WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiproton beams

  1. Treatment Plans for Antiproton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus;

    Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the expectat......Antiprotons have been proposed as potential modality for particle beam cancer therapy by Gray and Kalogeropoulos in 1985. This proposal was based on the enhancement of physical dose deposition near the end of range due to the annihilation of antiprotons when captured by a nucleus and the...... expectation of an enhanced RBE of this additional dose. Starting in 2003 the AD-4 collaboration at CERN has studied biological effects of antiproton beams on V79 Chinese Hamster cells and human FaDu cells. The AD-4 collaboration has developed relative and absolute dosimetry for pulsed antiproton beams. Data...... from these measurements were used to benchmark the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, which then has been used for calculations of physical dose inside and outside of the primary antiproton beam. From clonogenic survival studies on the different cell lines mentioned above we have determined biological effective...

  2. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  3. Polarized antiproton beam at U-70 accelerator of IHEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurushev, S. B.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, V. I.; Meschanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Rykov, V. L.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized proton and antiproton beam channel is currently under development at the U-70 accelerator of IHEP, Protvino, Russia. An availability of the both, polarized protons and antiprotons provides an exciting opportunity for the comparative studies of spin effects induced by polarized protons and antiprotons in a variety of hadronic reactions. While the proton and antiproton beams are formed by essentially the same method, there is the specific in the antiproton beam shaping and properties compared to protons. In this report, we address some technical details of forming the polarized antiproton beam and describe its main properties.

  4. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  5. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  6. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  7. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the...

  8. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  9. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, L R; Burov, A; Crisp, J; Eddy, N; Hu, M; Shemyakin, A

    2012-01-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  10. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Burov, A.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Hu, M.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  11. Beam Diagnostics for Measurements of Antiproton Annihilation Cross Sections at Ultra-low Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todoroki K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons collaboration of CERN is currently attempting to measure the antiproton-nucleus in-flight annihilation cross sections on thin target foils of C, Pd, and Pt at 130 keV of kinetic energy. The low-energy antiprotons were supplied by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD and a radio-frequency quadrupole decelerator. For this measurement, a beam profile monitor based on secondary electron emission was developed. Data from this monitor was used to ensure that antiprotons were precisely tuned to the position of an 80-mm-diameter experimental target, by measuring the spatial profile of 200-ns-long beam pulses containing 105 − 106 antiprotons with an active area of 40 mm × 40 mm and a spatial resolution of 4 mm. By using this monitor, we succeeded in finely tuning antiproton beams on the target, and observed some annihilation events originating from the target.

  12. Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  13. Time purified/separated antiproton beam at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1 km antiproton beam has been designed for construction at the AGS. The momentum band can be varied between +-0.3% to +-1.0%, and the resolution for tagged particles will be deltap/p approx. 10-4 at beam rates as high as 106 anti p/s. Separation by decay purification will be on the order of 1 anti p/10(π-+μ-). This beam will be used in a detailed investigation of Charmonium including a measurement of the chi widths. We will also search for expected but as yet unseen states, and search for possible I=1 events which would imply the existence of four quark states. This facility will also lend itself to a wide variety of exciting physics such as the proton form factor including both e+e- and γγ final states, two-body hadron final states, anti-nucleus yields, and possibly tagged hadron beams (i.e., Lambda, E, etc.). When heavy ions become available at the AGS, one can measure various long lived particle yields. Finally, with as many as 107 polarized muons in the beam, one has the possibility to use them for nuclear structure studies

  14. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  15. Efficient accumulation of antiprotons and positrons, production of slow mono-energetic beams, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) project, particularly the antiproton trapping and slow antiproton production, is discussed. An RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) installed in the ASACUSA beam line has an excellent deceleration efficiency of 25% providing 10-130keV antiprotons, which improves the final accumulation efficiency at least one and half orders of magnitude. The decelerated antiprotons are then injected in a large volume multiring trap, stored, and electron-cooled. About 1 million antiprotons are successfully accumulated per one AD shot and 10-500eV antiprotons are extracted as a mono-energetic beam. A UHV compatible positron accumulation is newly developed combining electron plasma and an ion cloud, which yields an accumulation rate as high as 400e **+s/mCi, two and a half orders of magnitude higher than other UHV compatible schemes. A new scheme to synthesize a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam is also discussed, which will play a vit...

  16. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  17. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  18. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    Purpose  Radiotherapy with antiprotons is still being investigated as a possible new beam modality. Antiprotons behave much like protons until they come to rest, where they will annihilate with a target nucleus, thereby releasing additional energy. This can potentially lead to a favourable  depth...... change in the depth-dose distribution and average LET when substituting the materials. Adding boron and gadolinium up to concentrations of 1 per 1000 atoms to a water phantom, did not change the depth-dose profile nor the average LET. Conclusions  According to our FLUKA calculations, antiproton neutron...

  19. A new antiproton beam transfer scheme without coalescing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    An effective way to increase the luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron collider program Run2 is to improve the overall antiproton transfer efficiency. During antiproton coalescing in the Main Injector (MI), about 10-15% particles get lost. This loss could be avoided in a new antiproton transfer scheme that removes coalescing from the process. Moreover, this scheme would also eliminate emittance dilution due to coalescing. This scheme uses a 2.5 MHz RF system to transfer antiprotons from the Accumulator to the Main Injector. It is then followed by a bunch rotation in the MI to shorten the bunch length so that it can be captured by a 53 MHz RF bucket. Calculations and ESME simulations show that this scheme works. No new hardware is needed to implement this scheme.

  20. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  1. A high-intensity low-momentum separated antiproton beam for the study of annihilations at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schmitt, F M; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1977-01-01

    The main features of the low-momentum separated antiproton beam built at the CERN Proton Synchrotron to allow the stopping of a large number of antiprotons are described. An effective stopping rate of 1000 antiproton per 10/sup 12/ protons on the Ps internal target is obtained. Results of the measurement of the rate of reaction pp to h /sup +/h/sup -/ in a 50 cm long liquid hydrogen target are given to illustrate the stopping and monitoring techniques. (6 refs).

  2. Antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  3. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.;

    2010-01-01

    directly and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg...... peak region. A qualitative analysis of the foci detected in the Bragg peak and plateau region indicates significant differences highlighting the different severity of DNA lesions produced along the particle path. Irradiation of desalted plasmid DNA with 5 Gy antiprotons at the Bragg peak resulted in a...

  4. Suppression of propagating TE modes in the FNAL antiproton source stochastic beam cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of attenuating the propagation of waveguide modes in the stochastic cooling array beam pipes to be utilized in the accumulator and debuncher rings of the Fermilab antiproton source is described. The attenuation method treated involves lining the vertical walls of the beam pipes with a ferrimagnetic material. The general solution for propagation in a nonhomogeneously loaded waveguide is presented along with numerical results specific to the antiproton source beam cooling system. Also described is a broadband, automated technique for the simultaneous measurement of complex μ and epsilon developed to aid in the characterization of different ferrite materials. Permittivity and permeability data for a typical ferrite are presented along with a discussion of the effects of these parameters on waveguide mode attenuation in the ferrite lined beam pipes

  5. Suppression of propagating TE modes in the fnal antiproton source stochastic beam cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of attenuating the propagation of waveguide modes in the stochastic cooling array beam pipes to be utilized in the accumulator and debuncher rings of the Fermilab antiproton source is described. The attenuation method treated involves lining the vertical walls of the beam pipes with a ferrimagnetic material. The general solution for propagation in a nonhomogeneously loaded waveguide is presented along with numerical results specific to the antiproton source beam cooling system. Also described is a broadband, automated technique for the simultaneous measurement of complex μ and epsilon developed to aid in the characterization of different ferrite materials. Permittivity and permeability data for a typical ferrite is presented along with a discussion of the effects of these parameters on waveguide mode attenuation in the ferrite lined beam pipes

  6. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  7. Antiproton beam parameters measurement by a new digital-receiver-based system

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Chohan, V; Findlay, A; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Pedersen, F

    2001-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) provides the users with very low intensity beams, in the 107 particles range, hence prompting the development of an innovative measuring system, which was completed in early 2000. This system measures antiproton beam intensity for bunched and debunched beams, together with momentum spread and mean momentum for debunched beams. It uses a state-of-the-art Digital Receiver board, which processes data obtained from two ultra-low-noise, wide-band AC beam transformers. These have a combined bandwidth in the range 0.02 MHz - 30 MHz and are used to measure AC beam current modulation. For bunched beams, the intensity is obtained by measuring the amplitude of the fundamental and second RF Fourier components. On the magnetic plateaus the beam is debunched for stochastic or electron cooling and longitudinal beam properties (intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum) are measured by FFT-based spectral analysis of Schottky signals. The system provides real-time information characterising ...

  8. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  9. AA, entrance of proton beam to antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Please look up 8010295 first. The intense proton beam from the 26 GeV PS arrives from the right, through the vacuum chamber. The big flange contains a thin window, after which the proton beam continues through free air. A beam transformer, affixed to the shielding block, measures its intensity, before it enters the hole in the concrete to hit the target behind it.

  10. Application of high quality antiproton beam to study charmonium and exotics above DD-bar threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of charmonium and exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. It is a good testing tool for theories of strong interactions including QCD in both perturbative and non-perturbative regime, lattice QCD, potential models and phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of charmonium and charmed hybrid spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimental data in the above DD-bar threshold region are considered. Experiments using antiproton beam take advantage of the intensive production of particle-antiparticle pairs in antiproton-proton annihilations. Experimental data from different collaboration are analyzed with special attention given to new states with hidden charm that were discovered recently. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-laying S, P and D wave charmonium states. But much more data on different decay modes are needed before firmer conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c. (authors)

  11. Status of the anti-proton production beam in the CERN PS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new scheme was put into operation in November 1988 to upgrade the proton beam delivered by the 26 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS) for anti-proton production. It makes use of quasi-adiabatic manipulations of the RF parameters to squeeze a beam filling 1/2 of the PS circumference into a 1/4 turn and can in theory preserve the longitudinal emittance. A maximum intensity of 1.68 e13 ppp in 5 bunches at 26 GeV has been reached in the course of 22 weeks of operation. The limitations of the performance are analysed together with possible improvements. (author) 6 refs., 9 figs

  12. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  13. Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a small synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler, which is currently being constructed at CERN to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to energies as low as 100 keV. At such low energies it is very important to carefully take contributions from electron cooling and beam heating mechanisms (e.g. on the residual gas and intrabeam scattering) into account. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of effects from electron cooling and heating sources have been carried out, and the equilibrium phase space dimensions of the beam have been computed, based on numerical simulations using the code BETACOOL. The goal is to provide a consistent explanation of the different physical effects acting on the beam in ELENA

  14. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  15. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  16. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  17. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  18. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  19. Polarization of antiprotons by antiproton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of polarized antiproton beams at Fermilab is briefly reviewed. Two types of high-energy anti p polarimeters are described - the Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter and the Primakoff-effect polarimeter. The production of 8.9 GeV/c polarized antiprotons before entering the Fermilab accumulator ring is then discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs

  20. Thermal excitation of heavy nuclei with 5-15 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Hsi, W C; Lefort, T; Pienkowski, L; Korteling, R G; Wang, G; Back, B B; Bracken, D S; Breuer, H; Cornell, E A; Gimeno-Nogues, F; Ginger, D S; Gushue, S; Huang, M J; Laforest, R; Lynch, W G; Martin, E; Morley, K B; Ramakrishnan, E; Remsberg, L P; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Tsang, M B; Viola, V E; Winchester, E M; Xi, H; Yennello, S J

    1999-01-01

    Excitation-energy distributions have been derived from measurements of 5.0-14.6 GeV/c antiproton, proton and pion reactions with $^{197}$Au target nuclei, using the ISiS 4$\\pi$ detector array. The maximum probability for producing high excitation-energy events is found for the antiproton beam relative to other hadrons, $^3$He and $\\bar{p}$ beams from LEAR. For protons and pions, the excitation-energy distributions are nearly independent of hadron type and beam momentum above about 8 GeV/c. The excitation energy enhancement for $\\bar{p}$ beams and the saturation effect are qualitatively consistent with intranuclear cascade code predictions. For all systems studied, maximum cluster sizes are observed for residues with E*/A $\\sim$ 6 MeV.

  1. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  2. Proceedings of the 1986 summer workshop on antiproton beams in the 2-10 GeV/c range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, D. (ed.)

    1987-05-07

    The possibilities for building a facility for the formation spectroscopy of ''charmonium'' and the study of ''exotics'' at the AGS with high intensity antiproton beams of good resolution and enhanced purity are explored. The performance potential of a number of long beams and the AGS booster are evaluated and costs are estimated. Fluxes of several 10/sup 7/ antiprotons per pulse with purities of 5% to 99% are possible with conventional long beams. A similar total antiproton flux would be available with the Booster with no beam contamination. This could effectively be enhanced by two orders of magnitude by reducing the momentum spread in order to scan very narrow (less than 1 MeV) resonances. The maximum momentum attainable with the present Booster magnet design is 5.6 GeV/c which only reaches the Chi/sub 0/ (3415) charmonium state. Modifications are possible which would raise the maximum momentum to 6.3 GeV/c to include all states up to and including eta'/sub c/ (3590) in its range. The performance potential for this physics at the AGS is found to compare favorably with that at other laboratories with more antiprotons delivered annually, running in the post-Booster era, than at FNAL or Super-Lear with ACOL under typical scheduling conditions. A high resolution purified source of antiprotons in the 2-10 GeV/c range at BNL would cost $3.0M - $4.1M including an experimental hall. There are contributed papers in the appendices.

  3. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  4. Experimental determination of the complete spin structure for anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K D; Berdoz, A; Franklin, G B; Khaustov, P; Meyer, C A; Bradtke, C; Gehring, R; Görtz, S; Harmsen, J; Meier, A; Meyer, W; Radtke, E; Reicherz, G; Dutz, H; Plückthun, M; Schoch, B; Dennert, H; Eyrich, W; Hauffe, J; Metzger, A; Moosburger, M; Stinzing, F; Wirth, S; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Heinsius, F H; Kriegler, E; Schmitt, H; Bunker, B; Hertzog, D; Jones, T; Tayloe, R; Bröders, R; Geyer, R; Kilian, K; Oelert, W; Röhrich, K; Sachs, K; Sefzick, T; Bassalleck, B; Eilerts, S; Fields, D E; Kingsberry, P; Lowe, J; Stotzer, R; Johansson, T; Pomp, S; Wirth, St.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda -> anti-proton + \\pi^+ + proton + \\pi^- has been measured with high statistics at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c. The use of a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target combined with the self-analyzing property of \\Lambda/anti-\\Lambda decay allows access to unprecedented information on the spin structure of the interaction. The most general spin-scattering matrix can be written in terms of eleven real parameters for each bin of scattering angle, each of these parameters is determined with reasonable precision. From these results all conceivable spin-correlations are determined with inherent self-consistency. Good agreement is found with the few previously existing measurements of spin observables in anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda near this energy. Existing theoretical models do not give good predictions for those spin-observables that had not been previously measured.

  5. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  6. Comparison of Optimized Single and Multifield Irradiation Plans of Antiproton, Proton and Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Karaiskos, Pantelis;

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotons have been suggested as a possibly superior modality for radiotherapy, due to the energy released when antiprotons annihilate, which enhances the Bragg peak and introduces a high-LET component to the dose. However, concerns are expressed about the inferior lateral dose distribution cau...

  7. Search for Polarization Effects in the Antiproton Production Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam, various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization, a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described

  8. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    relative biological effect (RBE) has already been beam measured in spread out Bragg peaks of antiprotons, relative to that found in the plateau region. However, the antiproton annihilation process is associated with a substantial release of secondary particles which contribute to the dose outside the...

  9. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  10. Formation spectra of charmed meson--nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Nieves, J; Salcedo, L L; Tolos, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson--nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson--nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The $\\bar{D}$ mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the $\\bar{D} N$ pair. Employing an effective model for the $\\bar{D} N$ and $D N$ interactions and solving the Klein--Gordon equation for $\\bar{D}$ and $D$ in finite nuclei, we find that the $D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system has $1 s$ and $2p$ mesic nuclear states and that the $D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}$ system binds in a $1s$ state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the $[D^{-}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ and $[D^{0}$-${}^{11}\\rm{B}]$ mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a ${}^{12} \\rm{C}$ target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the $2 p$ $D^{-}...

  11. Beam-spin asymmetry of pion, kaon, proton and antiproton production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-spin asymmetries in the azimuthal distribution of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) extracted from 2000-2007 HERMES data are presented. The asymmetries were measured in the kinematic region Q2>1 GeV2, W2 > 10 GeV2, 0.1 antiprotons are shown. Assuming that the SIDIS cross section factorizes to distribution (DF) and fragmentation (FF) functions that dependent on transverse quark momentum (TMD functions), one can obtain novel information about the spin-orbit correlations inside the nucleon and orbital angular momentum of quarks.

  12. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  13. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ninno, G

    1999-07-01

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had tobe designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  14. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had to be designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  15. Cancer Therapy with Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Ad-4 Collaboration

    2005-10-01

    Starting in 2003 the AD-4/ACE collaboration has studied the biological effects of antiprotons annihilating in a human tissue like material on live V-79 Chinese Hamster cells. The main goal of the work is to prove the efficacy of antiprotons for cancer therapy. In this report we discuss a critical point to be considered carefully for all particle beam radiation therapies, namely the loss of primary particles from the beam on the way to a tumor seated some distance below the surface.

  16. Nuclear physics with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of antiproton beams in Nuclear Physics has been until now limited to a few total and reaction cross section measurements and to the study of antiprotonic atoms. This situation is presently about to change with the advent of the low Energy Antiproton Ring ''LEAR'' at CERN which started to deliver antiprotons for Physics experiments in July 1983. But what can we learn from Nuclear Physics with antiprotons. To answer this question I will first review basic and simple features of the low energy antiN-N interaction and their energy dependence. I will show that the antiproton is an interesting probe to explore the nucleus and bring informations complementary to that already provided by the other usual probe like e, p, π, α particles etc... I will in turn point out a few points that make a nucleus a very useful laboratory to study the antiN-N elementary interaction and get informations that are not available in the free antiN-N interaction

  17. Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

  18. Proceedings of the 10 May 1989 Antiproton Technology Workshop: Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1989-09-01

    Antiprotons are particles of antimatter which release highly penetrating radiation when they are stopped in normal matter. According to presentations at the Antiproton Technology Workshop this radiation can be used, in very small quantities, to image objects and determine their composition and density. In larger amounts, the radiation could be used to kill cancer tumors or produce highly localized heating and shock waves. Titles of presentations include: Stopping Power of MeV Proton and Antiproton Beams; Recent Simulation Results of ASTER; Pbar Testing of Hydrogen Effects in Sealed Carbon-Carbon Composites; Potential for Antiprotons in Radiation Oncology; Prospects for a Commercial Antiproton Source; Prospects for Exciting Extreme States in Nuclear Matter with Intense Antiproton Beams; Status of AL Studies Relating to condensed Antimatter; Electromagnetic Traps for Atomic Antihydrogen; Antihydrogen Production; Antiproton Catalyzed Fusion; Antiproton Induced Fusion Reaction; Modeling Antiproton-Plasma Interactions; Introduction to CP Violation Studies with Pbars; and Antiproton Production Calculation by the Multistring Model VENUS.

  19. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  20. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  1. Antiproton Star Observed in Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Chupp, Warren W.; Goldhaber, Gerson; Segre,Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1955-12-01

    In connection with the antiproton investigation at the Bevatron we planned and carried out a photographic-emulsion exposure in a magnetically selected beam of negative particles. The magnetic system was identical to the first half (one deflecting magnet and one magnetic lens) of the system used in the antiproton experiment of Chamberlain, Segre, Wiegand, and Ypsilantis. The selected particles left the copper target in the forward direction with momentum 1.09 Bev/c.

  2. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  3. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  4. Ultra-low Energy Antiprotons at FLAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Welsch, C.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R; Orlov, D.; Wolf, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Future Accelerator Facility for Beams of Ions and Antiprotons at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. So far it is foreseen to accelerate the antiprotons to high energies (3-15 GeV) for meson spectroscopy and other nuclear and particle physics experiments in the HESR (High Energy Storage Ring). Within the planned complex of storage rings, it is possible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the possibility to create low en...

  5. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  6. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; AD-4/ACE Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for...

  7. Example of an Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, O.; Chupp, W.W.; Ekspong, A.G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Lofgren, E.J.; Segre, E.; Wiegand, C.; Amaldi, E.; Baroni,G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-02-27

    The existence of antiprotons has recently been demonstrated at the Berkeley Bevatron by a counter experiment. The antiprotons were found among the momentum-analyzed (1190 Mev/c) negative particles emitted by a copper target bombarded by 6.2-Bev protons. Concurrently with the counter experiment, stacks of nuclear emulsions were exposed in the beam adjusted to 1090 Mev/c negative particles in an experiment designed to observe the properties of antiprotons when coming to rest. This required a 132 g/cm2 copper absorber to slow down the antiprotons sufficiently to stop them in the emulsion stack. Only one antiproton was found in stacks in which seven were expected, assuming a geometric interaction cross section for antiprotons in copper. It has now been found that the cross section in copper is about twice geometric, which explains this low yield.

  8. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  9. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  10. Some prospects for antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the possibilities for fruitful research with antiprotons are outlined below. Special emphasis is placed on the possibility of learning about quark spectroscopy and dynamics using highly precise and intense anti p beams such as LEAR. It is urged that any discussion of LAMPF II give very careful consideration to the construction of a facility competitive with LEAR

  11. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  12. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  13. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap

  14. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  15. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  16. Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow($v_1$) measurements for charged pions, protons and antiprotons near mid-rapidity ($y=0$) are reported in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au + Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  17. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  18. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  19. Gold fragmentation induced by stopped antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Lubinski, P.; Grochulska, A.; von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F. J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Kurcewicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.; Stolarz, A.; Trzcinska, A.

    2002-01-01

    A natural gold target was irradiated with the antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN. Antiprotons of 200 MeV/c momentum were stopped in a thick target, products of their annihilations on Au nuclei were detected using the off-line gamma-ray spectroscopy method. In total, yields for 114 residual nuclei were determined, providing a data set to deduce the complete mass and charge distribution of all products with A > 20 from a fitting procedure. The contribution of evaporatio...

  20. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first...... ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 60Co c-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose and...... particle fluence response relationships were constructed from data in the plateau and Bragg peak regions of the beams and used to assess the biological effectiveness. Results: Due to uncertainties in antiproton dosimetry we defined a new term, called the biologically effective dose ratio (BEDR), which...

  1. Proceedings of the Antiproton Technology Workshop held in Upton, New York on 10 May 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordley, Gerald D.

    1989-05-01

    Titles of presentations included: Stopping Power of MeV Proton and Antiproton Beams; Recent Simulation Results of ASTER; Pbar Testing of Hydrogen Effects in Sealed Carbon-Carbon Composites; Potential for Antiprotons in Radiation Oncology; Prospects for a Commercial Antiproton Source; Prospects for Exciting Extreme States in Nuclear Matter with Intense Antiproton Beams; Status of AL Studies Relating to Condensed Antimatter; Electromagnetic Traps for Atomic Antihydrogen; Antihydrogen Production; Headquarters DoE Antiproton Activities; Antiproton Catalyzed Fusion; Antiproton Induced Fusion Reaction; Options for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility; Modeling Antiproton-Plasma Interactions; Concepts for Experimental Determination of Radiation Shielding and Metal Clad Pellet Performance; Introduction to CP Violation Studies with Pbars; Search for CP Violation in Pbar-P to J/psi; Studies of Rare Models of Pbar-P Annihilation; and Antiproton Production Calculation by the Multistring Model VENUS Computer Code.

