WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiperspirants

  1. Deodorants and antiperspirants affect the axillary bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, Chris; Hutapea, Prawira; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-01

    The use of underarm cosmetics is common practice in the Western society to obtain better body odor and/or to prevent excessive sweating. A survey indicated that 95 % of the young adult Belgians generally use an underarm deodorant or antiperspirant. The effect of deodorants and antiperspirants on the axillary bacterial community was examined on nine healthy subjects, who were restrained from using deodorant/antiperspirant for 1 month. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the individual microbial dynamics. The microbial profiles were unique for every person. A stable bacterial community was seen when underarm cosmetics were applied on a daily basis and when no underarm cosmetics were applied. A distinct community difference was seen when the habits were changed from daily use to no use of deodorant/antiperspirant and vice versa. The richness was higher when deodorants and antiperspirants were applied. Especially when antiperspirants were applied, the microbiome showed an increase in diversity. Antiperspirant usage led toward an increase of Actinobacteria, which is an unfavorable situation with respect to body odor development. These initial results show that axillary cosmetics modify the microbial community and can stimulate odor-producing bacteria.

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart C - HVOC 1 Content Limits for Underarm Deodorants and Underarm Antiperspirants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Deodorants and Underarm Antiperspirants 2 Table 2 to Subpart C Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Deodorants and Underarm Antiperspirants Product category Percent HVOC content limit (weight-percent HVOC) Underarm antiperspirants—aerosol 60 Underarm deodorants—aerosol 20 1 High-volatility organic compound (HVOC...

  3. Skin exposure to deodorants/antiperspirants in aerosol form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiling, W; Buttgereit, P; Hall, B; O'Keeffe, L; Safford, B; Tozer, S; Coroama, M

    2012-06-01

    Many cosmetic products are available in spray form. Even though the principal targets of these products are the skin and hair, spraying leads to the partitioning of the product between the target and the surrounding air. In the previous COLIPA study (Hall et al., 2007) the daily use of deodorant/antiperspirant (Deo/AP) in spray form was quantified in terms of the amount of product dispensed from the spray can, without specifically quantifying the product fraction reaching the skin during use. Results of the present study provide this additional information, necessary for a reliable safety assessment of sprayed Deo/AP products. In a novel experimental approach the information obtained from real-life movement analysis (automated motion imaging) of volunteers using their own products was integrated with the aerosol cloud sampling data obtained from the same products, leading to the computation of the product deposited on the skin. The 90th percentile values, expressed as percent deposition relative to the can weight loss after spraying, are 23.5% and 11.4% for ethanol-based and non-ethanol-based products, respectively. Additionally, the study has generated data on the skin area covered by the products, spray duration time, spray angle and spray distance from the skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [The use of deodorants/antiperspirants does not constitute a risk factor for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, Moïse; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Gligorov, Joseph; Lokiec, François; Spielmann, Marc

    2008-09-01

    Based on the observation of a high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant adjacent to the usual area of application of deodorants and/or antiperspirants, several scientific teams have advanced the hypothesis of a possible link between antiperspirants and breast cancer. The possibility of the involvement of parabens and aluminium salts, traditional components of a number of cosmetic products, has been advanced by the same teams. In order to ascertain whether this hypothesis could or could not be confirmed, a group of clinical experts in oncology was set up to search and analyse the literature data relating to the problem raised with the aim of answering three predefined questions: 1) does it exist experimental or biological arguments supporting a potential link between the use of deodorants/antiperspirants and breast cancer? 2) Does the use of deodorants/antiperspirants have any effect on the increase in the risk of breast cancer? 3) Could a causal relationship between the use of deodorants/antiperspirants and breast cancer be accepted? The scientific data were searched systematically in the PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez) using standardised search equations. Fifty-nine studies resulting from the literature search were reviewed and nineteen articles with various methodologies were selected for in-depth analysis. In view of the fact that parabens are generally not present in deodorants/antiperspirants, the reflection group's search related purely to the question of aluminium salts. Among these nineteen articles, many are methodologically unsound, do not answer to the questions posed or deal with the question of parabens and were therefore discarded by the reflection group. The expert group's conclusion coincides with those of the French, European and American health authorities. After analysis of the available literature on the subject, no scientific evidence to support the hypothesis was identified and no validated

