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Sample records for antiproton stopping powers

  1. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  2. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-06

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge. (orig.).

  3. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0. 2 and 3 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The ''Z{sub 1}{sup 3} contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made. (orig.).

  4. Measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons between 0.2 and 3 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    Our previous measurement of the stopping power of silicon for antiprotons has been extended down to 200 keV. The antiproton stopping power is found to be more than 30% lower than that for equivelocity protons at 200 keV. The " Z13 contribution" to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons. Comparisons to theoretical estimates are made.

  5. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  6. Stopping power of antiprotons in H, H2, and He targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The stopping power of antiprotons in atomic and molecular hydrogen as well as helium was calculated in an impact-energy range from 1 keV to 6.4 MeV. In the case of H2 and He the targets were described with a single-active electron model centered on the target. The collision process was treated...... of the corrections to the first-order stopping number, the average energy transferred to the target electrons, and the relative importance of the excitation and the ionization process for the energy loss of the projectile was determined. Finally, the stopping powers of the H, H2, and He targets were directly...

  7. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV.......A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  8. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  9. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons...... significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...

  10. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  11. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  12. Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  13. Stopping Power for Degenerate Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    This is a first attempt at calculating the BPS stopping power with electron degeneracy corrections. Section I establishes some notation and basic facts. Section II outlines the basics of the calculation, and in Section III contains some brief notes on how to proceed with the details of the calculation. The remaining work for the calculation starts with Section III.

  14. Relativistic corrections to stopping powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relativistic corrections to the nonrelativistic Bethe-Bloch formula for the stopping power of matter for charged particles are traditionally computed by considering close collisions separately from distant collisions. The close collision contribution is further divided into the Mott correction appropriate for very small impact parameters, and the Bloch correction, computed for larger values. This division of the region of close collisions leads to a very cumbersome result if one generalizes the original Bloch procedure to relativistic energies. The authors avoid the resulting poorly specified scattering angle theta/sub o/ that divides the Mott and Bloch correction regimes by using the procedure suggested by Lindhard and applied by Golovchenko, Cox and Goland to determine the Bloch correction for relativistic velocities. 25 references, 2 figures

  15. Shell corrections in stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichsel, H.

    2002-05-01

    One of the theories of the electronic stopping power S for fast light ions was derived by Bethe. The algorithm currently used for the calculation of S includes terms known as the mean excitation energy I, the shell correction, the Barkas correction, and the Bloch correction. These terms are described here. For the calculation of the shell corrections an atomic model is used, which is more realistic than the hydrogenic approximation used so far. A comparison is made with similar calculations in which the local plasma approximation is utilized. Close agreement with the experimental data for protons with energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV traversing Al and Si is found without the need for adjustable parameters for the shell corrections.

  16. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  17. Stopping-power calculations for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method developed by Brandt and Reinheimer which explicitly includes the effect of the semiconductor gap has been used to calculate the proton and α-particle stopping powers of the valence-electron gas of C (diamond), ZnTe, and U. These values, as well as those existing for Si and Ge, have been combined with the stopping contribution of the electronic core obtained from the statistical atomic model of Bonderup. Stopping powers have also been calculated using the statistical model alone. The calculated curves, which are valid for all incident projectile energies, reproduce the overall features of the semiempirical slowing-down curves, but not always the absolute values

  18. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    purpose/objective The AD-4/ACE collaboration has recently performed experiments to directly measure the RBE of antiprotons. Antiprotons have very similar stopping power compared to protons, but when they come to rest, antiprotons will annihilate on a target nucleus and thereby release almost 2 Ge...

  19. Inner-shell ionization and stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For better understanding of various aspects in stopping phenomena such as Z13-dependence, shell correction, geometrical effect, direction dependence etc., it seems to be helpful to examine theoretically and experimentally the elementary processes which include plasmon excitation, single electron excitation and inner-shell excitation/ionization. In the present, impact-parameter dependent stopping power is discussed in connection with inner-shell ionization

  20. Proton Stopping Power in Warm Dense Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Drew; Chen, Sophia; Atzeni, Stefano; Gauthier, Maxence; Mangia, Feliciana; Marquès, Jean-Raphaël; Riquier, Raphaël; Fuchs, Julien

    2013-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) research is fundamental to many fields of physics including fusion sciences, and astrophysical phenomena. In the WDM regime, particle stopping-power differs significantly from cold matter and ideal plasma due to free electron contributions, plasma correlation effects and electron degeneracy. The creation of WDM with temporal duration consistent with the particles probes is difficult to achieve experimentally. The short-pulse laser platform allows for the production of WDM along with relatively short bunches of protons compatible of such measurements, however, until recently, the intrinsic broadband proton spectrum was not well suited to investigate the stopping power directly. This difficulty has been overcome using a novel magnetic particle selector (ΔE/E = 10%) to select protons (in the range 100-1000 keV) as demonstrated with the ELFIE laser in LULI, France. These protons bunches probe high-density (5 × 1020 cm-3) gases (H, He) heated by a nanosecond laser to reach estimated temperatures above 100 eV. Measurement of the proton energy loss within the heated gas allows the stopping power to be determined quantitatively. The experimental results in cold matter are compared to preexisting models to give credibility to the measurement technique. The results from heated matter show that the stopping power of 450 keV protons is dramatically reduced within heated hydrogen plasma.

  1. The phase effect of electronic stopping power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaZhong-Quan; ZhengYu-Feng

    1998-01-01

    A corrective factor(φ(E,ρ)≤1) dependent on ion energy and mass density of material for energy loss has been introduced into Bethe-Bloch formula,so that the energy deposition process of fast ion penetrating through the allotropic solid films are well discussed with the two-component assumption.An analysis expression of electronic stopping power for different phase structures has been derived from the contribution of "valence ”and “Core” electrons.The two thirds of inelastic scattering arisen from valence electron was revealed by comparing the theoretical calculation and experimental results on both random and oriented lattice site.THe corrective factor representative to the role of inner electrons increases with the projectile energy but decreases with mass density of solids.

  2. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  3. Low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations were performed using the impact parameter method for antiproton and proton collisions with alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen molecules. The targets are described as effective one-electron systems using appropriate model potentials. The proton data verify the employed method while the results for antiprotons improve the literature on these systems considerably. Cross sections for ionization and excitation as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping power will be presented.

  4. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  5. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ya [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: weijiang@hust.edu.cn [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yi, Lin [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  6. Beam Stop For High-Power Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermid, Iain S.; Williamson, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/aluminum plate absorbs most of light. Beam stop fits on standard optical mounting fixture. Graphite plate thick enough to absorb incident laser beam but thin enough to transfer heat quickly to heat sink. Device used for variety of blocking purposes. For example, blocks laser beam after it passes through experimental setup, or at each stage of setup so stages checked and tested in sequence. Negligible reflectance of device is valuable safety feature, protecting both users and equipment from reflections.

  7. Ion Stopping Powers and Ranges Whenever You Need Them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Christensen, Casper; Tørresø, Jesper Rosholm

    A new app "Electronic Stopping Power" for Android mobile phones and tablets, looks up stopping powers using the ICRU 49 (protons and alphas) and the revised ICRU 73 (lithium and heavier ions) tables. In addition, also MSTAR and an implementation of the Bethe equation expanded to low energies...... are available. The app knows all ICRU materials, and automatically expands the ICRU table and MSTAR data using Bragg's additivity rule when possible. Ion ranges are calculated using the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA), including inverse lookups, i.e. one can determine what projectile energy...... is needed for a given ion range in a given material. The app is available on Google Play for free, and does only require SD-card storage access for saving the stopping power tables. No network connection is needed, making the app usable even when in WiFi free zones. The app is based on the stopping power...

  8. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); Gauthier, Maxence [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-01-15

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  9. Calculation of the relativistic Bloch correction to stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Bloch's technique of joining the nonrelativistic Bethe and Bohr stopping-power expressions by taking into account wave-packet effects for close collisions is extended to the relativistic case. It is found that Bloch's nonrelativistic correction term must be modified and that charge asymmetric terms appear. Excellent agreement is observed by comparing the results of these calculations to recent data on the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions.

  10. Ab initio electronic stopping power of protons in bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukri, Abdullah Atef; Bruneval, Fabien; Reining, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The electronic stopping power is a crucial quantity for ion irradiation: it governs the deposited heat, the damage profile, and the implantation depth. Whereas experimental data are readily available for elemental solids, the data are much more scarce for compounds. Here we develop a fully ab initio computational scheme based on linear response time-dependent density-functional theory to predict the random electronic stopping power (RESP) of materials without any empirical fitting. We show that the calculated RESP compares well with experimental data, when at full convergence, with the inclusion of the core states and of the exchange correlation. We evaluate the unexpectedly limited magnitude of the nonlinear terms in the RESP by comparing with other approaches based on the time propagation of time-dependent density-functional theory. Finally, we check the validity of a few empirical rules of thumbs that are commonly used to estimate the electronic stopping power.

  11. PROTON STOPPING POWER OF DIFFERENT DENSITY PROFILE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first instance, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of a ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as a function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  12. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  13. Stopping power of diamond for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models used to describe the interaction of electrons with the valence band of insulators are discussed. Results for the application of these models to calculate stopping power and mean-free path of low-energy electrons (< 10 KeV) in diamond are presented. The influence of core polarizability, oscillator strength coupling between core and valence electrons, and exchange corrections is included. The contributions to the mean-free path and stopping power from ionization of inner shells have been evaluated from sum-rule-constrained classical binary-collision model. (author)

  14. Stopping powers of metallic elements for high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of metallic elements have been measured for 55, 65 and 73 MeV protons and for 13 MeV/u 4He and 12C ions using a high resolution magnetic spectrograph. Analyzing experimental data for protons with the Bethe-Bloch formula, we deduced mean excitation energies for 10 metallic elements. The magnitude of the Barkas correction was extracted from the stopping power difference for 4He and 12C ions at the same velocity which was found to consistent with that measured in previous experiments. (Author)

  15. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  16. Stopping power modeling in warm and hot dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is presented to calculate the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Comparisons with experiment in the cold dense regime are presented and discussed. Further, we present results from the warm dense matter regime and the field of high energy density physics. (authors)

  17. Proton stopping powers in some low-Z elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharada, K S

    1993-12-01

    For some calculations, the proton stopping power in tissue must be known accurately. The composition of tissue was assumed to be constituted of 11 elements; the proton stopping powers were available for hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Those for the remaining 7 elements for the energy range 0.5 to 10 MeV at intervals of 0.5 MeV are evaluated and presented in this paper. Corrections such as the Barkas effect correction, Bloch's correction, and shell correction are evaluated and used in the calculation of proton stopping powers. Corrections for the Bethe formula for heavy ions were suggested by Barkas et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 11, 26, 1963) when they observed that the stopping powers for positive ions were larger than those for the negative ions with identical velocities. They suggested that a charge-dependent correction term be incorporated in the Bethe formula. Theoretical estimates of this correction derived by Ashley et al. (Phys. Rev. 85, 2392-2397, 1972) were used in the calculation of the Barkas effect. The Barkas effect correction depends on projectile velocity and Z. It decreases with energy. To account for the discrepancy between the classical and the quantum mechanical treatment of the Bethe formula, Bloch (Ann. Phys. 285, Chap. 18, 1933) suggested a correction to the stopping-power formula; this correction is also evaluated in this paper. Bloch's correction also decreases with energy. The shell correction needed for the binding of the electrons in the target atom is also calculated using Walske's asymptotic formula taking into account the screening effect of the atomic electrons of the K and L shells of the target atom. A computer program was written to calculate the stopping powers of protons with all these corrections for seven low-Z elements which are part of the tissue composition. These values are compared with those of other authors, and fairly good agreement is found. The lack of sufficient experimental information and uncertainty in the mean

  18. Dielectric description of wakes and stopping powers in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Abril Sánchez, Isabel; García Molina, Rafael; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; Pérez Pérez, F. Javier; Arista, Néstor R.

    1998-01-01

    The dielectric description of the dynamical potential induced by swift protons in solids and the related stopping power is analyzed, using a combination of Mermin-type dielectric functions, which are fitted to available experimental data, to describe the optical properties of various materials. We apply this method to represent the energy loss functions of aluminum, silicon, amorphous carbon, and copper on a wide range of energy and momentum transfers. Using these functions we calculate the s...

  19. Stopping power of Mylar for heavy ions up to copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Annu; Kumar, Shyam E-mail: search@vidja.kuk.ernet.insearch@granth.kuk.ernet.in; Sharma, S.K.; Diwan, P.K.; Nath, N.; Mittal, V.K.; Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D.K

    2000-10-01

    The stopping powers of Mylar for several heavy ions covering Z=11 to 29 in the energy range {approx}0.3 to 2.3 MeV/n have been measured using the elastic recoil detection technique and twin detector system. The technique provided a unique method to generate a variety of variable energy ion species utilizing a fixed energy 140 MeV Ag{sup 13+} primary beam from the Pelletron accelerator facility at Nuclear Science Center, New Delhi, India. Most of these measurements are new. The experimentally measured stopping power values have been compared with those calculated using LSS theory, Ziegler et al. formulation and Northcliffe and Schilling tabulations. Merits and demerits of these formulations are highlighted. Stopping power calculations using the Hubert et al. formulation have been extended successfully beyond its recommended range of validity, i.e. 2.5-500 MeV/n down to energies as low as 0.5 MeV/n.

  20. Calculation of stopping power ratios for carbon ion dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithner, Oksana; Andreo, P.; Sobolevsky, N.; Hartmann, G.; Jäkel, O.

    2006-05-01

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used, which is a newly developed version where substantial modifications were implemented on its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1 (Gudowska et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1933-58). The code was completely rewritten replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe-Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. In addition, the code includes optionally MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data. The fragmentation model was verified and its parameters were also adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. It has been used to compute the physical quantities needed for the calculation of stopping power ratios, swater,air, of carbon beams. Compared with the recommended constant value given in the IAEA Code of Practice, the differences found in the present investigations varied between 0.5% and 1% at the plateau region, respectively for 400 MeV/u and 50 MeV/u beams, and up to 2.3% in the vicinity of the Bragg peak for 50 MeV/u.

  1. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  2. Calculation of runaway electrons stopping power in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy loss rate of runaway electrons (RE) was analysed for ITER plasma facing components materials (Be and W). The stopping power, the energy deposition profiles, and the material erosion are estimated by using the codes MEMOS and ENDEP. The latter has been updated by including the effect of the target's polarizability. Our calculations show that this effect is significant for high RE energies and low Z materials such as Be. We also find that the conversion of the RE's magnetic energy into heat can explain the temperature rise on dump plate in JET. In the case of ITER, the calculated heat deposition due to RE is almost two times the melting threshold energy of Be but well below that of W.

  3. Stopping Power for Strong Beam-Plasma Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Dirk O.

    2001-10-01

    The slowing down process of charged particles in plasma targets is investigated for the case of strong beam-plasma coupling. Strong beam-plasma correlations can be considered using the collision operator of the quantum Boltzmann equation. As a first step, dynamic screening is included in the first Born approximation. This approach gives good results for moderate beam-plasma coupling (Zb Γ^3/2 Bethe-formula, the standard model of the stopping power (Bethe plus Bloch corrections and Barkas terms), the Li & Petrasso formula and simulation data (MD and PIC), is given. This comparison clearly shows the advantage of the proposed model: it smoothly interpolates between the classical low velocity regime, where strong coupling effects occur, and the high velocity quantum regime, where collective modes are important. In the latter case, the experimentally proven Bethe-formula is obtained. Furthermore, it matches the simulation data for moderate as well as strong beam-plasma coupling.

  4. New stopping power formula for intermediate energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hasan

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a new stopping power (SP) formula for electrons. In the modified Bethe-Bloch SP expression, analytical expressions for the effective charge and effective mean excitation energies (EMEE) of target atoms are used, while for the effective charge of incoming electrons, Sugiyama's semiempirical formula from Peterson and Green is used. An analytical expression for practical SP calculations is obtained using the Bethe approximation and a Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. The calculated results of the SP for electrons in some materials, such as H(2)O, H(2), CO(2), N(2), and O(2), are compared with experimental data, together with Penelope code results and a number of other semiempirical and analytical calculations. PMID:18586505

  5. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  6. Measurement of stopping power ratios for 60 MeV positive or negative pions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, J A; Henkelman, R M

    1979-07-01

    Pion stopping power ratios are essential parameters for pion radiotherapy treatment planning. The validity of scaling proton stopping powers to pions is called into question since the pion mass is intermediate between the electron and proton masses. Direct measurements of stopping power ratios with respect to water were made for 60 MeV pions of both charges in Teflon, Plexiglas, nylon, paraffin, gelatine, tissue-equivalent plastic (Shonka A150), graphite, aluminium, steel and copper. Corrections for multiple scattering and energy dependence of the stopping power are applied. Measured stopping power ratios at an accuracy of 0.6% are in agreement to within the limits of experimental error with stopping power ratios calculated from the Bethe-Bloch equation using elemental I-values and Bragg additivity. PMID:112597

  7. Stopping powers of energetic electrons penetrating condensed matter--theory and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhen-Yu; XIA Yue-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, the motivation of studying inelastic energy loss for energetic electrons penetrating through matter and the corresponding technological importance have been outlined. The theoretical development and method for the calculation of stopping powers are described. The stopping power data tables for a group of polymers and bioorganic compounds are presented, and the application aspects of the stopping power data are briefly discussed.

  8. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 124 Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  9. Example of an Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, O.; Chupp, W.W.; Ekspong, A.G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Lofgren, E.J.; Segre, E.; Wiegand, C.; Amaldi, E.; Baroni,G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-02-27

    The existence of antiprotons has recently been demonstrated at the Berkeley Bevatron by a counter experiment. The antiprotons were found among the momentum-analyzed (1190 Mev/c) negative particles emitted by a copper target bombarded by 6.2-Bev protons. Concurrently with the counter experiment, stacks of nuclear emulsions were exposed in the beam adjusted to 1090 Mev/c negative particles in an experiment designed to observe the properties of antiprotons when coming to rest. This required a 132 g/cm2 copper absorber to slow down the antiprotons sufficiently to stop them in the emulsion stack. Only one antiproton was found in stacks in which seven were expected, assuming a geometric interaction cross section for antiprotons in copper. It has now been found that the cross section in copper is about twice geometric, which explains this low yield.

  10. Modified predictive formula for the electron stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an improved predictive formula for the electron stopping power (SP) based on an analysis and fit of SPs and electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) calculated from optical data for 37 elemental solids and energies between 200 eV and 30 keV. The formula is a function of energy, density, and IMFP, and is recommended for solids with atomic numbers larger than 6. While the mean deviation between predicted and calculated SPs was 7.25%, larger deviations were found for four additional materials, Li (22.2%), Be (17.9%), graphite (15.3%), and diamond (15.7%). The predictive SP formula can be applied to multicomponent materials. Test comparisons for two compounds, guanine and InSb, showed average deviations of 16.0% and 19.1%, respectively. The improved SP formula is expected to be useful in simulations of electron trajectories in solids with the continuous slowing-down approximation (e.g., in Auger-electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis)

  11. Mean excitation energy for the stopping power of light elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Shiles, E.

    2006-09-01

    We have evaluated the mean excitation energy or I value for Coulomb excitations by swift charged particles passing through carbon, aluminum and silicon. A self-consistent Kramers-Kronig analysis was used to treat X-ray optical spectra now available from synchrotron light sources allowing us to carry out Bethe's original program of evaluating I from the observed dielectric response. We find that the K and L shell are the dominant contributors to I in these light elements and that the contribution of valence electrons is relatively small, primarily because of their low binding energy. The optical data indicate that Si and Al have nearly equal I values, in contrast to Bloch's Thomas-Fermi result, I ∝ Z. The optically based I values for C and Al are in excellent agreement with experiment. However, the dielectric-response I value for Si is 164 ± 2 eV, at variance with the commonly quoted value of 173 ± 3 eV derived from stopping-power measurements.

  12. An experimental investigation of charge-dependent deviations from the Bethe stopping power formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Simonsen, H.; Sørensen, H.

    1969-01-01

    The stopping powers of aluminiun and tantalum for 5–13.5 MeV protons and deuterons and 8–20 MeV 3He and 4He have been measured. At identical velocities, the ratio between the stopping powers for the double-charged and the single-charged ions is systematically higher than the factor four predicted...

  13. Modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters for a wide range of elements and compounds. This formula maintains the generality of the Bethe formula and gives reasonable agreement in comparing the predicted stopping powers for 15 elements and 6 compounds with the experimental data and those calculated within dielectric theory including the exchange effect. Use of the stopping power obtained from this formula for hydrogen silsesquioxane in Monte Carlo simulation gives the energy deposition distribution in consistent with the experimental data. - Highlights: • We propose a modified Bethe formula for low-energy electron stopping power without fitting parameters. • Our formula is found based on the stopping power calculated by the dielectric theory including the exchange effect. • We calculate the energy deposition distribution of 3 keV electrons in 15 nm HSQ resist layer on Si substrate

  14. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  15. Antiproton trapping in various helium media: report of the HELIUMTRAP experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELIUMTRAP (PS205) investigates the recently discovered anomalously long-lived states of antiprotons in various helium media. An overview is given of experiments stopping antiprotons in several phases of helium performed at LEAR in the last two years. (author)

  16. Implications of different stopping power models on target heating simulations using HYDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Barnard, John; Henestroza, Enrique; Kerbel, Gary; Marinak, Marty

    2007-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of ion driven Warm Dense Matter experiments requires accurate models of stopping powers for targets with temperatures up to a few eV. For finite temperature targets, energy loss of beam ions is comprised of contributions from nuclear stopping, bound electron stopping, and free electron stopping. We compare two different stopping power algorithms and the implications on target heating for two different beams corresponding to the current Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) and proposed NDCX II experiments. The NDCX I beam has a beam energy much lower than the Bragg peak while the NDCX II beam is designed to enter the target just above the Bragg peak, and exit just below. The first stopping power algorithm is based on the classical Bethe-Bloch formulation as is currently implemented in the HYDRA simulation code. The second algorithm is based on rescaling of experimental protonic stopping powers as developed by Brandt and Kitagawa for nuclear and bound electronic stopping, and free electron stopping following the model developed by Peter and Meyer-ter-Vehn.

  17. Simulation of phosphorus implantation into silicon with a single-parameter electronic stopping power model

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, D; Beardmore, K M; Grønbech-Jensen, N

    1998-01-01

    We simulate dopant profiles for phosphorus implantation into silicon using a new model for electronic stopping power. In this model, the electronic stopping power is factorized into a globally averaged effective charge Z1*, and a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. There is only a single adjustable parameter in the model, namely the one electron radius rs0 which controls Z1*. By fine tuning this parameter, we obtain excellent agreement between simulated dopant profiles and the SIMS data over a wide range of energies for the channeling case. Our work provides a further example of implant species, in addition to boron and arsenic, to verify the validity of the electronic stopping power model and to illustrate its generality for studies of physical processes involving electronic stopping.

  18. Calculations on the stopping power of a heterogeneous Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Schnürer, Matthias; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Morales, Roberto; González-Gallego, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is estimated by means of the individual contributions of free electrons and bound electrons existing in this special kind of matter, located between classical and degenerate plasmas. For free electrons, the dielectric formalism, well described in previous works of our research group, is used to estimate free electron stopping power. For bound electrons, mean excitation energy of ions is used. Excitation energies are obtained through atomic calculations of the whole atom or, shell by shell in order to estimate their stopping power. Influence of temperature and density is analyzed in case of an impinging projectile. This influence became important for low projectile velocities and negligible for high ones. Using both analysis, the stopping power of an extended WDM is inferred from a dynamical calculation of energy transferred from the projectile to the plasma, where the Bragg peak and stopping range are calculated. Finally, this theoretical framework is used to stud...

  19. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  20. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  1. Comment on Stopping power of nonmonochromatic heavy-ion clusters with two-ion correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the results of Lontano and Raimondi [Phys. Rev. E 51, R2755 (1995)] within the full random-phase approximation. We show that the correlation and also velocity dispersion of the cluster ions enhance and reduce the stopping power, respectively. Nevertheless, the enhancement of energy losses due to ionic correlation is much stronger than that obtained by Lontano and Raimondi, and furthermore, the projectile velocity dependence of the stopping power is strictly monotonic, presenting no oscillations. We also did not obtain negative values for the cluster stopping power, as did Lontano and Raimondi. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Influence of electron motion in target atom on stopping power for low-energetic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stopping power was calculated, representing the electrons of the target atom as an assembly of quantum oscillators. It was considered that the electrons in the atoms have some velocity before interaction with the projectile, which is the main contribution of this paper. The influence of electron velocity on stopping power for different projectiles and targets was investigated. It was found that the velocity of the electron stopping power has the greatest influence at low energies of the projectile.

  3. Stopping power for particle therapy: the generic library libdEdx and clinically relevant stopping-power ratios for light ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Toftegaard, Jakob; Kantemiris, Ioannis;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Stopping-power data enter at a number of different places in particle therapy and their uncertainties have a direct impact on the accuracy of the therapy, e.g., in treatment planning. Furthermore, for clinical quality assurance, the particle beam stopping-power ratios (STPR) have...... of target materials. Calculations of STPR in the case of spread-out Bragg-peaks (SOBP) are performed with the Monte Carlo transportation code SHIELD-HIT (SHIELD-Heavy Ion Transport) using different ions relevant for particle therapy. Results: For SOBP the water-to-air STPR depends on the residual range...