  2. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  3. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  4. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼1012 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  5. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Introduction Antiprotons as a new beam modality in radiotherapy are being investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration since 2002. A beam of antiprotons hitting a water phantom exhibit a similar depth-dose curve as that known from protons, except that the Bragg-peak is significantly pronounced due...... primary particles, the increased stopping power of the secondary causes an increase in the dose averaged LET. The maximum LET is recorded in the peak as 19 keV/µm. Discussion The dose-average LET in the plateau region may result in a RBE different from unity in the plateau region. RBE measurements of...

  6. Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kartavtsev, O. I.

    1995-01-01

    Metastable antiprotonic helium atoms $^{3,4}\\! H\\! e\\bar pe$ have been discovered recently in experiments of the delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium media. These exotic atoms survive for an enormous time (about tens of microseconds) and carry the extremely large total angular momentum $L\\sim 30-40$. The theoretical treatment of the intrinsic properties of antiprotonic helium atoms, their formation and collisions with atoms and molecules is discussed.

  7. From LEAR to HESR: past, present and future of meson spectroscopy with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meson spectroscopy experiments performed using antiproton beams have carried out a deep and systematic study of all the main open problems of strong interaction in the non-perturbative regime. In this review, I will sketch the major achievements obtained by experiments studying antiproton annihilations at the CERN LEAR machine and at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator. Finally I will illustrate which topics might be addressed, in the next future, by the new antiproton machine (HESR) that will be available at GSI

  8. Antiproton induced DNA damage: proton like in flight, carbon-ion like near rest

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D.J.; Savage, K. I.; Richard, D J; S.J. McMahon(Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, United Kingdom); Hartley, Oliver; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Prise, K M; Bassler, N.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Schettino, G

    2013-01-01

    Biological validation of new radiotherapy modalities is essential to understand their therapeutic potential. Antiprotons have been proposed for cancer therapy due to enhanced dose deposition provided by antiproton-nucleon annihilation. We assessed cellular DNA damage and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a clinically relevant antiproton beam. Despite a modest LET (,19 keV/mm), antiproton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) irradiation caused significant residual c-H2AX foci compared to X-ra...

  9. The CERN antiproton collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 108 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  10. Low energy antiproton possibilities at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical feasibility of creating a pure antiproton beam at the AGS has been studied. The scheme involves an antiproton target station and transport back to the Booster synchrotron, which acts as both a purifier and accelerator/decelerator. This proposal would be very attractive to the user community since this operation could run parasitically (transparently) to the AGS operating modes. The energy range of antiprotons can be as low as 2 MeV to as high as 5 GeV. The intensity of the beam is estimated to be 7 x 107/sec above 2.5 GeV/c and 4 x 104/sec at 200 MeV/c

  11. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  12. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    investigated the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte...

  13. Physics with Antiprotons at PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PANDA experiment is part of the core project of the planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany)[1]. One major component of the upgraded accelerator complex is the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) which will provide a high quality antiproton beam in the momentum range between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. PANDA, a fixed target experiment directly implemented in the HESR, will investigate antiproton annihilations with the aim to explore fundamental questions in the cross over region of the non perturbative and the strong QCD. Due to the planned extensive physics program a multipurpose detector with a nearly complete solid angle coverage, proper particle identification over a large momentum range, and high resolution calorimetry for neutral particles is required. After an overview about the goals and the detector design of the PANDA experiment major parts of the planned physics program will be discussed, namely the meson spectroscopy and the search for exotics in the charmonium and open charm region

  14. Antiprotons at Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Bieber, J W; Engel, R; Gaisser, T K; Roesler, S; Stanev, T; Bieber, John W.; Engel, Ralph; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Roesler, Stefan; Stanev, Todor

    1999-01-01

    New measurements with good statistics will make it possible to observe the time variation of cosmic antiprotons at 1 AU through the approaching peak of solar activity. We report a new computation of the interstellar antiproton spectrum expected from collisions between cosmic protons and the interstellar gas. This spectrum is then used as input to a steady-state drift model of solar modulation, in order to provide predictions for the antiproton spectrum as well as the antiproton/proton ratio at 1 AU. Our model predicts a surprisingly large, rapid increase in the antiproton/proton ratio through the next solar maximum, followed by a large excursion in the ratio during the following decade.

  15. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  16. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  17. Shielding calculations for the antiproton target area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding calculations performed in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab antiproton target hall are summarized. The following radiological considerations were examined: soil activation, residual activity of components, and beam-on radiation. In addition, at the request of the designers, the energy deposition in the proposed graphite beam dump was examined for several targeting conditions in order to qualitatively determine its ability to survive

  18. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  19. FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research: the Universe in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, F.

    2015-11-01

    As of the year 2018 the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will offer access to exotic ion beams and beams of antiproton of unprecedented luminosity. The facility currently under construction in Darmstadt, Germany, adjacent to the existing accelerator at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research, will serve several collaborations and fields simultaneously: atomic, hadron, nuclear, and plasma physics.

  20. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  1. Interaction of antiprotons with nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 945, JAN (2016), s. 197-215. ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * antiproton annihilation * antiproton nuclear bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.202, year: 2014

  2. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  3. Inclusive production of hyperons, as well as of pions, charged kaons, protons, anti-protons and neutrons in p+p collisions at 158 GeV/c beam momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New data on the production of hyperons, as well as of pions, charged kaons, protons, anti-protons, neutrons in p+p interactions are presented. The data come from a sample of 8.2 million inelastic events obtained with the NA49 detector at the CERN SPS at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. The high statistics data sample allows the extraction of detailed differential distributions as a function of xf, y and pT. The results are compared with published data and models. Moreover, the measurements provide an important reference for studying effects of cold nuclear matter in proton-nucleus and hot dense matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. (author)

  4. Commissioning of Fermilab's Electron Cooling System for 8-GeV Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gai, Wei; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kazakevich, Grigory; Kramper, Brian J; Kroc, Thomas K; Leibfritz, Jerry; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley M; Saewert, Greg W; Schmidt, Chuck; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V; Sutherland, Mary; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden

    2005-01-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is being currently commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper will report on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  5. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  6. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H- ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H- ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼106 to 107 particles

  7. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  8. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  9. Primary population of antiprotonic helium states

    OpenAIRE

    Révai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2003-01-01

    A full quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident (lab) energies of the antiproton.

  10. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  11. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  12. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Soter, A; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  13. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  14. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammash, T.

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that “at rest” annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  15. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  16. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  17. Many Facets of Strangeness Nuclear Physics with Stored Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Pochodzalla, Josef; Lorente, Alicia Sanchez; Rojo, Marta Martinez; Steinen, Marcell; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharova, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent a unparalleled factory for hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of strange hadronic systems with unprecedented precision. The behavior of hyperons and -- for the first time -- of antihyperons in nuclear systems can be studied under well controlled conditions. The exclusive production of $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ pairs in antiproton-nucleus interactions probe the neutron and proton distribution in the nuclear periphery and will help to sample the neutron skin. For the first time, high resolution $\\gamma$-spectroscopy of doubly strange nuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of double hypernuclei with mesons beams at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange $\\Xi$-atoms are feasible and even the pr...

  18. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  19. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...

  20. Large amounts of antiproton production by heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To produce large amounts of antiprotons, on the order of several grams/year, use of machines to produce nuclear collisions are studied. These can be of either proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus in nature. To achieve high luminosity colliding beams, on the order of 1041 m/cm2, a self-colliding machine is required, rather than a conventional circular colliding type. The self-colliding machine can produce additional antiprotons through successive collisions of secondary particles, such as spectator nucleons. A key problem is how to collect the produced antiprotons without capture by beam nuclei in the collision zone. Production costs for anti-matter are projected for various energy source options and technology levels. Dedicated facilities using heavy ion collisions could produce antiproton at substantially less than 1 million $/milligram. With co-production of other valuable products, e.g., nuclear fuel for power reactors, antiproton costs could be reduced to even lower values

  1. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  2. Low energy antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the present experimental and theoretical status of antinucleon-nucleon (bar NN) interactions at low energy (below 2 GeV/c). The authors discuss elastic scattering, hyperon pair production, and annihilation into mesonic channels, including the search for exotic meson states in the annihilation debris. New results from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN, from KEK in Japan, and from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are now available. Some of the experiments and their comparison to theoretical predictions have been reviewed earlier. The authors extend these reviews to more recent data and theoretical calculations

  3. Electron cooling for low-energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divergence and size of stored ion beams can be reduced superimposing on them an intense, monoenergetic electron beam with little transverse motion ('electron cooling'). The present work first considers the theoretical foundations of the method and then describes the planning and construction of an electron beam device for cooling antiprotons with MeV energies in the storage ring LEAR and CERN. With respect to the quantitative description of the method, the microscopic processes during the damping of the ion motion, the effect of the damping on an ion in a storage ring, and the properties of the intense, magnetically guided electron beam are discussed. Special attention is paid to the improvement of ion beam cooling due to the magnetic field guiding the electron beam. The electron beam device, operated in ultra-high vacuum, and the experience gained during its construction are described; experiments performed during the test period are presented. The work further develops a numerical simulation of electron cooling on the basis of the theory discussed. Given realistic external parameters, the simulation yields cooling times and equilibrium states of the ion beam during electron cooling in a storage ring. Finally, non-destructive methods for measuring the velocity distribution in the electron beam are described, which may prove helpful for optimizing the beam cooling. (orig.)

  4. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  5. Absolute calibration of the antiproton detection efficiency for BESS below 1 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Asaoka, Y; Yoshida, T; Abe, K; Anraku, K; Fujikawa, M; Fuke, H; Haino, S; Izumi, K; Maeno, T; Makida, Y; Matsui, N; Matsumoto, H; Matsunaga, H; Motoki, M; Nozaki, M; Orito, S; Sanuki, T; Sasaki, M; Shikaze, Y; Sonoda, T; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Toki, Y; Yamamoto, A

    2001-01-01

    An accelerator beam experiment was performed using a low-energy antiproton beam to measure the antiproton detection efficiency of the BESS detector. Measured and calculated efficiencies derived from the BESS Monte Carlo simulation based on GEANT/GHEISHA showed good agreement. With the detailed verification of the BESS simulation, results demonstrate that the relative systematic error of detection efficiency derived from the BESS simulation is within 5 %, being previously estimated as 15 % which was the dominant uncertainty for measurements of cosmic-ray antiproton flux.

  6. Photon and dilepton production at the Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research and beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider using coarse-grained microscopic transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of dilepton and photon spectra for the energy range Elab=2 A to35 A GeV which will be available for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research (FAIR). The same energy regime will also be covered by phase II of the beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC-BES). Coarse-grained dynamics from microscopic transport calculations of the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model is used to determine temperature and chemical potentials, which allows for the use of dilepton and photon-emission rates from equilibrium quantum-field-theory calculations. The results indicate that nonequilibrium effects, the presence of baryonic matter, and the creation of a deconfined phase might show up in specific manners in the measurable dilepton invariant-mass spectra and in the photon transverse-momentum spectra. However, as the many influences are difficult to disentangle, we argue that the challenge for future measurements of electromagnetic probes will be to provide a high precision with uncertainties much lower than in previous experiments. Furthermore, a systematic study of the whole energy range covered by CBM at FAIR and RHIC-BES is necessary to discriminate between different effects, which influence the spectra, and to identify possible signatures of a phase transition.

  7. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  8. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  9. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which ∼ 400 x 1010 antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every ∼15 hours

  10. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  11. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation: antiprotons vs. pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c bar p and π- beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z ≅ 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code

  12. Heating of nuclear matter and multifragmentation : antiprotons vs. pions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Laforest, R.; Lefort, T.; Martin, E.; Pienkowski, L.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Remsberg, L. P.; Rowland, D.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V. E.; Winchester, E.; Yennello, S. J.

    1999-05-03

    Heating of nuclear matter with 8 GeV/c {bar p} and {pi}{sup {minus}} beams has been investigated in an experiment conducted at BNL AGS accelerator. All charged particles from protons to Z {approx_equal} 16 were detected using the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4{pi} array. Significant enhancement of energy deposition in high multiplicity events is observed for antiprotons compared to other hadron beams. The experimental trends are qualitatively consistent with predictions from an intranuclear cascade code.

  13. Annihilation of low energy antiprotons in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Canali, C; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Derking, J H; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Haider, S; Harasimovic, J; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Susa, A; Vasquez, M A Subieta; Špacek, M; Testera, G; Welsch, C P; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. To achieve this goal, the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS collaboration will produce a pulsed, cold (100 mK) antihydrogen beam with a velocity of a few 100 m/s and measure the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the beam from a straight path. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1$%$ precision on the measurement of $\\bar{g}$ with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct measurement of antiproton annihilation in a segmented silicon sensor, the first step towards designing a position sensitive silicon detector for the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment. We also pr...

  14. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  15. Measurement of low-energy antiproton detection efficiency in BESS below 1 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Asaoka, Y; Yoshida, T; Abe, K; Anraku, K; Fujikawa, M; Fuke, H; Haino, S; Izumi, K; Maeno, T; Makida, Y; Matsui, N; Matsumoto, H; Matsunaga, H; Motoki, M; Nozaki, M; Orito, S; Sanuki, T; Sasaki, M; Shikaze, Y; Sonoda, T; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Toki, Y; Yamamoto, A

    2002-01-01

    An accelerator experiment was performed using a low-energy antiproton beam to measure antiproton detection efficiency of BESS, a balloon-borne spectrometer with a superconducting solenoid. Measured efficiencies showed good agreement with calculated ones derived from the BESS Monte Carlo simulation based on GEANT/GHEISHA. With detailed verification of the BESS simulation, the relative systematic error of detection efficiency derived from the BESS simulation has been determined to be +-5%, compared with the previous estimation of +-15% which was the dominant uncertainty for measurements of cosmic-ray antiproton flux.

  16. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  17. Remote antiproton sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiprotons are well on their way to becoming a standard laboratory commodity. Heavy utilization of LEAR is ushering in a new era where p's achieve their logical potential, equal to that of e-,e+,H-, as controlled probes and experimental building blocks. The uniqueness and usefulness of - /SUB p/ 's for studies at low (table top) energies is well documented. The main stumbling block to universal pursuit of such studies is the overhead of - /SUB p/ production. The stability of the - /SUB p/ thus makes cogent an investigation of possibilities and limits to transporting - /SUB p/ 's in quantity. I base my discussion on LEAR as the source of - /SUB p/ 's for bottling, since it is the only concrete example to work with at present. Two other lines of contemporary research then, largely in atomic physics, pioneered by Dehmelt and collaborators, aimed at precision studies of clouds of, or single e /SUP +or-/ ,p /SUP +or-/ , or ions in large storage time traps. Second, there is work, experimental and theoretical, from the plasma physics tradition aimed at characterizing non neutral plasmas

  18. Capture of slow antiprotons by helium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Revai, J.; Shevchenko, N.V.(Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež, 25068, Czech Republic)

    2004-01-01

    A consistent quantum mechanical calculation of partial cross-sections leading to different final states of antiprotonic helium atom was performed. For the four-body scattering wave function, corresponding to the initial state, as well as for the antiprotonic helium wave function, appearing in the final tate, adiabatic approximations was used. Calculations were carried out for a wide range of antiprotonic helium states and incident energies of the antiproton. Obtained energy dependances of som...

  19. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  20. Measurement of antiproton-proton cross sections at low momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis describes an experiment which serves for the study of the antiproton-proton interaction at laboratory momenta between 150 MeV/c and 600 MeV/c. The arrangement permits the measurement of differential cross sections of the elastic scattering and the charge-exchange reaction as well as the cross section of the annihilation into charged and neutral pions. By the availability of an intense beam with low momentum uncertainty from the LEAR storage ring for low energy antiprotons at CERN a clear improvement of the measurement accuracy compared to earlier experiments at separated antiproton beams can be reached. A prototype of the antineutron calorimeter used for the measurement of the angular distribution of the charge-exchange reaction was subjected to a careful test in a separated beam. The results were compared with the results of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the antineutron detection. The cross sections measured in two beam periods in November and December 1983 are consistent with the published data in the hitherto available momentum range above about 350 MeV/c. Especially in the cross section of the annihilation into charged pions a statistically significant signal at a mass of 1937 MeV/c2 appears. However further measurements are necessary to study all systematic causes of errors. (orig.)

  1. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  2. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  3. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force since acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, we have no direct knowledge of the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data taken by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: namely, the scattering length (f0) and effective range (d0). As direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, our result provides a fundamental ingr...

  4. Antiproton annihilation in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-proton annihilation has a number of important advantages as a probe of QCD in the low energy domain. Exclusive reaction in which complete annihilation of the valance quarks occur. There are a number of exclusive and inclusive /bar p/ reactions in the intermediate momentum transfer domain which provide useful constraints on hadron wavefunctions or test novel features of QCD involving both perturbative and nonperturbative dynamics. Inclusive reactions involving antiprotons have the advantage that the parton distributions are well understood. In these lectures, I will particularly focus on lepton pair production /bar p/A → /ell//bar /ell//X as a means to understand specific nuclear features in QCD, including collision broadening, breakdown of the QCD ''target length condition''. Thus studies of low to moderate energy antiproton reactions with laboratory energies under 10 GeV could give further insights into the full structure of QCD. 112 refs., 40 figs

  5. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  6. Perspectives for low energy antiproton physics at FAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The CRYRING accelerator, previously located at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory of Stockholm University, has been chosen by the FLAIR collaboration as the central accelerator for the planned facility. It has been modified to allow for high-energy injection and extraction and is capable of providing fast and slow extracted beams of antiprotons and highly charged ions. It is currently being installed at the ESR of GSI Darmstadt where it can be used with highly charged ions. The future possibilitie...

  7. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  8. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    A new experiment, AD-4/ACE (antiproton cell experiment), has been approved by the CERN Research Board. The experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in June and continue through the 2003 run cycle. The experiment is designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating...

  9. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  10. Antiproton Stacking in the Recycler

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2003-01-01

    Possibilities to accumulate antiprotons in the Recycler are considered for three different cases: with current stochastic cooling, with upgraded stochastic cooling and with electron cooling. With stochastic cooling only, even upgraded, Recycler looks hardly useful. However, with electron cooling at its goal parameters and reasonably good vacuum in the Recycler, this machine would be efficient.

  11. Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shochet, Melvyn J.

    1995-01-01

    Comment: Summary of the 10th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, Fermilab, May 9-13, 1995. Postscript file (34 pages with 82 embedded figures; 5.7 MB) available at http://www-cdf.fnal.gov/physics/conf95/cdf3225_pbarp_wkshp_summary.ps

  12. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Federič, Pavol; Chaloupka, P.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, David; Trzeciak, B. A.; Vértési, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 527, č. 7578 (2015), s. 345-348. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20841S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * antiprotons * protons Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 41.456, year: 2014

  13. Antiproton production in Au + Au collisions at 11.7 A·GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the dependence of antiproton yields on the number of wounded projectile nucleons (Nproj). The dN/dy/Nproj of antiprotons with the beam energy correction is almost constant from p+A to Si+A collisions, while it decreases in Au+Au collisions to 30-60% of the constant. Next, we have compared dependence of ratios of dN/dy, p-bar/π-, p/π-, K-/π-, K+/π-, and π+/π- at 1.2proj in Au+Au collisions. Only the ratio of p-bar/π- decreases rapidly, while the ratios of p/π-, K+/π-, and K-/π- increase, and π+/π- stays constant. These observations suggest that in the AGS energy regime, the absorption effect of antiprotons in Au+Au collisions is much stronger than in p+A and Si+A collisions. We have compared the antiproton data with the RQMD model. In RQMD, antiprotons are produced initially from multi-step excitation processes and some of them are absorbed by nucleons with free NN-bar annihilation cross sections. RQMD reproduces overall tendencies of antiproton yields from p+A to Au+Au collisions within 50%. Finally, we explored the relation between baryon densities and antiproton yields in A+A collisions. We used a model in a static participant volume with the RQMD initial production and the absorption length with the free NN-bar annihilation cross section. In the model, only the antiprotons produced around the surface of the participant volume can survive. The model reproduces the scaling of experimental antiproton yields with the 2/3 power of the number of participants. By comparing the model with the experimental data, it is found that the ratio of the mean baryon density to the surface baryon density is 3-4 independent of collision systems. (J.P.N.). 109 refs

  14. Antiproton production at 0 degrees for Si + A and Au + A collisions at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results on antiproton production obtained in the AGS experiments E858 and preliminary results of E878. The yields of antiprotons in Si + A collisions are shown to sale with number of first collisions. The rapidity distributions for all targets (Au, Cu and Al) and both beams (si at 14.6 GeV/c and A at 11. GeV/c) have gaussian shapes peaking at yNN and with similar standard deviations. From E878 we report a difference in the shape of the antiproton rapidity distributions obtained from two samples of the data populated with central and peripheral events respectively. In A induced reactions the A dependence of the antiproton yields is small

  15. Measurement of asymmetries and differential cross sections in antiproton-proton elastic scattering at momenta between 497 and 1550 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intermediate energy antiproton proton (anti pp) elastic scattering experiment is described. The data comprise a set of 15 measurements of the differential cross section and the asymmetry between 497 and 1550 MeV/c antiproton momentum. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam provided by the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. A conventional polarized target was used, consisting of pentanol. The motivation for the measurements is the study of the anti pp interaction by providing data on the spin observable Aon in a momentum range where it has never been measured before. 56 refs.; 55 figs.; 40 tabs

  16. Neutron Fluence in Antiproton Radiotherapy, Measurements and Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Materials and Methods: Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute fluence measurements of the thermalized part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The results were compared with the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. Results: The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. Discussion: The secondary neutron fluences encountered in antiproton therapy are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities.

  17. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  18. Interaction of antiproton with nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    Vol. 234. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015, s. 93-98. ISSN 0304-3843. [5th International Conference on Exotic Atoms and Related Topics (EXA). Vienna (AT), 15.09.2014-19.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/2126 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * RMF model * G-parity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  19. Design study of an Antiproton Collector for the Antiproton Accumulator (ACOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Report gives a full description of an Antiproton Collector Ring which, placed around the existing Antiproton Accumulator at CERN, would enhance the antiproton flux available to both the SPS and LEAR by a factor of ten. The new ring and the focusing devices which precede it are designed to accept a much larger fraction of the antiproton production cone from the target. Each pulse of particles will be pre-cooled before being fed to the Antiproton Accumulator, where improved stochastic cooling systems will build up the stack. A full list of parameters is included. (orig.)

  20. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  1. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  2. Antiproton-nucleus interactions at 5 to 9 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton beams of 5, 7 and 9 GeV/c were used to interact with C, Al, Cu, Sn and Pb nuclear targets. Charged particle multiplicity distributions, strange particle production cross sections and rapidity distributions were measured. The charged particle multiplicities are reported in this paper. (orig.)

  3. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  4. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Gattuso, C.; Joireman, P.W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique.

  5. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique

  6. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  7. Fermilab Antiproton Source, Recycler Ring, and Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, the Accumulator and the Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world's only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II, neutrino experiments using 8-GeV and 120-GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120-GeV primary proton beams. This paper provides a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  8. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  9. Prospects for Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Newly proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the end of the Tevatron Collider program. For example, the annihilation of 5 to 8 GeV antiprotons is expected to yield world-leading sensitivities to hyperon rare decays and CP violation. It could also provide the world's most intense source of tagged D^0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and, via CP violation, to search for new physics. Other measurements that could be made include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's most precise measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons offer a great opportunity for a broad and exciting physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  10. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  11. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs

  12. Low Energy Antiproton Experiments -- A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by studying discrete symmetries. Known interactions can be tested precisely and fundamental constants can be extracted from accurate measurements on free antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$'s) and bound two- and ...