  5. A simple and fast method for the determination of active ingredient in antiperspirant cosmetics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanias, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Antiperspirant cosmetics are tested for their active ingredient (aluminium chlorohydroxide) by conventional analytical techniques. Aluminium has been determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis in all antiperspirant products and package forms available in the Greek market in order to develop a simple and fast method for quantization. The results show that neutron activation analysis could be established as an official method for the determination of active ingredient in antiperspirant cosmetics. The proposed method is compared with the existing official methods and an alternative sampling method for aerosol package is presented. (author)

  6. If exposure to aluminium in antiperspirants presents health risks, its content should be reduced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Alain; Fauconneau, Bernard; Sappino, André-Pascal; Deloncle, Roger; Guillard, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    Since aluminium (Al) pervades our environment, the scientific community has for many years raised concerns regarding its safety in humans. Al is present in numerous cosmetics such as antiperspirants, lipsticks and sunscreens. Al chlorohydrate is the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics and may constitute for Al a key exposure route to the human body and a potential source of damage. An in vitro study has demonstrated that Al from antiperspirant can be absorbed through viable human stripped skin. The potential toxicity of Al has been clearly shown and recent works convincingly argue that Al could be involved in cancerogenic processes. Nowadays, for example, Al is suspected of being involved in breast cancer. Recent work in cells in culture has lent credence to the hypothesis that this metal could accumulate in the mammary gland and selectively interfere with the biological properties of breast epithelial cells, thereby promoting a cascade of alterations reminiscent of the early phases of malignant transformation. In addition, several studies suggest that the presence of Al in human breast could influence metastatic process. As a consequence, given that the toxicity of Al has been widely recognized and that it is not a physiological component in human tissues, reducing the concentration of this metal in antiperspirants is a matter of urgency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of habitual and experimental antiperspirant and deodorant product use on the armpit microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Urban

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An ever expanding body of research investigates the human microbiome in general and the skin microbiome in particular. Microbiomes vary greatly from individual to individual. Understanding the factors that account for this variation, however, has proven challenging, with many studies able to account statistically for just a small proportion of the inter-individual variation in the abundance, species richness or composition of bacteria. The human armpit has long been noted to host a high biomass bacterial community, and recent studies have highlighted substantial inter-individual variation in armpit bacteria, even relative to variation among individuals for other body habitats. One obvious potential explanation for this variation has to do with the use of personal hygiene products, particularly deodorants and antiperspirants. Here we experimentally manipulate product use to examine the abundance, species richness, and composition of bacterial communities that recolonize the armpits of people with different product use habits. In doing so, we find that when deodorant and antiperspirant use were stopped, culturable bacterial density increased and approached that found on individuals who regularly do not use any product. In addition, when antiperspirants were subsequently applied, bacterial density dramatically declined. These culture-based results are in line with sequence-based comparisons of the effects of long-term product use on bacterial species richness and composition. Sequence-based analyses suggested that individuals who habitually use antiperspirant tended to have a greater richness of bacterial OTUs in their armpits than those who use deodorant. In addition, individuals who used antiperspirants or deodorants long-term, but who stopped using product for two or more days as part of this study, had armpit communities dominated by Staphylococcaceae, whereas those of individuals in our study who habitually used no products were dominated by

  8. The effect of habitual and experimental antiperspirant and deodorant product use on the armpit microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Julie; Fergus, Daniel J; Savage, Amy M; Ehlers, Megan; Menninger, Holly L; Dunn, Robert R; Horvath, Julie E

    2016-01-01

    An ever expanding body of research investigates the human microbiome in general and the skin microbiome in particular. Microbiomes vary greatly from individual to individual. Understanding the factors that account for this variation, however, has proven challenging, with many studies able to account statistically for just a small proportion of the inter-individual variation in the abundance, species richness or composition of bacteria. The human armpit has long been noted to host a high biomass bacterial community, and recent studies have highlighted substantial inter-individual variation in armpit bacteria, even relative to variation among individuals for other body habitats. One obvious potential explanation for this variation has to do with the use of personal hygiene products, particularly deodorants and antiperspirants. Here we experimentally manipulate product use to examine the abundance, species richness, and composition of bacterial communities that recolonize the armpits of people with different product use habits. In doing so, we find that when deodorant and antiperspirant use were stopped, culturable bacterial density increased and approached that found on individuals who regularly do not use any product. In addition, when antiperspirants were subsequently applied, bacterial density dramatically declined. These culture-based results are in line with sequence-based comparisons of the effects of long-term product use on bacterial species richness and composition. Sequence-based analyses suggested that individuals who habitually use antiperspirant tended to have a greater richness of bacterial OTUs in their armpits than those who use deodorant. In addition, individuals who used antiperspirants or deodorants long-term, but who stopped using product for two or more days as part of this study, had armpit communities dominated by Staphylococcaceae, whereas those of individuals in our study who habitually used no products were dominated by Corynebacterium

