proton like in flight, carbon-ion like near rest

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D.J.; Savage, K. I.; Richard, D J; S.J. McMahon(Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, United Kingdom); Hartley, Oliver; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Prise, K M; Bassler, N.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Schettino, G

    2013-01-01

    Biological validation of new radiotherapy modalities is essential to understand their therapeutic potential. Antiprotons have been proposed for cancer therapy due to enhanced dose deposition provided by antiproton-nucleon annihilation. We assessed cellular DNA damage and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a clinically relevant antiproton beam. Despite a modest LET (,19 keV/mm), antiproton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) irradiation caused significant residual c-H2AX foci compared to X-ra...

  2. Ultra-low energy antiprotons for anti hydrogen spectroscopy and antimatter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large scale Penning trap at the Low Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultra-low energy antiprotons for gravitational physics as well as for precision spectroscopy of anti hydrogen for CPT tests

  3. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise. PMID:23664946

  4. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  5. Many Facets of Strangeness Nuclear Physics with Stored Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Pochodzalla, Josef; Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Rojo, Marta Martinez; Steinen, Marcell; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharova, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent a unparalleled factory for hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of strange hadronic systems with unprecedented precision. The behavior of hyperons and -- for the first time -- of antihyperons in nuclear systems can be studied under well controlled conditions. The exclusive production of $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ pairs in antiproton-nucleus interactions probe the neutron and proton distribution in the nuclear periphery and will help to sample the neutron skin. For the first time, high resolution $\\gamma$-spectroscopy of doubly strange nuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of double hypernuclei with mesons beams at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange $\\Xi$-atoms are feasible and even the pr...

  6. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which ∼ 400 x 1010 antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every ∼15 hours

  7. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  8. Antiproton-Nucleus Interaction and Coulomb Effect at High Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; WU Qing; GU Yun-Ting; MA Wei-Xing; TAN Zhen-Qiang; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The Coulomb effect in high energy antiproton-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering from 12C and 16O is studied in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory for five kinetic energies ranged from 0.23 to 1.83 GeV.A microscopic shell-model nuclear wave functions, Woods-Saxon single-particle wave functions, and experimental pN amplitudes are used in the calculations. The results show that the Coulomb effect is of paramount importance for filling up the dips of differential cross sections. We claim that the present result for inelastic scattering of antiproton-12C is sufficiently reliable to be a guide for measurements in the very near future. We also believe that antiproton nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering may produce new information on both the nuclear structure and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, in particular the p-neutron interaction.

  9. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  10. Second Stop and Sbottom Searches with a Stealth Stop

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Qin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The top squarks (stops) may be the most wanted particles after the Higgs boson discovery. The searches for the lightest stop have put strong constraints on its mass. However, there is still a search gap in the low mass region if the spectrum of the stop and the lightest neutralino is compressed. In that case, it may be easier to look for the second stop since naturalness requires both stops to be close to the weak scale. The current experimental searches for the second stop are based on the simplified model approach with the decay modes $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 Z$ and $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 h$. However, in a realistic supersymmetric spectrum there is always a sbottom lighter than the second stop, hence the decay patterns are usually more complicated than the simplified model assumptions. In particular, there are often large branching ratios of the decays $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{b}_1 W$ and $\\tilde{b}_1 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 W$ as long as they are open. The decay chains can be even more complex if there ar...

  11. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  12. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, L R; Burov, A; Crisp, J; Eddy, N; Hu, M; Shemyakin, A

    2012-01-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  13. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Burov, A.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Hu, M.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  14. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half

  15. Relativistic hydrodynamics, heavy ion reactions and antiproton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of relativistic hydrodynamics to relativistic heavy ions and antiproton annihilation is summarized. Conditions for validity of hydrodynamics are presented. Theoretical results for inclusive particle spectra, pion production and flow analysis are given for medium energy heavy ions. The two-fluid model is introduced and results presented for reactions from 800 MeV per nucleon to 15 GeV on 15 GeV per nucleon. Temperatures and densities attained in antiproton annihilation are given. Finally, signals which might indicate the presence of a quark-gluon plasma are briefly surveyed

  16. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  17. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Maynard, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Barriga-Carrasco, M D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Valuev, A A [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-28

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly.