  13. Beam-beam compensation studies in the Tevatron with electron lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we studied the feasibility of suppressing the antiproton head-on beam-beam tune spread using a magnetically confined 5-keV electron beam with Gaussian transverse profile overlapping with the circulating beam. When electron cooling of antiprotons was applied in regular Tevatron operations, the nonlinear head-on beam-beam effect on antiprotons was small. Therefore, we first focused on the operational aspects, such as beam alignment and stability, and on fundamental observations of tune shifts, tune spreads, lifetimes, and emittances. We also attempted two special collider stores with only 3 proton bunches colliding with 3 antiproton bunches, to suppress long-range forces and enhance head-on effects. We present here the results of this study and a comparison between numerical simulations and observations. These results contributed to the application of this compensation concept to RHIC at Brookhaven.

  14. Calculation of transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon laser transitions of antiprotonic helium

    OpenAIRE

    HORI, MASAKI; Korobov, Vladimir I.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical ab initio variational calculations of the transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon transitions of antiprotonic helium atoms driven by two counter-propagating laser beams are presented. We found that sub-Doppler spectroscopy is in principle possible by exciting transitions of the type (n,L)->(n-2,L-2) between antiprotonic states of principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n~L-1~35, first by using highly monochromatic, nanosecond laser beams of intensities 10^4...

  15. Antiproton-nucleus potentials from global fits to antiprotonic X-rays and radiochemical data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 761, 3/4 (2005), s. 283-295. ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : antiproton-nuclear interaction * RMF calculations * antiproton X-rays Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.950, year: 2005

  16. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  17. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, M

    2013-01-01

    In the post-Nova era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiemnts. Therefore, It requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  18. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  19. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  20. Electron beam focusing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  1. Ultralow-energy antiprotons for antihydrogen spectroscopy and antimatter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large-scale Penning trap at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Up to 65% of the captured antiprotons have subsequently been electron cooled to energies below 1 eV and have been stored up to one hour. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultralow-energy antiprotons for gravitational physics, as well as for precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen for CPT tests

  2. Computer control of RF-manipulations in the CERN antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERN antiproton accumulator uses a conventional RF system for bunched beam manipulation within the ring. Several different manipulations are needed, often in close succession, so a fast, reliable and accurate method of switching between them is required. This has led to an unconventional computerized beam control system. For a desired set of beam manipulations, the computer calculates the needed voltage and frequency as functions of time, using a mathematical model of the beam and lattice. These are then loaded into function generators which subsequently operate independently of the computer. The RF system, a dual gap, ferrite loaded cavity driven by a 4CX25000 power tetrode, has three main uses: the stacking process to accumulate the antiprotons, the unstacking process to make the accumulated antiprotons available for extraction, and a variety of test and measurement purposes. Two digital function generators control voltage and frequency in the cavity. The voltage function is logarithmic and is fed into an AVC loop which contains a logarithmic detector and modulator to provide high voltage for stacking and low voltage for unstacking. The frequency function controls a 10 to 30 kHz quadrature VCO which is mixed with the output of a quadrature synthesizer producing an 1840 to 1860 kHz frequency range. RF phase and magnet noise were harmful while manipulating low emittance proton and antiproton bunches. A high-pass phase loop acquires beam cavity phase; adding AC corrections to the frequency program eliminated this problem. The cavity tune is maintained by a tuning loop acting on a DC ferrite base. Schematics are provided

  3. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  4. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  5. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds

  6. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  7. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  8. Cryogenic design of the stochastic cooling pick-ups for the CERN antiproton collector (ACOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic cooling, a technique of prime importance for obtaining antiproton beams usable at high-energy colliders, requires wide-band and low-noise signal acquisition and processing. For this purpose, the CERN Antiproton Collector (ACOL), presently under construction, is equipped with six beam pick-up stations operating at cryogenic temperatures. Each station consists of a high-vacuum vessel housing two mobile arrays of pick-up electrodes, cooled to about 100 K by radiation to a surrounding thermal shield, and two preamplifiers kept below 20 K. Refrigeration is provided by a pair of two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium cryogenerators, thermally linked to the preamplifiers and to the thermal shield. The cryogenerators also cool activated charcoal cryopanels, in order to maintain a residual pressure in the vessel below 10-8 mbar. The choice of such cryogenic options is dictated by performance (steady-state and cool-down), simplicity of operation and maintenance, and high reliability

  9. Information on antiprotonic atoms and the nuclear periphery from the PS209 experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Trzcinska, A.; Jastrzebski, J.; Czosnyka, T.; von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F. J.; Iwanicki, J.; Ketzer, B.; Kisielinski, M.; Klos, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Lubinski, P.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pienkowski, L.; Schmidt, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the PS209 experiments at CERN two kinds of measurements were performed: the in-beam measurement of X-rays from antiprotonic atoms and the radiochemical, off-line determination of the yield of annihilation products with mass number A_t -1 (less by 1 than the target mass). Both methods give observables which allows to study the peripheral matter density composition and distribution.

  10. Antiproton-proton resonant like channels in J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Loiseau, B

    2005-01-01

    The BES collaboration has recently observed a strong enhancement close to the proton-antiproton threshold in the J/Psi decays into photon, proton and antiproton. Such a structure can be explained by a traditional nucleon-antinucleon model. The near threshold 1S0 bound state and/or the well-established 3P0 resonant state found in this nucleon-antinucleon interaction can adequately describe the BES data.

  11. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  12. Ionization in antiproton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing the semiclassical approximation we calculate within the coupled-state formalism the ionization probability in antiproton-hydrogen (anti p+H) collisions. In particular we investigate the adiabatic ionization at the distance of closest approach in almost central collisions. Striking differences in the electron excitation probability compared with proton-hydrogen (p+H) collisions are predicted. (orig.)

  13. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  14. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research

  15. Experimental test of a new antiproton acceleration scheme in the Fermilab Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to provide higher intensity and lower emittance antiproton beam to the Tevatron collider for high luminosity operation, a new Main Injector (MI) antiproton acceleration scheme has been developed [1-4]. In this scheme, beam is accelerated from 8 to 27 GeV using the 2.5 MHz rf system and from 27 to 150 GeV using the 53 MHz rf system. This paper reports the experimental results of beam study. Simulation results are reported in a different PAC'05 paper [5]. Experiments are conducted with proton beam from the Booster. Acceleration efficiency, emittance growth and beam harmonic transfer between 2.5 MHz (h=28) and 53 MHz (h=588) buckets have been studied. Beam study shows that one can achieve an overall acceleration efficiency of about 100%, longitudinal emittance growth less than 20% and negligible transverse emittance growth. accelerated to 150 GeV and injected to the Tevatron. The multi-bunch coalescing process is eliminated in this acceleration scheme. Consequently, longitudinal emittance growth is reduced. Smaller emittance growth reduces beam loss

  16. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezov, R., E-mail: r.berezov@gsi.de; Brodhage, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Ivanova, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ullmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  17. Technical design report for the PANDA (AntiProton Annihilations at Darmstadt) Straw Tube Tracker. Strong interaction studies with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the technical layout and the expected performance of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT), the main tracking detector of the PANDA target spectrometer. The STT encloses a Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) for the inner tracking and is followed in beam direction by a set of GEM stations. The tasks of the STT are the measurement of the particle momentum from the reconstructed trajectory and the measurement of the specific energy loss for a particle identification. Dedicated simulations with full analysis studies of certain proton-antiproton reactions, identified as being benchmark tests for the whole PANDA scientific program, have been performed to test the STT layout and performance. The results are presented, and the time lines to construct the STT are described. (orig.)

  18. The Angular Distribution Of Electron-positron Pairs From Exclusive Charmonium Decays In Antiproton-proton Annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    McTaggart, R J

    1998-01-01

    The angular distributions of the charmonium resonances J/ Y (3097) and Y (3686) in their exclusive decay to an electron-positron pair are studied. Experiment 835 at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory produced charmonium resonances by annihilating protons with antiprotons in the Fixed Target Mode of the Antiproton Accumulator: A stochastically cooled antiproton beam collides with a hydrogen gas jet, which forms clusters under the right pressure and low temperature. The charmonium decay products are detected out of a large hadronic background with the help of a segmented lead glass sampling calorimeter, which is sensitive to the high mass electron-positron charmonium decay, and a set of Cerenkov threshold detectors that provide good electron/pion separation. Several factors influence the angular distribution parameter l taken from the angular distribution, including the energy scale of the resonance, the coupling strength of the charmonium atom, and how quarks and gluons interact in the dissolution...

  19. Study of the anti-hydrogen atom and ion formation in the collisions antiproton-positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future CERN experiment called GBAR intends to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter on Earth using cold (neV) anti-hydrogen atoms undergoing a free fall. The experiment scheme first needs to cool anti-hydrogen positive ions, obtained thanks to two consecutive reactions occurring when an antiproton beam collides with a dense positronium cloud.The present thesis studies these two reactions in order to optimise the production of the anti-ions. The total cross sections of both reactions have been computed in the framework of a perturbation theory model (Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State), in the range 0 to 30 keV antiproton kinetic energy; several excited states of positronium have been investigated. These cross sections have then been integrated to a simulation of the interaction zone where antiprotons collide with positronium; the aim is to find the optimal experimental parameters for GBAR. The results suggest that the 2P, 3D or, to a lower extend, 1S states of positronium should be used, respectively with 2, less than 1 or 6 keV antiprotons. The importance of using short pulses of antiprotons has been underlined; the positronium will have to be confined in a tube of 20 mm length and 1 mm diameter. In the prospect of exciting the 1S-3D two-photon transition in positronium at 410 nm, a pulsed laser system had already been designed. It consists in the frequency doubling of an 820 nm pulsed titanium-sapphire laser. The last part of the thesis has been dedicated to the realisation of this laser system, which delivers short pulses (9 ns) of 4 mJ energy at 820 nm. (author)

  20. A polarized beam for the M-3 line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beamline is proposed for polarized protons to be built in the M-3 line of the Meson Laboratory utilizing lambda decays. This beamline would provide a clean source of polarized protons or an enriched beam of antiprotons or polarized antiprotons

  1. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10-10 torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Jerse, G; Karelin, A V; Kheymits, M D; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Wu, J; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; 10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L1

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three ...

  3. X-ray transitions from antiprotonic noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of antiprotonic X-ray transitions at high principal quantum numbers and the occurrence of electronic X-ray in antiprotonic argon krypton, and xenon is analysed with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The shell by shell ionisation by Auger electron emission, characterised by appearance and disappearance of X-ray lines, is followed through the antiprotonic cascade by considering transition and binding energies of both the antiproton and remaining electrons. A number of additional lines in the X-ray spectra have been tentatively assigned to electronic transitions caused by electronic de-excitation after Auger emission during the antiprotonic cascade. A few lines remain unexplained so far or are not unambiguously assigned. The complexity of the electronic states cannot be resolved with semiconductor detectors. Hopefully, in future high resolution devices like crystal spectrometers and Auger electron spectroscopy at antiproton at GSI will resolve this complexity

  4. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies

  5. Investigation of silicon sensors for their use as antiproton annihilation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics and Technology, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [University of Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, via Valleggio 11, Como (Italy); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-11-21

    We present here a new application of silicon sensors aimed at the direct detection of antinucleons annihilations taking place inside the sensor's volume. Such detectors are interesting particularly for the measurement of antimatter properties and will be used as part of the gravity measurement module in the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. One of the goals of the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen with 1% precision. Three different silicon sensor geometries have been tested with an antiproton beam to investigate their properties as annihilation detection devices: strip planar, 3D pixels and monolithic pixel planar. In all cases we were successfully detecting annihilations taking place in the sensor and we were able to make a first characterization of the clusters and tracks.

  6. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    method are applied in order to describe the target molecule and the collision process. It is shown that three perpendicular orientations of the molecular axis with respect to the trajectory are sufficient to accurately reproduce the ionization cross section calculated by Sakimoto [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062704......Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...... (2005)] reducing the numerical effort drastically. The independent-event model is employed to approximate the cross section for double ionization and H+ production in antiproton collisions with H2....

  7. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  8. Antiproton production in relativistic Si-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured antiproton production cross sections as functions of centrality in collisions of 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon 28Si ions with targets of Al, Cu, and Pb. For all targets, the antiproton yields increase linearly with the number of projectile nucleons that have interacted, and show little target dependence. We discuss the implications of this result on the production and absorption of antiprotons within the nuclear medium

  9. An antiproton catalyst for inertial confinement fusion propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Raymond A.; Newton, Richard; Smith, Gerald A.; Toothacker, William S.; Kanzleiter, Randall J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an inertial confinement fusion propulsion system involving an antiproton catalyst (for antiproton-induced fission). It is argued that, when the two processes, fusion and antimatter annihilation, are combined into one system, a viable candidate propulsion system for planetary exploration emerges. It is shown that as much as 7.6 GW of power, well within the requrements for interplanetary travel, can be achieved using existing driver technologies and available quantities of antiprotons.

  10. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, S; Rahman, S N

    2003-01-01

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined.

  11. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with PAMELA

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles, and especially antiparticles, in the cosmic radiation. The apparatus is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite which was launched on 15 June 2006. PAMELA has been traveling around the earth along an elliptical and semi-polar orbit for almost five years. It mainly consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, a time of flight system and an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, which allows antiprotons to be ...

  12. Looking for new gravitational forces with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quite general arguments based on the principle of equivalence and modern field theory show that it is possible for the gravitational acceleration of antimatter to be different than that for matter. Further, there is no experimental evidence to rule out the possibility. In fact, some evidence indicates there may be unexpected effects. Thus, the planned experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons is of fundamental importance. 20 refs., 3 figs

  13. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined. (author)

  14. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langanke, K.

    2015-11-01

    In the coming years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and path-breaking research in hadronic, nuclear and atomic physics as well as applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on nuclear physics related to supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  15. Antiproton-Proton Glory Scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment measures @*p and K|-p backwards scattering between 8 and 16 GeV/c in the Omega spectrometer using the S1 beam, with sensitivities of several events per nanobarn. The mechanism responsible for backward scattering in channels not mediated by particle exchange is not understood, and could be almost energy-independent glory scattering, especially since relatively high cross sections of 190~(@*p) and 120~(K|-p)nb have been measured earlier at 5~GeV/c. @p|-p backwards scattering is measured for monitoring purposes. The trigger requires a forward particle of momentum close to the beam momentum. Absence of light in the two forward Cerenkov counters indicates that the particle is a proton. Combinations of an incident @p|- and an outgoing K|+, or an incident K|- or @* and an outgoing @p|+, cover the following byproducts: @*p~@A~@p|+@p|- which is an (allowed) baryon exchange reaction, and the exotic exchange reactions @p|-p~@A~K|+Y K|-p~@A~@p|+Y|-, where Y|- may be the @S|- or the Y*|-(1385).

  16. Elastic scattering, polarization and absorption of relativistic antiprotons on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B

    2016-01-01

    We perform Glauber model calculations of the antiproton-nucleus elastic and quasielastic scattering and absorption in the beam momentum range $\\sim 0.5\\div10$ GeV/c. A good agreement of our calculations with available LEAR data and with earlier Glauber model studies of the $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering allows us to make predictions at the beam momenta of $\\sim 10$ GeV/c, i.e at the regime of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The comparison with the proton-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections shows that the diffractive minima are much deeper in the $\\bar p A$ case due to smaller absolute value of the ratio of the real-to-imaginary part of the elementary elastic amplitude. Significant polarization signal for $\\bar p A$ elastic scattering at 10 GeV/c is expected. We have also revealed a strong dependence of the $\\bar p A$ absorption cross section on the slope parameter of the transverse momentum dependence of the elementary $\\bar pN$ amplitude. The $\\bar p A$ optical potential is discussed.

  17. Anti-protons in the primary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge of the flux of antiprotons is of value in examining the manner in which cosmic rays propagate, assuming, as is conventional, that the antiprotons arise from interactions in the I.S.M. A comparison of observed and expected anti p/p ratios is made. (Auth.)

  18. Experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration has been formed to measure the acceleration of antiprotons in the earth's gravitational field. The technique is to produce, decelerate, and trap quantities of antiprotons, to cool them to untralow energy, and to measure their acceleration in a time-of-flight experiment. Present plans and the results of initial efforts toward this end are presented

  19. A study of the reactions antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ- at 14.6 GeV/c and a study of charged multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of two reactions on deuterium has been performed with incident antiprotons of 14.6 GeV/c: antiproton-d→antiproton-dπ+π- and antiproton-d→psub(s)antiproton-pπ-. The final states are dominated by Δ(1236) resonance production and in the coherent reaction the d* effect is observed as at lower incident momenta. At 14.6 GeV/c, it seems that the diffraction dissociation process as well for the incident particle as for the target takes a large part of the production mechanism for the two reactions. A study of charged multiplicity distributions in antiproton-neutron interactions is presented at 5.5, 9.3 and 14.6 GeV/c. The topological cross sections as well as various statistical moments obtained from the charged multiplicities are studied as functions of the incident momentum. A comparison between our results and antiproton-proton and pp data shows, that in the range of incident momenta used, a scaling function which describes antiproton-N and proton-proton interactions does not exist as expected from the KNO model (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen model)

  20. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed

  1. Wave Packet Simulations of Antiproton Scattering on Molecular Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Stegeby, Henrik; Kowalewski, Markus; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Karlsson, Hans O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of antiproton scattering on the molecular Hydrogen is investigated by means of wave packet dynamics. The electronically potential energy surfaces of the antiproton H2 system are presented within this work. Excitation and dissociation probabilities of the molecular Hydrogen for collision energies in the ultra low energy regime below 10 eV are computed.

  2. Unconventional Purcell filter in superferric magnets in the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the magnets used in beam lines, especially in high resolution applications, the field quality ΔB/B is a very important factor which determines the quality of the beam after passing through the magnets. End-shaping of the poles and introduction of Purcell filters improve field uniformity. However, in most applications, what matters is the uniformity in the total field integrated along the beam path (Δ(∫Bdl)/∫Bdl). With this criterion in mind, we have used unconventional partially penetrating Purcell filters in designing wide aperture highly uniform dipole and quadrupole magnets for the large acceptance low energy beam line in the Super Fragment Separator of the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The weight of dipole magnets decreases by the use of such filters

  3. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; /Fermilab; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  4. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime

  5. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  6. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  7. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  8. Antiproton production in heavy-ion collisions at energies below the threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of this thesis the antiproton production in heavy ion collisions at projectile energies far below the threshold for anti p production in nucleon-nucleon collisions (5.63 GeV/u) was studied. A suited detection apparature was developed and constructed at the fragment separator-magnet spectrometer at the Society for Heavy Ion Research (GSI). For the identification of the antiprotons the momentum of the particles emitted in beam direction was measured and their velocity multiple-redundantly determined by means of time-of-flight measurements and threshold Cherenkov detectors. By this way the antiprotons could be in spite of low anti p production cross sections and high production rates for lighter particles (R antip:RK--:Rπ--∼1:5*103:107) background-freely determined. By this experiment for Ne+NaF, Cu, Sn, and Bi as well ass Ni+Ni collisions at incident energies between 1.6 GeV/u and 2.0 GeV/u production cross sections for antiprotons in the momentum range between 1.0 GeV/c and 2.2 GeV/c and for kaons and pions between 0.5 GeV/c and 2.8 GeV/c were measured, in order to study the influence of collisional-system size, incident energy, and secondary-particle momentum on the production probabilities and to contribute in comparison with the prognoses of theoretical models to the explanation of the particle production mechanisms. (HSI)

  9. Collimation with hollow electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G; Annala, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Vorobiev, L G

    2011-01-01

    A novel concept of controlled halo removal for intense high-energy beams in storage rings and colliders is presented. It is based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The first results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented.

  10. Progress with Tevatron Electron Lens Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevatron electron lenses have been successfully used to mitigate bunch-to-bunch differences caused by longrange beam-beam interactions. For this purpose, the electron beam with uniform transverse density distribution was used. Another planned application of the electron lens is the suppression of tune spread due to head-on beam-beam collisions. For this purpose, the transverse distribution of the E- beam must be matched to that of the antiproton beam. In 2009, the Gaussian profile electron gun was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We report on the first experiments with non-linear beam-beam compensation. Discussed topics include measurement and control of the betatron tune spread, importance of the beam alignment and stability, and effect of electron lens on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  11. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 30 MeV and 180 MeV antiprotons on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports on the first measurements of angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons from nuclei, which have been performed, using the beam delivered by LEAR and the spectrometer SPES II, over a wide angular range and with good precision. Angular distributions for elastic scattering of 50 MeV antiprotons from 12C, 40Ca, 208Pb and 180 MeV antiprotons from 12C, 16O, 18O, 40Ca, 208Pb have been measured. Data on the inelastic 4.4 MeV and 9.6 MeV excited states of 12C and 1.98 MeV excited state of 18O have also been collected. The diffractive angular distributions are first analysed in terms of a fuzzy black disk model, which confirms that the antiproton is strongly absorbed (annihilation) by the nuclei. Optical model analysis, with Woods-Saxon geometry, shows that the real potential is attractive and shallow. The potentials are only determined at the nuclear surface, around the strong absorption radius, where /W(R)/ > 2 /V(R)/. Main characteristics of the antip-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections are well described within microscopic models using the free elementary antiN N interaction, like KMT which have no free parameters. Possibility for test of spin-isospin dependence of the elementary amplitude antiN-N from the measurement of unnatural parity states is also studied

  12. LEAP [Low-Energy Antiproton]: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LEAP (Low-Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic-ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et. al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic-ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at Goddard Space Flight Center, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter designed and built at the University of Arizona. Analysis of flight data performed by the high-energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and Goddard Space Flight Center, 90% confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10-5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10-4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies

  13. Antiproton-proton annihilations into four prongs at 7.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annihilation reactions are described in which four charged pions and also maybe uncharged particles are produced. Data was acquired in an antiproton-proton experiment at a beam momentum of 7.2 GeV/c and 220K pictures of the CERN 2m HBC were measured. Cross sections have been determined and angular distributions of the pions and of some resonances are given. Two models that describe annihilation reactions are treated, the so called CLA model and a simple quark model. (C.F./Auth.)

  14. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  15. FNAL main ring to energy save antiproton transfer system for Tevatron I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for antiproton beam transfer from the Main Ring to the Energy Saver for colliding beam operations has been designed and fabricated. The system is similar to the existing proton beam transfer system used for fixed target operation of the Energy Saver. Using a fast kicker in the Main Ring, one or several bunches of 150 GeV pbars will be kicked horizontally across the septa of two Lambertsons into a short transfer line. At the end of this line, they are injected into the Energy Saver through two more Lambertsons and kicked onto a closed orbit by a second fast kicker. For commissioning and tune-up, the system will be operated in reverse, extracting 150 GeV protons from the Energy Saver to the Main Ring. In addition to a description of the design of the system and its components, the status of the installation and commissioning will also be discussed

  16. Feasibility study of a decelerating radio frequency quadrupole system for the antiproton decelerator AD

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Brouet, M; Couturier, B; Gelato, G; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Grandclaude, F; Hémery, J Y; Lombardi, A M; Mikkelsen, U; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Pedersen, F; Pirkl, Werner; Raich, U; Umstätter, H H; Vretenar, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    This feasibility study reports on a decelerating Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) system for post-deceleration of the 100 MeV/c antiproton beam of the AD machine. The corresponding kinetic energy of 5.314 MeV is reduced to values which can be chosen between 10 to 100 keV with minimal blow-up of the normalised beam emittances. This wide range of output energy is required for the second phase of the ASACUSA experiment; it is achieved by electrostatic means. The study gives details of the overall performance of the system, the proposed implementation of the RFQ, the associated rf equipment, the beam lines, the diagnostics as well as estimations for the cost and the manpower requirements of the project.

  17. Experimental demonstration of beam-beam compensation by Tevatron electron lenses and prospects for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab; Bishofberger, K.; /Los Alamos

    2007-06-01

    Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams are significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron Collider Run II (2001-present). We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in high energy physics (HEP) operation, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades and discuss ways to improve it.