  4. Electronic stopping power for heavy ions in SiC and SiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Grove, David A. [Luxel Corporation; Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xue, Jianming [Peking University; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Accurate information of electronic stopping power is fundamental for broad advances in electronic industry, space exploration, national security, and sustainable energy technologies. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely applied to predict stopping powers and ion distributions for decades. Recent experimental results have, however, shown considerable errors in the SRIM predictions for stopping of heavy ions in compounds containing light elements, indicating an urgent need to improve current stopping power models. The electronic stopping powers of 35Cl, 80Br, 127I, and 197Au ions are experimentally determined in two important functional materials, SiC and SiO2, from tens to hundreds keV/u based on a single ion technique. By combining with the reciprocity theory, new electronic stopping powers are suggested in a region from 0 to 15 MeV, where large deviations from SRIM predictions are observed. For independent experimental validation of the electronic stopping powers we determined, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are utilized to measure the depth profiles of implanted Au ions in SiC with energies from 700 keV to 15 MeV. The measured ion distributions from both RBS and SIMS are considerably deeper (up to ~30%) than the predictions from the commercial SRIM code. In comparison, the new electronic stopping power values are utilized in a modified TRIM-85 (the original version of the SRIM) code, M-TRIM, to predict ion distributions, and the results are in good agreement with the experimentally measured ion distributions.

  5. New method for measuring stopping powers using ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for measuring the stopping power of matter for ions is presented. The techniques used are those developed for use in trace element analysis by proton induced x-ray emission. This new method has been validated by comparing the measured stopping powers for copper, silver, and gold at 100 keV with those reported by Allison and Warshaw for free standing foils. The agreement is excellent: +-1% for both copper and silver and +-2% for gold

  6. Monte Carlo Simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2009-01-01

    Many papers discussed the I value for water given by the ICRU, concluding that a value of about 80±2  eV instead of 67.2  eV would reproduce measured ion depth-dose curves. A change in the I value for water would have an effect on the stopping power and, hence, on the water-to-air stopping power ...

  7. Charged Particle Stopping Power in Dense Plasmas: Improvements, Validation, and Practical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Charged particle stopping power is an important quantity that arises in thermonuclear burn, particle beam experiments, and fast ignition. Because stopping power models arise from kinetic theory collision operators and stopping power is a velocity-resolved non-equilibrium statistical mechanics problem, exact values of stopping power are ideal quantities for validating collision models. By directly comparing classical molecular dynamics simulations with stopping models derived from both linear response and binary cross section pictures, we have quantified the accuracy of these models and determined which physics is needed as a function of Coulomb coupling, projectile charge, and velocity. We have found that for divergent linear response theories, a velocity-dependent cutoff works better than a simpler temperature-dependent cutoff, but both fail when the velocity of the projectile is low and the Coulomb coupling is large. This problem is somewhat rectified by the inclusion of local field corrections. Alternatively, one can use a binary cross section in constructing a collision operator for better inclusion of strong scattering. We find that low-velocity stopping can be significantly improved by including non-linear screening of the target particles when calculating this cross section. We extend this knowledge to the quantum case, giving the relative contributions of Heisenberg uncertainty, degeneracy, and quantum scattering. This work was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 09-SI-011.

  8. One-stop shopping behavior, buyer power, and upstream merger incentives

    OpenAIRE

    von Schlippenbach, Vanessa; Wey, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We analyze how consumer preferences for one-stop shopping affect the bargaining relationship between a retailer and its suppliers. One-stop shopping preferences create demand complementarities among otherwise independent products which lead to two opposing effects on upstream merger incentives: first a standard double mark-up problem and second a bargaining effect. The former creates merger incentives while the later induce suppliers to bargain separately. When buyer power becomes large enoug...

  9. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, sw,m, have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm2. Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of sw,m calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, sw,m changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of sw,m, reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung

  10. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases

  11. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  12. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  13. The stopping power and carbon ion ranges in elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of the heavy ions stopping cross sections calculation are discussed. The stopping ppower and C12 ions ranges are evaluated using the protons stopping data in matter and Pirson's and Blanns formula for the effectvive charge. The energy losses due to the elastic collisions with atoms have been taken into account in low energies. The RBregg's rule was used to calculate the stopping power of compounds. The comparison with the evailable data showed a good agreement. The C12 ions ranges with energies from 0.01 to 10 NMeV/nucleon for elements from hydrogen to uranium and several compounds are tabulated. The C12 ions energy losses in the layers of definite thickness can be determined using these tables

  14. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  15. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild;

    2015-01-01

    development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... of detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Results. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors...

  16. Stopping powers of gases for ions of energy below 200 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been renewed interest in the stopping power of matters for ions in low energy region. But there is not an established theory in this energy region, and experimental data did not coincide with the curves in some data books. Therefore, precise experimental measurement is still necessary. In present neutron dosimetry, tissues are the object of measurement of absorbed dose. In this experiment, it was intended to use tissue equivalent gas as a target gas. In the experimental apparatus, ions come from the Cockcroft-Walton accelerator are applied to the cell, in which the target gas is admitted from gas source. Gas in the cell is observed with the electrostatic energy analyzer. Stopping power is calculated from the results of energy loss measurement. In this report, only the preliminary results are shown. The tissue equivalent gas is composed of CH4, CO2 and N2, each percentage is 64.95, 32.2 and 2.85, respectively. It seems that the stopping powers of noble gases will be useful for the developments of the theory, and the stopping power for He+ ions was measured. The results are shown in a figure, and the errors were estimated to be less than 1.5%. At the end of the report, some discussions among a few persons are added. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Stopping powers for MeV Ge ions in Al foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Stopping powers for Ge ions (3.5MeV~8.0MeV) in Al foil were measured with RBS (Rutherford backscattering) technique and determined with a new method. Our results are much smaller than the values predicted by the TRIM code and LSS theory.

  18. Mean excitation energies for stopping power as derived from oscillator-strength distributions. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inokuti, M; Turner, J E

    1978-01-01

    The concept of mean excitation energy, I, and its relation to stopping-power measurements are briefly discussed. The recent theoretical and experimental advances in obtaining I directly from oscillator-strength distributions for atoms, molecules, solids, and liquids are reviewed. Numerical results are summarized.

  19. Power in discursive practices: The case of the STOP EPAs campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Felice, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Transnational activism has increased in relation to international trade and development politics in the past decades, yet their power has been inadequately studied. This article analyses the STOP EPAs campaign (2004-2009) which aimed to influence the negotiations of Economic Partnership Agreements b

  20. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration at CERN is investigating the anticipated benefit of antiproton radiotherapy. The experimental tasks have been twofold: 1) To quantify the radiobiological properties of the antiproton beam. 2) Perform absolute dosimetry on a pulsed antiproton beam. In order to do define ...

  1. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  2. Polarization of antiprotons by antiproton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of polarized antiproton beams at Fermilab is briefly reviewed. Two types of high-energy anti p polarimeters are described - the Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter and the Primakoff-effect polarimeter. The production of 8.9 GeV/c polarized antiprotons before entering the Fermilab accumulator ring is then discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs

  3. Inventory of nuclear power plants and research reactors temporary or definitively stopped in industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data and information on the end of the life of nuclear reactors. One deals more particularly with installations of industrialized countries. This report gives the motivations which have involved the definitive shut down of nuclear power plants and of research reactors in the concerned countries. A schedule of definitive reactor shutdowns is presented. Then, one deals with nuclear power plants of which the construction has been stopped. The reasons of these situations are also given. The temporary difficulties met during the construction or the starting of nuclear power plants these last years are mentioned. Most times, there are economical or political considerations, or safety reasons. Finally, the nuclear power plants stopped for more than two years are mentioned

  4. WE-D-BRF-05: Quantitative Dual-Energy CT Imaging for Proton Stopping Power Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the two-parameter separable basis-vector model (BVM) to estimation of proton stopping power from dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. Methods: BVM assumes that the photon cross sections of any unknown material can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding quantities for two bracketing basis materials. We show that both the electron density (ρe) and mean excitation energy (Iex) can be modeled by BVM, enabling stopping power to be estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation. We have implemented an idealized post-processing dual energy imaging (pDECT) simulation consisting of monogenetic 45 keV and 80 keV scanning beams with polystyrene-water and water-CaCl2 solution basis pairs for soft tissues and bony tissues, respectively. The coefficients of 24 standard ICRU tissue compositions were estimated by pDECT. The corresponding ρe, Iex, and stopping power tables were evaluated via BVM and compared to tabulated ICRU 44 reference values. Results: BVM-based pDECT was found to estimate ρe and Iex with average and maximum errors of 0.5% and 2%, respectively, for the 24 tissues. Proton stopping power values at 175 MeV, show average/maximum errors of 0.8%/1.4%. For adipose, muscle and bone, these errors result range prediction accuracies less than 1%. Conclusion: A new two-parameter separable DECT model (BVM) for estimating proton stopping power was developed. Compared to competing parametric fit DECT models, BVM has the comparable prediction accuracy without necessitating iterative solution of nonlinear equations or a sample-dependent empirical relationship between effective atomic number and Iex. Based on the proton BVM, an efficient iterative statistical DECT reconstruction model is under development.

  5. Simple polynomial approximation to modified Bethe formula low-energy electron stopping powers data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A., E-mail: ana.taborda@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Reis, M.A. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-08-01

    A recently published detailed and exhaustive paper on cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons clearly shows that electron phenomena occurring in parallel with X-ray processes may have been dramatically overlooked for many years, mainly when low atomic number species are involved since, in these cases, the fluorescence coefficient is smaller than the Auger yield. An immediate problem is encountered while attempting to tackle the issue. Accounting for electron phenomena requires the knowledge of the stopping power of electrons within, at least, a reasonably small error. Still, the Bethe formula for stopping powers is known to not be valid for electron energies below 30 keV, and its use leads to values far off experimental ones. Recently, a few authors have addressed this problem and both detailed tables of electron stopping powers for various atomic species and attempts to simplify the calculations, have emerged. Nevertheless, its implementation in software routines to efficiently calculate keV electron effects in materials quickly becomes a bit cumbersome. Following a procedure already used to establish efficient methods to calculate ionisation cross-sections by protons and alpha particles, it became clear that a simple polynomial approximation could be set, which allows retrieving the electronic stopping powers with errors of less than 20% for energies above 500 eV and less than 50% for energies between 50 eV and 500 eV. In this work, we present this approximation which, based on just six parameters, allows to recover electron stopping power values that are less than 20% different from recently published experimentally validated tabulated data.

  6. Simple polynomial approximation to modified Bethe formula low-energy electron stopping powers data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently published detailed and exhaustive paper on cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons clearly shows that electron phenomena occurring in parallel with X-ray processes may have been dramatically overlooked for many years, mainly when low atomic number species are involved since, in these cases, the fluorescence coefficient is smaller than the Auger yield. An immediate problem is encountered while attempting to tackle the issue. Accounting for electron phenomena requires the knowledge of the stopping power of electrons within, at least, a reasonably small error. Still, the Bethe formula for stopping powers is known to not be valid for electron energies below 30 keV, and its use leads to values far off experimental ones. Recently, a few authors have addressed this problem and both detailed tables of electron stopping powers for various atomic species and attempts to simplify the calculations, have emerged. Nevertheless, its implementation in software routines to efficiently calculate keV electron effects in materials quickly becomes a bit cumbersome. Following a procedure already used to establish efficient methods to calculate ionisation cross-sections by protons and alpha particles, it became clear that a simple polynomial approximation could be set, which allows retrieving the electronic stopping powers with errors of less than 20% for energies above 500 eV and less than 50% for energies between 50 eV and 500 eV. In this work, we present this approximation which, based on just six parameters, allows to recover electron stopping power values that are less than 20% different from recently published experimentally validated tabulated data

  7. Stopping Power of Be, Al, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au for 5-12-MeV Protons and Deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Hanke, C.; Sørensen, H.;

    1967-01-01

    Recent measurements on stopping power of aluminum have been continued with the stopping materials Be, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au. The method of measuring stopping powers utilizing a thermometric compensation technique working at liquid-helium temperature has been used. Results are obtained with a standard...... deviation of 0.3%, and agree with other published experimental results and with Bichsel's tabulated values within their stated errors....

  8. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  9. AMS-02 Antiprotons Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    Kappl, Rolf; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has released preliminary data on the antiproton fraction in cosmic rays. The surprisingly hard antiproton spectrum at high rigidity has triggered speculations about a possible primary antiproton component originating from dark matter annihilations. In this note, we employ newly available AMS-02 boron to carbon data to update the secondary antiproton flux within the standard two-zone diffusion model. The new background permits a considerably better fit to the measured antiproton fraction compared to previous estimates. This is mainly a consequence of the smaller slope of the diffusion coefficient favored by the new AMS-02 boron to carbon data.

  10. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02 g/cm3 and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17 eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas

  11. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Purpose: In ion beam therapy electronic stopping power data enter in different disciplines, e.g., dose planning, dosimetry, and radiobiology. However, relevant stopping power data are only known within an accuracy of 2%-10%. We started the software library project libdEdx to unify data ...

  12. Calculation of water/air stopping-power ratios using EGS4 with explicit treatment of electron-positron differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation program, a general purpose code has been written to calculate Bragg--Gray and Spencer--Attix stopping-power ratios for use in radiation dosimetry. The stopping-power ratios can be calculated in any material in any region in a general cylindrical geometry with a large number of source geometries possible. The calculations take into account for the first time the differences between the stopping powers and the inelastic scattering of positrons and electrons. The results show that previous calculations ignoring these effects were accurate. The present results agree, typically within 0.1%, with the Spencer--Attix water-to-air stopping-power ratios for broad parallel beams of electrons given in the AAPM and IAEA protocols except at the surface where the present calculations follow the buildup of secondary electrons in more detail and see a 2% reduction in the stopping-power ratios

  13. Electronic stopping powers for Be, Ca and Ti in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy loss of ions in matter is fundamental to many applications dependent on the transport of ions in matter. In spite of a long history of studies, the electronic stopping power is not adequately described over all ranges of ions, energies and targets, particularly in the case of heavy ions or compound targets. In this study, stopping powers for Be, Ca and Ti in SiC have been determined using a time-of-flight energy elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA) set-up. In transmission geometry, the energy loss of heavy ions in a self-supporting SiC foil was measured over a continuous range of energies using the ToF data that was tagged by a Si detector with and without the stopping foil. By essentially calibrating the Si detector for each channel over the measured energy region based on TOF spectrometry, measurement uncertainties of less than 4% are achieved. In comparing with the experimental data, both the SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code and the binary theory provide reasonable predictions

  14. Analytical Solution for the Stopping Power of the Cherenkov Radiation in a Uniaxial Nanowire Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago A. Morgado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We derive closed analytical formulae for the power emitted by moving charged particles in a uniaxial wire medium by means of an eigenfunction expansion. Our analytical expressions demonstrate that, in the absence of material dispersion, the stopping power of the uniaxial wire medium is proportional to the charge velocity, and that there is no velocity threshold for the Cherenkov emission. It is shown that the eigenfunction expansion formalism can be extended to the case of dispersive lossless media. Furthermore, in the presence of material dispersion, the optimal charge velocity that maximizes the emitted Cherenkov power may be less than the speed of light in a vacuum.

  15. Electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    Atomistic calculations of the electronic stopping power in liquid water for protons and α particles from first principles are demonstrated without relying on linear response theory. The computational approach is based on nonequilibrium simulation of the electronic response using real-time time-dependent density functional theory. By quantifying the velocity dependence of the steady-state charge of the projectile proton and α particle from nonequilibrium electron densities, we examine the extent to which linear response theory is applicable. We further assess the influence of the exchange-correlation approximation in real-time time-dependent density functional theory on the stopping power with range-separated and regular hybrid functionals with exact exchange.

  16. Range distributions and electronic stopping power of nitrogen ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation the authors wish to report on some recent data, developed at the Naval Surface Weapons Center, that pertain to range distributions and electronic stopping powers of nitrogen ions in solid elemental targets. They had previously inferred electronic stopping powers of nitrogen in the energy region to 800 keV in targets having atomic numbers Z2 = 22 to 32 and 40 to 52, as well as in C, Si, Ta, Au, and Pb. The general feature of the Z2 oscillations were observed, with minima occurring at the positions of the closed d shells. In particular, the measured data show minima occurring near Cu and Ag. The motivation of the present investigation was to determine if a minimum also occurs near Au, as theory predicts, as well as to study the regions about the rare earth materials, to verify the maxima predicted. 9 references, 5 figures

  17. Tunable proton stopping power of deuterium-tritium by mixing heavy ion dopants for fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. B.; Hu, L. X.; Wang, W. Q.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zhang, G. B.; Ouyang, J. M.; Shao, F. Q.; Zhuo, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical model of charged-particle stopping power for the Coulomb logarithm lnΛb ≥ 2 plasma [Phys. Rev. Lett., 20, 3059 (1993)] is extended to investigate the transport of the energetic protons in a compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) pellet mixed with heavy ion dopants. It shows that an increase of mixed-ion charge state and density ratio results in the substantial enhancement of the proton stopping power, which leads to a shorter penetration distance and an earlier appearance of the Bragg peak with a higher magnitude. The effect of hot-spot mix on the proton-driven fast ignition model is discussed. It is found that ignition time required for a small mixed hot-spot can be significantly reduced with slightly increased beam energy. Nevertheless, the ignition cannot maintain for a long time due to increasing alpha-particle penetration distance and energy loss from mechanical work and thermal conduction at high temperatures.

  18. The Barkas-Effect Correction to Bethe-Bloch Stopping Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    A brief history of the discovery of the Barkas-effect correction to the Bethe-Bloch stopping power formula is presented, followed by a recounting of the initial theoretical calculations prepared as a quantitative explanation. A current version of the modified Bethe-Bloch formula is described in detail. An overview of the current capability to assess the validity of several existing formalisms for calculating the Barkas-effect correction term is provided, in the course of which discussion of numerous sources of uncertainty ensues. Finally, an opinion on the significance of this departure from Bethe-Bloch theory is offered, along with a presentation of a few recent developments and of some areas for focus in future exploration in the field of the stopping power of matter for charged particles.

  19. The Barkas effect and other higher-order Z1-contributions to the stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental evidence for contributions to the stopping power proportional to Z13 (Barkas effect) and Z14 (Bloch correction) at velocities around 10 v0 is reviewed. Quantitative evidence is found for both terms but it is not possible experimentally to discern whether hard collisions contribute to the Barkas term. Evidence from single-collision events are drawn into the discussion and some experiments which may turn out to be decisive are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Ion energy loss at maximum stopping power in a laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of this thesis, a new experimental setup for the measurement of the energy loss of carbon ions at maximum stopping power in a hot laser-generated plasma has been developed and successfully tested. In this parameter range where the projectile velocity is of the same order of magnitude as the thermal velocity of the plasma free electrons, large uncertainties of up to 50% are present in the stopping-power description. To date, no experimental data are available to perform a theory benchmarking. Testing the different stopping theories is yet essential for inertial confinement fusion and in particular for the understanding of the alpha-particle heating of the thermonuclear fuel. Here, for the first time, precise measurements were carried out in a reproducible and entirely characterized beam-plasma configuration. It involved a nearly fully-stripped ion beam probing a homogeneous fully-ionized plasma. This plasma was generated by irradiating a thin carbon foil with two high-energy laser beams and features a maximum electron temperature of 200 eV. The plasma conditions were simulated with a two-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic code, while the ion-beam charge-state distribution was predicted by means of a Monte-Carlo code describing the charge-exchange processes of projectile ions in plasma. To probe at maximum stopping power, high-frequency pulsed ion bunches were decelerated to an energy of 0.5 MeV per nucleon. The ion energy loss was determined by a time-of-flight measurement using a specifically developed chemical-vapor-deposition diamond detector that was screened against any plasma radiation. A first experimental campaign was carried out using this newly developed platform, in which a precision better than 200 keV on the energy loss was reached. This allowed, via the knowledge of the plasma and of the beam parameters, to reliably test several stopping theories, either based on perturbation theory or on a nonlinear T-Matrix formalism. A preliminary

  1. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  2. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  3. Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kartavtsev, O. I.

    1995-01-01

    Metastable antiprotonic helium atoms $^{3,4}\\! H\\! e\\bar pe$ have been discovered recently in experiments of the delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium media. These exotic atoms survive for an enormous time (about tens of microseconds) and carry the extremely large total angular momentum $L\\sim 30-40$. The theoretical treatment of the intrinsic properties of antiprotonic helium atoms, their formation and collisions with atoms and molecules is discussed.

  4. The CERN antiproton collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 108 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  5. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons as a Test of Stopping Power in Degenerate Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C; Schulz, A E; Boswell, M; Fowler, M M; Grim, G; Klein, A; Rundberg, R S; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF ($E_n>$ 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about $10^{-4}$ of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled $(\\Gamma\\sim$0.6) and electron degenerate $(\\theta_\\mathrm{Fermi}/\\theta_e\\sim$4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. We find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions and some models are ruled out b...

  6. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 12C3+ and 16O3+ ions with energies between 4.5 and 7.8 MeV in a 0.166-μm-thin silicon nitride and in 4-μm-thin polypropylene foils were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered PIPS detector. Ions scattered from a thin gold layer under a scattering angle of 150° were used. The energy spectra of back-scattered and decelerated ions were registered and evaluated simultaneously. The measured stopping powers were compared with the theoretical predictions simulated by SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes. SRIM prediction of energy stopping is reasonably close to the experimentally obtained values comparing to MSTAR values. Better agreement between experimental and predicted data was observed for C3+ ion energy losses comparing to O3+ ions. The experimental data from Paul’s database and our previous experimental data were also discussed. The obtained experimental energy-straggling data were compared to those calculated by using Bohr’s, Yang’s models etc. The predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment within a frame of uncertainty of 25%

  7. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikšová, R., E-mail: miksova@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Macková, A.; Malinský, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic v.v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, Ceske Mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Slepička, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of {sup 12}C{sup 3+} and {sup 16}O{sup 3+} ions with energies between 4.5 and 7.8 MeV in a 0.166-μm-thin silicon nitride and in 4-μm-thin polypropylene foils were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered PIPS detector. Ions scattered from a thin gold layer under a scattering angle of 150° were used. The energy spectra of back-scattered and decelerated ions were registered and evaluated simultaneously. The measured stopping powers were compared with the theoretical predictions simulated by SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes. SRIM prediction of energy stopping is reasonably close to the experimentally obtained values comparing to MSTAR values. Better agreement between experimental and predicted data was observed for C{sup 3+} ion energy losses comparing to O{sup 3+} ions. The experimental data from Paul’s database and our previous experimental data were also discussed. The obtained experimental energy-straggling data were compared to those calculated by using Bohr’s, Yang’s models etc. The predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment within a frame of uncertainty of 25%.

  8. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  9. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In ion beam therapy electronic stopping power data enter in different disciplines, e.g., dose planning, dosimetry, and radiobiology. However, relevant stopping power data are only known within an accuracy of 2%-10%. We started the software library project libdEdx to unify data from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library is programmed in the language C to provide broad portability and high performance. A clean API provides full access to the underlying functions and thread safety in multi-threaded applications. The possibility to define arbitrary materials complements the list of predefined ICRU materials. Furthermore, we introduced a collection of tools, e.g., inverse stopping power look-up as well as CSDA range calculation and its inverse. Results: On a standard desktop PC libdEdx calculates 22 million look-ups/sec. A web GUI (available at http://dedx.au.dk) provides easy access to libdEdx and download of stopping data and graphs. For compounds, we observe that stopping power data are robust for variations in the mean excitation potential of the constituents as long as the total mean excitation potential is fixated. Conclusion: We released libdEdx (version number 1.2.1: http://sf.net/projects/libdedx/) with a web-based GUI. Future development will focus on implementing further stopping powers sources (e.g., for electrons and nuclear stopping) and relativistic effects.

  10. Measurement of stopping powers of gases for heavy ions of 3 to 13 MeV by nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping powers of gases have been measured for incident 10Ne, 18Ar, 29Cu, 36Kr and 47Ag ions of 3 to 13 MeV/u. These measurements have confirmed the existence of a gas-solid difference for the stopping powers (the stopping power of solids being larger than that of gazes). Such a difference was theoretically postulated by Bohr and Lindhard in 1954, and experimentally observed for the first time by Geissel in 1982. This effect can be qualitatively interpreted by a difference in the ion's effective charge in stopping power. However, the determination of charge state distribution for Ar and Fe ions in two particular cases (Ar + Nsub(2s)or Nsub(2g) and (Fe + Csub(s) or Csub(g)) from a theoric model and experimental cross sections for atomic collisions don't quantitatively account for observed differences

  11. Stopping power of palladium for protons in the energy range 0.300-3.100 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P. A.; Sepúlveda, A.; Morales, J. R.; Rodriguez, T.; Burgos, E.; Fernández, H.

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of palladium for protons has been measured using the transmission method with an overall uncertainty of around 5% over the energy range Ep=(0.300-3.100) MeV. These stopping power data are then compared to stopping power values calculated by the SRIM-2010 code and to those derived from a model based on the dielectric formalism. Subsequently, and within the framework of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory, this stopping power data were used for extracting Pd target mean excitation and ionization potential, (I = 468 ± 5 eV), and Barkas effect parameter, (b = 1.51 ± 0.06). A good agreement is found between the obtained results and values reported in literature.

  12. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  13. Antiprotons at Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Bieber, J W; Engel, R; Gaisser, T K; Roesler, S; Stanev, T; Bieber, John W.; Engel, Ralph; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Roesler, Stefan; Stanev, Todor

    1999-01-01

    New measurements with good statistics will make it possible to observe the time variation of cosmic antiprotons at 1 AU through the approaching peak of solar activity. We report a new computation of the interstellar antiproton spectrum expected from collisions between cosmic protons and the interstellar gas. This spectrum is then used as input to a steady-state drift model of solar modulation, in order to provide predictions for the antiproton spectrum as well as the antiproton/proton ratio at 1 AU. Our model predicts a surprisingly large, rapid increase in the antiproton/proton ratio through the next solar maximum, followed by a large excursion in the ratio during the following decade.