  18. Beam Diagnostics for Measurements of Antiproton Annihilation Cross Sections at Ultra-low Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todoroki K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons collaboration of CERN is currently attempting to measure the antiproton-nucleus in-flight annihilation cross sections on thin target foils of C, Pd, and Pt at 130 keV of kinetic energy. The low-energy antiprotons were supplied by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD and a radio-frequency quadrupole decelerator. For this measurement, a beam profile monitor based on secondary electron emission was developed. Data from this monitor was used to ensure that antiprotons were precisely tuned to the position of an 80-mm-diameter experimental target, by measuring the spatial profile of 200-ns-long beam pulses containing 105 − 106 antiprotons with an active area of 40 mm × 40 mm and a spatial resolution of 4 mm. By using this monitor, we succeeded in finely tuning antiproton beams on the target, and observed some annihilation events originating from the target.

  19. Relativistic theory of stopping for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the electronic stopping power and the corresponding straggling for ions of arbitrary charge number, penetrating matter at any relativistic energy. The stopping powers are calculated by a simple method. Its starting point is the deviation of the precise theory from first-order quantum perturbation. We show that this deviation can be expressed in terms of the transport cross section, σtr, for scattering of a free electron by the ion. In the nonrelativistic case the deviation is precisely the Bloch correction to Bethe close-quote s formula; we look into the nonrelativistic case in order to clarify both some features of our method and a seeming paradox in Rutherford scattering. The corresponding relativistic correction is obtained from σtr for scattering of a Dirac electron in the ion potential. Here, the major practical advantage of the method shows up; we need not find the scattering distribution, but merely a single quantity, σtr, determined by differences of successive phase shifts. For a point nucleus our results improve and extend those of Ahlen. Our final results, however, are based on atomic nuclei with standard radii. Thereby, the stopping is changed substantially already for moderate values of γ=(1-v2/c2)-1/2. An asymptotic saturation in stopping is obtained. Because of finite nuclear size, recoil corrections remain negligible at all energies. The average square fluctuation in energy loss is calculated as a simple fluctuation cross section for a free electron. The fluctuation in the relativistic case is generally larger than that of the perturbation formula, by a factor of ∼2 endash 3 for heavy ions. But the finite nuclear radius leads to a strong reduction at high energies and the elimination of the factor γ2 belonging to point nuclei. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Secondary antiprotons as a Galactic Dark Matter probe

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel determination of the astrophysical uncertainties associated to the secondary antiproton flux originating from cosmic-ray spallation on the interstellar gas. We select a set of propagation models compatible with the recent B/C data from PAMELA, and find those providing minimal and maximal antiproton fluxes in different energy ranges. We use this result to determine the most conservative bounds on relevant Dark Matter (DM) annihilation channels: We find that the recent claim of a DM interpretation of a gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Center region cannot be ruled out by current antiproton data. Finally, we discuss the impact of the recently released preliminary data from AMS-02. In particular, we provide a reference model compatible with proton, helium and B/C spectra from this experiment. Remarkably, the main propagation parameters of this model are in perfect agreement with the best fit presented in our earlier statistical analyses. We also show that the antiproton-to-proton ratio does not...

  1. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  2. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  3. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  4. Delta-Isobar Production in Antiproton Annihilation on the Deuteron

    OpenAIRE

    Lykasov, G. I.; Bussa, M. P.; Valacca, L.

    1997-01-01

    The annihilation of antiprotons on deuterons at rest are investigated for the case when pion-nucleon and pion-delta-isobar pairs are produced. The two-step mechanism is investigated by analysing these processes when either neutral particles and charged ones are produced. Some predictions for the branching ratios are presented.

  5. Ion stopping in heated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion stopping departs from classical, cold material values as the target material heats to appreciable ionization levels. The authors are investigating this phenomenon experimentally on the Proto I accelerator with a radial, Applied-B field ion diode. When the beam is focused to 0.5 TW/cm3 on thin aluminum foil targets the time-resolved departure from cold stopping is clear. Their observations and early interpretations will be presented. 9 references, 9 figures

  6. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  7. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  8. Measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment and a determination of the LS-term for the antiproton-nucleus-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects of this thesis are a measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment, a particle property, with the aim of testing the CPT-theorem for the strong interaction and the investigation of a possible spin-orbit-term of the anti p-nucleus-interaction. For both aspects the information is given in the finestructure-splitting of antiprotonic X-ray-transitions from heavy nuclei, since only for those the splitting is observable. From the finestructure-splitting of the transition 11→10 in 208Pb the magnetic moment of the antiproton can be calculated. The result of this best measurement up to now is μ sub anti p = (-2.8007±0.0091)μN. In between the error bars it confirms the CPT-Theorem and the new average value for the difference of the antiproton magnetic moment from the proton magnetic moment is (μp-anti μ sub anti p)/average = (-2.5±3).10-3. At the same time the limits of our detectors are described and other possibilities are discussed. In 174Yb one observes a splitting of the last observable transition 9→8, which is influenced by the strong interaction. From our measurement we find that the measured splitting is different from the calculated electromagnetic value and the Lorentz-widths of both line components are different as well. It is ΔEsw = 58±25±13 eV and ΔΓ = 195±58±20 eV. As result we find a sign for the existence of a spin-orbit-term of the antiproton-nucleus-interaction. Nevertheless is has to be confirmed in further experiments. (orig./HSI)