  18. Design of a new low momentum kaon beam for the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low momentum beam described is to be a unique source of antiprotons as well as kaons. The discussion covers (1) choice of production angle; (2) secondary beams; (3) the use of sector dipole magnets for minimizing aberrations; (4) beam bending magnets; (5) beam separators; and (6) beam acceptance

  19. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  20. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  1. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy: astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date ap measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different as...

  2. Rescattering effects in antiproton deuteron annihilation at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper higher order corrections to the single scattering term for antiproton deuteron annihilation are evaluated. As dominant corrections the initial state interaction of the antiprotons and the rescattering of pions are considered. For low spectator momenta, these corrections cause a strong modulation of the distribution in the invariant mass of the annihilation pions, which could modify the parameters of the resonant baryonium states

  3. Antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into two mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branching ratios for antiproton-proton annihilations at rest into two mesons are given. The data were obtained at LEAR by stopping antiprotons in a liquid hydrogen target. Both charged and neutral annihilation products were detected in the Crystal Barrel detector. Representative data are presented, and their bearing on the general picture of annihilation dynamics is discussed. In addition, preliminary branching ratios for two-body radiative annihilations are given. (orig.)

  4. Cosmic Antiproton Constraints on Effective Interactions of the Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  5. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments.

  6. Cosmic antiproton constraints on effective interactions of the dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the antiproton flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter in the Galactic Halo and compare to the most recent antiproton spectrum of the PAMELA experiment. We obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions that are comparable to those deduced from collider and gamma-ray experiments

  7. Low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations were performed using the impact parameter method for antiproton and proton collisions with alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen molecules. The targets are described as effective one-electron systems using appropriate model potentials. The proton data verify the employed method while the results for antiprotons improve the literature on these systems considerably. Cross sections for ionization and excitation as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping power will be presented.

  8. Measurement of Spin Transfer Observables in Antiproton-Proton -> Antilambda-Lambda at 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Bassalleck, B; Bradtke, C; Bröders, R; Bunker, B; Dennert, H; Dutz, H; Eilerts, S W; Eyrich, W; Fields, D; Fischer, H; Franklin, G; Franz, J; Gehring, R; Geyer, R; Görtz, S; Harmsen, J; Hauffe, J; Heinsius, F H; Hertzog, D W; Johansson, T; Jones, T; Khaustov, P; Kilian, K; Kingsberry, P; Kriegler, E; Lowe, J; Meier, A; Metzger, A E; Meyer, C A; Meyer, Werner T; Moosburger, M; Oelert, Walter; Paschke, K D; Plückthun, M; Pomp, S; Quinn, B; Radtke, E; Reicherz, G; Röhrich, K; Sachs, K; Schmitt, H; Schoch, B; Sefzick, T; Stinzing, F; Stotzer, R W; Tayloe, R; Wirth, S; Wirth, St.

    2002-01-01

    Spin transfer observables for the strangeness-production reaction Antiproton-Proton -> Antilambda-Lambda have been measured by the PS185 collaboration using a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target with an antiproton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN. This measurement investigates observables for which current models of the reaction near threshold make significantly differing predictions. Those models are in good agreement with existing measurements performed with unpolarized particles in the initial state. Theoretical attention has focused on the fact that these models produce conflicting predictions for the spin-transfer observables D_{nn} and K_{nn}, which are measurable only with polarized target or beam. Results presented here for D_{nn} and K_{nn} are found to be in disagreement with predictions from existing models. These results also underscore the importance of singlet-state production at backward angles, while current models predict complete or near-complete t...

  9. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90 circle are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment. (orig.)

  10. Study of hyperon-antihyperon production in antiproton-proton collision at 4 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results on hyperon-antihyperon production by 4 GeV/c antiprotons in hydrogen. We used about 105 pictures taken in an antiproton beam from the CERN proton synchrotron with the 81 cm Saclay hydrogen bubble chamber. The aim of this work was the study, through the cross sections and the angular distributions, of production mechanism of hyperon antihyperon pairs and excited hyperons (or antihyperons). For most of the channels, these angular distributions show a strong forward peaking of the antihyperon in the center of mass of the interaction. This suggests that a peripheral-type mechanism is predominant in these processes. We compare the results of some cross sections, with theoretical predictions according to SU3 unitary symmetry. (author)

  11. CERN: LEP delivers; Looking deeper at spin; Handling low energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One year ago, with the world catalogue of Z particles - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - containing a few hundred examples, it sounded extravagant when proponents of CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider promised a hundred thousand Zs by Christmas 1989. The first round of experiments in the North Area of CERN's SPS proton synchrotron included a considerable investment in studies using high energy muon beams. This paid off with important contribuions to physics, particularly in the measurement of the quark/gluon content (structure functions) of nucleons. ; The LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN takes its antimatter beams down to very low kinetic energies - less than 10 MeV - for a unique range of physics studies. However even these modest energies are too high for a series of experiments aiming to explore the effects of gravity on antimatter

  12. Toward polarized antiprotons: Machine development for spin-filtering experiments at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Weidemann, C; Stein, H J; Lorentz, B; Bagdasarian, Z; Barion, L; Barsov, S; Bechstedt, U; Bertelli, S; Chiladze, D; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dymov, S; Engels, R; Gaisser, M; Gebel, R; Goslawski, P; Grigoriev, K; Guidoboni, G; Kacharava, A; Kamerdzhiev, V; Khoukaz, A; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Lomidze, N; Macharashvili, G; Maier, R; Martin, S; Mchedlishvili, D; Meyer, H O; Merzliakov, S; Mielke, M; Mikirtychiants, M; Mikirtychiants, S; Nass, A; Nikolaev, N N; Oellers, D; Papenbrock, M; Pesce, A; Prasuhn, D; Retzlaff, M; Schleichert, R; Schröer, D; Seyfarth, H; Soltner, H; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Tagliente, G; Engblom, P Thörngren; Trusov, S; Valdau, Yu; Vasiliev, A; Wüstner, P

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the commissioning of the experimental equipment and the machine studies required for the first spin-filtering experiment with protons at a beam kinetic energy of $49.3\\,$MeV in COSY. The implementation of a low-$\\beta$ insertion made it possible to achieve beam lifetimes of $\\tau_{\\rm{b}}=8000\\,$s in the presence of a dense polarized hydrogen storage-cell target of areal density $d_{\\rm t}=(5.5\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{13}\\,\\mathrm{atoms/cm^{2}}$. The developed techniques can be directly applied to antiproton machines and allow for the determination of the spin-dependent $\\bar{p}p$ cross sections via spin filtering.

  13. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  14. Antiproton-impact ionization of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization processes in antiproton collisions with H2 are studied by direct solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a one-electron 3D wavefunction in the field of H+2 is used to calculate single-ionization cross sections at incident energies ranging from 50 keV to 1.5 MeV. Averaging over the molecular orientations, the single-ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with time-dependent basis set calculations and experiment. A time-dependent close-coupling method based on an expansion of a two-electron 6D wavefunction in the field of H2+2 is used to calculate single- and double-ionization cross sections at an incident energy of 100 keV. Initiatory 6D results for the H+2 production cross section range are somewhat lower than experiment, while the H+ production cross section range brackets experiment.

  15. Elastic and inelastic scattering of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last two years very interesting results have been collected at LEAR on both the elementary pantip and the antip nucleus interactions. A review of all the interesting experimental results already available is far beyond the scope of the present talk. Its topic will be essentially limited to report on the new experimental informations dealing with the knowledge of the fundamental properties of the antip p elementary interaction and the determination of the characteristics of the antip nucleus interaction. The results of the antip p cross sections measured at low momenta by the PS173 and PS172 experiments are discussed. The antip nucleus elastic scattering angular distributions collected by the PS184 experiment have significantly contributed to define the properties of the p nucleus optical potential and stimulated a lot of microscopic calculations. The results are reviewed. A comparison to the informations obtained from the measurements of X-rays in antiprotonic atoms done by the PS176 and PS186 experiments is given. The interpretation of the inelastic scattering data measured for the 12C(antip, antip)12C* system at 47 and 180 MeV for various discrete states is presented: special emphasis will be given to the study of spin-flip transitions to unnatural parity states which would provide significant constant on the isovector tensor component of the NantiN interaction. Status on the experimental study of the (antip, p) reaction is discussed

  16. Delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed annihilation of antiprotons, which was recently discovered in liquid 4He at KEK, has been studied at CERN in gas-phase 4He and 3He. The annihilation time spectra in gas 4He at various pressures were found to be similar to that for liquid 4He. The observed average lifetime in the region t > 1μsec for 3 atm 4He was about 3.2μsec, while for 3 atm 3He gas it was 2.8μsec, i.e. shorter by 15 %. The time spectra show a growth-decay type function, which is indicative of the presence of a series of metastable states. For 4He and 3He they have nearly identical shapes, differing only in the time scale by 14 ± 3 %. These observations are qualitatively consistent with the atomic model of p-bare-He++ proposed by Condo. The time spectra were found to be sensitive to the presence of small amounts (as small as 20 ppm) of H2. No evidence was seen for delayed annihilation in gaseous Ne. 36.10. (author)

  17. Charm production in antiproton-proton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Haidenbauer, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of charmed mesons (D) and baryons (Lambda_c) in antiproton-proton (app) annihilation close to their respective production thresholds. The elementary charm production process is described by either baryon/meson exchange or by quark/gluon dynamics. Effects of the interactions in the initial and final states are taken into account rigorously. The calculations are performed in close analogy to our earlier study on app -> antiLambda-Lambda and app -> antiK-K by connecting the processes via SU(4) flavor symmetry. Our predictions for the antiLambda_c-Lambda_c production cross section are in the order of 1 to 7 mb, i.e. a factor of around 10-70 smaller than the corresponding cross sections for antiLambda-Lambda However, they are 100 to 1000 times larger than predictions of other model calculations in the literature. On the other hand, the resulting cross sections for antiD-D production are found to be in the order of 10^{-2} -- 10^{-1} microbarn and they turned out to be comparable to those ob...

  18. Antiproton trapping in various helium media: report of the HELIUMTRAP experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELIUMTRAP (PS205) investigates the recently discovered anomalously long-lived states of antiprotons in various helium media. An overview is given of experiments stopping antiprotons in several phases of helium performed at LEAR in the last two years. (author)

  19. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti)protons by multiple passage through the polarized internal target (PIT). Implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR GSI are discussed

  20. Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics with the Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TApAS*) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoszek, Larry; /Bartoszek Engineering, Aurora; Piacentino, Giovanni M.; /Cassino U.; Phillips, Thomas J.; /Duke U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Hbar Technologies, West Chicago /Houston U. /IIT, Chicago /IIT, Hyderabad /ITEP /KyungPook National U. /LPI

    2008-01-01

    We propose to assemble a cost-effective, yet powerful, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events and use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, and precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration, with installation occurring during the accelerator downtime following the completion of the Tevatron run, and with funding largely from university research grants. The experiment will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle-physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S.

  1. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidinger, David S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the required critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in 238U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fissions. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results, the specific design presented was inadequate. Despite this, the concept of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of thrust warrants further study.

  2. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and pionic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiproton) experiment of CERN has observed two-photon spectroscopy by making non-linear transitions of the antiprotons which have occupied highly excited levels. The metastable antiproton helium atoms are studied by irradiating two laser light photons propagating in the counter direction. As the result, the spectrum of narrow line width was observed by making the Doppler width of the resonant transition to decrease. And the anti-proton helium transition frequency was measured with the accuracy of (2.3∼5) X10-9. The mass ratio of the antiproton and the electron has been decided to be Mp/me =1836.152674(23) from the comparison of quantum electrodynamics calculation and the present experimental result. The pion-Helium experiment instrument has been also constructed at the ring cyclotron of PSI (Paul Sherer Institute) toward the successful laser spectroscopy of this atom. When this atom is observed, the π- mass can be obtained with the accuracy higher than 6∼8 orders of magnitude which may contribute to the direct measurement of the upper limit value of muon neutrino mass in the Particle Data Book Mass although various difficulties may be encountered. This report describes briefly the laser spectroscopy at first and then the recent situation of the experiments. (S. Funahashi)

  3. Ultra-low energy antiprotons for anti hydrogen spectroscopy and antimatter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large scale Penning trap at the Low Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultra-low energy antiprotons for gravitational physics as well as for precision spectroscopy of anti hydrogen for CPT tests

  4. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham Stokes

    2006-06-30

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{bar p}p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p{bar p}. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is {sigma} = 33 {+-} 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c{sup 2} is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  5. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectrum of the lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiprotons of the low-energy separated anti p-beam K23 at CERN in Geneva have been stopped in thin (0.6 g/cm2) targets of the Lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li. The characteristic X-rays of the formed antiprotonic atoms were measured with four identical high-resolution Si (Li) detectors. Three lines of the N- series, four lines of the M-series and the 3d-2p transition of the Balmer series were observed. The measured relative intensities of the M- and N-series transitions are well described by the simple cascade model of Eisenberg and Kessler. The 3d-2p transition is considerably influenced by the strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus and thus drastically reduced in intensity. The analysis of this transition yields the shift and width of the 2p level, whereas the width of the 3d level is deduced from intensity considerations. (orig./HSI)

  6. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  7. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  8. Antiproton-Nucleus Interaction and Coulomb Effect at High Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; WU Qing; GU Yun-Ting; MA Wei-Xing; TAN Zhen-Qiang; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The Coulomb effect in high energy antiproton-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering from 12C and 16O is studied in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory for five kinetic energies ranged from 0.23 to 1.83 GeV.A microscopic shell-model nuclear wave functions, Woods-Saxon single-particle wave functions, and experimental pN amplitudes are used in the calculations. The results show that the Coulomb effect is of paramount importance for filling up the dips of differential cross sections. We claim that the present result for inelastic scattering of antiproton-12C is sufficiently reliable to be a guide for measurements in the very near future. We also believe that antiproton nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering may produce new information on both the nuclear structure and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, in particular the p-neutron interaction.

  9. Antiproton-induced fission for space power and propulsion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gasdynamic Mirror[GDM] fusion reactor is investigated for use as a bi-modal propulsion device when driven by antiprotons.The deuterium-tritium[DT] fusion reactions in the device will be initiated by the heating provided by the fission fragments and annihilation products resulting from the 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in U-238 target nuclei.The energetic pions and muons of the proton-antiproton[or neutron]annihilation in the U-238 nucleus can heat a DT plasma to several keV during their relatively short lifetimes.The remaining heating to about 10 keV is provided by the fission fragments.Fissioning of U-238 by 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons has been shown to be 100% efficient,and the process can thus be effectively used in heating a suitable plasma to thermonuclear temperatures.With GDM as a steady state fusion reactor,and assuming certain efficiencies for the various components of the system,we calculate the energy multiplication factor 'Q' needed to sustain the steady-state operation for either the 'propulsive' mode or the 'power-producing' mode.With the aid of a system and mission analyses,we find that approximately 3.5 micrograms of antiprotons are required to accomplish a round mission to Mars in about 59 days.A similar amount is required to initiate and sustain the power-producing mode where gigawatts of electric power may be generated.Although roughly nanograms of antiprotons are currently produced annually,it is expected that hundreds of milligrams or even several grams will be produced annually in the next decade or so when Mars missions may be contemplated

  10. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  11. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half

  12. Relativistic hydrodynamics, heavy ion reactions and antiproton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of relativistic hydrodynamics to relativistic heavy ions and antiproton annihilation is summarized. Conditions for validity of hydrodynamics are presented. Theoretical results for inclusive particle spectra, pion production and flow analysis are given for medium energy heavy ions. The two-fluid model is introduced and results presented for reactions from 800 MeV per nucleon to 15 GeV on 15 GeV per nucleon. Temperatures and densities attained in antiproton annihilation are given. Finally, signals which might indicate the presence of a quark-gluon plasma are briefly surveyed

  13. Rapidity dependence of anti-proton production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E859 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is an extension of experiment E802, using additional tracking chambers and a new second-level trigger to provide on-line particle identification, thereby providing better event selection and allowing higher beam intensities to be used. The anti-proton measurements made by E802 have been extended to lower rapidities and the statistics in the y-pt regions already studied have been improved by approximately an order of magnitude. The authors present dn/dy distributions and cross-sections for antiproton production in the rapidity range 0.6 < y < 1.7, for 14.6 GeV/c Si beams on Al and Au targets. In addition, anti-lambda production will be discussed

  14. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  15. Spin Observables in Antilambda-Lambda Production from Antiproton-Proton Annihilation with a Transverse Inital State Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K; Paschke, Kent; Quinn, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The formalism describing the scattering of two spin-1/2 objects is reviewed for the case of antilambda-lambda production from antiproton-proton annihilation. It is shown that an experiment utilizing a transverse target polarization can, in principle, completely determine the spin structure of the reaction. Additional measurements, even those using both beam and target polarizations, would not be sensitive to any additional spin dynamics. Thus, the transverse target polarization allows access to the complete set of spin observables, not just the subset upon which the literature has previously focused. This discussion is especially relevant in light of the data collected by PS185/3 at LEAR.

  16. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR Cosmic Matter in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoecker, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt Main (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sturm, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt Main (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Cosmic matter in the laboratory - a broad spectrum of unprecedented fore-front research becomes available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR. The new facility will be constructed within the next seven years adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt/Germany. On October 4th, 2010, nine countries signed the international agreement on the construction of FAIR which will start in 2012. First beam will be delivered in 2017/2018 providing worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities. This will open the way for a large variety of experiments in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as applied sciences which will be briefly described in this article. A few more details will be given on heavy-ion collisions providing a tool to study strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions.

  17. Secondary antiprotons as a Galactic Dark Matter probe

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel determination of the astrophysical uncertainties associated to the secondary antiproton flux originating from cosmic-ray spallation on the interstellar gas. We select a set of propagation models compatible with the recent B/C data from PAMELA, and find those providing minimal and maximal antiproton fluxes in different energy ranges. We use this result to determine the most conservative bounds on relevant Dark Matter (DM) annihilation channels: We find that the recent claim of a DM interpretation of a gamma-ray excess in the Galactic Center region cannot be ruled out by current antiproton data. Finally, we discuss the impact of the recently released preliminary data from AMS-02. In particular, we provide a reference model compatible with proton, helium and B/C spectra from this experiment. Remarkably, the main propagation parameters of this model are in perfect agreement with the best fit presented in our earlier statistical analyses. We also show that the antiproton-to-proton ratio does not...

  18. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  19. ACOL, CERN'S upgrade of the antiproton accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At its present best the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) produces 6 x 10/sup 9/ p-bar's/hour. In routine operation this amounts to around 10/sup 11/ p-bar's/day including anadvertent stops of all the systems involved. Post ACOL performance aims at increasing these rates tenfold

  20. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  1. Delta-Isobar Production in Antiproton Annihilation on the Deuteron

    OpenAIRE

    Lykasov, G. I.; Bussa, M. P.; Valacca, L.

    1997-01-01

    The annihilation of antiprotons on deuterons at rest are investigated for the case when pion-nucleon and pion-delta-isobar pairs are produced. The two-step mechanism is investigated by analysing these processes when either neutral particles and charged ones are produced. Some predictions for the branching ratios are presented.

  2. Beam position monitor R&D for keV ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Naveed, S; Nosych, A; Søby,L

    2013-01-01

    Beams of cooled antiprotons at keV energies shall be provided by the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at the Facility for Low energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) and the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility. Both storage rings put challenging demands on the beam position monitoring (BPM) system as their capacitive pick-ups should be capable of determining the beam position of beams at low intensities and low velocities, close to the noise level of state-of-the-art electronics. In this contribution we describe the design and anticipated performance of BPMs for low-energy ion beams with a focus on the ELENA orbit measurement systems. We also present the particular challenges encountered in the numerical simulation of pickup response at very low beta values. Finally, we provide an outlook on how the implementation of faster algorithms for the simulation of BPM characteristics could potentially help speed up such studies considerably.

  3. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  4. Measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment and a determination of the LS-term for the antiproton-nucleus-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects of this thesis are a measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment, a particle property, with the aim of testing the CPT-theorem for the strong interaction and the investigation of a possible spin-orbit-term of the anti p-nucleus-interaction. For both aspects the information is given in the finestructure-splitting of antiprotonic X-ray-transitions from heavy nuclei, since only for those the splitting is observable. From the finestructure-splitting of the transition 11→10 in 208Pb the magnetic moment of the antiproton can be calculated. The result of this best measurement up to now is μ sub anti p = (-2.8007±0.0091)μN. In between the error bars it confirms the CPT-Theorem and the new average value for the difference of the antiproton magnetic moment from the proton magnetic moment is (μp-anti μ sub anti p)/average = (-2.5±3).10-3. At the same time the limits of our detectors are described and other possibilities are discussed. In 174Yb one observes a splitting of the last observable transition 9→8, which is influenced by the strong interaction. From our measurement we find that the measured splitting is different from the calculated electromagnetic value and the Lorentz-widths of both line components are different as well. It is ΔEsw = 58±25±13 eV and ΔΓ = 195±58±20 eV. As result we find a sign for the existence of a spin-orbit-term of the antiproton-nucleus-interaction. Nevertheless is has to be confirmed in further experiments. (orig./HSI)

  5. Correction of unevenness in recycler beam profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A beam confined between two rf barriers in the Fermilab Recycler Ring exhibits very uneven longitudinal profile. This leads to the consequence that the momentum-mined antiproton bunches will have an intolerable variation in bunch intensity. The observed profile unevenness is the result of a tiny amount of rf imperfection and rf beam-loading. The profile unevenness can be flattened by feeding back the uneven rf fan-back gap voltage to the low-level rf.

  6. Fermilab Proton Beam for Mu2e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Plans to use existing Fermilab facilities to provide beam for the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) are under development. The experiment will follow the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. The proposed Mu2e operating scenario is described as well as the accelerator issues being addressed to meet the experimental goals.

  7. Calculation of transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon laser transitions of antiprotonic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical ab initio variational calculations of the transition probabilities and ac Stark shifts in two-photon transitions of antiprotonic helium atoms driven by two counter-propagating laser beams are presented. We found that sub-Doppler spectroscopy is, in principle, possible by exciting transitions of the type (n,L)→(n-2,L-2) between antiprotonic states of principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n∼L-1∼35, first by using highly monochromatic, nanosecond laser beams of intensities 104-105 W/cm2, and then by tuning the virtual intermediate state close (e.g., within 10-20 GHz) to the real state (n-1,L-1) to enhance the nonlinear transition probability. We expect that ac Stark shifts of a few MHz or more will become an important source of systematic error at fractional precisions of better than a few parts in 109. These shifts can, in principle, be minimized and even canceled by selecting an optimum combination of laser intensities and frequencies. We simulated the resonance profiles of some two-photon transitions in the regions n=30-40 of the p4He+ and p3He+ isotopes to find the best conditions that would allow this.

  8. First observation of dijet events with an antiproton tag at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV using the D0 Forward Proton Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strang, Michael Allen

    2005-07-01

    The Forward Proton Detector (FPD) is a new sub-system of the D0 detector, a 5000 ton particle physics detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The FPD was implemented for the Tevatron Run II and gives access to a wide range of diffractive scattering processes, where one or both of the beam particles remain intact. The analysis described in this thesis makes use of the dipole spectrometer of the FPD to tag outgoing antiprotons in events that have a dijet signature in the central D0 calorimeter. Properties of jets with a diffractive tag signature are compared to jets without such a signature yielding the first observation of tagged diffractive dijets at a 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  9. Preparations for HFS spectroscopy of antiprotonic 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Antiprotonic helium (pHe) is a neutral exotic atom, consisting of a helium nucleus, an electron and an antiproton. The interactions of the angular momenta and spins of its constituents cause splitting within the principle states. The measured transition frequencies between hyperfine levels can be compared with three-body QED calculations as a test of the theory. Previous measurements have been performed on p4He. The next two years will be dedicated to measuring a similar transition within p3He. Due to the additional coupling to the helion spin, it consists of an octuplet of states instead of a quadruplet. A new microwave cavity has been designed and is being constructed for the transition frequency of 11.14 GHz. This cavity has been simulated using the high frequency structure simulator HFSS to obtain the correct cavity dimensions. A new cryostat to cool the target is under construction. Numerical simulations are also in progress. (author)

  10. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p ..-->.. ..gamma gamma.. for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology.