  14. Stopping power of aluminium for 5-12 MeV protons and deuterons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Hanke, C.C.;

    1966-01-01

    The stopping power of aluminium for 5-12 MeV protons and deuterons has been measured by a thermometric compensation technique working at liquid helium temperature. The experimental method is described and the standard deviation of the results is found to be 0.3%. In order to obtain this accuracy...... one has to apply theoretical corrections for the influence of Coulomb scattering, X-rays and deltarays. Other possible corrections are discussed, but are found to be negligible for this combination of projectiles, energies and target material. The results agree with published experimental results...

  15. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Atzeni, S [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D.P [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Mangia, F. [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Marques, J-R; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-11

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  16. Electronic stopping power data of heavy ions in polymeric foils in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, A.; Ammi, H.; Hedibel, M.; Guesmia, A.; Mammeri, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    A continuous energy loss measurements of 63Cu, 28Si, 27Al, 24Mg, 19F, 16O and 12C ions over an energy range of (0.06-0.65) MeV/nucleon through thin polymeric foils (Mylar, Polypropylene and Formvar) were carried out by time of flight spectrometry. The deduced experimental stopping data have been used in order to assess our proposed semi empirical formula. The proposed approach based on the Firsov and Lindhard-Scharff stopping power models is provided for well describing-the electronic stopping power of heavy ions (3 ⩽ Z < 100) in various solids targets at low energy range. The ζe factor, which was approximated to be ∼Z11/6 , involved in Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) formula has been suitably modified in the light of the available experimental stopping power data. The calculated stopping power values after incorporating, effective charge Z1∗ of moving heavy ions with low velocities (v ⩽v0Z12/3) and modified ζe in LSS formula, have been found to be in close agreement with measured values in various solids targets. A reason of energy loss measurements is to obtain data that help to assess our understanding of the stopping power theories. For this, the obtained results are compared with, LSS calculations, MSTAR and SRIM-2013 predictions code.

  17. The stopping powers and energy straggling of heavy ions in polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 7Li, 12C and 16O ions in thin poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) foils were measured in the incident beam energy range of 9.4–11.8 MeV using an indirect transmission method. Ions scattered from a thin gold target at an angle of 150° were registered by a partially depleted PIPS detector, partly shielded with a polymer foil placed in front of the detector. Therefore, the signals from both direct and slowed down ions were visible in the same energy spectrum, which was evaluated by the ITAP code, developed at our laboratory. The ITAP code was employed to perform a Gaussian-fitting procedure to provide a complete analysis of each measured spectrum. The measured stopping powers were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes and with previous experimental data. The energy straggling data were compared with those calculated by using Bohr’s, Lindhard–Scharff and Bethe–Livingston theories

  18. Analytical expressions for stopping-power ratios relevant for accurate dosimetry in particle therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lühr, Armin; Jäkel, Oliver; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2010-01-01

    In particle therapy, knowledge of the stopping-power ratios (STPRs) of the ion beam for air and water is necessary for accurate ionization chamber dosimetry. Earlier work has investigated the STPRs for pristine carbon ion beams, but here we expand the calculations to a range of ions (1 <= z <= 18) as well as spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) and provide a theoretical in-depth study with a special focus on the parameter regime relevant for particle therapy. The Monte Carlo transport code SHIELD-HIT is used to calculate complete particle-fluence spectra which are required for determining STPRs according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We confirm that the STPR depends primarily on the current energy of the ions rather than on their charge z or absolute position in the medium. However, STPRs for different sets of stopping-power data for water and air recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) are compared, including also the...

  19. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Ziegler, James F.

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u‑1 to 450 MeV u‑1 or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  20. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Ingram, W. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Robertson, Daniel [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Beddar, Sam, E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent.

  1. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  2. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Ziegler, James F.

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u-1 to 450 MeV u-1 or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  3. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  4. Forward Lambda Production and Nuclear Stopping Power in d+Au Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, F

    2005-01-01

    Using the forward time projection chambers of STAR we measure the centrality dependent Lambda and Anti-Lambda yields in d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN} = 200 GeV at forward and backward rapidities. The contributions of different processes to particle production and baryon transport are probed exploiting the inherent asymmetry of the d+Au system. While the d side appears to be dominated by multiple independent nucleon-nucleon collisions, nuclear effects contribute significantly on the Au side. Using the constraint of baryon number conservation, the rapidity loss of baryons in the incoming deuteron can be estimated as a function of centrality. This is compared to a model and to similar measurements in Au+Au, which gives insights into the nuclear stopping power at relativistic energies.

  5. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A. F.; Mesa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 101 eV - 1010 eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  6. Mean excitation energies for use in Bethe's stopping-power formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review has been made of the mean excitation energies that can be derived from the analysis of stopping-power and range measurements, and from semi-empirical dipole oscillator-strength distributions for gases and dielectric-response functions for solids. On the basis of this review, mean excitation energies have been selected for 43 elemental substances and 54 compounds. Additivity rules have also been considered which allow one to estimate the mean excitation energies for compounds for which no direct data are available. These additivity rules are based on the use of mean excitation energies for atomic constituents which, to a certain extent, take into account the effects of chemical binding and physical aggregation

  7. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED = a HUscH + b HUscL + c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc = HU + 1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions.

  8. Fluence Correction Factors and Stopping Power Ratios for Clinical Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Sobolevsky, Nikolai;

    2011-01-01

    for increased positioning accuracy, graphite calorimetry being developed as a primary standard for dose to water dosimetry, but also for the comparison of dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations with those of pencil beam algorithms. Material and methods. In the conversion of absorbed dose to phantom...... material to absorbed dose to water the water-to-material stopping power ratios (STPR) and the fluence correction factors (FCF) for the full charged particle spectra are needed. We determined STPR as well as FCF for water to graphite, bone (compact), and PMMA as a function of water equivalent depth, zw......, with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A. Simulations considering all secondary ions were performed for primary protons as well as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions with a total range of 3 cm, 14.5 cm and 27 cm as well as for two spread-out Bragg-peaks (SOBP). STPR as a function of depth are also compared...

  9. Damage induced by swift heavy ions in insulators by electronic stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift heavy ions with an energy larger than 100 keV/a.m.u., penetrating into matter lose their energy mainly by interaction with the target electrons. In most insulators, above an electronic excitation threshold (a few keV per angstrom of ion range), an extended damage is induced along the ion path: the so-called latent track. The damage mechanism is still unclear. In this work, we study the defects formed by swift heavy ions in magnetic oxides and quartz. Moessbauer spectrometry, Rutherford Backscattering Ion Channelling and High and Medium resolution electron microscopy are used to determine the extent of the damage. On the one hand, we have determined the electronic stopping power threshold of damage creation in yttrium iron garnet. On the second hand, we have outlined the velocity effect. Up to now, the damage creation has been linked to the linear energy transfer, but so far the lateral distribution of the energy deposition has not been taken into account. In fact, the energy loss dE/dx can be identical for one ion at two different incident energies, or for different ions at various incident energies. The experimental results show that for a given projectile ion, the damage is higher at low velocity than at high velocity at constant dE/dx. Consequently, the electronic stopping power is not the only key parameter to account for the creation of the ion tracks. Moreover, the thermal spike model has been applied to ion-irradiated quartz in order to calculate the radii of the observed tracks taking into account this velocity effect. (author). 172 refs., 51 figs., 15 tabs

  10. The stopping power and energy straggling of the energetic C and O ions in polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikšová, R.; Macková, A.; Slepička, P.

    2016-03-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 12Cn+ and 16On+ heavy ions in the energy range 5.3-8.0 MeV in 8 μm thick polyimide (PI) foil were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered a PIPS detector. Ions scattered from thin gold layer, under the scattering angle 150° were detected and the spectrum of ions penetrating the PI foil and without foil was recorded. The values of the experimentally determined stopping powers were compared to the calculated data by SRIM-2013 and MSTAR codes. Measured data were in good agreement with data calculated by SRIM-2013, especially for C ions was observed better agreement than for O ions. The energy straggling was determined and compared to those calculated by using Bohr's, Bethe-Livingston and Yang models. The measured energy straggling values in the PI foil was corrected for foil roughness and thickness inhomogeneity determined from AFM. Bethe-Livingston predicting formula has been modified to make it appropriate for thicker targets. The energy straggling determined in our experiment was obtained higher than Bohr's predicted value; the predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment. Bethe-Livingston formulation of the energy straggling shows better agreement with the experimental data after the modified formula implementation which assumes that the thick target was consisted to be composed of n-number of thin layers. Influence of the charge-exchange phenomena to the energy straggling of C and O ions in PI was discussed.

  11. Phenomenological electronic stopping-power model for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is crucial to have a good phenomenological model of electronic stopping power for modeling the physics of ion implantation into crystalline silicon. In the spirit of the Brandt-Kitagawa effective charge theory, we develop a model for electronic stopping power for an ion, which can be factorized into (i) a globally averaged effective charge taking into account effects of close and distant collisions by target electrons with the ion, and (ii) a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. This phenomenological model is implemented into both molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. There is only one free parameter in the model, namely, the one electron radius r0s for unbound electrons. By fine tuning this parameter, it is shown that the model can work successfully for both boron and arsenic implants. We report that the results of the dopant profile simulation for both species are in excellent agreement with the experimental profiles measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) over a wide range of energies and with different incident directions. We point out that the model has wide applicability, for it captures the correct physics of electronic stopping in ion implantation. This model also provides a good physically based damping mechanism for molecular dynamics simulations in the electronic stopping power regime, as evidenced by the striking agreement of dopant profiles calculated in our molecular dynamics simulations with the SIMS data. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. Stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 0.2-3.0 MeV He ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Izarra, C; Lulli, G; Summonte, C

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power of SiO sub 2 for 200 keV-3 MeV He ions has been evaluated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and a semiempirical stopping power curve is proposed in this energy range. The curve is parameterized using the Andersen and Ziegler's formula, allowing for an easy implementation in any simulation program. The estimated accuracy of the present stopping power curve is of the order of 2%. Samples used for the measurements consist of thin SiO sub 2 films grown by wet thermal oxidation of Si(1 0 0) wafers. The thickness of each sample was independently determined by reflectance spectroscopy. The fitting of the experimental RBS spectra was performed using full Monte Carlo calculation of trajectories in the binary collision approximation.

  13. Quiet: The Power of Introvert in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Schat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Do you pay attention to the differences between extroversion and introversion? It can be fascinating to consider who is and is not aware of  the distinction between the two, as well as the significant formative role they both play in daily perceptions and interactions.  In my experience, more often than not it is the introverts who recognize and appreciate the difference, while too many extroverts remain unaware. In  Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking(2012, Susan Cain reminds us of the potency and power of the gift of introversion.  She challenges her readers to recognize and celebrate the unique insights and contributions that may be latent in communities and organizations—present, but hidden from view, and likely to remain so unless given the space to flourish and to find a voice. She also suggests that creating a space for the introvert voice may bring unforeseen blessings to an organization or community.

  14. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  15. Stopping power of 1.0-3.0 MeV helium in Mylar, Makrofol and Kapton foils

    CERN Document Server

    Chekirine, M

    1999-01-01

    The stopping powers of 1.0-3.0 MeV of helium ( sup 4 He) in Makrofol KG, Mylar and Kapton were measured. The results were compared with scanty experimental data in the literature and with values predicted by both Bragg's rule and cores-and-bonds model. These values agree with each other within the uncertainties; maximum deviations are <5%.

  16. Stopping power of palladium for protons in the energy range 0.300–3.100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P.A., E-mail: pjmirand@gmail.com; Sepúlveda, A.; Morales, J.R.; Rodriguez, T.; Burgos, E.; Fernández, H.

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of palladium for protons has been measured using the transmission method with an overall uncertainty of around 5% over the energy range E{sub p}=(0.300–3.100) MeV. These stopping power data are then compared to stopping power values calculated by the SRIM-2010 code and to those derived from a model based on the dielectric formalism. Subsequently, and within the framework of the modified Bethe–Bloch theory, this stopping power data were used for extracting Pd target mean excitation and ionization potential, (I = 468 ± 5 eV), and Barkas effect parameter, (b = 1.51 ± 0.06). A good agreement is found between the obtained results and values reported in literature. It is worth mentioning that these are the first reported results for protons on palladium over this energy range, which is often used in IBA applications, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE)

  17. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  19. Getting deeper insight into stopping power problems in radiation physics using the Noether's theorem corollary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The theories that combine two different approaches in dealing with interacting objects, for instance, treating electromagnetic laser field classically, and the interacting atom as a quantum object, have some ambiguities and, as such, they should be labeled as “mixed”. From the Noether's Theorem Corollary, which we proved earlier, about the conservation laws of energy, momentum and angular momentum in mixed theories, follows that the aforementioned theories do not support the law of angular momentum/spin conservation (to be precise, the obtained result does not imply that the law of conservation of angular momentum and spin is not valid generally, but rather that mixed theories can produce the results which might violate this law. In present paper, an additional explanation following our Corollary is given to why the calculation of the stopping power in the fully quantized theory gives better results than those that were obtained in mixed theories, which further confirms the predictions of our Corollary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171021: The experimental and theoretical research in radiation physics and radioecology

  20. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-21

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED=a HUscH+b HUscL+c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc=HU+1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions. PMID:25360874

  1. Intriguing results of stopping power measurements with light ions traversing several organic (Co) polymer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    2001-07-01

    Previously published measurements of stopping powers of four organic (co)polymers for protons, alpha particles, and 7Li ions have been analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory. This procedure allows extraction of values of various parameters which constitute an integral part of the formalism, most notably the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b). Normally one can expect the extracted I-value to exceed by a few per cent the value based on the additivity assumption (IB), whereas the extracted b-value should lie within the expected interval of about 1.3-1.5. Results of one series of measurements with the same experimental arrangement, utilizing thin target foils of formvar (a polyvinylformyl resin), polysulfone, kapton (a polymide), and vyns (a vinylchloride-vinylacetate copolymer), yielded results quite consistent with expectation except that the extracted I-value for formvar lay about 20% below the value of IB. This salient anomaly will be examined in detail. Moreover, trends in extracted I- and b-values suggesting a dependence on projectile will be considered.

  2. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  3. Reconciling Particle-Beam and Optical Stopping-Power Measurements in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, William; Shiles, E. J.; Smith, David Y.

    A swift, charged particle passing through matter loses energy to electronic excitations via the electro-magnetic transients experienced by atoms along its path. Bethe related this process to the matter's frequency-dependent dielectric function ɛ (ℏω) through the energy-loss function, Im[-1/ ɛ (ℏω) ]. The matter's response may be summarized by a single parameter, the mean excitation energy, or I value, that combines the optical excitation spectrum and excitation probability. Formally, ln I is the mean of ln ℏω weighted by the energy-loss function. This provides an independent optical check on particle energy-loss experiments. However, a persistent disagreement is found for silicon: direct particle-beam studies yield 173.5elements suggests 165 eV. An independent determination from optical data in 1986 gave 174 eV supporting the higher values. However, recent x-ray measurements disclosed short comings in the 1986 optical data: 1. Measurements by Ershov and Lukirskii underestimated the L-edge strength, and 2. A power-law extrapolation overestimated the K-edge strength. We have updated these data and find I = 162 eV, suggesting that silicon's recommended I value should be reconsidered. While this 5% change in I value changes the stopping power by only 1%, it is significant for precision measurements with Si detectors. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H- ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H- ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼106 to 107 particles

  5. SU-E-J-149: Secondary Emission Detection for Improved Proton Relative Stopping Power Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J; Musall, B; Erickson, A [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This research investigates application of secondary prompt gamma (PG) emission spectra, resulting from nuclear reactions induced by protons, to characterize tissue composition along the particle path. The objective of utilizing the intensity of discrete high-energy peaks of PG is to improve the accuracy of relative stopping power (RSP) values available for proton therapy treatment planning on a patient specific basis and to reduce uncertainty in dose depth calculations. Methods: In this research, MCNP6 was used to simulate PG emission spectra generated from proton induced nuclear reactions in medium of varying composition of carbon, oxygen, calcium and nitrogen, the predominant elements found in human tissue. The relative peak intensities at discrete energies predicted by MCNP6 were compared to the corresponding atomic composition of the medium. Results: The results have shown a good general agreement with experimentally measured values reported by other investigators. Unexpected divergence from experimental spectra was noted in the peak intensities for some cases depending on the source of the cross-section data when using compiled proton table libraries vs. physics models built into MCNP6. While the use of proton cross-section libraries is generally recommended when available, these libraries lack data for several less abundant isotopes. This limits the range of their applicability and forces the simulations to rely on physics models for reactions with natural atomic compositions. Conclusion: Current end-of-range proton imaging provides an average RSP for the total estimated track length. The accurate identification of tissue composition along the incident particle path using PG detection and characterization allows for improved determination of the tissue RSP on the local level. While this would allow for more accurate depth calculations resulting in tighter treatment margins, precise understanding of proton beam behavior in tissue of various

  6. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    the volume targeted for irradiation. A major part of this peripheral dose arise from neutrons, which in particular are problematic due to their high RBE for secondary cancer incidence. We have measured the fast and thermal neutron spectrum in different geometrical configurations in order to experimentally...... the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...... the annihilation vertex inside the polystyrene phantom produced a response which corresponds to a neutron fluence of 8000 neutrons/cm2 per 107 antiprotons. This is equivalent to a neutron kerma of 1.4e-9 Gy (adult brain) per 107 antiprotons following ICRU 46. Conclusion: The thermalized part of the neutron...

  7. Electronic interactions and nuclear scattering effects in the stopping power of carbon for fragmented H2+ projectiles

    OpenAIRE

    Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Arista, Néstor R.

    1998-01-01

    The stopping power of amorphous carbon for fragmented swift H2+ molecular ions has been carried out using a Molecular Dynamics code to follow the trajectory of each fragment proton as it moves through the target. We consider the interaction of each proton with the target electrons, the Coulomb repulsion between both protons and the vicinage effects due to the wake potential created by its partner proton. The nuclear scattering with the target nuclei was also taken into account using a Monte C...

  8. Primary population of antiprotonic helium states

    OpenAIRE

    Révai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2003-01-01

    A full quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident (lab) energies of the antiproton.

  9. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  10. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Ibañez, Irene L.; Behar, Moni; Grasselli, Mariano; Bermúdez, Gerardo García

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2-22.1 MeV cm2 mg-1 and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  11. A phenomenological electronic stopping power model for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of ion implantation into silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, D; Snell, C M; Beardmore, K M; Cai, David; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels; Snell, Charles M.; Beardmore, Keith M.

    1996-01-01

    It is crucial to have a good phenomenological model of electronic stopping power for modeling the physics of ion implantation into crystalline silicon. In the spirit of the Brandt-Kitagawa effective charge theory, we develop a model for electronic stopping power for an ion, which can be factorized into (i) a globally averaged effective charge taking into account effects of close and distant collisions by target electrons with the ion, and (ii) a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. This phenomenological model is implemented into both molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. There is only one free parameter in the model, namely, the one electron radius rs0 for unbound electrons. By fine tuning this parameter, it is shown that the model can work successfully for both boron and arsenic implants. We report that the results of the dopant profile simulation for both species are in excellent agreement with the experimental profiles measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry(...

  12. Stopping power dependence of nitrogen sputtering yields in copper nitride films under swift-ion irradiation: Exciton model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, N., E-mail: nuri.gordillo@gmail.com [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI de Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Rivera, A. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI de Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Munnik, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 10119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Agullo-Lopez, F. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Nitrogen sputtering yields as high as 10{sup 4} atoms/ion, are obtained by irradiating N-rich-Cu{sub 3}N films (N concentration: 33 {+-} 2 at.%) with Cu ions at energies in the range 10-42 MeV. The kinetics of N sputtering as a function of ion fluence is determined at several energies (stopping powers) for films deposited on both, glass and silicon substrates. The kinetic curves show that the amount of nitrogen release strongly increases with rising irradiation fluence up to reaching a saturation level at a low remaining nitrogen fraction (5-10%), in which no further nitrogen reduction is observed. The sputtering rate for nitrogen depletion is found to be independent of the substrate and to linearly increase with electronic stopping power (S{sub e}). A stopping power (S{sub th}) threshold of {approx}3.5 keV/nm for nitrogen depletion has been estimated from extrapolation of the data. Experimental kinetic data have been analyzed within a bulk molecular recombination model. The microscopic mechanisms of the nitrogen depletion process are discussed in terms of a non-radiative exciton decay model. In particular, the estimated threshold is related to a minimum exciton density which is required to achieve efficient sputtering rates.

  13. The influence of magnetic fields on the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate how a magnetic field affects the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in plasmas. The corresponding density of plasma electrons is investigated. At a weak magnetic field, the wakes exhibit typical V-shaped cone structures. As the magnetic field strengthens, the wakes spread and lose their typical V-shaped structures. At a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the wakes exhibit conversed V-shaped structures. Additionally, strengthening the magnetic field reduces the stopping power in regions of low and high beam density. However, the influence of the magnetic field becomes complicated in regions of moderate beam density. The stopping power increases in a weak magnetic field, but it decreases in a strong magnetic field. At high beam density and moderate magnetic field, two low-density channels of plasma electrons appear on both sides of the incident beam pulse trajectory. This is because electrons near the beam pulses will be attracted and move along with the beam pulses, while other electrons nearby are restricted by the magnetic field and cannot fill the gap

  14. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  15. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  16. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  17. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy: astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date ap measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different as...

  18. Experimental study of the He stopping power into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantero, E.D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Fadanelli, R.C. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, C.P. 15051, CEP 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Behar, M., E-mail: behar@if.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, C.P. 15051, CEP 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Nagamine, L.C.C.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lantschner, G.H.; Eckardt, J.C. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-09-15

    In the present work, we report experimental results of He stopping power into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films by using both transmission and Rutherford backscattering techniques. We have performed measurements along a wide energy range, from 60 to 3000 keV, covering the maximum stopping range. The results of this work are compared with previously published data, showing a good agreement for the high-energy range, but evidencing discrepancies in the low-energy region. The existing theories follow the same tendency: good theoretical-experimental agreement for higher energies, but they failed to reproduce previous and present results in the low energy regime. On the other hand it is interesting to note that the semi-empirical SRIM code reproduces quite well the present data.

  19. Mean excitation energies extracted from stopping power measurements of protons in polymers by using the modified Bethe Bloch formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammi, H.; Zemih, R.; Mammeri, S.; Allab, M.

    2005-04-01

    Recent stopping power measurements in thin polymeric films have been performed for protons of 0.4-3.5 MeV energies using the indirect transmission technique [H. Ammi, S. Mammeri, M. Chekirine, B. Bouzid, M. Allab, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 198 (2002) 5]. Experimental stopping data have been analyzed with the modified Bethe-Bloch formula and the mean excitation energies I have been then extracted from the data. Resulting values for each thin film are 76 ± 1 eV in Mylar, 70.8 ± 1 eV in Makrofol, 82.2 ± 1.2 eV in LR-115 and 55.4 ± 1 eV in Polypropylene. The I-extracted values are compared to those IB calculated by using the Bragg's rule.

  20. Treatment Plans for Antiproton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus;

    Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the expectat...

  1. Reaction-in-Flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Cerjan, C. J.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M. M.; Gooden, M. E.; Grim, G. P.; Henry, E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sepke, S. M.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Singleton, R. L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenically cooled inertial confinement fusion capsule designs are suitable for studies of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons. RIF neutrons occur when energetically up-scattered ions undergo DT reactions with a thermal ion in the plasma, producing neutrons in the energy range 9-30 MeV. The knock-on ions lose energy as they traverse the plasma, which directly affects the spectrum of the produced RIF neutrons. Here we present measurements from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of RIF neutrons produced in cryogenic capsules, with energies above 15 MeV. We show that the measured RIFs probe stopping under previously unexplored degenerate plasma conditions and constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions.

  2. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  3. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  4. Stopping power measurements with 17-GeV/c protons at the AGS or inclusive proton spectra from proton-nucleus interactions at 17 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of nuclear stopping power and its importance to the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies was brought to general attention one year ago at Quark Matter 83 by Busza and Goldhaber. In this context, nuclear stopping power can be thought of as the rate of energy (or rapidity) loss of a proton traversing nuclear matter. It does not directly address the important question of energy deposition. Busza and Goldhaber showed that knowledge of nuclear stopping power is needed to estimate the minimum center-of-mass energy required in nucleus-nucleus collisions to ensure the production of very high temperatures at low baryon density. At cm energies of about 1 to 10 GeV/A, the stopping power is important in the estimation of the maximum baryon densities attainable in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The data presented are more relevant to this latter point

  5. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show...... theory after having presented a summary of recent results on the projectile- and charge-state dependence of forward and backward electron yields gamma(F) and gamma(B) and the Meckbach factor R = gamma(F)/gamma(B). A simple extension of the yield equations is proposed and several assumptions are justified...

  6. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet into......At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...

  7. Semi empirical formula for electronic stopping power determination of 24Mg, 27Al and 28Si ions crossing Formvar foil in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmia, A.; Ammi, H.; Mammeri, S.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Msimanga, M.; Hedibel, M.