  9. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  10. Stopped nucleons in configuration space

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, Andrzej; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note, using the colour string model, we study the configuration space distribution of stopped nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. We find that the stopped nucleons from the target and the projectile end up separated from each other by the distance increasing with the collision energy. In consequence, for the center of mass energies larger than 6 or 10 GeV (depending on the details of the model) it appears that the system created is not in thermal and chemical equilibrium, and the net baryon density reached is likely not much higher than that already present in the colliding nuclei.

  11. Preparations for HFS spectroscopy of antiprotonic 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Antiprotonic helium (pHe) is a neutral exotic atom, consisting of a helium nucleus, an electron and an antiproton. The interactions of the angular momenta and spins of its constituents cause splitting within the principle states. The measured transition frequencies between hyperfine levels can be compared with three-body QED calculations as a test of the theory. Previous measurements have been performed on p4He. The next two years will be dedicated to measuring a similar transition within p3He. Due to the additional coupling to the helion spin, it consists of an octuplet of states instead of a quadruplet. A new microwave cavity has been designed and is being constructed for the transition frequency of 11.14 GHz. This cavity has been simulated using the high frequency structure simulator HFSS to obtain the correct cavity dimensions. A new cryostat to cool the target is under construction. Numerical simulations are also in progress. (author)

  12. Neutron Fluence in Antiproton Radiotherapy, Measurements and Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Materials and Methods: Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute fluence measurements of the thermalized part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The results were compared with the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. Results: The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. Discussion: The secondary neutron fluences encountered in antiproton therapy are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities.

  13. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p ..-->.. ..gamma gamma.. for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology.

  14. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  15. Proton-antiproton annihilation into two photons at large s

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C

    2002-01-01

    Exclusive proton-antiproton annihilation into two photons can be viewed as the Compton process in the crossed channel. At large s (~10 GeV^2) and |t|,|u| s this process can be described by a generalized partonic picture, analogous to the 'soft mechanism' in wide-angle real Compton scattering. The two photons are emitted in the annihilation of a single fast quark and antiquark ('handbag graph'). The transition of the p-pbar system to a q-qbar pair through soft interactions is described by double distributions, which can be related to the timelike proton elastic form factors as well as, by crossing symmetry, to the usual quark--antiquark distributions in the nucleon. We estimate that this reaction should be observable with reasonable statistics at the proposed 1.5..15 GeV high-luminosity antiproton storage ring (HESR) at GSI.

  16. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  17. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Uggerhøj, Ulrik Ingerslev

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  18. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  19. Commissioning of Fermilab's Electron Cooling System for 8-GeV Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gai, Wei; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kazakevich, Grigory; Kramper, Brian J; Kroc, Thomas K; Leibfritz, Jerry; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley M; Saewert, Greg W; Schmidt, Chuck; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V; Sutherland, Mary; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden

    2005-01-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is being currently commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper will report on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  20. Current status of antiproton impact ionization of atoms and molecules: theoretical and experimental perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Tom; Knudsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical progress in the field of antiproton-impact-induced ionization of atoms and molecules is reviewed. We describe the techniques used to measure ionization cross sections and give an overview of the experimental results supplemented by tables of all existing data. An...... status of our understanding of antiproton impact ionization. The related issues of energy loss measurements and antiproton therapy are briefly described and directions for possible future work are pointed out as well....

  1. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  2. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value

  3. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation: antiprotons vs. pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c bar p and π- beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z ≅ 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code

  4. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; M. Boezio; Bogomolov, E.A.; M. Bongi; Bonvicini, V.; Borisov, S.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; F. Cafagna; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of tr...