  11. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  12. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  13. Proton-antiproton annihilation into two photons at large s

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C

    2002-01-01

    Exclusive proton-antiproton annihilation into two photons can be viewed as the Compton process in the crossed channel. At large s (~10 GeV^2) and |t|,|u| s this process can be described by a generalized partonic picture, analogous to the 'soft mechanism' in wide-angle real Compton scattering. The two photons are emitted in the annihilation of a single fast quark and antiquark ('handbag graph'). The transition of the p-pbar system to a q-qbar pair through soft interactions is described by double distributions, which can be related to the timelike proton elastic form factors as well as, by crossing symmetry, to the usual quark--antiquark distributions in the nucleon. We estimate that this reaction should be observable with reasonable statistics at the proposed 1.5..15 GeV high-luminosity antiproton storage ring (HESR) at GSI.

  14. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  15. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Uggerhøj, Ulrik Ingerslev

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  16. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  17. Current status of antiproton impact ionization of atoms and molecules: theoretical and experimental perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Tom; Knudsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical progress in the field of antiproton-impact-induced ionization of atoms and molecules is reviewed. We describe the techniques used to measure ionization cross sections and give an overview of the experimental results supplemented by tables of all existing data. An...... status of our understanding of antiproton impact ionization. The related issues of energy loss measurements and antiproton therapy are briefly described and directions for possible future work are pointed out as well....

  18. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value

  19. The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; M. Boezio; Bogomolov, E.A.; M. Bongi; Bonvicini, V.; Borisov, S.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; F. Cafagna; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of tr...

  20. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  1. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  2. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  3. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (∼ 50 μeV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge (∼1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  4. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Charged pion albedo induced by cosmic antiproton interactions with the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the calculations of the energy spectra and fluxes of single and double albedo charged pions generated by cosmic proton and antiproton interactions with the lunar surface. Properties of such spectra and related fluxes are investigated in order to clarify some important facets of the antiproton detection via charged pion albedo flux from the lunar surface. Pion albedo measurement may represent a novel approach for the identification of cosmic antiprotons using the lunar surface as a calorimeter. Future scientific programs on the Moon designed to measure antiproton flux may benefit from the results of these calculations. (author)

  6. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons from 3.7 to 19 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, M.; Pfeifer, C.; Menn, W.; Simon, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany); Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Laboratory; Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Ricci, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali, Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-02-01

    The antiproton to proton ratio in the cosmic rays has been measured in the energy range from 3.7 to 19 GeV. This measurement was carried out using a balloon-borne superconducting magnetic spectrometer along with a gas Cherenkov counter, an imaging calorimeter and a time of flight scintillator system. The measured antiproton to proton ratio was determined to be 1.24 (+0.68, -0.51)X 10{sup -4}. The present result along with other recent observations show that the observed abundances of antiprotons are consistent with models, in which antiprotons are produced as secondaries during the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  7. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  8. AA, beam stopper with scintillator screen

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    An insertable steel-plate beam stopper was located after nearly a full turn downstream of the injection point. It was fitted with a scintillator screen, a thin plate of Cr-doped alumina, imprinted with a grid and reference points. The screen was illuminated through a window and observed with a highly sensitive TV camera plus image intensifier. This allowed observation of beam position and size of a proton test beam and of the beam from the target, which consisted not only of antiprotons but contained as well electrons, pions and muons of the same momentum.

  9. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  10. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  11. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  12. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  13. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons

  14. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  15. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  16. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Slevin, J. [Department of Experimental Physics, St. Patrick`s College, Maynooth (Ireland); Charlton, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-4234 (Switzerland)

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  17. A new cryogenic target and microwave cavity for hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A new cryostat with pulse tube refrigeration and gas-tight microwave cavity with a laser and antiproton window has been designed and built to study the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium-3. The improvements between this and the old system will be explained. (author)

  18. Antiproton small momentum transfer charge exchange scattering on protons at 30 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton charge exchange scattering on protons anti pp→anti nn is investigated with 30 GeV/c antiprotons at the IHEP accelerator. The experiment confirms the existence of a structure at small angles in the angular distribution of this reaction at high energies, observed earlier

  19. The PS 200 catching trap: A new tool for ultra-low energy antiproton physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultra-low energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned

  20. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed

  1. Illuminating dark matter and primordial black holes with an interstellar antiproton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstellar antiproton fluxes can arise from dark matter annihilating or decaying into quarks or gluons that subsequently fragment into antiprotons. Evaporation of primordial black holes also can produce a significant antiproton cosmic-ray flux. Since the background of secondary antiprotons from spallation has an interstellar energy spectrum that peaks at 2 GeV and falls rapidly for energies below this, low-energy measurements of cosmic antiprotons are useful in the search for exotic antiproton sources. However, measurement of the flux near the earth is challenged by significant uncertainties from the effects of the solar wind. We suggest evading this problem and more effectively probing dark-matter signals by placing an antiproton spectrometer aboard an interstellar probe currently under discussion. We address the experimental challenges of a light, low-power-consuming detector, and present an initial design of such an instrument. This experimental effort could significantly increase our ability to detect, and have confidence in, a signal of exotic, nonstandard antiproton sources. Furthermore, solar modulation effects in the heliosphere would be better quantified and understood by comparing results to inverse modulated data derived from existing balloon and space-based detectors near the earth

  2. Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons with PAMELA and studies of propagation models

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Studying the acceleration and propagation mechanisms of Galactic cosmic rays can provide information regarding astrophysical sources, the properties of our Galaxy, and possible exotic sources such as dark matter. To understand cosmic ray acceleration and propagation mechanisms, accurate measurements of different cosmic ray elements over a wide energy range are needed. The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus which allows different cosmic ray species to be identified over background. Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio from 1.5 GeV to 180 GeV are presented in this thesis. Compared to previous experiments, PAMELA extends the energy range of antiproton measurements and provides significantly higher statistics. The derived antiproton flux and antiproton-to-proton flux ratio are consistent with previous measurements and generally considered to be produced as secondary products when cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei interact with the interstellar med...

  3. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt [1]. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration [2–4]. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattic...

  4. Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    OpenAIRE

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; S. Chapman; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected s...

  5. Top Production at the Tevatron: The Antiproton Awakens

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10 fb$^{-1}$. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the $p\\bar{p}$ initial state.

  6. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  7. Pion production on exotic nuclei by antiproton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pion production by antiproton annihilation on neutron- or proton-rich nuclei is studied in a fully quantum mechanical description of the reaction process in terms of a distorted wave approach. The elementary elastic N-bar N and the N-bar N → nπ annihilation vertices are obtained from a t-matrix accounting for coupled channels effects. The theoretical amplitudes are used to derive a microscopic N-bar A optical model potential and the meson production vertices. Nuclear structure effects are taken into account microscopically. Results for meson production cross sections are presented.

  8. Measurement of 0.25 endash 3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balloon-borne isotope matter-antimatter experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on 16 endash 17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 GeV. Both the absolute flux of antiprotons and the antiproton/proton ratio are consistent with recent theoretical work in which antiprotons are produced as secondary products of cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium. This consistency implies a lower limit to the antiproton lifetime of ∼107 yr. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Antiproton-proton elastic scattering at 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/C; Difusion elastica antiproton-proton a 3,0 y 4,0 GeV/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unamuno, S.

    1965-07-01

    This paper presents the results-obtained in studying the two-prong interactions observed in the Saclay 81 cm hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to the 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/c antiproton beams from CERN Proton-Synchroton. Total elastic cross-sections corresponding to both energies are given. The results are given. The results are compared with those of p-p scaterring at different energies and with those of p-p scattering. Several optical-models, from the simples one (the black disk model) to a rather elaborated, four-parameters model have been applied. These models can explain some of the experimental results but fail in predicting the angular distribution of large angle scattering. (Author)

  10. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin-flip?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis discusses the extraction of the electron-proton spin-flip cross-section. The experimental setup, the data analysis and the results are pictured in detail. The proton is described by a QCD-based parton model. In leading twist three functions are needed. The quark distribution, the helicity distribution and the transversity distribution. While the first two are well-known, the transversity distribution is largely unknown. A self-sufficient measurement of the transversity is possible in double polarized proton-antiproton scattering. This rises the need of a polarized antiproton beam. So far spin filtering is the only tested method to produce a polarized proton beam, which may be capable to hold also for antiprotons. In-situ polarization build-up of a stored beam either by selective removal or by spin-flip of a spin-(1)/(2) beam is mathematically described. A high spin-flip cross-section would create an effective method to produce a polarized antiproton beam by polarized positrons. Prompted by conflicting calculations, a measurement of the spin-flip cross-section in low-energy electron-proton scattering was carried out. This experiment uses the electron beam of the electron cooler at COSY as an electron target. The depolarization of the stored proton beam is detected. An overview of the experiment is followed by detailed descriptions of the cycle setup, of the electron target and the ANKE silicon tracking telescopes acting as a beam polarimeter. Elastic protondeuteron scattering is the analyzing reaction. The event selection is depicted and the beam polarization is calculated. Upper limits of the two electron-proton spin-flip cross-sections σ parallel and σ perpendicularto are deduced using the likelihood method. (orig.)

  11. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin-flip?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oellers, Dieter Gerd Christian

    2010-04-15

    The present thesis discusses the extraction of the electron-proton spin-flip cross-section. The experimental setup, the data analysis and the results are pictured in detail. The proton is described by a QCD-based parton model. In leading twist three functions are needed. The quark distribution, the helicity distribution and the transversity distribution. While the first two are well-known, the transversity distribution is largely unknown. A self-sufficient measurement of the transversity is possible in double polarized proton-antiproton scattering. This rises the need of a polarized antiproton beam. So far spin filtering is the only tested method to produce a polarized proton beam, which may be capable to hold also for antiprotons. In-situ polarization build-up of a stored beam either by selective removal or by spin-flip of a spin-(1)/(2) beam is mathematically described. A high spin-flip cross-section would create an effective method to produce a polarized antiproton beam by polarized positrons. Prompted by conflicting calculations, a measurement of the spin-flip cross-section in low-energy electron-proton scattering was carried out. This experiment uses the electron beam of the electron cooler at COSY as an electron target. The depolarization of the stored proton beam is detected. An overview of the experiment is followed by detailed descriptions of the cycle setup, of the electron target and the ANKE silicon tracking telescopes acting as a beam polarimeter. Elastic protondeuteron scattering is the analyzing reaction. The event selection is depicted and the beam polarization is calculated. Upper limits of the two electron-proton spin-flip cross-sections {sigma} {sub parallel} and {sigma} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} are deduced using the likelihood method. (orig.)

  12. Antiproton-proton elastic scattering at 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results-obtained in studying the two-prong interactions observed in the Saclay 81 cm hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to the 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/c antiproton beams from CERN Proton-Synchroton. Total elastic cross-sections corresponding to both energies are given. The results are given. The results are compared with those of p-p scaterring at different energies and with those of p-p scattering. Several optical-models, from the simples one (the black disk model) to a rather elaborated, four-parameters model have been applied. These models can explain some of the experimental results but fail in predicting the angular distribution of large angle scattering. (Author)

  13. Double antikaonic nuclear clusters in antiproton-{sup 3}He annihilation at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Fuminori, E-mail: sakuma@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Curceanu, Catalina [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); Iwasaki, Masahiko [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Kienle, Paul [Technische Universiat Munchen (Germany); Ohnishi, Hiroaki [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Tokuda, Makoto [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Tsukada, Kyo [Tohoku University, Department of Physics (Japan); Widmann, Eberhard [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fuer Subatomare Physik (Austria); Yamazaki, Toshimitsu [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Zmeskal, Johannes [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fuer Subatomare Physik (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    We search for double anti-kaon nuclear bound states in the p-bar annihilation reaction in {sup 3}He nuclei at rest. In view of the strongly attractive K-bar N interaction, the existence of nuclear clusters with more than one K{sup }- has been predicted theoretically. The double anti-kaon production in elementary antiproton annihilation at rest is forbidden because of the negative Q-value; however, a double anti-kaon nuclear bound state, such as K{sup }- K{sup }- pp, with deep binding energy would enable double anti-kaon production in the nuclei. In order to investigate the K{sup }- K{sup }- pp production in the p-bar + {sup 3}He {yields} K{sup +} + K{sup 0} + X (X = K{sup -} K{sup -} pp) channel, the produced K{sup }- K{sup }- pp cluster is identified both using missing mass spectroscopy via the K{sup + }K{sup 0} channel with a {Lambda}-tag, and invariant mass analysis of the expected decay particles from the K{sup }- K{sup }- pp cluster such as {Lambda}{Lambda}. We propose to perform the experiment at the existing K1.8BR beam line at J-PARC with the E15 spectrometer.

  14. Double antikaonic nuclear clusters in antiproton-3He annihilation at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Fuminori; Curceanu, Catalina; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Kienle, Paul; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Tokuda, Makoto; Tsukada, Kyo; Widmann, Eberhard; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu; Zmeskal, Johannes

    We search for double anti-kaon nuclear bound states in the bar p annihilation reaction in 3He nuclei at rest. In view of the strongly attractive bar K N interaction, the existence of nuclear clusters with more than one K - has been predicted theoretically. The double anti-kaon production in elementary antiproton annihilation at rest is forbidden because of the negative Q-value; however, a double anti-kaon nuclear bound state, such as K - K - pp, with deep binding energy would enable double anti-kaon production in the nuclei. In order to investigate the K - K - pp production in the bar p + ^3He to K^+ + K^0 + X (X = K^-K^-pp) channel, the produced K - K - pp cluster is identified both using missing mass spectroscopy via the K + K 0 channel with a Λ-tag, and invariant mass analysis of the expected decay particles from the K - K - pp cluster such as ΛΛ. We propose to perform the experiment at the existing K1.8BR beam line at J-PARC with the E15 spectrometer.

  15. Antiproton magnetic moment determined from the HFS of p-bar He+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a determination of the antiproton magnetic moment, measured in a three-body system, independent of previous experiments. We present results from a systematic study of the hyperfine (HF) structure of antiprotonic helium where we have achieved a precision more than a factor of 10 better than our first measurement. A comparison between the experimental results and three-body quantum electrodynamic (QED) calculations leads to a new value for the antiproton magnetic moment μsp-bar=-2.7862(83)μN, which agrees with the magnetic moment of the proton within 2.9x10-3.

  16. Investigations into beam monitors at the AE bar {g}IS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, A.; Bravin, E.; Harasimowicz, J.; Jeff, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-02-01

    Detailed diagnostic of antiproton beams at low energies is required for essentially all experiments at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), but will be particularly important for the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) and its keV beam lines to the different experiments. Many monitors have been successfully developed and operated at the AD, but in particular beam profile monitoring remains a challenge. A dedicated beam instrumentation and detector test stand has recently been setup at the AE bar {g}IS experiment (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy). Located behind the actual experiment, it allows for parasitic use of the antiproton beam at different energies for testing and calibration. With the aim to explore and validate different candidate technologies for future low energy beam lines, as well as the downstream antihydrogen detector in AE bar {g}IS, measurements have been carried out using Silicon strip and pixel detectors, a purpose-built secondary emission monitor and emulsions. Here, results from measurements and characterization of the different detector types with regard to their future use at the AD complex are presented.

  17. Pulsed septum magnet for the Fermilab antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2 meter curved pulsed septum magnet for use in the Fermilab Antiproton Source is described. The magnet produces a peak field of 6 kGauss at a current of 20,000 Amperes within a 0.4 msec long pulse. The field uniformity obtained is ΔB/B<0.2% out to 3.8 cm from the copper septum. Power enters the magnet from the center resulting in very simple ends and the magnet incorporates at 0.5 cm steel guard which reduces the field to <1.4 Gauss in the zero-field region. The total septum thickness is 1.3 cm. The vacuum enclosure doubles as the stacking fixture for the magnet laminations allowing easy assembly of a magnet with a 50 m radius of curvature

  18. Survey and alignment of the Fermilab recycler antiproton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June of 1999 Fermilab commissioned a newly constructed antiproton storage ring, the 'Recycler Ring', in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline. The Recycler Ring is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring and is constructed of strontium ferrite permanent magnets. The 3319.4-meter-circumference Recycler Ring consists of 344 gradient magnets and 100 quadrupoles all of which are permanent magnets. This paper discusses the methods employed to survey and align these permanent magnets within the Recycler Ring with the specified accuracy. The Laser Tracker was the major instrument used for the final magnet alignment. The magnets were aligned along the Recycler Ring with a relative accuracy of ±0.25 mm. (author)

  19. An Update on the Depth-Dose Curve of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Knudsen, Helge;

    improves the situation, in particular on the upstream side of the Bragg-peak. This is attributed to a different spectrum of annihilation products created in the entrance window of the ionization chamber in comparison to the case of simply simulating annihilation taking place on water. Yet, a large portion...... of dose still is missing in the Bragg-peak. This effect is also visible in the tail where the dose is underestimated in both types of simulations because of the missing annihilation energy/products. Conclusions: The shape of the Bragg-peak has some dependence on what material the antiprotons is...... simulated dose to dose-to-water formalism. Results: Generally, the experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated dose on an absolute scale in the plateau region. However some deviations are found near the annihilation peak. A full geometric description of the ionization chamber simulation...

  20. One-Particle Measurement of the Antiproton Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    DiSciacca, J; Marable, K; Gabrielse, G; Ettenauer, S; Tardiff, E; Kalra, R; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T

    2013-01-01

    The antiproton $(\\bar{p})$ magnetic moment $\\mu \\bar{p} = \\mu_{\\bar{p}} S/(\\bar{h}/2)$ is proportional to its spin $S$. A single trapped $\\bar{p}$ is used for the first time to measure the $\\bar{p}$ magnetic moment in nuclear magnetons, giving $\\mu_\\bar{p}/\\mu N = -2.792 845 \\pm 0.000 012$. The 4.4 parts per million (ppm) uncertainty is 680 times smaller than previously realized. Comparing to the proton moment $\\mu_{p} = \\mu_{p} S/\\bar{h}/2)$ measured using the same method and trap electrodes gives $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}/\\mu_{p} = -1.000 000 \\pm 0.000 005$ to 5 ppm, consistent with the prediction of the CPT theorem.

  1. Decay of hot nuclei formed with energetic antiprotons (PS208)

    CERN Document Server

    Pienkowski, L; Eades, John; Egidy, T V; Figuera, P; Fuchs, H; Galin, J; Goldenbaum, F; Golubeva, Y S; Gulda, K; Hilscher, D; Iljinov, A S; Jahnke, U; Jastrzebski, J J; Kurcewicz, W; Lott, B; Morjean, M; Pausch, G; Peghaire, A; Polster, D; Proschitzki, S; Quednau, B; Rossner, H; Schmid, S; Schmid, W; Ziem, P

    1999-01-01

    Energetic antiproton-nucleus interactions allow to build up thermal excitation energies exceeding 800 MeV in nuclei of masses close to 200. We found that for these high excitation energies the fission process still remains a very significant exit channel. At excitation energies close to 800 MeV the fission process approaches 20-50% of the cross section for Ho, Au and U-like nuclei depending on the fission events selection criteria. The average intermediate mass fragment multiplicity at such high excitation energies is equal to about 1 and alpha particle multiplicity is equal to about 5 for all three reactions independently of the exit channel, including fission. A transition towards the multifragmentation is not observed.

  2. Antiproton-nucleus interaction: review of the experimental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will review the experimental situation of a few well-defined channels of the anti-p-nucleus interaction where the antiproton does not annihilate. It will not mention any experiment which studies annihilation of antiporotons in nuclei. The anti-p-nucleus reactions that will be reviewed are the following: 1. A(anti-p,anti-p)A elastic scattering which deals with the anti-p-nucleus system in a positive energy state. 2. Anti-p-nucleus atoms where the anti-p-nucleus system is almost at zero energy and interacts mostly through the Coulomb interaction, the strong interaction being only a perturbation. 3. A(anti-p,p)X proton knock-out reaction used to produce possible bound states or resonances of the anti-p-nucleus system via strong interaction. The main reasons for studying these three channels are to provide information about the anti-p-nucleus optical potential and also, through microscopic calculations which use the elementary anti-NN amplitudes and the nuclear matter densities as inputs, to get information about these quantities. 4. A(anti-p,anti-p')A* inelastic scattering - inelastic in the sense that the nucleus is left in an excited state but the antiproton does not annihilate, that is it deals only with the elastic part of the elementary anti-NN amplitude. Inelastic scattering from collective states also sets constraints on the anti-p-nucleus potential when analysed in terms of coupled-channel calculations. When unnatural parity states are concerned, it provides a sensitive test of the spin and isospin components of these amplitudes. In addition, this paper will focus essentially on the recent experiments performed at LEAR

  3. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti) protons by multiple passage through a polarized internal target (PIT). The implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR are discussed

  4. Beam-Beam Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  5. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  6. Proton and antiproton production in deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at 280 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results on proton and antiproton production in the target and current fragmentation regions of high energy muonnucleon scattering are presented. Proton and antiproton production is investigated as a function of Feynman x and rapidity. No significant difference is observed between production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. Correlations between pp, panti p and anti panti p pairs are analysed and the results are compared with the predictions of the Lund fragmentation model. (orig.)

  7. Proton and antiproton production in deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at 280 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffré, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jansco, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Poensgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schouten, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1987-12-01

    New results on proton and antiproton production in the target and current fragmentation regions of high energy muon-nucleon scattering are presented. Proton and antiproton production is investigated as a function of Feynman x and rapidity. No significant difference is observed between production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. Correlations between pp,pbar p andbar pbar p pairs are analysed and the results are compared with the predictions of the Lund fragmentation model.

  8. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  9. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  10. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; /Carleton U.; Phillips, Thomas J.; /Duke U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Hbar Technol., West Chicago /IIT, Chicago /CHEP, Taegu /Luther Coll. /Michigan U. /Northwestern U. /Notre Dame U. /St. Xavier U., Chicago

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  11. New Calculation of Antiproton Production by Cosmic Ray Protons and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachelriess, Michael; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Ostapchenko, Sergey S.

    2015-04-01

    A dramatic increase in the accuracy and statistics of space-borne cosmic ray (CR) measurements has yielded several breakthroughs over the last several years. The most puzzling is the rise in the positron fraction above ∼10 GeV over the predictions of the propagation models assuming pure secondary production. The accuracy of the antiproton production cross section is critical for astrophysical applications and searches for new physics since antiprotons in CRs seem to hold the keys to many puzzles including the origin of those excess positrons. However, model calculations of antiproton production in CR interactions with interstellar gas are often employing parameterizations that are out of date or are using outdated physical concepts. This may lead to an incorrect interpretation of antiproton data which could have broad consequences for other areas of astrophysics. In this work, we calculate antiproton production in pp-, pA-, and AA-interactions using EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II-04, two of the most advanced Monte Carlo (MC) generators tuned to numerous accelerator data including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that the antiproton yields obtained with these MC generators differ by up to an order of magnitude from yields of parameterizations commonly used in astrophysics.

  12. Interaction of antiprotons with Rb atoms and a comparison of antiproton stopping powers of the atoms H, Li, Na, K, and Rb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Fischer, Nicolas; Saenz, Alejandro

    Ionization and excitation cross sections as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping powers of the alkali metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb colliding with antiprotons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. An impact-energy range from 0.25 to 4000 keV was considered. The...... target atoms are treated as effective one-electron systems using a model potential. The results are compared with calculated cross sections for antiproton-hydrogen atom collisions....