    2014-03-01

    We have determined continuous stopping power of heavy ions in thin Formvar foil for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions over an energy range of (0.1-0.5) MeV/nucleon. Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique coupled with time of flight (ToF) spectrometer has been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in this thin absorber. Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) theory compared with the corresponding determined stopping values in Formvar, shows significantly large deviations. However, a novel semi empirical expression has been proposed here and tested for better stopping power calculations at low velocity in the ion energy domain of LSS theory for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions crossing thin Formvar foil. The results were compared to the obtained experimental stopping power data, predictions of LSS theory and also to those generated by SRIM-2010 computer code. The obtained results exhibit good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Semi empirical formula for electronic stopping power determination of 24Mg, 27Al and 28Si ions crossing Formvar foil in the ion energy domain of LSS theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined continuous stopping power of heavy ions in thin Formvar foil for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions over an energy range of (0.1–0.5) MeV/nucleon. Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique coupled with time of flight (ToF) spectrometer has been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in this thin absorber. Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott (LSS) theory compared with the corresponding determined stopping values in Formvar, shows significantly large deviations. However, a novel semi empirical expression has been proposed here and tested for better stopping power calculations at low velocity in the ion energy domain of LSS theory for 28Si, 27Al and 24Mg ions crossing thin Formvar foil. The results were compared to the obtained experimental stopping power data, predictions of LSS theory and also to those generated by SRIM-2010 computer code. The obtained results exhibit good agreement with experimental data. - Highlights: • Experimental stopping data has been obtained by using Heavy Ions Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis technique with Time of Flight spectrometer. • A new semi-empirical stopping formula based on LSS theory has been proposed for 28Si, 27Al and 24 Mg ions in Formvar foil. • This expression well fit the experimental stopping data at low energy in LSS domain

  9. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  10. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  11. A practical scattering power for Gaussian beam model of heavy charged particles stopping in tissue-like matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Dose calculation in treatment planning of radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions deals with a large volume of path integrals involving a scattering power of body tissue. This work provides a simple formulation for such demanding applications. Empirical linearity between RMS end-point displacement and range of incident particles in water was translated into a linear formula, from which a simple scattering power was derived. The simplicity enabled analytical formulation for ions stopping in water, which was designed to be equivalent with the extended Highland model and agreed with measurements better than 2% or 0.02 cm in RMS displacement. The simplicity will also improve the efficiency of numerical path integrals in the presence of heterogeneity.

  12. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  13. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  14. Antiproton Star Observed in Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Chupp, Warren W.; Goldhaber, Gerson; Segre,Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1955-12-01

    In connection with the antiproton investigation at the Bevatron we planned and carried out a photographic-emulsion exposure in a magnetically selected beam of negative particles. The magnetic system was identical to the first half (one deflecting magnet and one magnetic lens) of the system used in the antiproton experiment of Chamberlain, Segre, Wiegand, and Ypsilantis. The selected particles left the copper target in the forward direction with momentum 1.09 Bev/c.

  15. Measurement of Balmer and Lyman X-rays in antiprotonic hydrogen isotopes at pressures below 300 hPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Rohmann, D.; Schneider, M.; Egger, J.; Simons, L.M.; Elsener, K.

    1989-09-01

    X-rays of Balmer and Lyman transitions in antiprotonic hydrogen and of Balmer transitions in antiprotonic deuterium were observed at pressures below 300 hPa using Si(Li) semiconductor detectors. The measurement was performed at the LEAR-facility at a beam momentum of 202 MeV/c. In order to stop antiprotons in a low pressure gaseous target with high efficiency, a novel technique, the cyclotron trap has been used. Absolute yields were determined and compared with cascade calculations. A distinct difference in the cascade of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium is found. The parameters of strong interaction in antiprotonic hydrogen are determined to be /epsilon//sub 1s/=-(620+-100) eV, /Gamma//sub 1s/=(1130+-170) eV and /Gamma//sub 2p/=(32+-10) meV. (orig.).

  16. Improving spatial resolution of high stopping power X- and gamma-ray cameras:. fibers or slat-structured detectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenmayer, J.-L.

    2000-11-01

    For medical imaging applications, the earliness of the detection is an essential factor to increase chances of recovery; in the field of industrial imaging, nondestructive testing with lower detectivity threshold to ensure quality and safe conduct. Accordingly, in all areas using the up-to-date compact (much less-expensive facilities) high-energy pulsed electron accelerators (HF or induction linac, Marx generator) to produce energetic photons (bremsstrahlung), such as industrial and medical numerical imaging, flash radiography, radiotherapy positioning, computed tomography, detection of small- or low-contrasted details require two-dimensional (2D) detectors with an even more improved combination of sensitivity (which implies high stopping power), spatial resolution (millimetric or sub-millimetric) and speed, working in integrating mode (i.e. dose measurement) because bremsstrahlung X-ray sources provide short pulses. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the issues involved in the development of high-performance position-sensitive X- and gamma-ray cameras for high-energy flash imaging. The basic idea is that, examining in detail the energy deposition and its statistics (quantum noise), we shall be able to determine in real detectors the following features, such as detectors composition and pixel size, which can simultaneously lead to good detection efficiency and good spatial resolution. In general, conclusions can be transposed to other particle imaging detectors as neutron imagers (changing "dense" metal by "high energy transfer" material). There are, of course, challenges to get such detectors, although new technologies have already provided some prototypes offering more than 30% stopping power and less than 2 mm spatial resolution (blur) for 50 ns long 5 MeV X-ray pulses. There are various detector-segmentation methods that can be applied in order to improve the stopping power (macroscopic cross-section) and reduce the effect of the lateral energy

  17. Improvements of the Bethe stopping power theory and their application to problems involving radiation in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinky, Hussein Mohammed

    The latest advances in radiation oncology emphasizes the importance of the theory of energy loss of charged particles through matter. Since the development of the Bethe-Bloch stopping power for heavy charged incident particles in 1930, many corrections have been proposed to improve this equation's theoretical approximation. The region of applicability of this formula, with respect to the velocity and the charge of the incident particle as well as the characteristics of the target, is restricted by the validity of the approximation adopted. One of the major unsolved problems is the relativistic treatment of the inner-shell electrons for medium and heavy target elements. The stopping power theory treats atomic electrons non-relativistically for these targets which put serious limitation on the theory because the basic sum rules on which the theory relies are not amenable to vigorous relativistic generalization as pointed out by Fano. To solve this problem we assume completeness by employing the Dirac Hamiltonian, and then present a semi-relativistic approach to order v 2/c2 following the Foldy-Wouthuysen-Transformation (FWT) to exclude the contributions from the negative-energy states. To establish this goal we developed a very elegant, practical, and accurate step-by-step procedure using Baker-Hausdroff Lemma to do the FWT to any desired order for any functions of coordinate or momentum operator, or to any entire functions of both coordinate and momentum operators. We applied this procedure to general function of position where the result is then applied to find the TRK and Bethe sum rules by using semirelativistic Hamiltonian. This procedure can be used to find any desired sum rule by doing more computation relations of the transformed Hamiltonian of the system with the transformed function of position. For example, Sk sum rule will require k times commutation relations to be calculated. The resulting Bethe sum rule relativistic correction is then used to find the

  18. Slowing-down times and stopping powers for ˜2-MeVμ+ in low-pressure gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senba, Masayoshi; Arseneau, Donald J.; Pan, James J.; Fleming, Donald G.

    2006-10-01

    The times taken by positive muons (μ+) to slow down from initial energies in the range ˜3 to 1MeV , to the energy of the last muonium formation, ≈10eV , at the end of cyclic charge exchange, have been measured in the pure gases H2 , N2 , Ar , and in the gas mixtures Ar-He , Ar-Ne , Ar-CF4 , H2-He , and H2-SF6 , by the muon spin rotation (μSR) technique. At 1atm pressure, these slowing-down times, τSD , in Ar and N2 , vary from ˜14ns at the highest initial energies of 2.8MeV to 6.5ns at 1.6MeV , with much longer times, ˜34ns , seen at this energy in H2 . Similar variations are seen in the gas mixtures, depending also on the total charge and nature of the mixture and consistent with well-established (Bragg) additivity rules. The times τSD could also be used to determine the stopping powers, dE/dx , of the positive muon in N2 , Ar , and H2 , at kinetic energies near 2MeV . The results demonstrate that the μ+ and proton have the same stopping power at the same projectile velocity, as expected from the historic Bethe-Bloch formula, but not previously shown experimentally to our knowledge for the muon in gases at these energies. The energy of the first neutralization collision forming muonium (hydrogen), which initiates a series of charge-exchanging collisions, is also calculated for He , Ne , and Ar . The formalism necessary to describe the stopping power and moderation times, for either muon or proton, in three energy regimes—the Bethe-Bloch, cyclic charge exchange, and thermalization regimes—is developed and discussed in comparison with the experimental measurements reported here, and elsewhere. The slowing-down times through the first two regimes are controlled by the relevant ionization and charge-exchange cross sections, whereas the final thermalization regime is most sensitive to the forwardness of the elastic scattering cross sections. In this regime the slowing-down times (to kT ) at nominal pressures are expected to be ≲100ns .

  19. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  20. X-rays from antiprotonic3He and4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Blüm, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D.; Egger, J.; Simons, L. M.; Elsener, K.

    1991-06-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si (Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be ɛ2p=(-17±4) eV, Γ2p=(25±9) eV and Γ3d=(2.14 ±0.18) meV for ¯p3He and ɛ2p=(-18±2) eV, Γ2p =(45±5) eV and Γ3d=(2.36±0.10) meV for ¯p4He.

  1. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  2. Stopping Gluinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvanitaki, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Pierce, A.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, S.; Wacker, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-29

    Long lived gluinos are the trademark of split susy. They form R-hadrons that, when charged, efficiently lose energy in matter via ionization. Independent of R-spectroscopy and initial hadronization, a fraction of R-hadrons become charged while traversing a detector. This results in a large number of stopped gluinos at present and future detectors. For a 300 GeV gluino, 10{sup 6} will stop each year in LHC detectors, while several hundred stop in detectors during Run II at the Tevatron. The subsequent decays of stopped gluinos produce distinctive depositions of energy in calorimeters with no activity in either the tracker or the muon chamber.

  3. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water

    OpenAIRE

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Kyriakou, I.; Abril, I.; Nikjoo, H.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dis...

  4. Construction stop for Isar-2 nuclear power plant cancelled - constitutional complaint filed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Higher Administrative Court regards the result of the lawsuit on its merits as open. The arguments of the Administrative Court against the lawfulness of the permits could not persuade the Higher Administrative Court of the obvious justification of the action. Reservations against the clear definition of the permits cannot be made. If the result of the lawsuit on the merits remains open it has to be considered whose interests claim priority until a legal decision has been taken on the merits. In this case the interests of the applicant have to come second. In any case, urgent public interests in the security of the Bavarian energy supplies up to the end of this decade speak for the immediate continuation of the construction of the Isar-2 nuclear power plant. The submitted electricity demand forecasts, which show a power deficit of several 100 MW, are plausible. Due to the importance of these interests the applicant can be expected to accept the nuclear power plant during the period in which no final legal decision has been taken on his objections. (orig./HSCH)

  5. Low Energy Antiproton Ring experimental area

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The experimental area at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is seen. This set up was used to slow down antiprotons which had been produced by colliding a proton beam with a solid target. The experiments in the hall then took antiprotons from LEAR to perform antimatter studies. One such experiment, PS210, produced the world's first antihydrogen atoms.

  6. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  7. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  8. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force since acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, we have no direct knowledge of the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data taken by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: namely, the scattering length (f0) and effective range (d0). As direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, our result provides a fundamental ingr...

  9. Fusion Energy and Stopping Power in a Degenerate DT Pellet Driven by a Laser-Accelerated Proton Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrangiz, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Jafari, S.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have improved the fast ignition scheme in order to have more authority needed for high-energy-gain. Due to the more penetrability and energy deposition of the particle beams in fusion targets, we employ a laser-to-ion converter foil as a scheme for generating energetic ion beams to ignite the fusion fuel. We find the favorable intensity and wavelength of incident laser by evaluating the laser-proton conversion gain. By calculating the source-target distance, proton beam power and energy are estimated. Our analysis is generalized to the plasma degeneracy effects which can increase the fusion gain several orders of magnitude by decreasing the ion-electron collisions in the plasma. It is found that the wavelength of 0.53 μm and the intensity of about 1020 W/cm2, by saving about 10% conversion coefficient, are the suitable measured values for converting a laser into protons. Besides, stopping power and fusion burn calculations have been done in degenerate and non-degenerate plasma mediums. The results indicate that in the presence of degeneracy, the rate of fusion enhances. Supported by the Research Council of University of Guilan

  10. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  11. Monte Carlo-based Spencer-Attix and Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer-Attix (SA) and Bragg-Gray (BG) mass-collision-stopping-power ratios of tissue-to-air are calculated using a modified version of EGSnrc-based SPRRZnrc user-code for the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) beta sources such as 147Pm, 85Kr, 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh. The ratios are calculated at 5 and 70 μm depths along the central axis of the unit density ICRU-4-element tissue phantom as a function of air-cavity lengths of the extrapolation chamber l = 0.025-0.25 cm. The study shows that the BG values are independent of l and agree well with the ISO-reported values for the above sources. The overall variation in the SA values is ∼0.3 % for all the investigated sources, when l is varied from 0.025 to 0.25 cm. As energy of the beta increases the SA stopping-power ratio for a given cavity length decreases. For example, SA values of 147Pm are higher by ∼2 % when compared with the corresponding values of 106Ru/106Rh source. SA stopping-power ratios are higher than the BG stopping-power ratios and the degree of variation depends on type of source and the value of l. For example, the difference is up to 0.7 % at l = 0.025 cm for the 90Sr/90Y source. (authors)

  12. Electron stopping power and mean free path in organic compounds over the energy range of 20-10,000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Feng; Huang, Boda; Ji, Yanju

    2004-07-01

    An empirical method to obtain optical energy loss functions is presented for a large number of organic compounds, for which optical data are not available, on the basis of structure feature analysis of the existed optical energy loss functions for certain organic compounds. The optical energy loss functions obtained by using this method are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the Penn's statistical model, a set of systematic expressions have been given for the calculation of the stopping powers and mean free paths of electrons penetrating into the organic compounds in the energy range of E⩽10 keV. Detailed comparison of the calculated data with other theoretical results is presented. The stopping powers and mean free paths for a group of important polymers, without available optical data, have been calculated. In the calculations, three different cases have been considered, i.e. exchange correction not being considered, Ashley exchange correction being involved, and Born-Ochkur exchange correction being included. The results indicate that for these compounds the calculated stopping powers agree well with those obtained by using Bethe-Bloch theory at high-energy limit E=10 keV, as expected for a stopping power theory that should be converged to Bethe-Bloch theory at high energies.

  13. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  14. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  15. Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shochet, Melvyn J.

    1995-01-01

    Comment: Summary of the 10th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, Fermilab, May 9-13, 1995. Postscript file (34 pages with 82 embedded figures; 5.7 MB) available at http://www-cdf.fnal.gov/physics/conf95/cdf3225_pbarp_wkshp_summary.ps

  16. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  17. Unraveling resistive versus collisional contributions to relativistic electron beam stopping power in cold-solid and in warm-dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauzour, B. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Debayle, A. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Vaisseau, X.; Hulin, S.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; D' Humières, E.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Santos, J. J., E-mail: santos.joao@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Baton, S. D.; Yahia, V. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Batani, D. [CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), Univ. Bordeaux, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); Honrubia, J. J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Jarrot, L. C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Benocci, R.; Volpe, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); and others

    2014-03-15

    We present results on laser-driven relativistic electron beam propagation through aluminum samples, which are either solid and cold or compressed and heated by laser-induced shock. A full numerical description of fast electron generation and transport is found to reproduce the experimental absolute K{sub α} yield and spot size measurements for varying target thicknesses, and to sequentially quantify the collisional and resistive electron stopping powers. The results demonstrate that both stopping mechanisms are enhanced in compressed Al samples and are attributed to the increase in the medium density and resistivity, respectively. For the achieved time- and space-averaged electronic current density, 〈j{sub h}〉∼8×10{sup 10} A/cm{sup 2} in the samples, the collisional and resistive stopping powers in warm and compressed Al are estimated to be 1.5 keV/μm and 0.8 keV/μm, respectively. By contrast, for cold and solid Al, the corresponding estimated values are 1.1 keV/μm and 0.6 keV/μm. Prospective numerical simulations involving higher j{sub h} show that the resistive stopping power can reach the same level as the collisional one. In addition to the effects of compression, the effect of the transient behavior of the resistivity of Al during relativistic electron beam transport becomes progressively more dominant, and for a significantly high current density, j{sub h}∼10{sup 12} A/cm{sup 2}, cancels the difference in the electron resistive stopping power (or the total stopping power in units of areal density) between solid and compressed samples. Analytical calculations extend the analysis up to j{sub h}=10{sup 14} A/cm{sup 2} (representative of the full-scale fast ignition scenario of inertial confinement fusion), where a very rapid transition to the Spitzer resistivity regime saturates the resistive stopping power, averaged over the electron beam duration, to values of ∼1 keV/μm.

  18. Delta-electron spectra, inelastic cross sections, and stopping powers of ions in silicon: Comparison between different models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkerman, A.; Murat, M., E-mail: michael@soreq.gov.il; Barak, J.

    2014-02-15

    The energy spectrum of the δ-electrons ejected by an ion moving in the bulk of a solid is the origin of numerous effects which follow the transport of these electrons. This spectrum cannot be measured directly. Therefore, it should be derived theoretically. The present work aims to investigate the uncertainties introduced when applying commonly used theoretical approaches like BEA, CDFT, and PWBA to calculate δ-electron spectrum. Our calculations show that, above a certain δ-electron energy, the energy spectra of the δ-electrons obtained using the various approaches behave similarly. Below this energy, the spectra found using these approaches differ significantly due to the manner in which the solid state character of the target material is taken into account in each approach. This results in differences in the inelastic cross sections and stopping powers for the ions, which in turn result in different ion track structures. Also discussed in this paper is the effect of the uncertainty in the effective ion charge on the accuracy of ion track calculations. The results obtained for silicon allow estimating the possible uncertainties of the calculated ion track properties and related effects.

  19. Optimization of the stopping-power-ratio to Hounsfield-value calibration curve in proton and heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Matthias; Zink, Klemens [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz - IMPS, Giessen (Germany); Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Weber, Uli [Rhoen-Klinikum AG, Marburg (Germany); Kellner, Daniel [Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Inst. for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology

    2015-07-01

    For CT-based dose calculation in ion therapy a link between the attenuation coefficients of photons and the stopping-power of particles has to be provided. There are two commonly known approaches to establish such a calibration curve, the stoichiometric calibration and direct measurements with tissue substitutes or animal samples. Both methods were investigated and compared. As input for the stoichiometric calibration the data from ICRP-report 23 were compared to newly available data from ICRP-report 110. By employing the newer data no relevant difference could be observed. The differences between the two acquisition methods (direct measurement and stoichiometric calibration) were systematically analyzed and quantified. The most relevant change was caused by the exchange of carbon and oxygen content in the substitutes in comparison to the data of the ICRP-reports and results in a general overshoot of the Bragg peak. The consequence of the differences between the calibration curves was investigated with treatment planning studies and iso-range surfaces. Range differences up to 6 mm in treatment plans of the head were observed. Additionally two improvements are suggested which increase the accuracy of the calibration curve.

  20. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  1. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Kyriakou, I.; Abril, I.; Nikjoo, H.

    2009-06-01

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dispersion schemes based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) can result in sizeable errors due to the neglect of damping and local field effects that lead to a momentum broadening and shifting of the energy-loss function. Low-energy Born corrections for the Barkas, Bloch and charge-state effects practically cancel out down to 100 keV proton energies. Differences with ICRU Report 49 stopping power values and earlier calculations are found to be at the ~20% level in the region of the stopping maximum. The present work overcomes the limitations of the Bethe formula below 1 MeV and improves the accuracy of previous calculations through a more consistent account of the dielectric response properties of liquid water.

  2. Stopping power measurements of heavy ions (3 {<=} Z{sub 1} {<=} 14) in Mylar foil by time-of-flight spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammi, H., E-mail: hakim_ammi@yahoo.f [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, CPUT, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Mammeri, S. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Msimanga, M. [iThemba Labs, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Cape Town (South Africa); Ourabah, S.; Dib, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2011-02-01

    Heavy ions elastic recoil detection analysis coupled with time of flight spectrometer (HIERDA{sub T}oF-E) have been used to measure energy loss of charged particles in thin absorber. The stopping power of heavy ions has been determined in Mylar for {sup 28}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 19}F, {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C and {sup 7}Li ions over a continuous range of energies 0.14-0.80 MeV/nucleon. The ions were recoils from the bombardment of different samples (Si, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LiF and C) with a 27.5 MeV Kr{sup +} beam. The energy loss of the recoil atoms is measured with and without additional foils placed in front of a Surface Barrier Detector (SBD). The energy of individual ions is determined from its ToF data; the exit energy after the stopping foil is measured using the SBD detector. We have compared our stopping values to those predicted by SRIM-2008 computer code, ICRU-73 stopping data tables, MSTAR calculations and to the published data from literature. The results show good agreement with limited existing data but indicate a large deviation among the predicted theoretical values at the low energy side of the stopping maximum peak.

  3. New stopping cell capabilities : RF carpet performance at high gas density and cryogenic operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranjan, M.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W. R.; Schaefer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a stopping cell to be used at the FRS and Super-FRS (Superconducting FRagment Separator) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), both in Darmstadt, Germany. The cell has a stopping volume with a length of 1m and a

  4. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0–3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction. (paper)

  5. Calculations of stopping powers of 100 eV-30 keV electrons in 31 elemental solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present calculated electron stopping powers (SPs) for 31 elemental solids (Li, Be, glassy C, graphite, diamond, Na, Mg, K, Sc, Ti, V, Fe, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, In, Sn, Cs, Gd, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Bi). These SPs were determined with an algorithm previously used for the calculation of electron inelastic mean free paths and from energy-loss functions (ELFs) derived from experimental optical data. The SP calculations were made for electron energies between 100 eV and 30 keV and supplement our earlier SP calculations for ten additional solids (Al, Si, Cr, Ni, Cu, Ge, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au). Plots of SP versus atomic number for the group of 41 solids show clear trends. Multiple peaks and shoulders are seen that result from the contributions of valence-electron and various inner-shell excitations. Satisfactory agreement was found between the calculated SPs and values from the relativistic Bethe SP equation with recommended values of the mean excitation energy (MEE) for energies above 10 keV. We determined effective MEEs versus maximum excitation energy from the ELFs for each solid. Plots of effective MEE versus atomic number showed the relative contributions of valence-electron and different core-electron excitations to the MEE. For a maximum excitation energy of 30 keV, our effective MEEs agreed well for Be, graphite, Na, Al, and Si with recommended MEEs; a difference for Li was attributed to sample oxidation in the SP measurements for the recommended MEE. Substantially different effective MEEs were found for the three carbon allotropes (graphite, diamond, and glassy C)

  6. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  7. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  8. Physics with Antiprotons at PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PANDA experiment is part of the core project of the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany)[1]. One major component of the upgraded accelerator complex is the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) which will provide a high quality antiproton beam in the momentum range between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. PANDA, a fixed target experiment directly implemented in the HESR, will investigate antiproton annihilations with the aim to explore fundamental questions in the cross over region of the non perturbative and the strong QCD. Due to the planned extensive physics program a multipurpose detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, proper particle identification over a large momentum range, and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is required. After an overview about the goals and the detector design of the PANDA experiment major parts of the planned physics program will be discussed, namely the meson spectroscopy and the search for exotics in the charmonium and open charm region

  9. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, A. A.; Sankowska, I.; Tucholski, A.; Srebrny, J.; Morek, T.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Sałata, M.; Mierzejewski, J.; Kisieliński, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Perkowski, J.; Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Stonert, A.; Jagielski, J.; Gawlik, G.; Kownacki, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Korman, A. A.; Płóciennik, W.; Ruchowska, E.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.

    2015-02-01

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the 120Sn(14N, 5n)129La, 120Sn(11B, 4n)127Cs and 118Sn(11B, 4n)125Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm2) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe-Bloch formula has no application.

  10. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasternak, A.A. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersbourg (Russian Federation); Sankowska, I. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electron Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Tucholski, A., E-mail: andrzej.tucholski@fuw.edu.pl [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Srebrny, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Morek, T.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Sałata, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzejewski, J. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Kisieliński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kowalczyk, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Perkowski, J. [University of Łódź, Łódź (Poland); Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Stonert, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jagielski, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 02-300, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Gawlik, G. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kownacki, J.; Kordyasz, A. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2015-02-21

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the {sup 120}Sn({sup 14}N, 5n){sup 129}La, {sup 120}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n){sup 127}Cs and {sup 118}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n){sup 125}Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm{sup 2}) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe–Bloch formula has no application.

  11. Ultra-low Energy Antiprotons at FLAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Welsch, C.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R; Orlov, D.; Wolf, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Accelerator Facility for Beams of Ions and Antiprotons at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. So far it is foreseen to accelerate the antiprotons to high energies (3-15 GeV) for meson spectroscopy and other nuclear and particle physics experiments in the HESR (High Energy Storage Ring). Within the planned complex of storage rings, it is possible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the possibility to create low en...