  5. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  6. Perspectives for low energy antiproton physics at FAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The CRYRING accelerator, previously located at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory of Stockholm University, has been chosen by the FLAIR collaboration as the central accelerator for the planned facility. It has been modified to allow for high-energy injection and extraction and is capable of providing fast and slow extracted beams of antiprotons and highly charged ions. It is currently being installed at the ESR of GSI Darmstadt where it can be used with highly charged ions. The future possibilitie...

  7. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation : antiprotons vs. pions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Laforest, R.; Lefort, T.; Martin, E.; Pienkowski, L.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Remsberg, L. P.; Rowland, D.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V. E.; Winchester, E.; Yennello, S. J.

    1999-05-03

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c {bar p} and {pi}{sup {minus}} beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z {approx_equal} 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4{pi} array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code.

  8. Measurement of antiproton-proton cross sections at low momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis describes an experiment which serves for the study of the antiproton-proton interaction at laboratory momenta between 150 MeV/c and 600 MeV/c. The arrangement permits the measurement of differential cross sections of the elastic scattering and the charge-exchange reaction as well as the cross section of the annihilation into charged and neutral pions. By the availability of an intense beam with low momentum uncertainty from the LEAR storage ring for low energy antiprotons at CERN a clear improvement of the measurement accuracy compared to earlier experiments at separated antiproton beams can be reached. A prototype of the antineutron calorimeter used for the measurement of the angular distribution of the charge-exchange reaction was subjected to a careful test in a separated beam. The results were compared with the results of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the antineutron detection. The cross sections measured in two beam periods in November and December 1983 are consistent with the published data in the hitherto available momentum range above about 350 MeV/c. Especially in the cross section of the annihilation into charged pions a statistically significant signal at a mass of 1937 MeV/c2 appears. However further measurements are necessary to study all systematic causes of errors. (orig.)

  9. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (∼ 50 μeV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge (∼1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  10. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Charged pion albedo induced by cosmic antiproton interactions with the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the calculations of the energy spectra and fluxes of single and double albedo charged pions generated by cosmic proton and antiproton interactions with the lunar surface. Properties of such spectra and related fluxes are investigated in order to clarify some important facets of the antiproton detection via charged pion albedo flux from the lunar surface. Pion albedo measurement may represent a novel approach for the identification of cosmic antiprotons using the lunar surface as a calorimeter. Future scientific programs on the Moon designed to measure antiproton flux may benefit from the results of these calculations. (author)

  12. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons from 3.7 to 19 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, M.; Pfeifer, C.; Menn, W.; Simon, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany); Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Laboratory; Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Ricci, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali, Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-02-01

    The antiproton to proton ratio in the cosmic rays has been measured in the energy range from 3.7 to 19 GeV. This measurement was carried out using a balloon-borne superconducting magnetic spectrometer along with a gas Cherenkov counter, an imaging calorimeter and a time of flight scintillator system. The measured antiproton to proton ratio was determined to be 1.24 (+0.68, -0.51)X 10{sup -4}. The present result along with other recent observations show that the observed abundances of antiprotons are consistent with models, in which antiprotons are produced as secondaries during the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  13. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In [1] we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reprametrizations of the unit interval. I am grateful to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out to me...

  14. In Defence of Thought Stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Gary Maria

    2009-01-01

    Thought stopping (TS) has a long and established history as an effective mental control technique among the cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT). Recent claims have arisen, particularly from acceptance and mindfulness-based authors, that thought suppression--and therefore TS--is counterproductive. These claims take the syllogistic form: TS is a…

  15. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Tunstall, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops ${\\tilde t}_1$, making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are ${\\tilde t_1}\\to t \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, ${\\tilde t_1}\\to W b \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ and ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$. We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ in a model-independent fashion, revealing the existence of large regions in parameter space which are excluded for any ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ branching ratio. This effect is then illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the LHC bounds from ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ searches are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing leads only to a modest increase in the allowed regions of parameter...

  16. Child Violence Can Be Stopped

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Knot

    2000-01-01

    Mehr Khan argues that education, love and support can stop child violence. He argues that the idea that some children are born ‘bad’ and destined to be violent is outdated. Children become violent because of the violence and depravation they experience. Development (2000) 43, 53–54. doi:10.1057/palgrave.development.1110117

  17. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  18. Stop researching transformational leadership! Now!

    OpenAIRE

    Tummers, Lars

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Intro__ Researchers all over the world, stop with your research on transformational leadership! Now! This could be the provocative conclusion after reading the recent article of Profs. Daan van Knippenberg and Sim Sitkin in The Academy of Management Annals (2013). These leadership professors write about the problems surrounding transformational leadership.

  19. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  20. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)