  13. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?

    CERN Document Server

    Oellers, D; Barsov, S; Bechstedt, U; Benati, P; Bertelli, S; Chiladze, D; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Dietrich, J; Dolfus, N; Dymov, S; Engels, R; Erven, W; Garishvili, A; Gebel, R; Goslawski, P; Grigoryev, K; Hadamek, H; Kacharava, A; Khoukaz, A; Kulikov, A; Langenberg, G; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Lomidze, N; Lorentz, B; Macharashvili, G; Maier, R; Martin, S; Merzliakov, S; Meshkov, I N; Meyer, H O; Mielke, M; Mikirtychiants, M; Mikirtychiants, S; Nass, A; Nekipelov, M; Nikolaev, N N; Nioradze, M; d'Orsaneo, G; Papenbrock, M; Prasuhn, D; Rathmann, F; Sarkadi, J; Schleichert, R; Smirnov, A; Seyfarth, H; Sowinski, J; Spoelgen, D; Stancari, G; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Straatmann, H; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Tagliente, G; Engblom, P Thoerngren; Trusov, S; Vasilyev, A; Weidemann, Chr; Welsch, D; Wieder, P; Wüstner, P; Zupranski, P

    2009-01-01

    We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

  14. Direct High-Precision Measurement of the g-Factor of a Single Antiproton Stored in a Cryogenic Penning Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S; Blaum, K; Quint, W; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    We propose a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment, or g-factor, of a single antiproton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. Currently the most precise value of the magnetic moment of the antiproton is extracted from hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms, and known with a relative precision of $10^{-3}$, only . With the experiment proposed in this Letter of Intent we aim at a measurement with a relative precision of $10^{-9}$ or better.

  15. Proceedings of the beam-beam interaction seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam-beam interaction has been and continues to be a performance limiting effect in colliding beam systems. Electron-positron collisions are typically more than a factor of five lower in luminosity than expectations from beam design and with present understanding, extrapolations to future systems are not satisfactory. Prediction and optimized design are even more uncertain for proton-proton and proton-antiproton future systems with the ISR at CERN being the sole precedent. The very health of the high energy physics program in the next decades depends to a significant extent on our ability to unravel the mechanisms of this phenomenon and to control them. There have been a variety of studies, including a plasma model of e+e- collisions, models emphasizing the effects of noise and a model involving a diffusion-damping equilibrium. Various nonlinear analyses of the beam-beam systems have also been performed. And finally an entirely new form of beam-beam configuration has been proposed and studied - the very strong single pass collider. In view of this extensive and broad effort, there was organized an informal seminar to bring many of these ideas into an open forum. This seminar was held at SLAC on May 22 and 23, 1980. Contributors, totaling seventeen, came from universities and national laboratories across the United States. These proceedings represent a record of the seminar. The written versions of the papers presented were submitted by the authors and are included here without editing

  16. Beam manipulation and compression using broadband rf systems in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G William Foster et al.

    2004-07-09

    A novel method for beam manipulation, compression, and stacking using a broad band RF system in circular accelerators is described. The method uses a series of linear voltage ramps in combination with moving barrier pulses to azimuthally compress, expand, or cog the beam. Beam manipulations can be accomplished rapidly and, in principle, without emittance growth. The general principle of the method is discussed using beam dynamics simulations. Beam experiments in the Fermilab Recycler Ring convincingly validate the concept. Preliminary experiments in the Fermilab Main Injector to investigate its potential for merging two ''booster batches'' to produce high intensity proton beams for neutrino and antiproton production are described.

  17. Omega spectrometer ready for SPS beams

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Two different beams arrive into the Omega magnet: - a tagged photon beam for a charm search - experiment WA4 by the Bonn-CERN-Daresbury-Ecole Polytechnique-Glasgow-Lancaster-Manchester-Orsay-Sheffield Collaboration; - a separated hadron beam, at first for a beam-dump experiment - WA12 by the Birmingham-CERN-Ecole Polytechnique-MPI, Munich-Neuchâtel Collaboration. Beams of either negative or positive pions or kaons, protons or antiprotons, all at an energy around 40 GeV were made to impinge on a copper target where a shower of hadrons was produced and, on occasion, two muons which before detection passed through an iron absorber (not visible here). WA12 was completed in February 1977. At the centre, on top of the superconducting magnet, the hut containing the TV cameras, These observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet below.

  18. First observation of two hyperfine transitions in antiprotonic 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first experimental results for microwave spectroscopy of the hyperfine structure of p-bar3He+. Due to the helium nuclear spin, p-bar3He+ has a more complex hyperfine structure than p-bar4He+, which has already been studied before. Thus a comparison between theoretical calculations and the experimental results will provide a more stringent test of the three-body quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory. Two out of four super-super-hyperfine (SSHF) transition lines of the (n,L)=(36,34) state were observed. The measured frequencies of the individual transitions are 11.12559(14) GHz and 11.15839(18) GHz, less than 1 MHz higher than the current theoretical values, but still within their estimated errors. Although the experimental uncertainty for the difference of these frequencies is still very large as compared to that of theory, its measured value agrees with theoretical calculations. This difference is crucial to be determined because it is proportional to the magnetic moment of the antiproton.

  19. Constraining pre-big-bang nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A host of dark energy models and nonstandard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of nonstandard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model

  20. Subthreshold antiproton and K- production in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subthreshold anti p and K- and energetic π- production was studied in Ne + NaF, Cu, Sn and Bi, and in Ni + Ni collisions with incident energies between 1.6 and 2 GeV/u. The measured cross sections indicate a dominant contribution of baryonic resonances. This is also consistent with a generalized scaling behaviour of the cross sections with the energy available in the collision and the energy necessary to produce particles as observed with Ne induced reactions. Deviations from scaling especially pronounced in the Ni-Ni system will be discussed in terms of absorption effects. The flat slope of the excitation function for anti p production is only understood with a reduced production threshold in the nuclear medium caused by a reduction of the antiproton mass in the dense and heated medium by about 100-150 MeV/c2. A similar in-medium mass reduction is also indicated for K- mesons. The dependence of the anti p yield on the system size is considerably weaker than expected from a simple fireball model, indicating increased reabsorption in Ni + Ni compared to Ne + NaF. (orig.)

  1. Studying the potential of antihyperons in nuclei with antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between an antibaryon and a nucleus may shed light on the short range antibaryon-baryon force in a unique way. However, because of the deep imaginary part of the nuclear potential of antibaryons, the physics of antihyperons in nuclei is hitherto an uncharted territory. Recently it was proposed to use transverse momentum correlations of exclusively produced antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-nucleus collisions to obtain information on the antihyperon potentials relative to that of the corresponding hyperon. In the present study we use the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling- Uhlenbeck Transportmodell (GiBUU) to explore the production of exclusive hyperon-antihyperon pairs close to threshold. Unlike the schematic calculation, these GiBBU simulations take e.g. important rescattering effects into account. In case of anti p + 20Ne → anti ΛΛ+X we confirm a significant sensitivity of transverse momentum correlations to the nuclear potential of Λs. We also explore the feasibility of such measurements at the PANDA experiment of the international facility FAIR.

  2. Near-threshold behavior of positronium-antiproton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, I. I.; Bray, A. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    Using the convergent close-coupling theory we study the threshold behavior of cross sections for positronium (Ps) of energy E scattering on antiprotons. In the case of Ps (1 s ) elastic scattering, simple power laws are observed for all partial waves studied. The partial-wave summed cross section is nearly constant, and dominates the antihydrogen formation cross section at all considered energies, even though the latter is exothermic and behaves as 1 /E1 /2 . For Ps (2 s ), oscillations spanning orders of magnitude on top of the 1 /E behavior are found in the elastic and quasielastic cross sections. The antihydrogen formation is influenced by dipole-supported resonances below the threshold of inelastic processes. Resonance energies form a geometric progression relative to the threshold. The exothermic antihydrogen formation cross sections behave as 1 /E at low energies, but are oscillation free. We demonstrate that all these rich features are reproduced by the threshold theory developed by Gailitis [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15, 3423 (1982), 10.1088/0022-3700/15/19/012].

  3. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  4. Antiproton constraints on dark matter annihilations from internal electroweak bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion, annihilations into two fermions and one gauge boson could have, for some choices of the parameters of the model, a non-negligible cross-section. Using a toy model of leptophilic dark matter, we calculate the constraints on the annihilation cross-section into two electrons and one weak gauge boson from the PAMELA measurements of the cosmic antiproton-to-proton flux ratio. Furthermore, we calculate the maximal astrophysical boost factor allowed in the Milky Way under the assumption that the leptophilic dark matter particle is the dominant component of dark matter in our Universe. These constraints constitute very conservative estimates on the boost factor for more realistic models where the dark matter particle also couples to quarks and weak gauge bosons, such as the lightest neutralino which we also analyze for some concrete benchmark points. The limits on the astrophysical boost factors presented here could be used to evaluate the prospects to detect a gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilations at currently operating IACTs as well as in the projected CTA

  5. Beam Loss Control for the Fermilab Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bruce C

    2013-01-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Losses were at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  6. Spectroscopy of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic 4He and 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spin magnetic moment μsp-bar of the antiproton can be determined by comparing the measured transition frequencies in p-bar4 He +  with three-body QED calculations. A comparison between the proton and antiproton can then be used as a test of CPT invariance. The highest measurement precision of the difference between the proton and the antiproton spin magnetic moments to date is 0.3%. A new experimental value of the spin magnetic moment of the antiproton was obtained as μsp-bar = -2.7862(83)/muN , slightly better than the previously best measurement. This agrees with μsp within 0.24%. In 2009, a new measurement with antiprotonic 3He has been started. A comparison between the theoretical calculations and experimental results would lead to a stronger test of the theory and address systematic errors therein. A measurement of this state will be the first HF measurement on p-bar3 He + . We report here on the new experimental setup and the first tests.

  7. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  8. ELENA: the extra low energy anti-proton facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Stephan; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, Francois; Carli, Christian; Eriksson, Tommy; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    At the last LEAP conference in Vancouver 2011 the authors stated that a project ”ELENA”, as an abbreviation for Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring and as first discussed in 1982 for LEAR by H. Herr et al., was freshly proposed with a substantial new design and revised layout and that it was under consideration to be built at CERN. ELENA is an upgrade of the Anti-proton Decelerator (AD) at CERN and is devoted to special experiments with physics using low energy anti-protons. The main topics are the anti-hydrogen production and consecutive studies of the features of this anti-matter atom as well as the anti-proton nucleon interaction by testing the QED to high precision. During the last years the project underwent several steps in presentations at different committees at CERN and was finally approved such that the construction has started. ELENA will increase the number of useful anti-protons by about two orders of magnitude and will allow to serve up to four experiments simultaneously. Very first and convinc...

  9. Antiproton Production in 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    E687 Collaboration; al, T. A. Armstrong et

    1997-01-01

    We present the first results from the E864 collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10% central 11.5 A GeV/c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4

  10. Study of Interaction of Low-Energy Antiprotons with H$^{2}$,He$^{3}$,He$^{4}$,Ne-Nuclei Using a Streamer Chamber in Magnetic Field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the systematic study of the interaction between low-energy antiprotons and the H|2,~He|3,~He|4,~Ne-nuclei using a self shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field exposed to the antiproton beam of the LEAR facility. The properties of the self shunted streamer chamber, which allows the use of the filling gas (hydrogen, helium, neon at a pressure of l~atm) as a target, permit to carry out experiments also in the very low-energy region. \\\\ \\\\ The experimental apparatus is suitable for a large programme of measurements. We plan to measure the @*H|2 cross section and the spectator momentum distributions at @* momenta lower than 250~MeV/c, where data are lacking. It is interesting to study for the first time the @*He|3 and @*He|4 interactions measuring the cross sections and the emitted particle distributions. Among other things the knowledge of the branching ratio of the @*He|4 annihilation channels clarifies some open cosmological questions. The study of the process of nuclear absor...

  11. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  12. Secondary antiproton flux induced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric secondary antiproton flux is studied for detection altitudes extending from sea level up to about three earth radii, by means of a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation, successfully applied previously to other satellite and balloon data. The calculated antiproton flux at mountain altitude is found to be in fair agreement with the recent BESS measurements. The flux obtained at balloon altitude is also in agreement with calculations performed in previous studies and used for the analysis of balloon data. The flux at sea level is found to be significant. The antineutron flux is also evaluated. The antiproton flux is prospectively explored up to around 2x104 km from the Earth. The results are discussed in the context of the forthcoming measurements by large acceptance experiments

  13. A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from \\PAMELA\\ have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleading but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the \\AMS\\ experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by \\AMS. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy depe...

  14. The Concept of Antiproton Accumulation in the RESR Storage Ring of the FAIR Project

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, Markus; Dolinskyy, Oleksiy; Franzke, Bernhard; Katayama, Takeshi; Litvinov, Sergey; Nolden, Fritz; Peschke, Claudius; Mohl, Dieter; Thorndahl, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The RESR storage ring of the FAIR projectwas designed for use as an accumulator ring for antiprotons. Therefore its optical design offers a large momentum acceptance and large flexibility in the choice of the working point. This is crucial, if longitudinal stacking with a stochastic cooling system is planned. The accumulation system has been studied in simulations which include both the properties of the optical design and details of the stochastic cooling system. The simulations confirm that the stochastic cooling system can support the accumulation with a repetition rate of 10 s for the injection of pre-cooled batches of 108 antiprotons from the collector ring CR. A maximum of intensity of 1011 accumulated antiprotons can be achieved as required for high luminosity experiments

  15. Measurements of electron spectra in the forward direction in slow-antiproton carbon-foil collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction from antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foils have been studied for projectile energies from 500 to 750 keV. Our main observation is that at the electron energy where the well-known convoy peak is observed for proton impact, the spectrum for equivelocity antiprotons is smooth, showing no indication of a deep anticusp. However, around 50 eV below the electron energy where the cusp is observed for proton impact, we have observed a small peak for antiproton impact. The energy and the relative intensity of the bump are found to be consistent with those predicted for electrons released from a wakeriding state. (author)

  16. Analysis of Subthreshold Antiproton Production in p-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions in the RBUU Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Teis, S; Maruyama, T; Mosel, U; Teis, Stefan; Cassing, Wolfgang; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Mosel, Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant RBUU approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the pbar differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton selfenergies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector selfenergies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density rho > rho_0 we examine the differential pbar spectra as a function of the antiproton selfenergy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean-field at normal nuclear matter density rho_0 which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  17. Neutron density distributions from antiprotonic 208Pb and 209Bi atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Klos, B.; Trzcinska, A.; Jastrzebski, J.; Czosnyka, T.; Kisielinski, M.; Lubinski, P.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pienkowski, L.; Hartmann, F. J.; Ketzer, B.; Ring, P.; Schmidt, R.; von Egidy, T.; Smolanczuk, R.; S. Wycech

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray cascade from antiprotonic atoms was studied for 208Pb and 209Bi. Widths and shifts of the levels due to the strong interaction were determined. Using modern antiproton-nucleus optical potentials the neutron densities in the nuclear periphery were deduced. Assuming two parameter Fermi distributions (2pF) describing the proton and neutron densities the neutron rms radii were deduced for both nuclei. The difference of neutron and proton rms radii /\\r_np equal to 0.16 +-(0.02)_{stat} +-...

  18. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  19. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV.......A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  20. Small angle elastic scattering at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton-antiproton elastic scattering at a centre of mass energy √s=540 GeV has been studied at low momentum transfer. The measured value of the logarithmic slope of the differential elastic cross-section, b = 17.1 +- 0.9 GeV-2 for 0.04 2, b = 12.9 +- 0.3 GeV-2 for 0.19 2 confirms the previous evidence from the UA1 and UA4 collaborations for an increase at small t. A preliminary estimate of the proton-antiproton total cross-section shows an increase of about 50% from ISR to Collider energy. (orig.)

  1. Proton-Antiproton Pair Production in Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> e+e- proton antiproton is studied with the L3 detector at LEP. The analysis is based on data collected at e+e- center-of-mass energies from 183 GeV to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 667 pb-1. The gamma gamma -> proton antiproton differential cross section is measured in the range of the two-photon center-of-mass energy from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV. The results are compared to the predictions of the three-quark and quark-diquark models.

  2. Anti-proton production and annihilation in nuclear collisions at 15-A/GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Jahns, André; Stöcker, Horst; Greiner, Walter; Sorge, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    We present a calculation of antiproton yields in Si+Al and Si+Au collisions at 14.5A GeV in the framework of the relativistic quantum molecular dynamics approach (RQMD). Multistep processes lead to the formation of high-mass flux tubes. Their decay dominates the initial antibaryon yield. However, the subsequent annihilation in the surrounding baryon-rich matter suppresses the antiproton yield considerably: Two-thirds of all antibaryons are annihilated even for the light Si+Al system. Comparis...

  3. The ratio Ri for nondissociative ionization of molecular hydrogen by antiproton/proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical ratio Ri of antiproton/proton cross sections for nondissociative ionization of hydrogen molecule has been obtained as a function of the impact energy E in the range 30 ≤ E ≤ 2500 keV lab. The required cross sections were computed in the close-coupling formulation of the semiclassical impact parameter theory using a simple one-active electron model for the molecular target. The ratio Ri is important for the analysis of the recent experimental data of Andersen et al. on antiproton scattering and the understanding of the collisional mechanisms in the keV range. (orig.)

  4. Antiproton Production in Au+Au Collisions at 11.7a GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiproton production in 11.7A GeV/c Au+Au collisions over a wide transverse-mass coverage was studied using the AGS-E866 experimental apparatus. The mean transverse kinetic energy increases as a function of centrality and is similar to that of protons. The antiproton yields in Si+Al , Si+Au , and Au+Au collisions are consistent with scaling with the 0.7 power of the number of participant nucleons. Copyright 1998, The American Physical Society

  5. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  6. Observation of antiproton annihilation in heavy nuclei at 100 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the observation of antiproton annihilation in Mg, Ag, and Au nuclei at 100 GeV/c. The experiment was performed with the Fermilab 30'' bubble chamber spectrometer and associated Downstream Particle Identifiers. By identifying events without a leading anti p or anti n we have determined that (39+-6)% of the antiprotons annihilate in a heavy nucleus. We present this fraction as a function of atomic mass number and discuss the associated charged particle multiplicity. 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Activity of beam uses for innovating frontier industry and knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of quantum beam technology, available research fields, various methods to promote use and persons of talent are stated. Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) and RI Beam Factory (RIBF) are in progressing in Japan. J-PARC is one of three large neutron resources; the others are SNS (USA) and ISIS (England). RI beam generation system factory of RIBF will be established in 2006, and Rare Isotope Accelerator (NSCL, USA), Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, Germany) and SPIRALII (French) are in progressing. The quantum beam technology will be used in the research fields such as nanotechnology, materials, life science, medical technology, environment and energy. The platform to promote use of quantum beam, establishment of trial use, a society for the study of beam use, seminars, mail service, and other methods for use of beam is described. (S.Y.)

  8. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  9. Optics of electron beam in the Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of ∼0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within ∼0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as ∼0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved

  10. Beam life time studies and design optimization of the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, C. P.; Papash, A. I.; Harasimowicz, J.; Karamyshev, O.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Newton, D.; Panniello, M.; Putignano, M.; Siggel-King, M. R. F.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR) at the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) will provide cooled beams of antiprotons in the energy range between 300 keV down to 20 keV. Based on the original design concept developed in 2005, the USR has been completely redesigned over the past few years by the QUASAR Group. The ring structure is now based on a 'split achromat' lattice. This ensures compact ring dimensions of 10 m × 10 m, whilst allowing both, in-ring experiments with gas jet targets and studies with extracted beams. In the USR, a wide range of beam parameters shall be provided, ranging from very short pulses in the nanosecond regime to a coasting beam. In addition, a combined fast and slow extraction scheme will be featured that allows for providing external experiments with cooled beams of different time structure. Detailed investigations into the dynamics of low energy beams, including studies into the long term beam dynamics and ion kinetics, beam life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with an internal target were carried out. This required the development of new simulation tools to further the understanding of beam storage with electrostatic fields. In addition, studies into beam diagnostics methods for the monitoring of ultra-low energy ions at beam intensities less than 10 6 were carried out. This includes instrumentation for the early commissioning of the machine, as well as for later operation with antiprotons. In this paper, on overview of the technical design of the USR is given with emphasis on two of the most important operating modes, long term beam dynamics and the design of the beam diagnostics system.

  11. Anti-proton tune measurements for the Fall 1995 accelerator studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, john; /Fermilab

    1996-04-01

    A system to measure the tunes of a single antiproton (or proton) bunch was built and has been commissioned. The system achieved high sensitivity with a novel closed-orbit suppression system. The use of high bandwidth directional pickpus and kickers in conjunction with precise timing gates enabled the measurement of the tune of a single bunch.

  12. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years

  13. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  14. Real time imaging of stopping distributions in biological targets for antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellner, Stefan; Boll, Rebecca; Tegami, Sara [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, Carsten P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Antiprotons are interesting particles that have special properties when used in possible cancer particle therapy. They behave almost the same as protons in the entrance channel but deposit additional annihilation energy when they come to rest in the Bragg peak region. Thus, the number of antiprotons can be reduced while still delivering the same target dose to the tumor. Healthy tissue in the entrance channel is finally less harmed compared to protons which is a ultimate goal for good cancer treatment. Additionally, annihilation energy partially goes into the creation of new particles, especially pions. They exit the body mostly non-interacting and can be detected with an external detector, enabling a real time supervision of the irradiation process. This is currently not possible in any particle treatment method. In our contribution we present model calculations for a low-cost real time detector setup and compare these to results from the recent experiment carried out with the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) Collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN as well as develop improved set-ups for future experiments.

  15. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.; Krizmanic, J.F.; Krombel, K.; Ormes, J.F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Labrador, A.W.; Davis, A.J.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Schindler, S.M.; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J.; Webber, W.R.; Menn, W.; Hof, M.; Reimer, O.; Simon, M.; Rasmussen, Ib Lundgaard

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 Ge...

  16. Can a Higgs portal Dark Matter be compatible with the anti-proton cosmic-ray?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent direct detection experiments of Dark Matter (DM), CoGeNT and DAMA implicate a light DM of a few GeV. Such a light DM would generate a large amount of anti-proton since suppression for anti-proton flux from DM annihilation is ineffective. We discuss whether a light dark matter with mass of 5-15 GeV, which is especially in favor of the recent experiments reported by CoGeNT, is compatible with the anti-proton no excess in the cosmic-ray. In view of the direct detection of DM and no anti-proton excess in the cosmic-ray both, we show that a Dirac DM is favored than a scalar one since there is no s-wave of the annihilation cross section for the Dirac DM. A large elastic cross section for direct detection can be obtained through the additional light Higgs exchange. We show an allowed region that simultaneously satisfies the DM relic density, the elastic cross section favored by CoGeNT and also the constraint of HLZZ coupling of the light Higgs boson by LEP.

  17. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  18. A new method to measure the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton at very low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new possible method to measure in lab the gravitational acceleration ''g'' of the antiproton is presented assuming that very low energy particles can be used. A schematic lay-out is described and preliminary results on ''g'' obtained by a simple simulation are given. The features of the method and its possible experimental problems are discussed

  19. Radionuclides in the Cooling Water Systems for the NuMi Beamline and the Antiproton Production Target Station at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Bessho, Kotaro; Sekimoto, Shun; Yashima, Hiroshi; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Oishi, Koji; Boehnlein, David; Lauten, Gary; Leveling, Anthony; Mokhov, Nikolai; Vaziri, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    At the 120-GeV proton accelerator facilities of Fermilab, USA, water samples were collected from the cooling water systems for the target, magnetic horn1, magnetic horn2, decay pipe, and hadron absorber at the NuMI beamline as well as from the cooling water systems for the collection lens, pulse magnet and collimator, and beam absorber at the antiproton production target station, just after the shutdown of the accelerators for a maintenance period. Specific activities of {\\gamma} -emitting radionuclides and 3H in these samples were determined using high-purity germanium detectors and a liquid scintillation counter. The cooling water contained various radionuclides depending on both major and minor materials in contact with the water. The activity of the radionuclides depended on the presence of a deionizer. Specific activities of 3H were used to estimate the residual rates of 7Be. The estimated residual rates of 7Be in the cooling water were approximately 5% for systems without deionizers and less than 0.1% f...