  12. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  13. Experimental study of ion stopping power in warm dense matter: charge-state distribution measurements of ions leaving warm dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination if the ion slowing down process (or stopping power) in warm dense matter is essential especially in the frame of inertial confinement fusion. During my thesis, our interest was driven by the modification of the charge state of ion beam emerging from warm dense matter, this quantity playing a major role in ion stopping power calculation. We took advantage of the properties exhibited by ion beams produced by high intensity short pulse lasers to study during two experiments performed at ELFIE and TITAN facilities, the charge state modification of a carbon and helium ion beams emerging from an aluminum foil isochorically heated by an energetic proton beam. In the first two chapters are presented the major challenges regarding the subject from both a theoretical and experimental point of view. Here are exposed the different simulation tools used during the thesis. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the property of laser-produced ion beams in the scope of our experiments aiming at studying the stopping power. We have studied in particular ion beams generated using lower-than-solid density targets during two experiments: helium gas jet and laser-exploded target. In the last chapter are presented the set-ups and results of the two experiments on the charge state of ion beam emerging from warm dense matter. The data we measured in solid-density cold aluminum are successfully compared with the results already obtained in conventional accelerators. (author)

  14. Measurements of output factors with different detector types and Monte Carlo calculations of stopping-power ratios for degraded electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate three different detector types (a parallel-plate ionization chamber, a p-type silicon diode and a diamond detector) with regard to output factor measurements in degraded electron beams, such as those encountered in small-electron-field radiotherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate mass collision stopping-power ratios between water and the different detector materials for these complex electron beams (nominal energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV). The diamond detector was shown to exhibit excellent properties for output factor measurements in degraded beams and was therefore used as a reference. The diode detector was found to be well suited for practical measurements of output factors, although the water-to-silicon stopping-power ratio was shown to vary slightly with treatment set-up and irradiation depth (especially for lower electron energies). Application of ionization-chamber-based dosimetry, according to international dosimetry protocols, will introduce uncertainties smaller than 0.3% into the output factor determination for conventional IORT beams if the variation of the water-to-air stopping-power ratio is not taken into account. The IORT system at our department includes a 0.3 cm thin plastic scatterer inside the therapeutic beam, which furthermore increases the energy degradation of the electrons. By ignoring the change in the water-to-air stopping-power ratio due to this scatterer, the output factor could be underestimated by up to 1.3%. This was verified by the measurements. In small-electron-beam dosimetry, the water-to-air stopping-power ratio variation with field size could mostly be ignored. For fields with flat lateral dose profiles (>3 x 3 cm2), output factors determined with the ionization chamber were found to be in close agreement with the results of the diamond detector. For smaller field sizes the lateral extension of the ionization chamber hampers

  15. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  16. Stabilization of the 12 V onboard power supply. Ultracapacitors in start-stop systems; Stabilisierung des 12-V-Bordnetzes. Ultrakondensatoren in Start-Stopp-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, Rainer; Gilch, Markus [Unit Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Regensburg (Germany). Div. Powertrain Business; Auer, Juergen; Wieser, Christoph [Maxwell Technologies GmbH, Gilching (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The market of start-stop systems is growing fast and so strongly, that vehicle manufacturers want to remedy weaknesses, which they had accepted approvingly in the beginning. The lack of capacity of the AGM batteries limited considerably the operation and the active times of start-stop. Continental is now announcing a voltage stabilizing system for the 12 V onboard power supply to be ready for serial production, in order to remedy weaknesses. The supplier falls back onto improved double layer capacitors by Maxwell. In addition to the reduction of components of the current short-term memory, the production processes were optimized, which are meant to make the capacitor more reliable and more cost-effective during operation. (orig.)

  17. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  18. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  19. That was LEAP 05! or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-01

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  20. Stopping power of Ni, Ag, Au and Pb for approx. 7 MeV/n α-particles and carbon ions (Z13 proportional deviation from the Bethe formula)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the end of the 1960's, Andersen, Simonsen and Sorensen carried out the measurements of stopping powers of a number of elements for protons, deuterons and α-particles using the calorimetric-compensation technique and showed sone Z13 proportional deviations from the Bethe formula. Recently, Andersen and his co-workers again made the measurements of stopping power of several elements for protons, α-particles and lithium ions in order to perform a more detailed investigation on the deviation from the Bethe formula. To ascertain the Z13 deviation of stopping power for heavier ions, it is desirable to make precise experiments using projectiles more massive than lithium ions, which are almost completely ionized. Recently, we attempted to measure the stopping powers of several metals for approx. 7 MeV/n α-particles and carbon ions, although thus obtained data need a small correction for effective charge. Results are presented and discussed

  1. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  2. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  3. Antiproton--Proton Scattering Experiments with Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lenisa, P; Lenisa, Paolo; Rathmann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The document describes the physics case of the PAX experiment using polarized antiprotons, which has recently been proposed for the new Facility for Antiprotons and Ions Research (FAIR) at GSI--Darmstadt. Polarized antiprotons provide access to a wealth of single-- and double--spin observables, thereby opening a new window to physics uniquely accessible at the HESR. The polarized antiprotons would be most efficiently produced by spin--filtering in a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring (APR) using an internal polarized hydrogen gas target. In the proposed collider scenario of the PAX experiment, polarized protons stored in a COSY--like Cooler Storage Ring (CSR) up to momenta of 3.5 GeV/c are bombarded head--on with 15 GeV/c polarized antiprotons stored in the HESR. This asymmetric double--polarized antiproton--proton collider is ideally suited to map, e.g., the transversity distribution in the proton. The proposed detector consists of a large--angle apparatus optimized for the detection of Drell--Yan electron ...

  4. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  5. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  6. Interaction of antiproton with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hrtánková, J

    2015-01-01

    We performed fully self-consistent calculations of $\\bar{p}$-nuclear bound states within the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The G-parity motivated $\\bar{p}$-meson coupling constants were adjusted to yield potentials consistent with $\\bar{p}$-atom data. We confirmed large polarization effects of the nuclear core caused by the presence of the antiproton. The $\\bar{p}$ absorption in the nucleus was incorporated by means of the imaginary part of a phenomenological optical potential. The phase space reduction for the $\\bar{p}$ annihilation products was taken into account. The corresponding $\\bar{p}$ width in the medium significantly decreases, however, it still remains considerable for the $\\bar{p}$ potential consistent with experimental data.

  7. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  8. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  9. Prospects for Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world's most intense source of tagged D^0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  10. A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from \\PAMELA\\ have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleading but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the \\AMS\\ experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by \\AMS. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy depe...

  11. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    AMS-02 is a multi-purpose high-precision particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiprotons measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small fraction of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is needed. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector and the time-of-flight system help to separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The strategies to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement in different energy regions are presented. Methods to suppress and the effect of the backgrounds to the antiproton-to-proton ratio are discussed.

  12. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  13. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  14. NONLINEAR ION STOPPING IN PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Avilov, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Peter, Th.

    1988-01-01

    We present an exact nonlinear solution of the one-dimensional Coulomb-Vlasov equations describing the stopping power of ions moving through a plasma. The solution is compared with the results of the corresponding linearized equations which are commonly used. We discuss the genuinely nonlinear regime. Nonlinear effects become important for highly charged ions at relatively low velocity. For heavy ion stopping in plasma they are relevant close to the end of the range. The method and the results...

  15. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  16. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  17. Stop smoking support programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... It is hard to quit smoking if you are acting alone. Smokers may have a ... of quitting with a support program. Stop smoking programs ...

  18. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  19. Calculations of electron stopping powers for 41 elemental solids over the 50 eV to 30 keV range with the full Penn algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present mass collision electron stopping powers (SPs) for 41 elemental solids (Li, Be, graphite, diamond, glassy C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ge, Y, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Cs, Gd, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, and Bi) that were calculated from experimental energy-loss-function data with the full Penn algorithm for electron energies between 50 eV and 30 keV. Improved sets of energy-loss functions were used for 19 solids. Comparisons were made of these SPs with SPs calculated with the single-pole approximation, previous SP calculations, and experimental SPs. Generally satisfactory agreement was found with SPs from the single-pole approximation for energies above 100 eV, with other calculated SPs, and with measured SPs.

  20. Electron interaction cross sections in Al and Al2O3; calculations of mean free paths, stopping powers, and electron slowing-down spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area of concern in the study of slowing-down spectra and interaction cross sections has been the lack of adequate theoretical information on electron interaction probabilities in solids, particularly in the electron energy region below a few keV. By using previously developed models, new calculations of cross sections for ionization by electrons of inner shells in Al and O atoms and a model insulator theory used to describe the valence band in Al2O3 are discussed. These new calculations are combined with earlier work to provide an improved description of electron interactions in Al metal and in the insulator Al2O3. Some examples of mean free path, stopping power, and electron slowing-down flux calculations for these materials are described. (7 figures) (U.S.)

  1. Thermal Power Plant Boiler Start & Stop Oil-saving Improvement%火电厂锅炉启停节油改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小松

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on technology of nebulized bubble burning directly to fire puluerized coal to start the boiler in Ruiming Power Plant # 1,According to the practical operation experience of the boiler start ,stop and stable run in low load of Ruiming # 1,we can provide the best way to adjust and optimize the operation for oil-saving.%本文介绍瑞明电厂#1炉采用小油量气泡雾化燃烧直接点燃煤粉启动锅炉技术,并通过在锅炉启、停和低负荷稳燃中的实际应用,着重讨论瑞明电厂#1炉小油枪改造后的运行优化调整,提供节油经验.

  2. Analyses of stopping power measurements for 0.90-2.50 MeV protons and deuterons traversing Al 2O 3 targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.

    2000-09-01

    Recently reported measurements of the stopping power of Al 2O 3 for 0.90-2.50 MeV protons and deuterons have been analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory. Values of the mean excitation energy ( I) and Barkas-effect parameter ( b) have been extracted from the data, yielding results for I and b, respectively, of 176.8 eV and 0.83 for protons, and of 182.7 eV and 1.02 for deuterons. These values of I exceed the additivity-based value by 32% for proton data and by 36% for deuteron data. Moreover, both extracted values of b lie well below the expected interval of 1.3-1.5.

  3. A new calculation on the stopping power and mean free path for low energy electrons in toluene over energy range of 20-10000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhang, Liming

    2009-04-01

    A new calculation of the stopping powers (SP) and inelastic mean free paths (IMFP) for electrons in toluene at energies below 10 keV has been presented. The calculation is based on the dielectric model and on an empirical evaluation approach of optical energy loss function (OELF). The reliability for the evaluated OELFs of several hydrocarbons with available experimental optical data has been systematically checked. For toluene, using the empirical OELF, the evaluated mean ionization potential, is compared with that given by Bragg's rule, and the calculated SP at 10 keV is also compared with the Bethe-Bloch prediction. The present results for SP and IMFP provide an alternative basic data for the study on the energy deposition of low-energy electrons transport through toluene, and also show that the method used in this work may be a good one for evaluating the SP and IMFP for hydrocarbons. PMID:19138526

  4. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  5. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  6. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2015-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high Dark Matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma rays have been observed by different telescopes, although its origin is not clear. In this work, we constrain the possible antiproton flux component associated to this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess, since the theoretical uncertainties corresponding to the mentioned background are small. The constraints depend on the diffusion model and the spectral features of the source. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production.

  7. SU-E-J-136: Investigation Into Robustness of Stopping Power Calculated by DECT and SECT for Proton Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Penfold, S [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) proton stopping power calibration techniques and quantify the associated errors when imaging a phantom differing in chemical composition to that used during stopping power calibration. Methods: The CIRS tissue substitute phantom was scanned in a CT-simulator at 90kV and 140kV. This image set was used to generate a DECT proton SPR calibration based on a relationship between effective atomic number and mean excitation energy. A SECT proton SPR calibration based only on Hounsfield units (HUs) was also generated. DECT and SECT scans of a second phantom of known density and chemical composition were performed. The SPR of the second phantom was calculated with the DECT approach (SPR-DECT),the SECT approach (SPR-SECT) and finally the known density and chemical composition of the phantom (SPR-ref). The DECT and SECT image sets were imported into the Pinnacle{sup 3} research release of proton therapy treatment planning. The difference in dose when exposed to a common pencil beam distribution was investigated. Results: SPR-DECT was found to be in better agreement with SPR-ref than SPR- SECT. The mean difference in SPR for all materials was 0.51% for DECT and 6.89% for SECT. With the exception of Teflon, SPR-DECT was found to agree with SPR-ref to within 1%. Significant differences in calculated dose were found when using the DECT image set or the SECT image set. Conclusion: The DECT calibration technique was found to be more robust to situations in which the physical properties of the test materials differed from the materials used during SPR calibration. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the DECT and SECT SPR calibration techniques can Result in significantly different calculated dose distributions.

  8. Stopping powers of polycarbonate for 0.36-5.94-MeV protons and 1.0-24.0-MeV α particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, J.; Trzaska, W. H.; Alanko, T.; Lyapin, V.; Porter, L. E.

    2003-08-01

    The stopping powers of polycarbonate for protons of energy 0.6-5.9 MeV and α particles of energy 2.0-24.0 MeV have been measured in a transmission experiment employing thin-foil targets. The essence of the novel experimental method employed in the present measurements is to record both projectile energy and time of flight while constantly alternating measurements with and without the target foil in place. The accuracies of the proton data and α-particle data range from 2.0% to 3.0% and 2.2% to 2.7%, respectively. All of the resulting measurements were analyzed in terms of modified Bethe-Bloch theory in order to extract values of the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b). The composite results for the two projectiles are that I=71.52 eV and b=1.13, the former value lying about one standard deviation below the additivity value and the latter value lying about one standard deviation below the expected value of 1.4±0.1. Previous measurements of the stopping power of polycarbonate for 7Li ions were analyzed by the same method, but with the inclusion of an effective charge parameter (λ). The proton and α-particle data, with a few lower-energy points included, were analyzed for a three-parameter fit, also. Results for the three projectiles studied indicate both internal consistency and agreement with expectations based on modified Bethe-Bloch theory.

  9. Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    inconsistently from the predictions of Lindhard-Scharff (LS) theory; they also exhibit various forms of exotic velocity dependence. These deviations are primarily due to the fact that the range of validity of BB theory is artificially extended to velocities at which the 'effective-charge' concept is assumed to be applicable. Coupled Z1,2 scaling as in theories of LS or Firsov would be much more appropriate. Overall, the electronic stopping cross sections by SRIM are of unpredictable value and often strongly misleading below 1 MeV/u. (iv) Another consequence of the tight link to the Z1,2 dependence of BB theory is that only 2 × 92 master sets of electronic stopping cross sections were required to generate all conceivable 89 × 92 tables from Se,f-ratios for elemental targets (the tables for H, He and Li projectiles are derived separately). The information contained in the SRIM library at large thus exhibits a highly redundant character. (v) The nuclear stopping cross sections Sn mirror the predictions of the universal potential due by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark, which differ from alternative suggestions typically by less than 15%. With this uncertainty, range distributions may be calculated with the TRIM program of SRIM, but only at energies where Sn dominates so that uncertainties in Se play a minor role. (vi) As a side aspect, an example is presented illustrating the efforts required to identify incorrect experimental data, notably when respected authors are accountable. (vii) Other approaches to establish stopping power tables are shown to be subject to the same problems as SRIM. It is recommended to add a warning to all theses tables, informing users at which energies the data are likely to lack reliability. (viii) The currently unacceptable quality of Se,f-data below 1 MeV/u could be improved significantly in the future if the user friendly TRIM(SRIM) code were modified to allow simulations with a free choice of nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections

  10. Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    inconsistently from the predictions of Lindhard-Scharff (LS) theory; they also exhibit various forms of exotic velocity dependence. These deviations are primarily due to the fact that the range of validity of BB theory is artificially extended to velocities at which the 'effective-charge' concept is assumed to be applicable. Coupled Z1,2 scaling as in theories of LS or Firsov would be much more appropriate. Overall, the electronic stopping cross sections by SRIM are of unpredictable value and often strongly misleading below 1 MeV/u. (iv) Another consequence of the tight link to the Z1,2 dependence of BB theory is that only 2 × 92 master sets of electronic stopping cross sections were required to generate all conceivable 89 × 92 tables from Se,f-ratios for elemental targets (the tables for H, He and Li projectiles are derived separately). The information contained in the SRIM library at large thus exhibits a highly redundant character. (v) The nuclear stopping cross sections Sn mirror the predictions of the universal potential due by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark, which differ from alternative suggestions typically by less than 15%. With this uncertainty, range distributions may be calculated with the TRIM program of SRIM, but only at energies where Sn dominates so that uncertainties in Se play a minor role. (vi) As a side aspect, an example is presented illustrating the efforts required to identify incorrect experimental data, notably when respected authors are accountable. (vii) Other approaches to establish stopping power tables are shown to be subject to the same problems as SRIM. It is recommended to add a warning to all theses tables, informing users at which energies the data are likely to lack reliability. (viii) The currently unacceptable quality of Se,f-data below 1 MeV/u could be improved significantly in the future if the user friendly TRIM(SRIM) code were modified to allow simulations with a free choice of nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections

  11. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  12. Low energy antiproton possibilities at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical feasibility of creating a pure antiproton beam at the AGS has been studied. The scheme involves an antiproton target station and transport back to the Booster synchrotron, which acts as both a purifier and accelerator/decelerator. This proposal would be very attractive to the user community since this operation could run parasitically (transparently) to the AGS operating modes. The energy range of antiprotons can be as low as 2 MeV to as high as 5 GeV. The intensity of the beam is estimated to be 7 x 107/sec above 2.5 GeV/c and 4 x 104/sec at 200 MeV/c

  13. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  14. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-08-01

    We present calculations for the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in p-bar-Cu and in p-bar-Ag collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the antibinding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross sections for protons.

  15. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9-3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damache, S.; Djaroum, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.; Moussa, D.

    2016-09-01

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for Ep ≈ (0.9-3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner's binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the Csbnd H, Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for Ep ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr's collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (Ep 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  16. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  17. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver;

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...... for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Finally we compare the antiproton depth-dose curve with that of protons, and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons....

  18. One-stop Remote Service Center of Renewable Power%可再生能源发电的一站式远程服务中心

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    北京ABB贝利工程有限公司

    2015-01-01

    监控和管理可再生能源发电,提高产能并降低运维成本,对于投资者和业主而言愈来愈重要,尤其是地理分散的太阳能、风电、生物质等可再生能源。ABB推出的可再生能源发电一站式远程服务中心解决方案,不仅仅是先进技术的结晶,而且将对运行、维护商业模式产生重大推动作用。%It is increasingly important for investors and owners to monitor, control and manage the renewable power, especially the solar, wind, biomass energy and etc. which are geographically widely spread. The solution of one-stop remote service center of renewable power proposed by ABB is not only the result of advancedtechnology, but also an impulse to the business model of operation and maintenance.

  19. Denosumab--a powerful RANKL inhibitor to stop lytic metastases and other bone loss actions by osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopper, László

    2012-10-01

    Denosumab is a perfect example on the targeted anticancer therapy. The inhibition of RANKL activity suppressed the osteoclasts' resorptive function and so prevented skeletal related events. This effect is useful not only against bone metastases, but also in the treatment of other diseases caused by bone loss. In different solid tumors with bone metastasis the quality of life also improved, although the overall survival usually showed no change. On the market the main competitors for denosumab are still the bisphosphonates (questions of costs and reimbursement are not discussed) and some potential new agents e.g. Src kinases (as dasatinib, saracatinib, bosutinib), cathepsin K inhibitors, (e.g. odanacatib), and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (e.g. bazedoxifene, lasofoxifene). Nevertheless, today denosumab is one of the most powerful agents in bone-saving area. PMID:22588706

  20. Antiproton-proton resonant like channels in J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Loiseau, B

    2005-01-01

    The BES collaboration has recently observed a strong enhancement close to the proton-antiproton threshold in the J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton. Such a structure can be explained by a traditional nucleon-antinucleon model. The near threshold 1S0 bound state and/or the well-established 3P0 resonant state found in this nucleon-antinucleon interaction can adequately describe the BES data.

  1. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21-2.68) MeV/u 1H+ and 4He+ ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, D.; Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H+ and 4He+ ions have been measured over the energy range E = (206.03- 2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S (E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S (E) data for H+ ions together with those for He2+ ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E > 1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe-Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas-Andersen parameter, b, for H+ and He+ projectiles, respectively: { (I = 164 ± 3) eV, b = 1.40 } and { (I = 163 ± 2.5) eV, b = 1.38 } . As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  2. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21–2.68) MeV/u {sup 1}H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, D., E-mail: djamelmoussa@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions have been measured over the energy range E=(206.03–2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S(E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S(E) data for H{sup +} ions together with those for He{sup 2+} ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E>1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe–Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas–Andersen parameter, b, for H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles, respectively: {(I=164±3)) eV, (b=1.40} and {(I=163±2.5)) eV, (b=1.38}. As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  3. Ionization in antiproton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing the semiclassical approximation we calculate within the coupled-state formalism the ionization probability in antiproton-hydrogen (anti p+H) collisions. In particular we investigate the adiabatic ionization at the distance of closest approach in almost central collisions. Striking differences in the electron excitation probability compared with proton-hydrogen (p+H) collisions are predicted. (orig.)

  4. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    -LET components resulting from the annihilation. Though, the calculations of dose-averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity. Materials and Methods Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating...

  5. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first e...

  6. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  7. SU-E-J-37: Combining Proton Radiography and X-Ray CT Information to Better Estimate Relative Proton Stopping Power in a Clinical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In standard proton therapy clinical practice, proton stopping power uncertainties are in the order of 3.5%, which affects the ability of placing the proton Bragg peak at the edge of the tumor. The innovating idea of this project is to approach the uncertainty problem in RSP by using combined information from X-ray CT and proton radiography along a few beam angles. In addition, this project aims to quantify the systematic error introduced by the theoretical models (Janni, ICRU49, Bischel) for proton stopping power in media. Methods: A 3D phantom of 36 cm3 composed of 9 materials randomly placed is created. Measured RSP values are obtained using a Gammex phantom with a proton beam. Theoretical RSP values are calculated with Beth-Block equation in combination with three databases (Janni, ICRU49 and Bischel). Clinical RSP errors are simulated by introducing a systematic (1.5%, 2.5%, 3.5%) and a random error (+/−0.5%) to the theoretical RSP. A ray-tracing algorithm uses each of these RSP tables to calculate energy loss for proton crossing the phantom through various directions. For each direction, gradient descent (GD) method is done on the clinical RSP table to minimize the residual energy difference between the simulation with clinical RSP and with theoretical RSP. The possibility of a systematic material dependent error is investigated by comparing measured RSP to theoretical RSP as calculated from the three models. Results: Using 10,000 iterations on GD algorithm, RSP differences between theoretical values and clinical RSP have converged (<1%) for each error introduced. Results produced with ICRU49 have the smallest average difference (0.021%) to the measured RSP. Janni (1.168%) and Bischel (−0.372%) database shows larger systematic errors. Conclusion: Based on these results, ray-tracing optimisation using information from proton radiography and X-ray CT demonstrates a potential to improve the proton range accuracy in a clinical environment

  8. Closing the stop gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czakon, Michal [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchnphysik und Kosmologie; Mitov, Alexander [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.; Papucci, Michele [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ruderman, Joshua T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-07-15

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity conserving supersymmetry, by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∝180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  9. Monte Carlo-based Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air mass-collision-stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantity of interest in external beta radiation protection is the absorbed dose rate to tissue at a depth of 7 mg/cm2 Dt (7 mg/cm2) in a 4-element ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements) unit density tissue phantom. ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 6980-2 provides guidelines to establish this quantity for beta emitters using an extrapolation chamber as a primary standard. ISO 6980-1 proposes two series of beta reference radiation fields, namely, series 1 and series 2. Series 1 covers 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr, 204Tl and 147Pm sources used with beam flattening filter and Series 2 covers 14C and 106Ru/106Rh sources used with beam flattening filter. Dt (7 mg/cm2) is realized based on measured current and set of corrections including Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air mass-stopping power ratio, (S/ρ)t,a. ISO provides (S/ρ)t,a values which are based on approximate methods. The present study is aimed at calculating (S/ρ)t,a for 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr, 106Ru/106Rh and 147Pm sources using the Monte Carlo (MC) methods and compare the same against the ISO values. By definition, (S/ρ)t,a should be independent of cavity length of the chamber which was verified in the work

  10. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power from 0.8 keV to 10 keV for metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XIE A G; XIAO S Y; WANG L

    2016-05-01

    Based on the range–energy relationship, the characteristics of secondary electron emission, some relationship between the secondary electron yield $\\delta$ and experimental results, the universal formulae for $\\delta_{0.8−2}$ (the subscript indicates that the energy range of primary energy atthe surface W$_{\\rm po}$ is from 0.8 keV to 2 keV) and $\\delta_{2−10}$ for metals were deduced. The $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ calculated with the universal formulae and the$\\delta_{0.8−10}$ measured experimentally were compared, and the scattering of $\\delta$ for the same metal was analysed. Finally, we concluded that the formulae were universal for $\\delta_{0.8−10}$ for metals. On the basis of some relationship between parameters of $\\delta$, wededuce a formula for expressing total stopping power $S_{0.8−10}$ as a function of $S_{10−30}, \\delta_{0.8−10}, \\delta_{10−30}$, backscattered coefficient $\\heta_{0.8−10}, \\heta_{10−30}$ and W$_{\\rm po}. The calculated $S_{0.8−10}$ were compared with the values measured experimentally and it was concluded that the formula to estimate $S_{0.8−10}$ was universal for metals.

  11. Determination of the Stopping Power and Failure-time of Spacecraft Components due to Proton Interaction Using GOES 11 Acquisition Data

    CERN Document Server

    Jibiri, N N; Kio, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the several ways to describe the net effect of charged-particles' interaction is the rate of energy loss along the particles' path. In this study, the mass stopping power (Sp) of selected spacecraft composite materials, through which the particle traverses, its range (R) and the distance (d) travelled (by the particles) through the materials have been calculated and analyzed. The dose (in Gy) as a function of particle flux and deposited energy was also determined. Predictions of their possible effects on space system operations and life-span were made, especially as values exceeded certain threshold (limit). Using GOES 11 acquired data for 3 months, estimations and/or calculations were made to determine the risk and safe period of a satellite in the geosynchronous orbit. Under certain space radiation environmental conditions (without mitigation of any sort), a spacecraft whose body is 20 mm thick and with Al alloy casing, was theoretically estimated to have a safe period of about 3 years and risk perio...