  9. Human axillary skin condition is improved following incorporation of glycerol into the stratum corneum from an antiperspirant formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard L; Turner, Graham A; Bates, Susan; Robinson, Teresa; Arnold, David; Marriott, Robert E; Pudney, Paul D A; Bonnist, Eleanor Y M; Green, Darren

    2017-11-01

    The study objectives were to demonstrate that glycerol, when topically applied from a roll-on antiperspirant formulation, can be delivered directly to human skin ex vivo and the axillary stratum corneum (SC) in vivo, and to assess whether it improves the quality of the axillary skin barrier. Ex vivo human skin absorption of glycerol was measured following application of a roll-on antiperspirant formulation containing 4% 13 C 3 -glycerol. Skin distribution of 13 C 3 -glycerol over 24 h was assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In vivo axillary SC penetration was measured by confocal Raman spectroscopy and multivariate curve-resolution software 1 h after topical application of a roll-on antiperspirant formulation containing 8% deuterated glycerol (d 5 -glycerol). A clinical study was conducted to determine the efficacy of a roll-on antiperspirant formulation containing 4% glycerol in reducing shaving-induced visual irritation and in increasing axillary-skin hydration. Ex vivo skin absorption studies indicated that the formulation delivered 13 C 3 -glycerol into the SC at all timepoints over the 24-h period. In vivo Raman measurements (1 h after application) demonstrated that d 5 -glycerol was detectable to a depth of at least 10 μm in the axillary SC. Application of 4% glycerol from a roll-on antiperspirant formulation to the axilla was associated with significantly less visible irritation and greater skin hydration than observed with the control (glycerol-free) product. These studies demonstrate that glycerol, incorporated in a roll-on antiperspirant formulation, is delivered directly and rapidly to all depths of the axillary SC, and results in improvements in visible irritation and hydration in the axilla.

  10. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Linda C.; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy’s questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  11. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from

  12. Effect of deodorant and antiperspirant use and presence or absence of axillary hair on absorption of testosterone 2% solution applied to men's axillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David S; Ni, Xiao; Polzer, Paula; Vart, Richard; Satonin, Darlene K; Mitchell, Malcolm I

    2014-11-01

    Testosterone 2% solution is applied to axillae and is indicated for testosterone replacement therapy in males deficient in endogenous testosterone. This open-label crossover study evaluated the effect of deodorant/antiperspirant use and presence or absence of axillary hair on absorption of testosterone solution. Healthy males (N = 30; ≥50 years of age with baseline testosterone deodorant/antiperspirant. Blood samples were taken over 72 hours after each dose for measuring serum testosterone concentrations. Profiles of mean testosterone concentrations were similar across treatments. For all treatments, area under the concentration-time curve through 24 hours (AUC[0-24] ) and 72 hours (AUC[0-72] ), and maximum total testosterone concentration (Cmax ) were similar except for 15% lower Cmax when treatment was applied after deodorant/antiperspirant to shaved vs. unshaved axillae (least squares mean, 531 ng/dL vs. 626 ng/dL, respectively; P = 0.011). This difference is not considered clinically significant. The 95% confidence intervals for AUC(0-24) , AUC(0-72) , and Cmax fell within the traditional bioequivalence limits of 0.8 to 1.25. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) was low (deodorant/antiperspirant or by the presence or absence of axillary hair. Testosterone solution was generally well tolerated. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. [Axillary hyperhidrosis--efficacy and tolerability of an aluminium chloride antiperspirant. Prospective evaluation on 20 patients with idiopathic axillary hyperhidrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streker, M; Reuther, T; Verst, S; Kerscher, M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of aluminium chloride gel for treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis. A total of 20 patients aged 22-38 (mean age: 26.9+/-4.3) with idiopathic axillary hyperhidrosis were included and treated with an antiperspirant (Sweat-off, Sweat-off GmbH, Hügelsheim). Study duration was 42 days. Treatment efficacy was evaluated clinically, as well as by starch-iodine test, gravimetric analysis and evaluation of the skin surface pH. After treatment there was a significant clinical improvement accompanied by significant qualitative and quantitative reduction of sweat as well as a significant reduction of skin surface pH. Except for slight skin irritation in 6 patients, there were no other side effects. Patient satisfaction improved markedly during the study. Treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with aluminium chloride is an effective, safe and inexpensive treatment modality.