  20. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  1. Can we explain AMS-02 antiproton and positron excesses simultaneously by nearby supernovae without pulsars nor dark matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Kohri, Kazunori; Fujita, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    We explain the excess of the antiproton fraction recently reported by the AMS-02 experiment by considering collisions between cosmic-ray protons accelerated by a local supernova remnant (SNR) and the surrounding dense cloud. The same "pp collisions" provide the right branching ratio to fit the observed positron excess simultaneously without a fine tuning. The supernova happened in relatively lower metalicity than the major cosmic-ray sources. The cutoff energy of electrons marks the supernova age of ~10^{5} years, while the antiproton excess may extend to higher energy. Both antiproton and positron fluxes are completely consistent with our predictions in Fujita, Kohri, Yamazaki and Ioka (2009).

  2. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  3. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  4. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U90+ beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  5. The Fermilab Main Injector: high intensity operation and beam loss control

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bruce C; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at ~400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  6. Branching ratios and correlations in antiproton-proton annihilations at 1.6GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary results on branching ratios and correlations, obtained from the antiproton-proton annihilation experiment in Gargamelle at 1.6GeV/c, are compared with the predictions of two statistical models and of a thermodynamical model

  7. Multifragmentation with GeV light-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Hsi, W.-C.; Wang, G.; Lefort, T.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Foxford, E. Renshaw; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R.; Korteling, R.G.; Pollacco, E.C.; Legrain, R.; Volant, C.; Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Laforest, R.; Martin, E.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Ruangma, A.; Winchester, E.; Yennello, S.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Breuer, H.; Morley, K.B.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Pienkowski, L.; Brzychczyk, J.; Botvina, A.; Friedman, W.A

    1999-07-26

    Multifragmentation studies with GeV light-ion beams indicate that for the most violent collisions, complex fragments are emitted during expansion of the hot source, followed by near simultaneous breakup of the system near {rho}/{rho}{sub o} {approx} ((1)/(3)). The results are compared with hybrid INC/EES and INC/SMM models. Preliminary data for the 8 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} and p-bar reactions on {sup 197}Au show enhanced deposition energy for the antiproton beam.

  8. Multifragmentation with GeV light-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifragmentation studies with GeV light-ion beams indicate that for the most violent collisions, complex fragments are emitted during expansion of the hot source, followed by near simultaneous breakup of the system near ρ/ρo ∼ ((1)/(3)). The results are compared with hybrid INC/EES and INC/SMM models. Preliminary data for the 8 GeV/c π- and p-bar reactions on 197Au show enhanced deposition energy for the antiproton beam

  9. Multifragmentation with GeV light-ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowski, K; Wang, G; Lefort, T; Bracken, D S; Cornell, E; Foxford, E R; Ginger, D S; Viola, V E; Yoder, N R; Korteling, R G; Pollacco, E C; Legrain, R; Volant, C; Gimeno-Nogues, F; Laforest, R; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J; Lynch, W G; Tsang, M B; Xi, H; Breuer, H; Morley, K B; Gushue, S; Remsberg, L P; Pienkowski, L; Brzychczyk, J; Botvina, A; Friedman, W A

    1999-01-01

    Multifragmentation studies with GeV light-ion beams indicate that for the most violent collisions, complex fragments are emitted during expansion of the hot source, followed by near simultaneous breakup of the system near rho/rho sub o approx ((1)/(3)). The results are compared with hybrid INC/EES and INC/SMM models. Preliminary data for the 8 GeV/c pi sup - and p-bar reactions on sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au show enhanced deposition energy for the antiproton beam.

  10. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wolbers, Stephen; Barker, B; Bledsoe, S; Boes, T; Bowden, Mark; Cancelo, Gugstavo I; Dürling, G; Forster, B; Haynes, B; Hendricks, B; Kasza, T; Kutschke, Robert K; Mahlum, R; Martens, Michael A; Mengel, M; Olsen, M; Pavlicek, V; Pham, T; Piccoli, Luciano; Steimel, Jim; Treptow, K; Votava, Margaret; Webber, Robert C; West, B; Zhang, D

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980s, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  11. Atomic approaches in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms. REPLY to 'analysis of the lifetimes and fractions of antiprotons trapped in metastable antiprotonic-helium states' by I. Shimamura and M. Kimura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present note the authors clarify the purpose of YO and complement its essential points, thus showing that the criticisms of SK are inappropriate. The paper YO [1] was aimed at discussing some new aspects related to the metastability of hadronic helium atoms which had been discovered when negative kaons [2], negative pions [3] and antiprotons [4] were stopped in liquid helium. The delayed fraction, time spectrum shape and lifetimes were the observables. Further experimental studies are in progress [5], and as of today there is no successful explanation for these interesting phenomena. So, YO tried to give brief and rather qualitative estimates for the observations in an intuitive way, considering only the leading terms. The following problems are discussed in as simple a manner as possible, starting from the exotic-atom viewpoints of Condo [6] and Russell [7]: i)the atomic core polarization effect, ii)the structure and radiative lifetimes, iii)the non-statistical distribution of the angular momentum and an estimate of the delayed fraction, and iv)the isotope effect, though the title represents only i). To respond to the comments of SK, it is important to consider the correspondence between the atomic approach and the molecular approach for the metastable antiprotonic helium atom of Condo-Russell. We therefore begin this note with a discussion of this aspect. (author)

  12. Time separated anti p beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1974, Fainberg and Kalogeropoulos measured the time structure of a resonant extracted beam from the AGS with the RF kept on the maintain tight bunching. The external pulses were found to be unexpectedly narrow (FWHM = 2.4 nsec after correction for counter resolution). An explanation for this and some pertinent comments were put forth by Barton in a subsequent report. The original motivation for the study was to examine the extent to which single counter time of flight (TOF) measurements would be feasible, making it possible to measure velocities of neutral secondary particles from a target. The encouraging result led later to a proposal by Kalogeropoulos to use the tightly bunched protons to produce a secondary time separated beam (TSB) of anti-protons, i.e., a beam with a long flight path over which the lower velocity particles (anti p's) separate longitudinally from the more numberous fast particles (π's) so that the anti p interactions can be studied independently by suitably gated detectors. Production and transport of such a beam is described

  13. Photoproduction of proton-antiproton Paris on hydrogen in the energy region 4.74 - 6.55 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs on hydrogen has been investigated in the elastic reaction γp → p anti p p. In an experiment at the Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY this reaction has been identified. The distribution of the p anti p invariant mass has been measured and the basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified. The kinematic region for the experiment was: 4.74 2. The experiment used a tagged photon beam, a magnetic spectrometer with proportional- and spark-chambers, a time of flight system, and a Cerenkov counter. From a total number of 1.5 x 106 triggers about 65 events of the reaction γp → p anti p p have been identified by using the following criteria: The mass of at least the negative outgoing particle, computed from the time of flight information, was about the proton mass and the kinematic analysis of the event yielded the largest probability for the hypothesis γp → p anti p p in comparison with the competing reactions. The basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified through a comparison of the experimental momentum- and four momentum transfer distributions with the corresponding distributions of simulated events. The simulated events have been generated by Monte Carlo methods according of forward or backward p anti p photoproduction. The result of the comparison was that in the investigated reaction a proton-antiproton pair is produced in backward direction in the c.m. system and the angular distribution of the anti p in the p anti p rest system is nearly isotropic. The identification of the basic reaction dynamics, allowed us to determine which of the two outgoing protons has been produced together with the antiproton by the photon. Therefore it was possible to calculate the invariant mass of the proton-anti-proton pair unambiguously. The resulting p anti p mass distribution shows within our statistics no significant structures which would indicate

  14. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  15. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  16. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  17. Double excitation of He and H- by fast proton and anti-proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigation has been made on double excitation processes of He and H- by fast proton and anti-proton impact in the MeV/u-energy region. The cross sections are calculated by use of both the close-coupling and the perturbation expansion methods, and the wave functions of target atoms are generated based on the hyperspherical coordinate method. The excitation to the 2p21De state of H- by anti-proton impact is dominant by about three times in comparison with that by proton impact at the incident energy of 0.1 MeV/u. The spectral shape of an ejected electron from the 2s2p 1po state of H- at the incident energy of 1.5 MeV/u is consistent with the line profile of the H- photodetachment observed by Bryant et al

  18. Anti- and Hypermatter Research at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheimer, J.; Xu, Z.; Rau, P.; Sturm, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2013-07-01

    Within the next six years, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is built adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt, Germany. Thus, the current research goals and the technical possibilities are substantially expanded. With its worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, FAIR will provide a wide range of unprecedented fore-front research in the fields of hadron, nuclear, atomic, plasma physics and applied sciences which are summarized in this article. As an example this article presents research efforts on strangeness at FAIR using heavy ion collisions, exotic nuclei from fragmentation and antiprotons to tackle various topics in this area. In particular, the creation of hypernuclei, metastable exotic multi-hypernuclear objects (MEMOs) and antimatter is investigated.

  19. Ionization of helium by slow antiproton impact: total and differential cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Borbély, S; Nagele, S; Tőkési, K; Nagy, L; Burgdörfer, J

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the single and double ionization of the He atom by antiproton impact for projectile energies ranging from $3$~keV up to $1000$~keV. We obtain accurate total cross sections by directly solving the fully correlated two-electron time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and by performing classical trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations. The obtained quantum-mechanical results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Along with the total cross sections, we also present the first fully \\textit{ab initio} doubly differential data for single ionization at 10 and 100~keV impact energies. In these differential cross sections we identify the binary-encounter peak along with the anticusp minimum. Furthermore, we also point out the importance of the post-collisional electron-projectile interaction at low antiproton energies which significantly suppresses electron emission in the forward direction.

  20. Nucleon density in the nuclear periphery determined with antiprotonic x-rays: cadmium and tin isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, R.; Trzcinska, A.; Czosnyka, T.; von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F. J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Ketzer, B.; Kisielinski, M.; Klos, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Lubinski, P.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pienkowski, L.; Smolanczuk, R.

    2002-01-01

    The x-ray cascade from antiprotonic atoms was studied for 106Cd, 116Cd, 112Sn, 116Sn, 120Sn, and 124Sn. Widths and shifts of the levels due to strong interaction were deduced. Isotopic effects in the Cd and Sn isotopes are clearly seen. The results are used to investigate the nucleon density in the nuclear periphery. The deduced neutron distributions are compared with the results of the previously introduced radiochemical method and with HFB calculations.

  1. Strangeness production in antiproton-tantalum interactions at 4 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general measure of strangeness production in antiproton-nucleus interactions is given which is unaffected by strangeness exchange reactions occurring after the initial annihilation. An intranuclear cascade model of anti p-nucleus interactions has also been developed. Both approaches are applied to data on strange particle yields and rapidity distributions obtained in 4 GeV/c anti p-Ta collisions. No evidence is seen for exotic phenomena. (orig.)

  2. Neutral strange particle production in antiproton-nucleus annihilation at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the Λ- and KS0-meson production in antiproton annihilation on nuclei at low energies (Epbar- and K-meson rescattering, Λ production in reactions with π- and ω-mesons is also considered. It is shown that these processes ensure a significant Λ-production even in the low energy region well below the ΛΛ-bar-threshold. 18 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Shift and broadening of resonance lines of the antiprotonic helium atoms in liquid He-4

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczak, Andrzej; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2013-01-01

    The shift and broadening of the resonance lines in spectrum of the antiprotonic helium atoms $\\bar{p}\\mathrm{He}^{+}$ located in fluid and superfluid $^4$He have been calculated. The contributions to the shift and broadening from collective degrees of freedom in liquid $^4$He have been estimated using the phenomenological response function. Effects due to the interaction of $\\bar{p}\\mathrm{He}^{+}$ with a single $^4$He atom have been calculated in the quasistatic approximation using the exper...

  4. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  5. Diffraction slopes for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at low momentum transfer values. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slopes is approximated by various analytic functions. The expanded "standard" logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range reasonably. Various approximations differ from each other both in the low energy and very high...

  6. Transverse momentum spectra for charged particles at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured transverse momentum spectra up to 10 GeV/c for charged particles produced centrally in proton-antiproton collisions at 540 GeV in the centre of mass at the CERN collider. Our results are compared with data at ISR energies and with the predictions of a QCD model. The charged particle spectrum shows a clear dependence on charged track multiplicity. (orig.)

  7. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  8. Unified interpretation of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton recent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use our numerical code, DRAGON, to study the implications and the impact of recent CREAM and PAMELA data on our knowledge of the propagation properties of cosmic ray nuclei with energy >or similar 1 GeV/n in the Galaxy. We will show that B/C (as well as N/O and C/O) and anti p/p data (especially including recent PAMELA results) can consistently be matched within a unique diffusion-reacceleration model. The requirement that light nuclei and anti p data are both reproduced within experimental uncertainties places stringent limits on suitable propagation parameters. In particular, we find the allowed range of the diffusion coefficient spectral index to be 0.38A ≅15 kms-1) is allowed. Furthermore, we do not need to introduce any ad hoc break in the injection spectrum of primary cosmic rays. If antiproton data are not used to constrain the propagation parameters, a larger set of models is allowed. In this case, we determine which combinations of the relevant parameters maximize and minimize the antiproton flux under the condition of still fitting light nuclei data at 95% C.L. These models may then be used to constrain a possible extra antiproton component arising from astrophysical or exotic sources (e.g. dark matter annihilation or decay). (orig.)

  9. Measurements of Wake-Riding Electrons in Antiproton-Carbon-Foil Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When a charged particle passes through dielectric media, e.g. a thin carbon foil, a ``wake'' is induced. The characteristic wake-potential shows an oscillatory behaviour, with a wavelength of about $ 2 \\pi v _{p} / \\omega _{p} _{l} $ where $ v _{p} $ is the projectile velocity and $ \\omega _{p} _{l} $ the plasmon energy of the target. This induced wake potential is superimposed on the Coulomb potential of the projectile, the latter leading to a pronounced ``cusp'' of electrons leaving the solid at $ v _{e} app v _{p} $ for positively charged projectiles in the MeV region. Correspondingly, an ``anti-cusp'' is expected for antiprotons. \\\\ \\\\ In the solid, the wake-potential leads to an attractive force on electrons, and a dynamic electronic state is predicted both for proton and antiproton projectiles. In the solid, the wake-riding electrons are travelling with the projectile speed $ v _{p} $ Upon exit of the foil, the electron released from the wake-riding state of an antiproton will suddenly find itself in th...

  10. Limits on dark matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    Herein we derive limits on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs), which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high-energy positron/antiproton fraction/ratio data. We parametrize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the galprop code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95% confidence level upper limits of possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Under the assumption taken in this work, we find that our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma ray Pass 8 data observation on the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime for mχ100 GeV ), where mχ is the rest mass of dark matter particles. We also find that constrains on DM parameters from AMS-02 data would become more stringent when the solar modulation is weak. Using these results, we also put limits on the effective field theory of dark matter.

  11. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional $SO(5) \\times U(1)$ gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW^+W^- and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for $m_H > m_W$. The most dominant annihilation channel is $H H \\to W^+ W^-$ followed by the subsequent decays of the $W$ bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70-90 GeV.

  12. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman; Song, Jeonghyeon [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk university, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tseng, Po-Yan, E-mail: cheung@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: jeonghyeon.song@gmail.com, E-mail: d9722809@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-01

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW{sup +}W{sup −} and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for m{sub H} > m{sub W}. The most dominant annihilation channel is HH → W{sup +}W{sup −} followed by the subsequent decays of the W bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70–90 GeV.

  13. Cosmic positron and antiproton constraints on the gauge-Higgs dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the cosmic ray positron and antiproton spectra of a gauge-Higgs dark matter candidate in a warped five-dimensional SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs unification model. The stability of the gauge-Higgs boson is guaranteed by the H parity under which only the Higgs boson is odd at low energy. The 4-point vertices of HHW+W− and HHZZ, allowed by H parity conservation, have the same magnitude as in the standard model, which yields efficient annihilation rate for mH > mW. The most dominant annihilation channel is HH → W+W− followed by the subsequent decays of the W bosons into positrons or quarks, which undergo fragmentation into antiproton. Comparing with the observed positron and antiproton spectra with the PAMALA and Fermi/LAT, we found that the Higgs boson mass cannot be larger than 90 GeV, in order not to overrun the observations. Together with the constraint on not overclosing the Universe, the valid range of the dark matter mass is restricted to 70–90 GeV

  14. A new calculation of the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum in the Galaxy and heliospheric modulation effects on this spectrum using a drift plus wavy current sheet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected interstellar antiproton spectrum arising from cosmic-ray interactions in the Galaxy is recalculated, and the modulation of both antiprotons and protons is calculated using a two-dimensional modulation model incorporating gradient and curvature drifts and a wavy current sheet as well as the usual diffusion, convection, and energy-loss effects. Significant differences in the antiproton/proton ratio for different solar magnetic field polarities are predicted as well as a 'low-energy' component for antiprotons below about 1 GeV. 28 refs

  15. A new calculation of the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum in the Galaxy and heliospheric modulation effects on this spectrum using a drift plus wavy current sheet model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, W.R.; Potgieter, M.S. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham (USA); Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education (South Africa))

    1989-09-01

    The expected interstellar antiproton spectrum arising from cosmic-ray interactions in the Galaxy is recalculated, and the modulation of both antiprotons and protons is calculated using a two-dimensional modulation model incorporating gradient and curvature drifts and a wavy current sheet as well as the usual diffusion, convection, and energy-loss effects. Significant differences in the antiproton/proton ratio for different solar magnetic field polarities are predicted as well as a 'low-energy' component for antiprotons below about 1 GeV. 28 refs.

  16. The design and performance of the FNAL high-energy polarized beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new polarized-proton and -antiproton beam with 185-GeV/c momentum in the Fermilab MP beam line which is currently operational. The design uses the parity-conserving decay of lambda and antilambda hyperons to produce polarized protons and antiprotons, respectively. A beam-transport system minimizes depolarization effects and uses a set of 12 dipole magnets that rotate the beam-particle spin direction. A beam-tagging system determines the momentum and polarization of individual beam particles, allowing a selection of particles in definite intervals at momentum and polarization. We measured polarization of the beam by using two types of polarimeters, which verified the determination of polarization by a beam-particle tagging system. Two of these processes are the inverse-Primakoff effect and the Coulomb-nuclear interference (CNI) in elastic proton-proton scattering. Another experiment measured the π0 production asymmetry of large-xF values; this process may now be used as an on-line beam polarimeter. 9 refs., 9 figs

  17. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio [National Institute of Nuclear Physics INFN-LNS, Catania 95125 (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  18. Study of muons associated with jets in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of heavy quark flavors in proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 x 1012 electron volts is studied for events containing hadronic jets with a nearby muon track, where both the jet and the muon are produced at large angles from the incident beams. The muon tracking system and pattern recognition are described. Detailed calculations of the muon background due to meson decay and hadron noninteractive punchthrough are presented, and other background sources are evaluated. Distributions of muon transverse momentum relative to the beam and to the jet axis agree with QCD expectations of semileptonic charm and beauty decay. Muon identification cuts and background subtraction leave 57.5 ± 17.1 muon-jet pairs, a rate consistent with the established production cross sections for charm and beauty quarks and the acceptance for minimum ionizing particles overlapping with nearby jets. A small dimuon sample clarifies the muon signature. No signatures of undiscovered phenomena are observed in this new energy domain. 39 refs., 51 figs., 12 tabs

  19. Applications of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle accelerator was invented almost seven decades ago with the primary purpose to break the atomic nucleus. The broader inspiration, however, was to understand the structure of matter and the nature around us. Since then the accelerators have evolved enormously in terms of types, intricacies and sizes. They continue to play, primarily, the same role now also but have necessitated, over the years, invention and development of a large number of technologies that are being driven to cutting edge to meet the demands of scientists to carry their researches to unprecedented frontiers in various branches of science. While the first ever accelerator was built to break a 'simple' nucleus of lithium atom, the accelerators of today are trying to recreate the 'big bang' in the laboratory. They have been serving the scientists over the decades to discover new particles and fields. Charged particle accelerators are very commonly used to generate secondary beams for basic research and applications. The secondary beams include neutrons, antiprotons, mesons, neutrinos etc. In view of the experimentalists needs, accelerators have been developed both for electrons as well as ions. While the basic technologies do not differ much, the two varieties offer their own challenges. For each variety, the accelerator can be of linear type or circular type. Generally, a given accelerator accelerates either electrons or ions. In this report we shall be concerned only with the ion accelerators - more specifically about their applications. The accelerators most commonly used to accelerate ions are Cockroft Walton accelerator, Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, Van-de- Graaff accelerator, linear accelerator (linac), cyclotron and synchrotron. In many situations they may operate in combination and, rarely, there exists hybrid variety also. (author)

  20. Uniform longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler using adaptive rf correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Martin; Broemmelsiek, Daniel Robert; Chase, Brian; Crisp, James L.; Eddy, Nathan; Joireman, Paul W.; Ng, King Yuen; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet based 8 GeV anti-proton storage ring. A wideband RF system, driven with ARB's (ARBitrary waveform generators), allows the system to produce programmable barrier waveforms. Beam current profile distortion was observed, its origin verified both experimentally and theoretically, and an FPGA-based correction system was designed, tested and implemented to level the bunch profile.

  1. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Thurman-Keup, R; Hahn, A; Hurh, P; Lorman, E; Lundberg, C; Meyer, T; Miller, D; Pordes, S; Valishev, A

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measur...

  2. Nonlinear beam-beam resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head-on collisions of bunched beams are considered, assuming the two colliding beams have opposite charges. A few experimental observations are described. The single resonance analysis is developed that is applicable to the strong-weak case of the beam-beam interaction. In this case, the strong beam is unperturbed by the beam-beam interaction; motions of the weak beam particles are then analyzed in the presence of the nonlinear electromagnetic force produced by the strong beam at the collision points. The coherent motions of the two coupled strong beams are shown to exhibit distinct nonlinear resonance behavior. 16 refs., 22 figs

  3. Can we explain AMS-02 antiproton and positron excesses simultaneously by nearby supernovae without pulsars or dark matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Ioka, Kunihito; Fujita, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    We explain the excess of the antiproton fraction recently reported by the AMS-02 experiment by considering collisions between cosmic-ray protons accelerated by a local supernova remnant and the surrounding dense cloud. The same "pp collisions" provide the right ratio of daughter particles to fit the observed positron excess simultaneously in the natural model parameters. The supernova happened in relatively lower metallicity than the major cosmic-ray sources. The cutoff energy of electrons marks the supernova age of {˜ }105 years, while the antiproton excess may extend to higher energy. Both antiproton and positron fluxes are completely consistent with our predictions in an earlier paper [Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Rev. D 80, 063003 (2009) [arXiv:0903.5298 [astro-ph.HE

  4. Quark versus hadron degrees of freedom in antiproton-proton annihilation's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into two mesons are presented with special emphasis on the importance of dynamical selection rules. These selection rules reduce the frequency of some annihilation rates for otherwise allowed annihilation modes by one order of magnitude. It is shown that SU(3) breaking cannot be held responsible for such large effects. This fact motivates an analysis of anti-pp branching ratios by SU(3) amplitudes. Different SU(3) coupling schemes and their interpretation are presented. A coupling scheme tracing the quark flux from the initial to the final state gives the best interpretation of the data and of the dynamical selection rules. (author)

  5. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300-318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3T/M<0.7. The particle rates have been extracted and interpreted in terms of the coalescence model. The (anti)deuteron production yield is smaller than the (anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements. (orig.)