  12. Electron stopping power and inelastic mean free path in amino acids and protein over the energy range of 20-20,000 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhenyu; Xia, Yueyuan; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Xiangdong

    2006-07-01

    Systematic calculations of stopping power (SPs) and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) values for 20-20,000 eV electrons in a group of 15 amino acids and a simple protein have been performed. The calculations are based on the dielectric response model and take into account the exchange effect between the incident electron and target electrons. The optical energy-loss functions for the 15 investigated amino acids and the protein are evaluated by using an empirical approach, because of the lack of experimental optical data. For all the considered materials, the calculated mean ionization potentials are in good agreement with those given by Bragg's rule, and the evaluated SP values at 20 keV converge well to the Bethe-Bloch predictions. The data shown represent the first results of SP and IMFP, for these 15 amino acids and the protein in the energy range below 20 keV, and might be useful for studies of various radiation effects in these materials. In addition, the average energy deposited by inelastic scattering of the electrons on this group of 15 amino acids, on the protein, on Formvar and on DNA, respectively, has been estimated for energies below 20 keV. The dependences of the average energy deposition on the electron energy are given. These results are important for any detailed studies of radiation-induced inactivation of proteins and the DNA. PMID:16733724

  13. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  14. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Gammaldi, V.; Maroto, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high dark matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma-rays have been observed by different telescopes, although their origin is not clear. In this work, we estimate the possible antiproton flux component associated with this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess. We estimate the sensitivity of PAMELA to this new primary antiproton source, which depends on the diffusion model and its spectral features. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production. This latter spectrum is typical in the production from annihilating or decaying dark matter. We pay particular attention to the case of a heavy dark matter candidate, which could be associated with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) data observed from the J1745-290 source.

  15. X-ray transitions from antiprotonic noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of antiprotonic X-ray transitions at high principal quantum numbers and the occurrence of electronic X-ray in antiprotonic argon krypton, and xenon is analysed with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The shell by shell ionisation by Auger electron emission, characterised by appearance and disappearance of X-ray lines, is followed through the antiprotonic cascade by considering transition and binding energies of both the antiproton and remaining electrons. A number of additional lines in the X-ray spectra have been tentatively assigned to electronic transitions caused by electronic de-excitation after Auger emission during the antiprotonic cascade. A few lines remain unexplained so far or are not unambiguously assigned. The complexity of the electronic states cannot be resolved with semiconductor detectors. Hopefully, in future high resolution devices like crystal spectrometers and Auger electron spectroscopy at antiproton at GSI will resolve this complexity

  16. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  17. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies

  18. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Kheymits, M D; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Wu, J; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; 10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L1

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three ...

  19. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  20. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  1. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  2. Shielding calculations for the antiproton target area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations performed in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab antiproton target hall are summarized. The following radiological considerations were examined: soil activation, residual activity of components, and beam-on radiation. In addition, at the request of the designers, the energy deposition in the proposed graphite beam dump was examined for several targeting conditions in order to qualitatively determine its ability to survive

  3. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with PAMELA

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles, and especially antiparticles, in the cosmic radiation. The apparatus is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite which was launched on 15 June 2006. PAMELA has been traveling around the earth along an elliptical and semi-polar orbit for almost five years. It mainly consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, a time of flight system and an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, which allows antiprotons to be ...

  4. Looking for new gravitational forces with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quite general arguments based on the principle of equivalence and modern field theory show that it is possible for the gravitational acceleration of antimatter to be different than that for matter. Further, there is no experimental evidence to rule out the possibility. In fact, some evidence indicates there may be unexpected effects. Thus, the planned experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons is of fundamental importance. 20 refs., 3 figs

  5. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined. (author)

  6. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  7. Antiproton production in relativistic Si-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured antiproton production cross sections as functions of centrality in collisions of 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon 28Si ions with targets of Al, Cu, and Pb. For all targets, the antiproton yields increase linearly with the number of projectile nucleons that have interacted, and show little target dependence. We discuss the implications of this result on the production and absorption of antiprotons within the nuclear medium

  8. SU-C-204-02: Improved Patient-Specific Optimization of the Stopping Power Calibration for Proton Therapy Planning Using a Single Proton Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I [Lyon 1 University and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne (France); Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Parodi, K [Ludwig Maximilian University, Garching, DE (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Krah, N [Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing, Heidelberg, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We present an improved method to calculate patient-specific calibration curves to convert X-ray computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) to relative stopping powers (RSP) for proton therapy treatment planning. Methods: By optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve, the difference between a proton radiographic image and a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography (DRR) is minimized. The feasibility of this approach has previously been demonstrated. This scenario assumes that all discrepancies between proton radiography and DRR originate from uncertainties in the HU-RSP curve. In reality, external factors cause imperfections in the proton radiography, such as misalignment compared to the DRR and unfaithful representation of geometric structures (“blurring”). We analyze these effects based on synthetic datasets of anthropomorphic phantoms and suggest an extended optimization scheme which explicitly accounts for these effects. Performance of the method is been tested for various simulated irradiation parameters. The ultimate purpose of the optimization is to minimize uncertainties in the HU-RSP calibration curve. We therefore suggest and perform a thorough statistical treatment to quantify the accuracy of the optimized HU-RSP curve. Results: We demonstrate that without extending the optimization scheme, spatial blurring (equivalent to FWHM=3mm convolution) in the proton radiographies can cause up to 10% deviation between the optimized and the ground truth HU-RSP calibration curve. Instead, results obtained with our extended method reach 1% or better correspondence. We have further calculated gamma index maps for different acceptance levels. With DTA=0.5mm and RD=0.5%, a passing ratio of 100% is obtained with the extended method, while an optimization neglecting effects of spatial blurring only reach ∼90%. Conclusion: Our contribution underlines the potential of a single proton radiography to generate a patient-specific calibration curve and to improve

  9. SU-E-J-147: Monte Carlo Study of the Precision and Accuracy of Proton CT Reconstructed Relative Stopping Power Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedes, G; Asano, Y; Parodi, K [Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Garching, DE (Germany); Arbor, N [Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Dauvergne, D; Testa, E [Universite Lyon 1, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Letang, J; Rit, S [Universite Lyon 1, INSA Lyon, CREATIS, Lyon (France)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of the intrinsic performances of proton computed tomography (pCT) as a modality for treatment planning in proton therapy. The performance of an ideal pCT scanner is studied as a function of various parameters. Methods: Using GATE/Geant4, we simulated an ideal pCT scanner and scans of several cylindrical phantoms with various tissue equivalent inserts of different sizes. Insert materials were selected in order to be of clinical relevance. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm taking into account the scattering of protons into the phantom. To quantify the performance of the ideal pCT scanner, we study the precision and the accuracy with respect to the theoretical relative stopping power ratios (RSP) values for different beam energies, imaging doses, insert sizes and detector positions. The planning range uncertainty resulting from the reconstructed RSP is also assessed by comparison with the range of the protons in the analytically simulated phantoms. Results: The results indicate that pCT can intrinsically achieve RSP resolution below 1%, for most examined tissues at beam energies below 300 MeV and for imaging doses around 1 mGy. RSP maps accuracy of less than 0.5 % is observed for most tissue types within the studied dose range (0.2–1.5 mGy). Finally, the uncertainty in the proton range due to the accuracy of the reconstructed RSP map is well below 1%. Conclusion: This work explores the intrinsic performance of pCT as an imaging modality for proton treatment planning. The obtained results show that under ideal conditions, 3D RSP maps can be reconstructed with an accuracy better than 1%. Hence, pCT is a promising candidate for reducing the range uncertainties introduced by the use of X-ray CT alongside with a semiempirical calibration to RSP.Supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  10. Stopping powers of havar for 0.63 5.9 MeV protons and 2.6 24 MeV alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L. E.; Trzaska, W. H.; Räisänen, J.; Lyapin, V.

    2004-11-01

    A transmission experiment utilizing thin foil targets has been conducted in order to establish the stopping powers of the cobalt-base alloy, havar, for 0.6-5.9 MeV protons and 2.6-24 MeV alpha particles. The basic technique of the novel experimental method used was to record both the projectile energy and the time of flight while alternating measurements with and without the target in place. The uncertainties of the proton and alpha particle data sets ranged from 1.4 to 2.3% and 1.1 to 1.5%, respectively. Modified Bethe-Bloch theory was applied to the measurements in order to ascertain values of the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b) for each projectile. The extracted values were I = 304.3 ± 2.4 eV and b = 1.37 ± 0.04 for the case of protons, and I = 306.3 ± 2.3 eV and b = 1.47 ± 0.03 for the case of alpha particles. The I-values are somewhat higher than the additivity-based expectation of 295.7 eV, whereas the b-values are clearly consistent with the expected range of 1.4 ± 0.1. The parameter values extracted from the measurements are appraised for compatibility with recently observed trends in values of I and of b with increasing projectile atomic number.

  11. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  12. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  13. A study of the reactions antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ- at 14.6 GeV/c and a study of charged multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of two reactions on deuterium has been performed with incident antiprotons of 14.6 GeV/c: antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ-. The final states are dominated by Δ(1236) resonance production and in the coherent reaction the d* effect is observed as at lower incident momenta. At 14.6 GeV/c, it seems that the diffraction dissociation process as well for the incident particle as for the target takes a large part of the production mechanism for the two reactions. A study of charged multiplicity distributions in antiproton-neutron interactions is presented at 5.5, 9.3 and 14.6 GeV/c. The topological cross sections as well as various statistical moments obtained from the charged multiplicities are studied as functions of the incident momentum. A comparison between our results and antiproton-proton and pp data shows, that in the range of incident momenta used, a scaling function which describes antiproton-N and proton-proton interactions does not exist as expected from the KNO model (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen model)

  14. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  15. SU-C-204-04: Patient Specific Proton Stopping Powers Estimation by Combining Proton Radiography and Prior-Knowledge X-Ray CT Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins-Fekete, CA [Massachussetts General Hospital, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Aarhus University, Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark); Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Brousmiche, S [Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Hansen, D [Aarhus University, Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark); Beaulieu, L [Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Seco, J [Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The material relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the highest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust and systematic method that yields accurate, patient specific, RSP by combining 1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and 2) daily proton radiograph of the patient. Methods: The method is formulated as a linear least-square optimization problem (min||Ax-B||2). The parameter A represents the pathlength crossed by the proton in each material. The RSPs for the materials (water equivalent thickness (WET)/physical thickness) are denoted by x. B is the proton radiograph expressed as WET crossed. The problem is minimized using a convex-conic optimization algorithm with xi

  16. SU-C-204-04: Patient Specific Proton Stopping Powers Estimation by Combining Proton Radiography and Prior-Knowledge X-Ray CT Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The material relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the highest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust and systematic method that yields accurate, patient specific, RSP by combining 1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and 2) daily proton radiograph of the patient. Methods: The method is formulated as a linear least-square optimization problem (min||Ax-B||2). The parameter A represents the pathlength crossed by the proton in each material. The RSPs for the materials (water equivalent thickness (WET)/physical thickness) are denoted by x. B is the proton radiograph expressed as WET crossed. The problem is minimized using a convex-conic optimization algorithm with xi

  17. An Update on the Depth-Dose Curve of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Knudsen, Helge;

    Purpose: The CERN AD-4/ACE project aims to measure the relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons. We have revisited previously published data for the antiproton depth-dose curve [1], where the relative dose deposition normalized to a point in the plateau region was plotted. In this revision...... we refine the experimental set-up to obtain absolute dose per primary particle, and compare these with simulations. Materials and Methods: Scrutinizing the geometrical setup, we could calculate beam scattering along the antiproton beam, which enables replotting the depth-dose curve as absolute dose...... is annihilating on. Precise modelling of the detector is therefore inevitable. The missing energy in the annihilation peak remains to be explained, but may be related to an overestimation of inelastic cross sections of the antiprotons. [1] Bassler, N., et al., The antiproton depth-dose curve in water, Phys. Med...

  18. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  19. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  20. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime

  1. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  2. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  3. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  4. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (2 despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H2 is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H2 molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H2+, and H2 as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H2, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed comparison of the present findings for p impacts and for anti p+He collisions with literature data. On the other hand, total and differential cross sections for ionization and excitation of the targets by anti p impact complement the sparse literature data of this kind. Results gained from different targets as well

  5. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  6. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will be infected and ...

  7. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  8. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  9. X-rays from antiprotonic sup 3 He and sup 4 He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Egger, J.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-02-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si(Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-17{plus minus}4) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(25{plus minus}9) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.14{plus minus}0.18) meV for anti p{sup 3}He and {epsilon}{sub 2p}=(-18{plus minus}2) eV, {Gamma}{sub 2p}=(45{plus minus}5) eV and {Gamma}{sub 3d}=(2.36{plus minus}0.10) meV for anti p{sup 4}He. (orig.).

  10. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  11. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  12. Search for narrow lines in photon spectra from proton-antiproton annihilations at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusive photon spectra from annihilation of antiprotons stopped in a liquid hydrogen target were measured at LEAR (CERN) with a magnetic pair spectrometer. The FWHM energy resolution of the spectrometer in the region from 100-700 MeV was in the range from 2 to 4.5%. A total number of about 4.8.106 events with energies up to 1 GeV have been reconstructed. The photon spectra were scanned for possible lines with widths comparable to spectrometer resolution indicating the existence of bound nucleon-antinucleon states. No such structures were found with branching ratios greater than 4 to 8.10-4 at 95% confidence level. Results of former experiments could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  13. Prospects for antiproton physics, my perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelert, Walter, E-mail: w.oelert@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    These closing remarks are not supposed to be a summary talk, for this please have a look to the individual contributions to be published in the proceedings, but rather some considerations on future prospects for antiproton physics. However, first I would like to appreciate the organizers idea for giving me the opportunity to thank them for a well balanced, exciting and interesting conference LEAP-2011 in this marvelous city of Vancouver. I am sure we all loved to be here and enjoyed the hospitality and the bond of friendship we could experience during these days. We appreciate the patience and help of all the local organizers where I especially would like to mention Jana Thomson for her endless and helpful assignment. Thank you all-the participants, the speakers, the conference chair, the sponsors-for making this conference a success and we are looking forward to the next occasion in this series of meetings which will be celebrated in Uppsala.

  14. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  15. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  16. Cosmic Antiproton Constraints on Effective Interactions of the Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  17. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  18. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments

  19. Sneaky light stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Eifert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  20. Simulation and implementation of high-power band-stop filter%一款大功率带阻滤波器的设计仿真与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冬梅

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the small spurious signals accurately, the large signals of the fundamental wave are filtered through band-stop filter before RF input signals entering the spectrum analyzer, which ensures the power level of mixer port meets the standard. A short-wave band-stop filter allowing high power to pass is designed in this paper. The filter not only filters the large signals of the fundamental wave to avoid saturation nonlinearity distortion, but also realizes flatness out of band, which makes spurious signals to be measured non-loss. The simulation results prove the feasibility of the design scheme.%为了准确测试杂散小信号,在射频输入信号进入频谱仪之前采用带阻滤波器滤除基波大信号,保证进入频谱议混频器端口的功率电平符合要求.设计了一款可过大功率的短波带阻滤波器,该滤波器不但可有效滤除基波大信号,避免频谱仪的饱和非线性失真,且带外平坦,对需要测量的杂散信号几乎无损耗.仿真结果证明了该设计方案的可行性.

  1. Antiproton Flux in Cosmic Ray Propagation Models with Anisotropic Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grajek, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Recently a cosmic ray propagation model has been introduced, where anisotropic diffusion is used as a mechanism to allow for $\\mathcal{O}(100)$ km/s galactic winds. This model predicts a reduced antiproton background flux, suggesting an excess is being observed. We implement this model in GALPROP v50.1 and perform a $\\chi^2$ analysis for B/C, $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be, and the recent PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ datasets. By introducing a power-index parameter $\\alpha$ that dictates the dependence of the diffusion coefficient $D_{xx}$ on height $|z|$ away from the galactic plane, we confirm that isotropic diffusion models with $\\alpha=0$ cannot accommodate high velocity convective winds suggested by ROSAT, while models with $\\alpha=1$ ($D_{xx}\\propto |z|$) can give a very good fit. A fit to B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^{9}$Be data predicts a lower $\\bar{p}/p$ flux ratio than the PAMELA measurement at energies between approximately 2 GeV to 20 GeV. A combined fit including in addition the $\\bar{p}/p$ data is marginal, suggesting only a...

  2. Near-threshold behavior of positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Bray, A. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    Using the convergent close-coupling theory we study the threshold behavior of cross sections for positronium (Ps) of energy E scattering on antiprotons. In the case of Ps (1 s ) elastic scattering, simple power laws are observed for all partial waves studied. The partial-wave summed cross section is nearly constant, and dominates the antihydrogen formation cross section at all considered energies, even though the latter is exothermic and behaves as 1 /E1 /2 . For Ps (2 s ), oscillations spanning orders of magnitude on top of the 1 /E behavior are found in the elastic and quasielastic cross sections. The antihydrogen formation is influenced by dipole-supported resonances below the threshold of inelastic processes. Resonance energies form a geometric progression relative to the threshold. The exothermic antihydrogen formation cross sections behave as 1 /E at low energies, but are oscillation free. We demonstrate that all these rich features are reproduced by the threshold theory developed by Gailitis [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15, 3423 (1982), 10.1088/0022-3700/15/19/012].

  3. One-stop shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C

    1996-11-25

    The long-term-care industry's new mantras are "continuum of care" and "one-stop shopping." Companies are trying to please consumers who are clamoring for more senior-living options and managed-care organizations that want administratively simple contracting arrangements.

  4. Stopping the unstoppable

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How do you stop two very high energy proton beams circulating in opposite directions around a 27-kilometre ring? The answer is the beam dumps. Two tunnels, pointing in opposite directions, are being constructed at point 6 of the LHC. These will allow the beams to be directed into two large beam dumps housed at the ends of the tunnels.

  5. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  6. Moments of random sums and Robbins' problem of optimal stopping

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Robbins' problem of optimal stopping asks one to minimise the expected {\\it rank} of observation chosen by some nonanticipating stopping rule. We settle a conjecture regarding the {\\it value} of the stopped variable under the rule optimal in the sense of the rank, by embedding the problem in a much more general context of selection problems with the nonanticipation constraint lifted, and with the payoff growing like a power function of the rank.

  7. Antiproton-impact ionization of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization processes in antiproton collisions with H2 are studied by direct solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a one-electron 3D wavefunction in the field of H+2 is used to calculate single-ionization cross sections at incident energies ranging from 50 keV to 1.5 MeV. Averaging over the molecular orientations, the single-ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with time-dependent basis set calculations and experiment. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a two-electron 6D wavefunction in the field of H2+2 is used to calculate single- and double-ionization cross sections at an incident energy of 100 keV. Initiatory 6D results for the H+2 production cross section range are somewhat lower than experiment, while the H+ production cross section range brackets experiment.

  8. Elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last two years very interesting results have been collected at LEAR on both the elementary pantip and the antip nucleus interactions. A review of all the interesting experimental results already available is far beyond the scope of the present talk. Its topic will be essentially limited to report on the new experimental informations dealing with the knowledge of the fundamental properties of the antip p elementary interaction and the determination of the characteristics of the antip nucleus interaction. The results of the antip p cross sections measured at low momenta by the PS173 and PS172 experiments are discussed. The antip nucleus elastic scattering angular distributions collected by the PS184 experiment have significantly contributed to define the properties of the p nucleus optical potential and stimulated a lot of microscopic calculations. The results are reviewed. A comparison to the informations obtained from the measurements of X-rays in antiprotonic atoms done by the PS176 and PS186 experiments is given. The interpretation of the inelastic scattering data measured for the 12C(antip, antip)12C* system at 47 and 180 MeV for various discrete states is presented: special emphasis will be given to the study of spin-flip transitions to unnatural parity states which would provide significant constant on the isovector tensor component of the NantiN interaction. Status on the experimental study of the (antip, p) reaction is discussed

  9. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  10. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and pionic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiproton) experiment of CERN has observed two-photon spectroscopy by making non-linear transitions of the antiprotons which have occupied highly excited levels. The metastable antiproton helium atoms are studied by irradiating two laser light photons propagating in the counter direction. As the result, the spectrum of narrow line width was observed by making the Doppler width of the resonant transition to decrease. And the anti-proton helium transition frequency was measured with the accuracy of (2.3∼5) X10-9. The mass ratio of the antiproton and the electron has been decided to be Mp/me =1836.152674(23) from the comparison of quantum electrodynamics calculation and the present experimental result. The pion-Helium experiment instrument has been also constructed at the ring cyclotron of PSI (Paul Sherer Institute) toward the successful laser spectroscopy of this atom. When this atom is observed, the π- mass can be obtained with the accuracy higher than 6∼8 orders of magnitude which may contribute to the direct measurement of the upper limit value of muon neutrino mass in the Particle Data Book Mass although various difficulties may be encountered. This report describes briefly the laser spectroscopy at first and then the recent situation of the experiments. (S. Funahashi)

  11. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  12. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  13. Baryon stopping and hadronic spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryon stopping and particle production in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon are studied as a function of the collision centrality using new proton, antiproton, charged kaon and charged pion production data measured with the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Stopping, which is measured by the shift in rapidity of net protons or baryons from the initial beam rapidity, increases in more central collisions. This is expected from a geometrical picture of the collisions. The stopping data are quantitatively compared to models incorporating various mechanisms for stopping. In general, microscopic transport calculations which incorporate current theoretical models of baryon stopping or use phenomenological extrapolations from simpler systems overestimate the dependence of stopping on centrality. Approximately, the yield of produced pions scales with the number of nucleons participating in the collision. A small increase in yield beyond this scaling, accompanied by a small suppression in the yield of the fastest pions, reflects the variation in stopping with centrality. Consistent with the observations from central collisions of light and heavy nuclei at the SPS, the transverse momentum distributions of all particles are observed to become harder with increasing centrality. This effect is most pronounced for the heaviest particles. This hardening is discussed in terms of multiple scattering of the incident nucleons of one colliding nucleus as they traverse the other nucleus and in terms of rescattering within the system of produced particles

  14. Should Exam Be Stopped?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢连香

    2006-01-01

    The exam system has come to be the main topic of modern education.As it plays so important a role in the area of education that it is under much discussion as to its use.People who are for it try to develop this system more;those who are against it believe that such a system should be stopped.Should exam be stopped?In my opinion it should be.Firstly,a number of people think that an exam is the only way to test knowledge,but,in fact,that is not true.A few questions given in an exam could in no way cover the ...

  15. The stop on top

    CERN Document Server

    Zakareishvili, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric partners of the top quark have been sought since the top quark has been discovered at the Tevatron. The searches are more easily performed in scenarios where the mass splitting between the top and the stop is large and where differences in kinematics are striking. The region in which top and stop are almost degenerate in mass is more difficult to explore experimentally as the final state kinematics are very similar, apart from angular-related distributions which reflect the spin/parity difference between the two particles. Usually the searches are performed looking for deviations on the measured top-quark pair production cross section with respect to the standard model prediction, or looking to simple variables such as the difference in the azimuthal angle between two leptons produced after top quark decays.

  16. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  17. Inertial-confinement-fusion applications of ion-stopping theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Bailey, D.S.

    1982-01-22

    Methods were developed to calculate: (1) the stopping power of a hot plasma target, (2) the charge-state of a fast ion projectile, and (3) the final disposition of the deposited energy. The first issue refers to the stopping power for protons. The proton stopping power is altered in high-density or high-temperature targets, especially at velocities below the stopping peak. The second issue concerns the application of a proton stopping curve to the arbitrary projectile. The third topic is more specialized to inertial fusion and concerns the partition of deposited energy between ion (nuclear motion) degrees of freedom and those corresponding to bound and free electrons. The question here is whether a thermal equilibrium plasma is produced.

  18. Many Facets of Strangeness Nuclear Physics with Stored Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Pochodzalla, Josef; Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Rojo, Marta Martinez; Steinen, Marcell; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharova, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent a unparalleled factory for hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of strange hadronic systems with unprecedented precision. The behavior of hyperons and -- for the first time -- of antihyperons in nuclear systems can be studied under well controlled conditions. The exclusive production of $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ pairs in antiproton-nucleus interactions probe the neutron and proton distribution in the nuclear periphery and will help to sample the neutron skin. For the first time, high resolution $\\gamma$-spectroscopy of doubly strange nuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of double hypernuclei with mesons beams at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange $\\Xi$-atoms are feasible and even the pr...

  19. Antiproton-Nucleus Interaction and Coulomb Effect at High Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; WU Qing; GU Yun-Ting; MA Wei-Xing; TAN Zhen-Qiang; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The Coulomb effect in high energy antiproton-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering from 12C and 16O is studied in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory for five kinetic energies ranged from 0.23 to 1.83 GeV.A microscopic shell-model nuclear wave functions, Woods-Saxon single-particle wave functions, and experimental pN amplitudes are used in the calculations. The results show that the Coulomb effect is of paramount importance for filling up the dips of differential cross sections. We claim that the present result for inelastic scattering of antiproton-12C is sufficiently reliable to be a guide for measurements in the very near future. We also believe that antiproton nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering may produce new information on both the nuclear structure and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, in particular the p-neutron interaction.

  20. The PANDA Experiment at FAIR - Subatomic Physics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction leads to spectacular phenomena, such as the formation of hadronic matter, color confinement, and the generation of the mass of visible matter. To get deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms remains one of the most challenging tasks within the field of subatomic physics. The antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt (PANDA) collaboration has the ambition to address key questions in this field by exploiting a cooled beam of antiprotons at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) combined with a state-of-the-art and versatile detector. This contribution will address some of the unique features of PANDA that give rise to a promising physics program together with state-of-the-art technological developments.

  1. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  2. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  3. The Brain Never Stops

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Your brain is doing a lot of work when you are engaged in activities such as sports, playing a game, or watching a movie. Your brain is also a master of associating one thought with another and making your mind wander. But what does your brain do when you are not engaged in particular thoughts or actions? Interestingly, similar to the heart that always keeps beating, the brain never stops its activity. For example, your brain is highly active even when you are fast asleep. In fact, brain cell...

  4. Improvements to Antiproton Accumulator to Recycler Transfers at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, J.P.; Drendel, B.; Vander Muelen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since 2005, the Recycler has become the sole storage ring for antiprotons used in the Tevatron Collider. The operational role of the Antiproton Source has shifted to exclusively producing antiprotons for periodic transfers to the Recycler. The process of transferring the antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Recycler has been greatly improved, leading to a dramatic reduction in the transfer time. The reduction in time has been accomplished with both an improvement in transfer efficiency and an increase in average stacking rate. This paper will describe the improvements that have streamlined the transfer process and other changes that contributed to a significant increase in the number of antiprotons available to the Collider.

  5. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.;

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 Ge......V. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of similar...

  6. GMSB with Light Stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. Two possible ways out are: i) To extend GMSB by direct superpotential messenger-MSSM Yukawa couplings to generate sizeable mixing, thus reintroducing the flavor problem; ii) To extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the $\\rho$ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second way by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges $Y=(0,\\pm 1)$, with a tree-level custodial $SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R$ global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the $\\rho$ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of ...

  7. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  8. Baryon stopping probes deconfinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Stopping and baryon transport in central relativistic Pb + Pb and Au + Au collisions are reconsidered with the aim to find indications for the transition from hadronic to partonic processes. At energies reached at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron ( √{s_{NN}} = 6.3-17.3 GeV) and at RHIC (62.4 GeV) the fragmentation-peak positions as obtained from the data depend linearly on the beam rapidity and are in agreement with earlier results from a QCD-based approach that accounts for gluon saturation. No discontinuities in the net-proton fragmentation peak positions occur in the expected transition region from partons to hadrons at 6-10GeV. In contrast, the mean rapidity loss is predicted to depend linearly on the beam rapidity only at high energies beyond the RHIC scale. The combination of both results offers a clue for the transition from hard partonic to soft hadronic processes in baryon stopping. NICA results could corroborate these findings.

  9. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  10. Measurements and calculation of the activation of the biologic shield of the Lingen BWR power reactor definitively stopped (in view of dismantling)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the dismantling planning of a power reactor, it is important to know among others the depth of activation of the biological shield. A large sampling and measurement program joint to computer calculations, has given data which will allow to avoid in the future high-cost measurement programs. One shows that the calculation of activation induced by neutrons in the median plane of the core, to determine the zone from which concrete is only slightly activated. In the reactor considered, this zone does not reach the external concrete (or first layer of concrete)

  11. Beam Diagnostics for Measurements of Antiproton Annihilation Cross Sections at Ultra-low Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todoroki K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons collaboration of CERN is currently attempting to measure the antiproton-nucleus in-flight annihilation cross sections on thin target foils of C, Pd, and Pt at 130 keV of kinetic energy. The low-energy antiprotons were supplied by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD and a radio-frequency quadrupole decelerator. For this measurement, a beam profile monitor based on secondary electron emission was developed. Data from this monitor was used to ensure that antiprotons were precisely tuned to the position of an 80-mm-diameter experimental target, by measuring the spatial profile of 200-ns-long beam pulses containing 105 − 106 antiprotons with an active area of 40 mm × 40 mm and a spatial resolution of 4 mm. By using this monitor, we succeeded in finely tuning antiproton beams on the target, and observed some annihilation events originating from the target.

  12. Secondary antiprotons as a Galactic Dark Matter probe

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel determination of the astrophysical uncertainties associated to the secondary antiproton flux originating from cosmic-ray spallation on the interstellar gas. We select a set of propagation models compatible with the recent B/C data from PAMELA, and find those providing minimal and maximal antiproton fluxes in different energy ranges. We use this result to determine the most conservative bounds on relevant Dark Matter (DM) annihilation channels: We find that the recent claim of a DM interpretation of a gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Center region cannot be ruled out by current antiproton data. Finally, we discuss the impact of the recently released preliminary data from AMS-02. In particular, we provide a reference model compatible with proton, helium and B/C spectra from this experiment. Remarkably, the main propagation parameters of this model are in perfect agreement with the best fit presented in our earlier statistical analyses. We also show that the antiproton-to-proton ratio does not...

  13. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  14. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  15. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  16. Beam Measurement Systems for the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Odier, P; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Spickermann, T

    2001-01-01

    The new, low-energy antiproton physics facility at CERN has been successfully commissioned and has been delivering decelerated antiprotons at 100 MeV/c since July 2000. The AD consists of one ring where the 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced from a production target are injected, rf manipulated, stochastically cooled, decelerated (with further stages involving additional stochastic and electron cooling and rf manipulation) and extracted at 100 MeV/c. While proton test beams of sufficient intensity could be used for certain procedures in AD commissioning, this was not possible for setting-up and routine operation. Hence, special diagnostics systems had to be developed to obtain the beam and accelerator characteristics using the weak antiproton beams of a few 10E7 particles at all momenta from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c. These include systems for position measurement, intensity, beam size measurements using transverse aperture limiters and scintillators and Schottky-based tools. This paper gives an overall view of...

  17. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  18. Stop the RIKA BANARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshio

    Children who want to study science & technology are decreasing continuously in Japan. This phenomenon is so called “Rika Banare” meaning literally science apart. Then, the number of students aiming at being engineers is decreasing. This will be a threat for Japanese industry. Many science & technology events are being held everywhere in Japan to overcome Rika Banare. However, most of them leave no sustainable influence over the students who reach to high school age. The reason why Rika Banare takes place is discussed. Then, it is insisted that the promotion of the attractive features of engineering career is important as well as improvement of the education system. In this article, eight proposals to stop Rika Banare are presented. Five of them are related to education system and the rest three to the improvement of social status of engineers.

  19. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  20. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise. PMID:23664946

  1. Interface control technologies for high-power GaN transistors: Self-stopping etching of p-GaN layers utilizing electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taketomo; Kumazaki, Yusuke; Edamoto, Masaaki; Akazawa, Masamichi; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2016-02-01

    The selective and low-damaged etching of p-type GaN or AlGaN layer is inevitable process for AlGaN/GaN high-power transistors. We have investigated an electrochemical etching of p-GaN layer grown on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, consisting of an anodic oxidation of p-GaN surface and a subsequent dissolution of the resulting oxide. The p-GaN layer was electrochemically etched by following the pattern of the SiO2 film that acted as an etching mask. Etching depth was linearly controlled by cycle number of triangular waveform at a rate of 25 nm/cycle. The AFM, TEM and μ-AES results showed that the top p-GaN layer was completely removed after 5 cycles applied, and the etching reaction was automatically sopped on the AlGaN surface. I-V and C-V measurements revealed that no significant damages were induced in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures.

  2. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise.

  3. Light Stops from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Pepin, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    In supersymmetric models the mass of the stops can be considered as the naturalness measure of the theory. Roughly, the lighter the stops are, the more natural the theory is. Both, the absence of supersymmetric signals at experiment and the measurement of the Higgs mass, put scenarios with light stops under increasing tension. I will present a supersymmetry breaking mechanism of the Scherk-Schwarz type that, by introducing extra $SU(2)_L$ triplets in the Higgs sector, is able to generate the correct Higgs mass while keeping stops light.

  4. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  5. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons; Desenvolvimento de uma metodologia para estimativa da dose absorvida e do poder de freamento para eletrons de conversao de baixa energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    1995-08-01

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internalcontamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy {sup 109} Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 {pi} proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin {sup 109} Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  6. Baryon Stopping in Au+Au and p+p collisions at 62 and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing

    2009-01-01

    BRAHMS has measured rapidity density distributions of protons and antiprotons in both p+p and Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV and 200 GeV. From these distributions the yields of so-called "net-protons", that is the difference between the proton and antiproton yields, can be determined. The rapidity dependence of the net-proton yields from peripheral Au+Au collisions is found to have a similar behaviour to that found for the p+p results, while a quite different rapidity dependence is found for central Au+Au collisions. The net-proton distributions can be used together with model calculations to find the net-baryon yields as a function of rapidity, thus yielding information on the average rapidity loss of beam particles, the baryon transport properties of the medium, and the amount of "stopping" in these collisions.

  7. Second Stop and Sbottom Searches with a Stealth Stop

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Qin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The top squarks (stops) may be the most wanted particles after the Higgs boson discovery. The searches for the lightest stop have put strong constraints on its mass. However, there is still a search gap in the low mass region if the spectrum of the stop and the lightest neutralino is compressed. In that case, it may be easier to look for the second stop since naturalness requires both stops to be close to the weak scale. The current experimental searches for the second stop are based on the simplified model approach with the decay modes $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 Z$ and $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 h$. However, in a realistic supersymmetric spectrum there is always a sbottom lighter than the second stop, hence the decay patterns are usually more complicated than the simplified model assumptions. In particular, there are often large branching ratios of the decays $\\tilde{t}_2 \\to \\tilde{b}_1 W$ and $\\tilde{b}_1 \\to \\tilde{t}_1 W$ as long as they are open. The decay chains can be even more complex if there ar...

  8. Secondary electron emission in antiproton-carbon foil collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K. (Inst. of Physics, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Andersen, L.H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. (orig.).

  9. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  10. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  11. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  12. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation: antiprotons vs. pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c bar p and π- beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z ≅ 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code

  13. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  14. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; M. Boezio; Bogomolov, E.A.; M. Bongi; Bonvicini, V.; Borisov, S.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; F. Cafagna; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of tr...

  15. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  16. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  17. Current status of antiproton impact ionization of atoms and molecules: theoretical and experimental perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Tom; Knudsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical progress in the field of antiproton-impact-induced ionization of atoms and molecules is reviewed. We describe the techniques used to measure ionization cross sections and give an overview of the experimental results supplemented by tables of all existing data. An...... status of our understanding of antiproton impact ionization. The related issues of energy loss measurements and antiproton therapy are briefly described and directions for possible future work are pointed out as well....

  18. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Maynard, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Barriga-Carrasco, M D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Valuev, A A [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-28

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly.

  19. Search for antiproton-{sup 15}N bound state in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dexu [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Larionov, Alexei; Mishustin, Igor [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ma, Yue [RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Maas, Frank [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the antiproton-nucleus potential (antimatter-mater potential), and prepare a possible experiment for the PANDA spectrometer at FAIR facility, we carried out a calculation with the Giessen-Boltzman-Uehling-Uhlenbeck(GiBUU) model. The calculation was performed for an antiproton beam energy 1.5 GeV and an {sup 16}O target. The interesting events, which provide information about the antiproton-{sup 15}N potential, are required to have one knocked-out proton in forward direction and two or more pions from the antiproton annihilation at rest. Preliminary results of these studies are presented.

  20. Single and double ionization of helium by fast antiproton and proton impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Mo-dash-barller, S.P.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.H.; Uggerho-dash-barj, E.

    1986-10-27

    The first ion-atom--collision data obtained with antiprotons are presented. We measured the single- and double-ionization cross section for 0.5-5-MeV antiprotons and protons colliding with helium. For ion energies above --2 MeV, the single-ionization cross section is the same for protons and antiprotons. However, surprisingly, the double-ionization cross section for antiprotons is approximately a factor of 2 larger than that for protons. The present data constitute a challenge for future theoretical models of charged-particle--atom collisions.

  1. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Charged pion albedo induced by cosmic antiproton interactions with the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the calculations of the energy spectra and fluxes of single and double albedo charged pions generated by cosmic proton and antiproton interactions with the lunar surface. Properties of such spectra and related fluxes are investigated in order to clarify some important facets of the antiproton detection via charged pion albedo flux from the lunar surface. Pion albedo measurement may represent a novel approach for the identification of cosmic antiprotons using the lunar surface as a calorimeter. Future scientific programs on the Moon designed to measure antiproton flux may benefit from the results of these calculations. (author)

  3. LHC Availability 2016: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2016. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  4. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  5. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  6. Ion stopping in heated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion stopping departs from classical, cold material values as the target material heats to appreciable ionization levels. The authors are investigating this phenomenon experimentally on the Proto I accelerator with a radial, Applied-B field ion diode. When the beam is focused to 0.5 TW/cm3 on thin aluminum foil targets the time-resolved departure from cold stopping is clear. Their observations and early interpretations will be presented. 9 references, 9 figures

  7. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  8. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  9. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  10. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Slevin, J. [Department of Experimental Physics, St. Patrick`s College, Maynooth (Ireland); Charlton, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-4234 (Switzerland)

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  11. Comparison of Optimized Single and Multifield Irradiation Plans of Antiproton, Proton and Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Karaiskos, Pantelis;

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotons have been suggested as a possibly superior modality for radiotherapy, due to the energy released when antiprotons annihilate, which enhances the Bragg peak and introduces a high-LET component to the dose. However, concerns are expressed about the inferior lateral dose distribution...

  12. Antiproton small momentum transfer charge exchange scattering on protons at 30 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton charge exchange scattering on protons anti pp→anti nn is investigated with 30 GeV/c antiprotons at the IHEP accelerator. The experiment confirms the existence of a structure at small angles in the angular distribution of this reaction at high energies, observed earlier

  13. Higgs-Stoponium Mixing Near the Stop-Antistop Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T; Wagner, Carlos E M

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model contain additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons that are coupled to heavy scalar top quarks (stops). This system exhibits interesting field theoretic phenomena when the Higgs mass is close to the stop-antistop production threshold. Existing work in the literature has examined the digluon-to-diphoton cross section near threshold and has focused on enhancements in the cross section that might arise either from the perturbative contributions to the Higgs-to-digluon and Higgs-to-diphoton form factors or from mixing of the Higgs boson with stoponium states. Near threshold, enhancements in the relevant amplitudes that go as inverse powers of the stop-antistop relative velocity require resummations of perturbation theory and/or nonperturbative treatments. We present a complete formulation of threshold effects at leading order in the stop-antistop relative velocity in terms of nonrelativistic effective field theory. We give detailed numerical calculations for the case in ...

  14. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Haisch, Ulrich; Tunstall, Lewis C.

    2016-09-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops {tilde{t}}_1 , making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are {tilde{t}}_1to t{tilde{χ}}_1^0 , {tilde{t}}_1to W b{tilde{χ}}_1^0 and {tilde{t}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 . We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 in a model-independent fashion, revealing that a large parameter space region with stop mass values {m_{tilde{t}}}{_1} up to 530 GeV is excluded for any {tilde{t}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 branching ratio by LHC Run I data. The impact of {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 decays is further illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the {tilde{c}}_1to c{tilde{χ}}_1^0 bounds are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing can lead to an increase in the allowed parameter space by at most 35%, with large areas excluded for arbitrary mixing.

  15. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  16. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  17. Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    OpenAIRE

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; S. Chapman; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected s...

  18. FAIR: The accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkov, Boris [FAIR JCR GSI, Darmstad (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation outlines the current status of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). It is expected that the actual construction of the facility will commence in 2010 as the project has raised more than one billion euro in funding. The sequence and scope of the construction of the accelerator modules in accordance with modularized start version are described. Outstanding research opportunities offered by the modularized start version for all scientific FAIR communities from early on will allow to bridge the time until FAIR's completion with a world-leading research program. The green paper outlining a realistic path to achieve this goal is discussed.

  19. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  20. Stopped nucleons in configuration space

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, Andrzej; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note, using the colour string model, we study the configuration space distribution of stopped nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. We find that the stopped nucleons from the target and the projectile end up separated from each other by the distance increasing with the collision energy. In consequence, for the center of mass energies larger than 6 or 10 GeV (depending on the details of the model) it appears that the system created is not in thermal and chemical equilibrium, and the net baryon density reached is likely not much higher than that already present in the colliding nuclei.

  1. Stop. Write! Writing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The message in this book, the dictum in this book, is to stop and write when the Grounded Theory (GT methodology puts you in that ready position. Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long. I will discuss these ideas in detail. My experience with PhD candidates is that for the few who write when ready, many do not and SHOULD. Simply put, many write-up, but many more should.

  2. Measurement of 0.25 endash 3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balloon-borne isotope matter-antimatter experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on 16 endash 17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 GeV. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of ∼107 yr. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Study of doubly strange systems using stored antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Olshevskiy, A.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfarth, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martìnez Rojo, M.; Marta, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espì, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.

    2016-10-01

    Bound nuclear systems with two units of strangeness are still poorly known despite their importance for many strong interaction phenomena. Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent an unparalleled factory for various hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of systems which contain two or even more units of strangeness at the P ‾ ANDA experiment at FAIR. For the first time, high resolution γ-spectroscopy of doubly strange ΛΛ-hypernuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of ΛΛ-hypernuclei at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange Ξ--atoms will be feasible and even the production of Ω--atoms will be within reach. The latter might open the door to the | S | = 3 world in strangeness nuclear physics, by the study of the hadronic Ω--nucleus interaction. For the first time it will be possible to study the behavior of Ξ‾+ in nuclear systems under well controlled conditions.

  4. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  5. In Defence of Thought Stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Gary Maria

    2009-01-01

    Thought stopping (TS) has a long and established history as an effective mental control technique among the cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT). Recent claims have arisen, particularly from acceptance and mindfulness-based authors, that thought suppression--and therefore TS--is counterproductive. These claims take the syllogistic form: TS is a…

  6. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In [1] we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reprametrizations of the unit interval. I am grateful to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out to me...

  7. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Tunstall, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops ${\\tilde t}_1$, making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are ${\\tilde t_1}\\to t \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, ${\\tilde t_1}\\to W b \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ and ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$. We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ in a model-independent fashion, revealing the existence of large regions in parameter space which are excluded for any ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ branching ratio. This effect is then illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the LHC bounds from ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ searches are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing leads only to a modest increase in the allowed regions of parameter...

  8. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  9. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  10. 压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统投运与退出方案论述%Discussion for the Scheme of Run and Stop of Reactor Protect System in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白杰; 王博; 姚兴瑞

    2015-01-01

    During every fuel cycle, the unit of nuclear power plant need back up for maintenance and fuel replacing. And then up and running again. In this phase, the reactor protect system need run and stop. The article discusses the scheme of run and stop of reactor protect system in one pressurized water reactor.%核电厂每个换料周期,机组需要下行进行换料和大修,结束后再重新上行至正常运行,这期间反应堆保护系统需要投运和退出.本文结合某压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统的设计原理和实现方式,介绍了压水堆核电站反应堆保护系统投运与退出的方案.

  11. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  12. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  13. Efficient accumulation of antiprotons and positrons, production of slow mono-energetic beams, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) project, particularly the antiproton trapping and slow antiproton production, is discussed. An RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) installed in the ASACUSA beam line has an excellent deceleration efficiency of 25% providing 10-130keV antiprotons, which improves the final accumulation efficiency at least one and half orders of magnitude. The decelerated antiprotons are then injected in a large volume multiring trap, stored, and electron-cooled. About 1 million antiprotons are successfully accumulated per one AD shot and 10-500eV antiprotons are extracted as a mono-energetic beam. A UHV compatible positron accumulation is newly developed combining electron plasma and an ion cloud, which yields an accumulation rate as high as 400e **+s/mCi, two and a half orders of magnitude higher than other UHV compatible schemes. A new scheme to synthesize a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam is also discussed, which will play a vit...

  14. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  15. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  16. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul's data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  17. Bus Stop - Environment Connection: Do Characteristics of the Built Environment Correlate with Bus Stop Crime?

    OpenAIRE

    Robin S Liggett; Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia; Iseki, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Can we understand why some bus stops are safe and others are crime-ridden? Can we predict which features of the bus stop environment are likely to encourage or discourage crime? Can we design safer bus stops? These questions are addressed by exploring the relationship between environmental variables and bus stop crime. An earlier study used crime data, along with environmental indicators, for a sample of 60 bus stops in downtown Los Angeles. Crime rates were higher for bus stops near alleys, ...

  18. Apparatus for stopping a vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattenburg, Willard H.; McCallen, David B.

    2007-03-20

    An apparatus for externally controlling one or more brakes on a vehicle having a pressurized fluid braking system. The apparatus can include a pressurizable vessel that is adapted for fluid-tight coupling to the braking system. Impact to the rear of the vehicle by a pursuit vehicle, shooting a target mounted on the vehicle or sending a signal from a remote control can all result in the fluid pressures in the braking system of the vehicle being modified so that the vehicle is stopped and rendered temporarily inoperable. A control device can also be provided in the driver's compartment of the vehicle for similarly rendering the vehicle inoperable. A driver or hijacker of the vehicle preferably cannot overcome the stopping action from the driver's compartment.

  19. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...... compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. The results are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities....

  20. Production and perception of glottal stops

    OpenAIRE

    Garellek, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how glottal stops are produced and perceived, and why they occur so frequently before word-initial vowels in languages of the world. Specifically, the goal of the production chapter was to determine whether glottal stops are truly glottal sounds. High-speed imaging of glottal stops uttered by five phonetically-trained English speakers was obtained using trans-oral videoendoscopy. When produced as plosives, glottal stops always had some form of vocal fold incursi...

  1. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  2. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  3. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  4. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  5. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape;

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  6. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  7. Technical design report for the PANDA (AntiProton Annihilations at Darmstadt) Straw Tube Tracker. Strong interaction studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Q.; Xu, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Aab, A.; Albrecht, M.; Becker, J.; Csapo, A.; Feldbauer, F.; Fink, M.; Friedel, P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Held, T.; Klask, L.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Leiber, S.; Leyhe, M.; Motzko, C.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pychy, J.; Roth, B.; Schroeder, T.; Schulze, J.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Trifterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J. [Universitaet Bochum I. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Beck, R.; Bianco, S.; Brinkmann, K.T.; Hammann, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Kaiser, D.; Kliemt, R.; Kube, M.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Schnell, R.; Thoma, U.; Vlasov, P.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H.G. [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bianconi, A. [Universita di Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pantelica, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Serbina, L.; Tarta, P.D. [Institutul National de C and D pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' , Bukarest-Magurele (Romania); Kaplan, D. [IIT, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago (United States); Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K. [AGH, University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)] [and others

    2013-02-15

    This document describes the technical layout and the expected performance of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT), the main tracking detector of the PANDA target spectrometer. The STT encloses a Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) for the inner tracking and is followed in beam direction by a set of GEM stations. The tasks of the STT are the measurement of the particle momentum from the reconstructed trajectory and the measurement of the specific energy loss for a particle identification. Dedicated simulations with full analysis studies of certain proton-antiproton reactions, identified as being benchmark tests for the whole PANDA scientific program, have been performed to test the STT layout and performance. The results are presented, and the time lines to construct the STT are described. (orig.)

  8. Measurements of the Decays $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$, and $B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions of $B^0$ decays to multi-body final states containing protons, based on 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. We measure the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.13\\pm0.06\\pm0.08)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.01\\pm0.10\\pm0.09)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(3.38\\pm0.14\\pm0.29)\\times 10^{-4}$, and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(4.81\\pm0.22\\pm0.44)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We present a search for the charmed pentaquark state, $\\Theta_c(3100)$ observed by H1 and put limits on the branching fraction ${\\cal B} (B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c \\to D^{*-}\\proton)<14\\times10^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c\\to D^-\\proton)<9\\time...

  9. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; /Carleton U.; Phillips, Thomas J.; /Duke U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Hbar Technol., West Chicago /IIT, Chicago /CHEP, Taegu /Luther Coll. /Michigan U. /Northwestern U. /Notre Dame U. /St. Xavier U., Chicago

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  10. Gauge mediation with light stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) solves the supersymmetric flavor problem although it requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value (125 GeV) of the Higgs mass. A possible way out is to extend the MSSM Higgs sector with triplets which provide extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Triplets with neutral components getting vacuum expectation values (VEV) have the problem of generating a tree-level correction to the \\rho parameter. We introduce supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges Y=(0,\\pm 1), with a tree-level custodial SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the \\rho parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of the Georgi-Machacek model. The renormalization group running from the messenger to the electroweak scale mildly breaks the custodial symmetry. We will present realistic low-scale scenarios, their main features being a Bino-like neutralino or right-handed stau as the NLSP, light (1 TeV) stops, exotic couplings (H^\\p...

  11. Revised emission factors for gas engines including start/stop emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.; Birr-Petersen, K.

    2008-06-15

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has led to Danish gas engine plants increasingly converting to the spot and regulating power markets. In order to offer regulating power, plants need to be able to start and stop the engines at the plants quickly. The liberalisation causes a considerable change of operation practice of the engines e.g. less full load operation hours /year. The project provides an inventory determining the scale of the emissions during the start and stop sequence as well as proposals for engine modifications aimed at reducing start/stop emissions. This report includes calculation of emission factors as well as an inventory of total emissions and reduction potentials. (au)

  12. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelke, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fornengo, N. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Masiero, A. [Pavoa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Pietroni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  13. Studying the potential of antihyperons in nuclei with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between an antibaryon and a nucleus may shed light on the short range antibaryon-baryon force in a unique way. However, because of the deep imaginary part of the nuclear potential of antibaryons, the physics of antihyperons in nuclei is hitherto an uncharted territory. Recently it was proposed to use transverse momentum correlations of exclusively produced antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-nucleus collisions to obtain information on the antihyperon potentials relative to that of the corresponding hyperon. In the present study we use the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling- Uhlenbeck Transportmodell (GiBUU) to explore the production of exclusive hyperon-antihyperon pairs close to threshold. Unlike the schematic calculation, these GiBBU simulations take e.g. important rescattering effects into account. In case of anti p + 20Ne → anti ΛΛ+X we confirm a significant sensitivity of transverse momentum correlations to the nuclear potential of Λs. We also explore the feasibility of such measurements at the PANDA experiment of the international facility FAIR.