  6. Ring imaging Cherenkov counter of HERMES for pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Toshi-Aki

    2014-12-01

    RICH of HERMES was built for identification of pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton in the momentum range of 2–15 GeV/c. It was a dual-radiator RICH. The radiators were aerogel and C{sub 4}F{sub 10} gas. Produced hadrons in electron–nucleon deep inelastic scattering were identified by the RICH and spin structure of the nucleon was studied by correlation between the directions of the target spin, scattered electron and produced hadrons.

  7. Search for a light Higgs boson at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have searched for a light standard-model Higgs boson produced in association with an intermediate vector boson at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. The search was made by looking for an excess of isolated high-transverse-momentum charged-track pairs in W and Z events. A Higgs boson with a mass mH in the intervals 2mμH2 and 846 MeV/c2HK is excluded at 90% C.L

  8. GAPS - Dark matter search with low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons

    OpenAIRE

    von Doetinchem, P.; Aramaki, T.; Boggs, S.; Fuke, H.; Hailey, C. J.; Mognet, S. I.; Ong, R. A.; K. Perez; Zweerink, J.

    2015-01-01

    The GAPS experiment is foreseen to carry out a dark matter search by measuring low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons with a novel detection approach. It will provide a new avenue to access a wide range of different dark matter models and masses from about 10GeV to 1TeV. The theoretically predicted antideuteron flux resulting from secondary interactions of primary cosmic rays is very low. Well-motivated theories beyond the Standard Model contain viable dark matter candidates, whi...

  9. Basic physics program for a low energy antiproton source in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize much of the important science that could be learned at a North American low energy antiproton source. It is striking that there is such a diverse and multidisciplinary program that would be amenable to exploration. Spanning the range from high energy particle physics to nuclear physics, atomic physics, and condensed matter physics, the program promises to offer many new insights into these disparate branches of science. It is abundantly clear that the scientific case for rapidly proceeding towards such a capability in North America is both alluring and strong. 38 refs., 2 tabs

  10. What do we learn from proton-antiproton diffractive scattering at the CERN colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We point out that the recent proton-antiproton collision experiments at the ISR allow for the first time a comparison with proton-proton collisions and make it possible to test very general predictions based on axiomatic field theory and also to confirm certain aspects of conventional models and to eliminate certain unorthodox possibilities . We also discuss what will be the output of the measurement of total cross-sections and elastic scattering at the SPS panti p collider, and describe what might happen in the ultra-high energy limit. (orig.)

  11. Effect of static electric field on cross sections in antiproton impact ionization of atomic helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the effect of static electric fields in different geometrical features on the collisional ionization of helium atoms by antiproton. The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method with a model interaction potential has been used to simulate the differential and total ionization cross sections in antiproton–helium atom collisions in the energy range of 10–500 keV with and without electric fields. The calculated ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the recently reported experimental and theoretical results. The effects of the external electric fields are seen to be quite prominent.

  12. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  13. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-, C; Estrada; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300--318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements.

  14. Expected Enhancement of the Primary Antiproton Flux at the Solar Minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsui, T.; Maki, K.; Orito, S.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the solar-modulated energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$'s) from two candidate primary sources, i.e., evaporating primordial black holes and the annihilation of neutralino dark matter, as well as for the secondary $\\bar{p}$'s produced by cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar gas. A large enhancement toward the solar minimum phase emerges in the low-energy flux of $\\bar{p}$'s from the primary sources, whereas the flux of the secondary $\\bar{p}$'s, falling steepl...

  15. Antiproton--proton annihilation into pion pairs within effective meson theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ying; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Antiproton--proton annihilation into light mesons is revisited in the few GeV energy domain, in view of a global description of the existing data. An effective meson model is developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees od freedom in $s$, $t$, and $u$ channels. Regge factors are added to reproduce the proper energy behavior and the forward and backward peaked behavior. A comparison with existing data and predictions for angular distributions and energy dependence are done for charged and neutral pion pair production.

  16. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  17. Antiproton and positron signal enhancement in dark matter mini-spikes scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Pierre [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules LAPP, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, 74941 Annecy-le-vieux (France); Bertone, Gianfranco [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy)]|[Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095-CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75014 Paris (France); Lavalle, Julien [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille CPPM, Universite de la Mediterannee, CNRS/IN2P3, 13288 Marseille (France); Salati, Pierre; Taillet, Richard [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique LAPTH, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, 74941 Annecy-le-vieux (France)

    2007-04-15

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a 'boost factor' that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of {approx}100 'mini-spikes' around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value. (authors)

  18. Antiproton and positron signal enhancement in dark matter mini-spikes scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a 'boost factor' that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of ∼100 'mini-spikes' around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value. (authors)

  19. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  20. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    V of energy. About 30 MeV of this energy is deposited in the vicinity of the Bragg-peak, thereby significantly enhancing it. It is furthermore expected that this additional energy is deposited by radiation which carries a high-LET component. This will have a significant influence on the radiobiological...... indicate that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region is only slightly increased compared to protons. Monte Carlo calulations of the LET-spectrum of the particles in the plateau region support the idea of an RBE of about 1.2. In the spread out Bragg-peak we measure an RBE of about 1.9, which is only...... in the plateau region is due to the presence of annihilation fragments from inflight annihilation. Even though the RBE in the peak region is slightly reduced compared to that of carbon ions, the ratio of peak to plateau is nearly identical. A striking difference between antiprotons and carbon ions...

  1. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  2. GAPS - Dark matter search with low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S I; Ong, R A; Perez, K; Zweerink, J

    2015-01-01

    The GAPS experiment is foreseen to carry out a dark matter search by measuring low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons with a novel detection approach. It will provide a new avenue to access a wide range of different dark matter models and masses from about 10GeV to 1TeV. The theoretically predicted antideuteron flux resulting from secondary interactions of primary cosmic rays is very low. Well-motivated theories beyond the Standard Model contain viable dark matter candidates, which could lead to a significant enhancement of the antideuteron flux due to annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. This flux contribution is believed to be especially large at low energies, which leads to a high discovery potential for GAPS. The GAPS low-energy antiproton search will provide some of the most stringent constraints on ~30GeV dark matter, will provide the best limits on primordial black hole evaporation on galactic length scales, and explore new discovery space in cosmic-ray physics. GAPS is designed...

  3. Polarized $\\chi_{c2}$-charmonium production in antiproton-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B; Bleicher, M

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the Feynman diagram representation of multiple scattering we consider the polarized $\\chi_c$(1P)-charmonia production in antiproton-nucleus reactions close to the threshold ($p_{\\rm lab}=5-7$ GeV/c). The rescattering and absorption of the incoming antiproton and outgoing charmonium on nucleons are taken into account, including the possibility of the elastic and nondiagonal (flavor-conserving) scattering $\\chi_{cJ} N \\to \\chi_{cJ^\\prime} N$, $J,J^\\prime=0,1,2$. The elementary amplitudes of the latter processes are evaluated by expanding the physical $\\chi_c$-states in the Clebsch-Gordan series of the $c \\bar c$ states with fixed values of internal orbital angular momentum ($L_z$) and spin projections on the $\\chi_c$ momentum axis. The total interaction cross sections of these $c \\bar c$ states with nucleons have been calculated in previous works using the QCD factorization theorem and the nonrelativistic quarkonium model and turned out to be strongly $L_z$-dependent due to the transverse size dif...

  4. Meas.of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by antiprotons in the energy range $>$~3~MeV. Comparison with already existing proton data will yield information on the mechanisms for double ionization, which could not be extracted from previous comparisons between ratios measured for equivelocity electrons and protons. The most basic information to be obtained from an antiproton experiment will be the amount of correlation existing between the two electrons in the ground-state helium atom.\\\\ \\\\ The equipment consists of a gas cell, which employs slow-ion collection via the so-called condenser-plate method for the absolute sum of partial-ionization cross sections and determination of the relative contribution of multiple charged ions by TOF. The gas cell has movable entrance and exit slits and a grid system to account for secondary emission from the collection of slow ions. Together with a field of 800~V/cm in the collision region, the potentials of the TOF sp...

  5. Bessel Beams

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kirk T

    2000-01-01

    Scalar Bessel beams are derived both via the wave equation and via diffraction theory. While such beams have a group velocity that exceeds the speed of light, this is a manifestation of the "scissors paradox" of special relativty. The signal velocity of a modulated Bessel beam is less than the speed of light. Forms of Bessel beams that satisfy Maxwell's equations are also given.

  6. Investigation and realization of a slow-positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first proposes a presentation of the GBAR project (Gravitational Behaviour of Anti-hydrogen at Rest) within which this research took place, and which aims at performing the first direct test of the Weak Equivalence Principle on anti-matter by studying the free fall of anti-hydrogen atoms in the Earth gravitational field. The author presents different aspects of this project: scientific objective, experiment principle and structure, detailed structure (positron beam, positron trap, positron/positronium conversion, anti-proton beam, trapping, slowing down and neutralisation of anti-hydrogen ions). The author then reports the design of the positron beam: study of source technology, studies related to the fast positron source, design of the low positron line (approach, functions, simulations, technology). The two last chapters report the construction and the characterization of the slow-positron line

  7. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  8. Testing the ECPSSR theory and its modifications with ratios of antiproton-to-proton ionization cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While fits to 90% of all ever measured K-shell ionization cross sections by protons are on the average within 10% of the ECPSSR [W. Brandt, G. Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23 (1981) 1717], this theory systematically overestimates the remaining 10% of all data (comprised mainly of the measurements on heavy target elements) in the slow collision regime of proton velocities less than 0.1 of the orbital velocity of the K-shell electron. For ionization of H and He, experimental ratios of antiproton-to-proton cross sections and benchmark theories thereof exist in the range around where the projectile and target electron velocities match and the cross sections peak. They confirm the excellent accuracy with which the antibinding/binding and antipolarization/polarization effects are accounted for in the perturbed-stationary state (PSS) treatment of the ECPSSR theory. It is shown that the K-shell ionization of heavy elements by MeV antiprotons, which were routinely extracted from the LEAR - or alternatively in ionization of light elements below 0.3 MeV that will become available at the GSI's future Facility for Low-Energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) - would provide for a decisive and critical test between various modifications of the ECPSSR theory and any other theory of inner-shell ionization by protons and antiprotons

  9. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  10. Diffractive dissociation of the beam particle in anti pp interactions at 32.1 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study of the reaction anti pp→pX at 32 GeV/c, where the recoiling proton has a small momentum, are presented. The data come from an experiment performed with the 4.5 m hydrogen bubble chamber ''MIRABELLE'' at Serpukhov. The results on the diffractive dissociation of the incident antiproton are compared with those obtained for other beam particles. (author)

  11. Search for narrow lines in photon spectra from proton-antiproton annihilations at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusive photon spectra from annihilation of antiprotons stopped in a liquid hydrogen target were measured at LEAR (CERN) with a magnetic pair spectrometer. The FWHM energy resolution of the spectrometer in the region from 100-700 MeV was in the range from 2 to 4.5%. A total number of about 4.8.106 events with energies up to 1 GeV have been reconstructed. The photon spectra were scanned for possible lines with widths comparable to spectrometer resolution indicating the existence of bound nucleon-antinucleon states. No such structures were found with branching ratios greater than 4 to 8.10-4 at 95% confidence level. Results of former experiments could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  12. Shielding experiment by foil activation method at the anti-proton production target of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shielding experiment was carried out using the Antiproton Production Target Station (Pbar) of Fermilab under the collaboration study of JASMIN: 'Japanese and American Study of Muon Interaction and Neutron detection'. In the experiment, the neutron flux distributions in the shielding assembly were obtained by means of multi-foil activation method. Neutron spectra in the energy range between 1 and 100 MeV were deduced from the experimental data using the fitting method, which was newly developed in this study. The experimental data were compared with the theoretical calculation of the particle transportation code: PHITS. The optimum value of neutron attenuation length λ was tentatively deduced by applying the experimental data to the Moyer's model. (authors)

  13. Full two-electron calculations of antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Total cross sections for single ionization and excitation of molecular hydrogen by antiproton impact are presented over a wide range of impact energies from 1 keV to 6.5 MeV. A nonperturbative time-dependent close-coupling method is applied to fully treat the correlated dynamics of the electrons...... is demonstrated. The present findings provide benchmark results which might be useful for the development of molecular models........ Good agreement is obtained between the present calculations and experimental measurements of single-ionization cross sections at high energies, whereas some discrepancies with the experiment are found around the maximum. The importance of the molecular geometry and a full two-electron description...

  14. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  15. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  16. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  17. Optical-data model for the stopping power of condensed matter for protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the energy-loss function of a medium that is based on optical data (∼zero momentum transfer) and a quadratic extension into the momentum-transfer plane is used to evaluate the stopping power of the medium for protons and antiprotons. Energies less than ∼40 MeV are considered for which radiative energy losses and density-effect corrections are negligible. 'Higher-order' corrections to the stopping power proportional to the incident particle charge to the third power, Barkas effect, and to the fourth power, Bloch correction, are included. Calculations are presented for aluminum, carbon, copper and polystyrene. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the optical-data model, plus higher-order corrections, provides an excellent description of energy loss for proton energies from ∼100 keV to several tens of MeV. (author)

  18. An explanation of the elliptic flow difference between proton and anti-proton from the UrQMD model with hadron potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaobao; Shen, Caiwan

    2016-01-01

    The time evolution of both proton and anti-proton $v_2$ flows from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=7.7 GeV are examined by using both pure cascade and mean-field potential versions of the UrQMD model. Due to a stronger repulsion at the early stage introduced by the repulsive potentials and hence much less annihilation probabilities, anti-protons are frozen out earlier with smaller $v_2$ values. Therefore, the experimental data of anti-proton $v_2$ as well as the flow difference between proton and anti-proton can be reasonably described with the potential version of UrQMD.

  19. A measurement of the S- and P-wave content of antiproton annihilation at rest into two pions in liquid deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on our measurement of the ratio f(π-π0p)/f(π+π-n) = 2.07±0.05 for antiproton annihilation at rest in liquid deuterium, we find that S-wave annihilation of the antiproton on the proton or neutron into ππ is dominant. We quote a 95% confidence level upper limit of 8% for P-wave annihilation into ππ. (orig.)

  20. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  1. Beam-Energy Dependence of the Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons, and Pions in Au plus Au Collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C.; Aparin, A. A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Pachr, M.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šumbera, Michal; Tlustý, David; Trzeciak, B. A.; Vértési, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 16 (2014), s. 162301. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20841S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : heavy ion collisions * quark-gluon plasma * STAR Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 7.512, year: 2014

  2. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  3. Storage rings for radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolden, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Steck, M.

    2008-10-01

    Storage rings for radioactive heavy ions can be applied for a wide range of experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. The rare isotope beams are produced in flight via fragmentation or fission of high-intensity primary ions and they circulate in the storage ring at moderately relativistic energies (typically between 0.1 GeV/u up to 1 GeV/u). Due to their production mechanism they are usually highly charged or even fully stripped. The circulating radioactive heavy ion beams can be used to measure nuclear properties such as masses and decay times, which, in turn, can depend strongly on the ionic charge state. The storage rings must have large acceptances and dynamic apertures. The subsequent application of stochastic precooling of the secondary ions which are injected with large transverse and longitudinal emittances, and electron cooling to reach very high phase space densities has turned out to be a helpful tool for experiments with short-lived ions having lifetimes down to a few seconds. Some of these experiments have already been performed at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI. The storage ring complex of the FAIR project is intended to enhance significantly the range of experimental possibilities. It is planned to extend the scope of experimental possibilities to collisions with electron or antiproton beams.

  4. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  5. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2003-10-24

    We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5antiprotons. They show a centrality-scaling behavior different from that of pions. The pmacr;/pi and p/pi ratios are enhanced compared to peripheral Au+Au, p+p, and e(+)e(-) collisions. This enhancement is limited to p(T)<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to pi(0) measured in the range 1.5

  6. Antiproton annihilation physics annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi...... cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds....... We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds....

  7. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  8. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  9. Frozen Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    In general, the temperature of a charged particle beam traveling in an accelerator is very high. Seen from the rest frame of the beam, individual particles randomly oscillate about the reference orbit at high speed. This internal kinetic energy can, however, be removed by introducing dissipative interactions into the system. As a dissipative process advances, the beam becomes denser in phase space or, in other words, the emittance is more diminished. Ideally, it is possible to reach a "zero-emittance" state where the beam is Coulomb crystallized. The space-charge repulsion of a crystalline beam just balances the external restoring force provided by artificial electromagnetic elements. In this talk, general discussion is made of coasting and bunched crystalline beams circulating in a storage ring. Results of molecular dynamics simulations are presented to demonstrate the dynamic nature of various crystalline states. A possible method to approach such an ultimate state of matter is also discussed.

  10. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  11. Beam Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2014-01-01

    When a beam propagates in an accelerator, it interacts with both the external fields and the self-generated electromagnetic fields. If the latter are strong enough, the interplay between them and a perturbation in the beam distribution function can lead to an enhancement of the initial perturbation, resulting in what we call a beam instability. This unstable motion can be controlled with a feedback system, if available, or it grows, causing beam degradation and loss. Beam instabilities in particle accelerators have been studied and analysed in detail since the late 1950s. The subject owes its relevance to the fact that the onset of instabilities usually determines the performance of an accelerator. Understanding and suppressing the underlying sources and mechanisms is therefore the key to overcoming intensity limitations, thereby pushing forward the performance reach of a machine.

  12. A self-consistent model for the Galactic cosmic ray, antiproton and positron spectra

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In this talk I will present the escape model of Galactic cosmic rays. This model explains the measured cosmic ray spectra of individual groups of nuclei from TeV to EeV energies. It predicts an early transition to extragalactic cosmic rays, in agreement with recent Auger data. The escape model also explains the soft neutrino spectrum 1/E^2.5 found by IceCube in concordance with Fermi gamma-ray data. I will show that within the same model one can explain the excess of positrons and antiprotons above 20 GeV found by PAMELA and AMS-02, the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range and the plateau in cosmic ray dipole anisotropy in the 2-50 TeV energy range by adding the effects of a 2 million year old nearby supernova.

  13. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  14. Isotope Effects on Delayed Annihilation Time Spectra of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms in Low-Temperature Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, B; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Niestroj, A; Schmid, S; Schmid, W; Yamazaki, T; Sugai, I; Nakayoshi, K; Hayano, R S; Maas, F E; Torii, H A; Ishikawa, T; Tamura, H; Morita, N; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E

    1996-01-01

    The delayed annihilation time spectra (DATS) of antiprotonic helium atoms have been studied in isotopically pure low temperature ^3He and ^4He gas at various densities. The DATS taken at 5.8~K and 400~mbar are very similar in shape except for i) a small difference in the time scale and ii) the presence of a distinct fast decay component in the case of ^3He. The ratio of overall trapping times (mean lifetimes against annihilation), R = T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{4}He})/T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{3}He}), has been determined to be 1.144 \\pm 0.009, which is in good agreement with a theoretical estimate yielding R = [(M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{4}He})/ M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{ \\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He})]^2=1.14, where M^* denotes the reduced mass of the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{He^{++}}\\ system. The presence of a short-lived component with a lifetime of (0.154\\pm 0.007)\\ \\mbox{\\mus} in the case of \\mbox{^{3}He}\\ suggests that the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He^{+}}\\ atom has a state of in...

  15. Fibre Optic Notch Filter For The Antiproton Decelerator Stochastic Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Simmonds, Max Vincent John

    2016-01-01

    The project scope included reverse engineering, upgrading, and recovering the operational conditions of an existing fibre optic notch filter. Once operational, tests were to be preformed to confirm the performance of the temperature stabilisation. The end goal is to use said notch filter in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN to help aid antimatter research. The notch filter was successfully reverse engineered and then documented. Changes were made in order to increase performance and reliability, and also allow easy integration into the AD. An additional phase was added whereby the notch filter was to be controller via a touchscreen computer, situated next to the filter, allowing engineers to set-up each of the electronic devices used. While one of the devices (Motorised Delay Line) can be controlled by the touchscreen computer, the other two cannot.Due to time constraints and difficulties with the Beckhoff TwincatII programming language, the USB devices were not able to be controlled via the To...

  16. Dark matter annihilations into two light fermions and one gauge boson. General analysis and antiproton constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2011-12-15

    We study in this paper the scenario where the dark matter is constituted by Majo- rana particles which couple to a light Standard Model fermion and an extra scalar via a Yukawa coupling. In this scenario, the annihilation rate into the light fermions with the mediation of the scalar particle is strongly suppressed by the mass of the fermion. Nevertheless, the helicity suppression is lifted by the associated emission of a gauge boson, yielding annihilation rates which could be large enough to allow the indirect detection of the dark matter particles. We perform a general analysis of this scenario, calculating the annihilation cross section of the processes {chi}{chi} {yields} f anti fV when the dark matter particle is a SU(2){sub L} singlet or doublet, f is a lepton or a quark, and V is a photon, a weak gauge boson or a gluon. We point out that the annihilation rate is particularly enhanced when the dark matter particle is degenerate in mass to the intermediate scalar particle, which is a scenario barely constrained by collider searches of exotic charged or colored particles. Lastly, we derive upper limits on the relevant cross sections from the non-observation of an excess in the cosmic antiproton-to-proton ratio measured by PAMELA. (orig.)

  17. Exclusive Central $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Maria [Julich, Forschungszentrum

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^{=}\\pi^{-}$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < $\\eta$ < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < $\\eta$ < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < $y$ < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M($\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = 5000 MeV/$c^2$. Resonance structures consistent with $f_0$ and $f_2$(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  18. Bottom Quark-antiquark Production And Mixing In Proton- Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Z

    2003-01-01

    The studies of bottom quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions play an important role in testing perturbative QCD. Measuring the mixing parameter of B mesons imposes constraints on the quark mixing (CKM) matrix and enhances the understanding of the Standard Model. Multi-GeV pp¯ colliders produce a significant amount of bb¯ pairs and thus enable studies in both of these fields. This thesis presents results of the bb¯ production cross section from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV and the time-integrated average BB¯ mixing parameter &parl0;c&parr0; using high- mass dimuon data collected by CDF during its Run IB. There is a high concentration of muon pairs from inclusive semileptonic B decays in this data set. We take advantage of the long lifetime property of B hadrons and isolate the muons from B decays by studying the displacement of the muon pair trajectories. We use an Unbinned Maximum Likelihood Fitting method to fit the two dimensi...

  19. Dark Matter with multi-annihilation channels and AMS-02 positron excess and antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Heng; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2015-01-01

    AMS-02 provided the unprecedented statistics in the measurement of the positron fraction from cosmic rays. That may offer a unique opportunity to distinguish the positron spectrum coming from various dark matter (DM) annihilation channels, if DM is the source of this positron excess. Therefore, we consider the scenario that the DM can annihilate into leptonic, quark, and massive gauge boson channels simultaneously with floating branching ratios to test this hypothesis. We also study the impacts from MAX, MED, and MIN diffusion models as well as from isothermal, NFW, and Einasto DM density profiles on our results. We found that under this DM annihilation scenario it is difficult to fit the AMS-02 $\\frac{e^+}{e^++e^-}$ data while evading the PAMELA $\\bar{p}/p$ constraint, except for the combination of MED diffusion model with the Einasto density profile, where the DM mass between 450 GeV to 1.2 TeV can satisfy both data sets at 95\\% CL. Finally, we compare to the newest AMS-02 antiproton data.

  20. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-01-01

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation$^{1}$ is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry—that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime—although it is model dependent$^{2}$. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests—using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others—have been performed$^{3}$, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available$^{4, 5, 6, 7, 8}$. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H$^−$) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare th...