  14. Elastic scattering, polarization and absorption of relativistic antiprotons on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B

    2016-01-01

    We perform Glauber model calculations of the antiproton-nucleus elastic and quasielastic scattering and absorption in the beam momentum range $\\sim 0.5\\div10$ GeV/c. A good agreement of our calculations with available LEAR data and with earlier Glauber model studies of the $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering allows us to make predictions at the beam momenta of $\\sim 10$ GeV/c, i.e at the regime of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The comparison with the proton-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections shows that the diffractive minima are much deeper in the $\\bar p A$ case due to smaller absolute value of the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the elementary elastic amplitude. Significant polarization signal for $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering at 10 GeV/c is expected. We have also revealed a strong dependence of the $\\bar p A$ absorption cross section on the slope parameter of the transverse momentum dependence of the elementary $\\bar pN$ amplitude. The $\\bar p A$ optical potential is discussed.

  15. Antiproton constraints on dark matter annihilations from internal electroweak bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion, annihilations into two fermions and one gauge boson could have, for some choices of the parameters of the model, a non-negligible cross-section. Using a toy model of leptophilic dark matter, we calculate the constraints on the annihilation cross-section into two electrons and one weak gauge boson from the PAMELA measurements of the cosmic antiproton-to-proton flux ratio. Furthermore, we calculate the maximal astrophysical boost factor allowed in the Milky Way under the assumption that the leptophilic dark matter particle is the dominant component of dark matter in our Universe. These constraints constitute very conservative estimates on the boost factor for more realistic models where the dark matter particle also couples to quarks and weak gauge bosons, such as the lightest neutralino which we also analyze for some concrete benchmark points. The limits on the astrophysical boost factors presented here could be used to evaluate the prospects to detect a gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilations at currently operating IACTs as well as in the projected CTA

  16. Multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar by fast protons and antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Sorensen, A.H.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.; Uggerhoj, E.

    1987-10-15

    Single and multiple ionization of He, Ne, and Ar has been studied experimentally by impact of fast protons and antiprotons. The single-ionization cross sections obtained with protons and antiprotons are found to be the same. The double-ionization cross sections obtained with antiprotons, however, are much larger than those obtained with protons at equal velocity. This difference is found for all three gases but the effect is largest for He and Ne, where the difference is about a factor of 2 at 1 MeV/amu. The difference is discussed in terms of interference between two collision mechanisms which both result in double-electron escape. Experimental information on the magnitude of the interference term is obtained by inclusion of double-ionization data, partly obtained in this work, for fast electron and ..cap alpha..-particle impact. For triple ionization of Ne, we also find that antiprotons yield much larger cross sections than protons do. Identical cross sections, however, are found for triple ionization of Ar with protons and antiprotons. This is believed to be due to the fact that triple ionization of Ar is mainly a consequence of a single vacancy produced in an inner shell followed by electronic rearrangement. This observation supports the interpretation that the observed charge effect is due to an interference effect in the outermost shell.

  17. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  18. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, N.; Aghion, S.; Alozy, J.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Campbell, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lawler, G.; Lebrun, P.; Llopart, X.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Tlustos, L.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  19. Antiproton Production in 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    E687 Collaboration; al, T. A. Armstrong et

    1997-01-01

    We present the first results from the E864 collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10% central 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4

  20. Measurements of Electron Spectra in the Forward Direction in Slow-Antiproton Carbon-Foil Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Kuroki, Kenro; Komaki, Ken-Ichiro; Andersen, Lars H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, Erik; Hvelplund, Preben; Knudsen, Helge; M{ø}ller, S{ø}ren P.; Uggerh{ø}j, Erik; Elsener, Konrad

    1990-08-01

    The spectrta of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wake-riding state.

  1. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  2. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  3. Measurements of electron spectra in the forward direction in slow-antiproton carbon-foil collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wakeriding state. (author)

  4. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  5. Heating due to momentum transfer in low-energy positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, M.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of unexpectedly large elastic cross sections for the scattering of low-energy antiprotons from n ≤3 positronium (Ps) on the experimental implementation of antihydrogen formation via Ps-antiproton collisions. The integrated elastic cross sections, obtained using the two-center convergent close-coupling theory, can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than their counterparts for antihydrogen formation. The differential momentum transfer cross sections, which suppress the large cross sections at forward scattering angles, show remarkably rich behavior across all scattering angles. We discuss the implications of these findings for the heating, via momentum transfer, of clouds of trapped antiprotons that are typically used for the creation of antihydrogen.

  6. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  7. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  8. Analysis of Subthreshold Antiproton Production in p-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions in the RBUU Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Teis, S; Maruyama, T; Mosel, U; Teis, Stefan; Cassing, Wolfgang; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Mosel, Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant RBUU approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the pbar differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton selfenergies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector selfenergies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density rho > rho_0 we examine the differential pbar spectra as a function of the antiproton selfenergy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean-field at normal nuclear matter density rho_0 which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  9. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2012-01-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called "dancing bunches," persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing.

  10. Addressing production stops in the food industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Herbert, Luke Thomas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges in the food industry which causes the production lines to stop, illustrated by a case study of an SME size company in the baked goods sector in Denmark. The paper proposes key elements this sector needs to be aware of to effectively address production stops...

  11. Variance optimal stopping for geometric Levy processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt; Pedersen, Jesper Lund

    2015-01-01

    The main result of this paper is the solution to the optimal stopping problem of maximizing the variance of a geometric Lévy process. We call this problem the variance problem. We show that, for some geometric Lévy processes, we achieve higher variances by allowing randomized stopping. Furthermore...

  12. Power

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bowles; Herbert Gintis

    2007-01-01

    We consider the exercise of power in competitive markets for goods, labour and credit. We offer a definition of power and show that if contracts are incomplete it may be exercised either in Pareto-improving ways or to the disadvantage of those without power. Contrasting conceptions of power including bargaining power, market power, and consumer sovereignty are considered. Because the exercise of power may alter prices and other aspects of exchanges, abstracting from power may miss essential a...

  13. Single ionization of helium by 40--3000-keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoj, E. (Institute of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (PSI, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  14. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  15. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Gattuso, C.; Joireman, P.W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique.

  16. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  17. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  18. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Corradini, M. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Salvador, D. De [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hori, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Kobayashi, T. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy); Seiler, D. [TUM Department of Physics E12 (Germany); Soter, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Todoroki, K. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Vallazza, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Venturelli, L., E-mail: venturelli@bs.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ∼125 keV.

  19. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    Purpose  Radiotherapy with antiprotons is still being investigated as a possible new beam modality. Antiprotons behave much like protons until they come to rest, where they will annihilate with a target nucleus, thereby releasing additional energy. This can potentially lead to a favourable  depth...... of elements with higher Z, may lead to heavier fragments, which in turn may increase the LET and be beneficial in radiotherapy context. Also, it was speculated whether the addition of elements with high thermal neutron cross section to the target material may or may not boost the locally deposited energy from...

  20. Antiproton and proton collisions with the alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, and K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Single-electron ionization and excitation cross sections as well as cross sections for excitation into the first excited p state of the alkali-metal atoms Li(2s), Na(3s), and K(4s) colliding with antiprotons and protons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. For antipro......Single-electron ionization and excitation cross sections as well as cross sections for excitation into the first excited p state of the alkali-metal atoms Li(2s), Na(3s), and K(4s) colliding with antiprotons and protons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach...

  1. The ratio Ri for nondissociative ionization of molecular hydrogen by antiproton/proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical ratio Ri of antiproton/proton cross sections for nondissociative ionization of hydrogen molecule has been obtained as a function of the impact energy E in the range 30 ≤ E ≤ 2500 keV lab. The required cross sections were computed in the close-coupling formulation of the semiclassical impact parameter theory using a simple one-active electron model for the molecular target. The ratio Ri is important for the analysis of the recent experimental data of Andersen et al. on antiproton scattering and the understanding of the collisional mechanisms in the keV range. (orig.)

  2. Observation of antiproton annihilation in heavy nuclei at 100 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the observation of antiproton annihilation in Mg, Ag, and Au nuclei at 100 GeV/c. The experiment was performed with the Fermilab 30'' bubble chamber spectrometer and associated Downstream Particle Identifiers. By identifying events without a leading anti p or anti n we have determined that (39+-6)% of the antiprotons annihilate in a heavy nucleus. We present this fraction as a function of atomic mass number and discuss the associated charged particle multiplicity. 5 refs., 3 figs

  3. Organic materials irradiated at very low temperature and at different stopping powers: examples of polyethylene and of cyclohexane molecules trapped in matrix; Materiaux organiques irradies a tres basse temperature et a differents pouvoirs d'arret: cas du polyethylene et des molecules de cyclohexane isolees en matrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melot, M

    2003-10-15

    This thesis concerns the formation mechanisms of defects created in organic materials during irradiation under vacuum, at very low temperature and at different electronic stopping powers. Analysis have been realised by infrared spectroscopy. The first part concerns polyethylene. Irradiating at 8 K allows to dissociate the direct irradiation effects (in cage reactions) and the radical recombination effects. According to the considered chemical groups, the radical mobility leads to very different changes for the formation radiochemical yields. The second part concerns the irradiation of cyclohexane molecules trapped in a solid argon matrix. We evaluate the contribution of intermolecular and intramolecular reactions. The intermolecular reactions have limited consequences when using low ionising radiations but are crucial for heavy ion irradiations. (author)

  4. A Light Stop with a Heavy Gluino: Enlarging the Stop Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Cleary, Kevin F

    2015-01-01

    It is widely thought that increasing bounds on the gluino mass, which feeds down to the stop mass through renormalization group running, are making a light stop increasingly unlikely. Here we present a counter-example. We examine the case of the Minimal Composite Supersymmetric Standard Model which has a light composite stop. The large anomalous dimension of the stop from strong dynamics pushes the stop mass toward a quasi-fixed point in the infrared, which is smaller than standard estimates by a factor of a large logarithm. The gluino can be about three times heavier than the stop, which is comparable to hierarchy achieved with supersoft Dirac gluino masses. Thus, in this class of models, a heavy gluino is not necessarily indicative of a heavy stop.

  5. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  6. A new method to measure the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton at very low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new possible method to measure in lab the gravitational acceleration ''g'' of the antiproton is presented assuming that very low energy particles can be used. A schematic lay-out is described and preliminary results on ''g'' obtained by a simple simulation are given. The features of the method and its possible experimental problems are discussed

  7. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  8. Antiproton-to-proton ratios for ALICE heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A., E-mail: atawfik@cern.ch [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-06-01

    Assuming that the final state of hadronization takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant entropy density, the antiproton-to-proton ratios produced in heavy-ion collisions are studied in framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. A phase transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadrons, a hadronization, has been conjectured in order to allow modifications in the phase-space volume and thus in the single-particle distribution function. Implementing both modifications in the grand-canonical partition function and taking into account the experimental acceptance in the heavy-ion collisions, the antiproton-to-proton ratios over center-of-mass energies {radical}(s) ranging from AGS to RHIC are very well reproduced by the HRG model. Comparing with the same particle ratios in pp collisions results in a gradually narrowing discrepancy with increasing {radical}(s). At LHC energy, the ALICE antiproton-to-proton ratios in the pp collisions turn to be very well described by the HRG model as well. It is likely that the ALICE AA-program will produce the same antiproton-to-proton ratios as the pp-one. Furthermore, the ratio gets very close to unity indicating that the matter-antimatter asymmetry nearly vanishes. The chemical potential calculated at this energy strengthens the assumption of almost fully matter-antimatter symmetry up to the LHC energy.

  9. Properties of Antiprotons and Antihydrogen, and the Study of Exotic Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of exotic atoms, of antiprotons and of antihydrogen atoms provides many windows into the investigation of fundamental symmetries, of interactions between particles and nuclei, of nuclear physics and of atomic physics. This field appeared at CERN simultaneously with the first accelerators, and has advanced over the decades in parallel with improvements and advances in its infrastructure.

  10. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.;

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...

  11. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  12. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  13. I Search of Narrow Proton-Antiproton Bound States: High Resolution Gamma and Charged Flow Pion Spectra from Protonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, Chariclia I.

    We studied the pp annihilations at rest looking for narrow bound states in the proton-antiproton system. We looked, with high energy resolution, for radiative and pionic transitions in the gamma and charged pion spectra. The detector for the (gamma)(--->)e+e- and the (pi)('(+OR-)) was a magnetic pair spectrometer. The directions of the incident particles (e(+OR-) and (pi)(+OR-)) were determined by a drift chamber module in front of the magnet and the final directions of the particles, if reflected in the magnet, by the same chamber; if transversing the magnet, by an identical module at the rear of the magnet. The momentum was calculated from the directions of the particle. The following gamma spectra were obtained. Gammas with both e+, e- reflected in the magnet at a field of about 6 Kgauss (RR-gammas). That covers the region between 80 and 180 MeV, corresponding to a missing mass 1794 to 1686 MeV/c. The energy resolution is about 2.5 MeV ((sigma)) at 129 MeV (confirmed by the observed Panofsky gammas from stopping (pi)('-)p data) and 5 MeV ((sigma)) at 80 MeV. We have no evidence for narrow peaks except for the Panofsky gamma produced with a branching ratio of 3.3 x 10('-3) from (pi)('-) stops in the target. Upper limits for (gamma) -transitions in the region between 80 to 180 MeV were set at about 10('-3). Gammas with one e+(e-) reflected and the other transversing the magnet (RP-gammas) for fields of about 6 and 12 Kgauss, covering the region (GREATERTHEQ) 200 MeV, which corresponds to missing mass (LESSTHEQ) 1664 MeV/c('2). The gamma energy resolution in MeV is 51(.)E('2) (GeV) and 25.5(.)E('2)(GeV) for the low and high field respectively. Finally the charged pion spectra for those transversing the magnet are given for both magnet settings and as a function of charge multiplicity, covering the momentum region from (GREATERTHEQ) 150 MeV/c. The momentum resolution is the same as that for the RP-gammas. The two body annihilations (pi)('+)(pi)('-) and (pi

  14. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Structure Program SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening Program Volunteer Recognition Program AAD and AADA Historian Leadership Institute Programs ... your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth. To help you stop biting your ...

  15. What Services Are Available to Stop Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Return to: What Communities Can Do What Services Are Available to Stop Abuse? A variety of ... Prosecution of offenders Assistance with obtaining restitution Support Services When abuse or neglect is related to the ...

  16. Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... I have friends and loved ones suffering from Alzheimer's. But I can imagine… and hope for… a ...

  17. Optimal Stopping for Non-linear Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Erhan Bayraktar; Song Yao

    2009-01-01

    We develop a theory for solving continuous time optimal stopping problems for non-linear expectations. Our motivation is to consider problems in which the stopper uses risk measures to evaluate future rewards.

  18. Optimal design of a beam stop for Indus-2 using finite element heat transfer studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sinha; K J S Sawhney; R V Nandedkar

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the design of an in-vacuum, water-cooled beam stop (X-ray shutter) for the materials science (X-ray diffraction) beamline proposed to be built on the wavelength shifter in the Indus-2 (2.5 GeV) synchrotron radiation source. The radiation source impinges ∼ 1 kW power on the beam stop and the heat transfer capabilities of the beam stop have been evaluated. Temperature distribution in the beam stop has been obtained under various cooling conditions using the finite element analysis calculations with ANSYS software. Design parameters of the beam stop have been optimised. It is also shown that radiation cooling alone is not sufficient for taking away the heat load. Water-cooling of the beam stop is essential.

  19. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico (United States); Sobolevsky, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Thomsen, Bjarne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bassler, Niels, E-mail: bassler@phys.au.dk [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  20. Study of the anti-hydrogen atom and ion formation in the collisions antiproton-positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future CERN experiment called GBAR intends to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter on Earth using cold (neV) anti-hydrogen atoms undergoing a free fall. The experiment scheme first needs to cool anti-hydrogen positive ions, obtained thanks to two consecutive reactions occurring when an antiproton beam collides with a dense positronium cloud.The present thesis studies these two reactions in order to optimise the production of the anti-ions. The total cross sections of both reactions have been computed in the framework of a perturbation theory model (Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State), in the range 0 to 30 keV antiproton kinetic energy; several excited states of positronium have been investigated. These cross sections have then been integrated to a simulation of the interaction zone where antiprotons collide with positronium; the aim is to find the optimal experimental parameters for GBAR. The results suggest that the 2P, 3D or, to a lower extend, 1S states of positronium should be used, respectively with 2, less than 1 or 6 keV antiprotons. The importance of using short pulses of antiprotons has been underlined; the positronium will have to be confined in a tube of 20 mm length and 1 mm diameter. In the prospect of exciting the 1S-3D two-photon transition in positronium at 410 nm, a pulsed laser system had already been designed. It consists in the frequency doubling of an 820 nm pulsed titanium-sapphire laser. The last part of the thesis has been dedicated to the realisation of this laser system, which delivers short pulses (9 ns) of 4 mJ energy at 820 nm. (author)

  1. On Antiproton Production in 158 GeV/c Proton-Carbon Collisions and Nuclear Temperature of Interacting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multisource thermal model is used in this paper to analyze the antiproton (p¯ production process in high-energy proton-carbon (p-C collisions. The transverse momentum, Feynman variable, and rapidity distributions of antiprotons in the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass system are calculated by using the model. The modeling results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data measured by the NA49 Collaboration at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. As a parameter, the nuclear temperature of interacting system extracted from the antiproton spectrum is estimated to be about 150 MeV.

  2. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control. PMID:27047324

  3. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1 the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2 an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination results in a longer go reaction time (RT, a lower stop error rate, as well as a faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  4. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  5. An Example of Suppression of Spurious Stop-Bands of EBG Band-Stop Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Dušan Nešić; Branko Kolundžija

    2011-01-01

    Based on the well known theory of infinite periodic structures, analytical theory of EBG (electromagnetic band gap) cells suppressing 6 higher (spurious) stop-bands is developed. Using such cells in a cascade the straight-forward procedure for design of the corresponding EBG band-stop filter is proposed, with possibility to control the width and the depth of the stop-band. The analytical theory is confirmed by the EM simulation of the filter realized in the microstrip technology.

  6. Application of Remote Tripping and Bus Differential Protection Stops Sending Letters of 1 1 0 kV Double Power Supply Lines of Communication%浅谈110 kV双电源联络线“远跳”及“母差停信”功能的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高峰; 李巧荣

    2014-01-01

    Taking PSL621and ISA-311G as the example,this article elaborated the principle of remote tripping and bus differential protection stops sending letters of 1 1 0 kV double power supply lines of communication,and introduced the function application and the realization.Finally,for 1 1 0 kV double power source lines of communication,when dead area failure and the bus failure,it proposed several matters needing attention to ensure fast and reliable removal on both sides.%文中以PSL621和 ISA-311G为例阐述了110 kV双电源联络线的“远跳”及“母差停信”原理,并对其功能的应用和实现作了相应的介绍,最后针对110 kV双电源联络线线路死区故障及母线故障时,确保两侧快速可靠切除提出了几点注意事项。

  7. Asia: stopping the Yangzi's flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the Three Gorges dam in China began four years ago and, starting at the end of this year, a 600km stretch of the Yangtze river, from the city of Chongqing to Yichang, is to be blocked. Some of the controversial aspects of this project are discussed. Originally the purpose of the dam was to prevent a recurrence against the kind of disastrous flooding that killed 30,000 people in 1954 but latterly its potential for generating one eighth of China's electric power requirement has also been stressed by the government. Some critics see the two goals as incompatible, however, and warn that water levels behind the dam may be kept at dangerously high levels in the interests of power generation and that excessive amounts of silt produced by the scheme will clog up harbours downstream. There are concerns too about the catastrophic consequences of the dam collapsing given China's poor record in safe dam construction. Although it is claimed that the hydropower generated will save the burning of millions of tonnes of sulphurous coal each year, there is international concern about the environmental effects of the project which will drown large cities, ancient towns, historic temples and fertile agricultural land, and will destroy some of the country's most famous scenery. Furthermore, it will require the forced resettlement of over a million people. (UK)

  8. 20 Aluminum Producers Stop Production in 1stHalf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> In the first half of 2004,the primary aluminumindustry in China had a profit plunge and 20primary aluminum enterprises in the wholecountry have completely stopped productiondue to the power price hikes,small margin ofalumina price reduction,price declining of pri-mary aluminum since May and other factors,making the Chinese producers more and moredifficult to survive.The statistics from theChina Non-Ferrous Metals Industry Associa-tion show that the first six months witnessed

  9. Instrumentation for measurement of in-flight annihilations of 130 keV antiprotons on thin target foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, K.; Barna, D.; Hayano, R. S.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Sótér, A.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Prest, V.; Vallazza, L.; De Salvador, D.; Hori, M.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the instrumentation for an experiment to measure the cross sections of antiprotons with kinetic energies of 130±10 keV annihilating on carbon, palladium, and platinum target foils of sub-100 nm thicknesses. A 120 ns long pulsed beam containing 105 -106 antiprotons was allowed to traverse the foils, and the signal annihilations that resulted from this were isolated using a time-of-flight method. Backgrounds arose from Rutherford scattering of the antiprotons off the target foils, their annihilations in the target chamber walls, and π → μ → e decay of the charged pions that emerged from the annihilations. Some antiprotons slowed down and annihilated in the contamination on the target surfaces. This reduced the signal-to-background ratio of the measurement.

  10. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  11. Comment Fail-Stop Blind Signature Scheme Design Based on Pairings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiaoming; HUANG Shangteng

    2006-01-01

    Fail-stop signature schemes provide security for a signer against forgeries of an enemy with unlimited computational power by enabling the signer to provide a proof of forgery when a forgery happens. Chang et al proposed a robust fail-stop blind signature scheme based on bilinear pairings. However, in this paper, it will be found that there are several mistakes in Chang et al' fail-stop blind signature scheme. Moreover, it will be pointed out that this scheme doesn' meet the property of a fail-stop signature: unconditionally secure for a signer. In Chang et al' scheme, a forger can forge a valid signature that can' be proved by a signer using the "proof of forgery". The scheme also doesn' possess the unlinkability property of a blind signature.

  12. Hybrid stop schedule of urban rail train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengmin Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to better serve the transport demand of urban area by rail, target at the Ur-ban Rail Train Stop Schedule problem.Design/methodology/approach: Bi-level mathematical programming model and game relation was used.Findings: A 0-1 bi-level mathematical programming model for urban rail transit hybrid Stop Schedule is developed when game relation between train Stop Schedule and passenger transfer choice is considered.Research limitations/implications: The research is still in progress. Practical implications: ChongQing urban rail line 2 was taken as an example, the practical application of the model has proved its feasibility and efficiency.Originality/value: A 0-1 bi-level mathematical programming model for urban rail transit hybrid Stop Schedule is developed. The upper level model is Stop Schedule targeting at the optimal profit from the operators side. The lower level model is passenger routing aims to minimize total travel time. According to its features, the bi-level model is integrated in order to be directly solvable by optimizing software.

  13. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  14. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  15. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the dynamics of power in processes of creativity, and show its paradoxical nature as both a bridge and a barrier to creativity in organisations. Recent social psychological experimental research (Slighte, de Dreu & Nijstad, 2011) on the relation between power...... and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable...... and floating source for empowering people in the organisation. We will explore and discuss here the potentials, challenges and pitfalls of power in relation to creativity in the life of organisations today. The aim is to demonstrate that power struggles may be utilised as constructive sources of creativity...

  16. StopWatcher: A Mobile Application to Improve Stop Sign Awareness for Driving Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stop signs are the primary form of traffic control in the United States. However, they have a tendency to be much less effective than other forms of traffic control like traffic lights. This is due to their smaller size, lack of lighting, and the fact that they may become visually obscured from the road. In this paper, we offer a solution to this problem in the form of a mobile application implemented in the Android platform: StopWatcher. It is designed to alert a driver when they are approaching a stop sign using a voice notification system (VNS. A field test was performed in a snowy environment. The test results demonstrate that the application can detect all of the stop signs correctly, even when some of them were obstructed by the snow, which in turn greatly improves the user awareness of stop signs.

  17. The extent of the stop coannihilation strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zheng, Jiaming [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Many supersymmetric models such as the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) feature a strip in parameter space where the lightest neutralino χ is identified as the lightest supersymmetric particle, the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), and the relic χ cold darkmatter density is brought into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology by coannihilation with the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} NLSP. We calculate the stop coannihilation strip in the CMSSM, incorporating Sommerfeld enhancement effects, and we explore the relevant phenomenological constraints and phenomenological signatures. In particular, we show that the t{sub 1} may weigh several TeV, and its lifetime may be in the nanosecond range, features that are more general than the specific CMSSM scenarios that we study in this paper. (orig.)

  18. New stopping criteria for segmenting DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) in the model selection framework. When this stopping criterion is applied to a left telomere sequence of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the complete genome sequence of bacterium Escherichia coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified (e.g. subtelomeric units, replication origin, and replication terminus), and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  19. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an unstable flow is observed for strong social influence. In the unstable flow, attendees near the attraction are crowded out from the clusters by others due to the interpersonal repulsion. The expelled pedestrians impede the pedestrian traffic between the left and right boundaries of the corridor. These collective patterns of pedestrian flow are summarized in a schematic phase diagram.

  20. Security Requirements for One Stop Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Georg E.

    The highest ranking e-government solutions are based on one-window, one-click or one stop government concepts. For Europe, the EU services directive sets new requirements for e-government, that have to be met till December 2009. Simple, easy to understand and complete information is one requirement. The other requirements are, that the services covered by this directive shall be available electronically and at a distance (which means mostly “by Internet”). Acceptable solutions are digitally signed mails and, as an alternative or supplement, transaction oriented online services. To implement this, a one stop government with document safe is best practice.