  14. Part 4 of a 4-part series Miscellaneous Products: Trends and Alternatives in Deodorants, Antiperspirants, Sunblocks, Shaving Products, Powders, and Wipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon; Katta, Rajani; Nedorost, Susan; Warshaw, Erin; Zirwas, Matt; Selbo, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To provide updated data on the usage of ingredients that are common potential contact allergens in several categories of topical products. To identify useful alternative products with few or no common contact allergens. Design: In November 2009, the full ingredient lists of 5,416 skin, hair, and cosmetic products marketed by the CVS pharmacy chain were copied from CVS.com into Microsoft Word format for analysis. Computer searches were made in Microsoft Word using search/replace and sorting functions to accurately identify the presence of specific allergens in each website product. Measurements: Percentages of American Contact Dermatitis Society core series allergens (and other common preservatives and sunblocks) were calculated. Results: The usage of American Contact Dermatitis Society core series allergens (and other preservatives and sunblocks) in various miscellaneous categories of topical products is reported. Conclusion: Data on allergens and alternatives for ancillary skin care products are not widely published. This article reviews some of the common potential allergens in antiperspirants, deodorants, shaving products, sunblocks, powders, and wipes. Suitable available alternative products for patients with contact allergy are listed. PMID:22010054

  15. Part 4 of a 4-part series Miscellaneous Products: Trends and Alternatives in Deodorants, Antiperspirants, Sunblocks, Shaving Products, Powders, and Wipes: Data from the American Contact Alternatives Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheman, Andrew; Jacob, Sharon; Katta, Rajani; Nedorost, Susan; Warshaw, Erin; Zirwas, Matt; Selbo, Nicole

    2011-10-01

    To provide updated data on the usage of ingredients that are common potential contact allergens in several categories of topical products. To identify useful alternative products with few or no common contact allergens. In November 2009, the full ingredient lists of 5,416 skin, hair, and cosmetic products marketed by the CVS pharmacy chain were copied from CVS.com into Microsoft Word format for analysis. Computer searches were made in Microsoft Word using search/replace and sorting functions to accurately identify the presence of specific allergens in each website product. Percentages of American Contact Dermatitis Society core series allergens (and other common preservatives and sunblocks) were calculated. The usage of American Contact Dermatitis Society core series allergens (and other preservatives and sunblocks) in various miscellaneous categories of topical products is reported. Data on allergens and alternatives for ancillary skin care products are not widely published. This article reviews some of the common potential allergens in antiperspirants, deodorants, shaving products, sunblocks, powders, and wipes. Suitable available alternative products for patients with contact allergy are listed.

  16. Hyperhidrosis plantaris - a randomized, half-side trial for efficacy and safety of an antiperspirant containing different concentrations of aluminium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streker, Meike; Reuther, Tilmann; Hagen, Linda; Kerscher, Martina

    2012-02-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis plantaris can cause impairment in social, physical, leisure and occupational activities. Topical treatment with aluminium chloride is the first-line treatment. The aim of this trial was to evaluate efficacy and safety of two different concentrations of aluminium chloride hexa-hydrate (12.5%, 30%) for 6 weeks. 20 volunteers with hyperhidrosis plantaris were included. Efficacy was evaluated using a clinical rating scale of the hyperhidrosis level and qualitative assessments including Minor's (iodine-starch) test and a standardized sniff test. Furthermore a patient questionnaire and measurements of skin surface pH were done to evaluate the subjective assessments and side effects. The hyperhidrosis level significantly decreased in both concentrations. There were no differences in tolerability regarding the skin surface pH and the patient questionnaires. In addition the hidrotic areas decreased after application of both products and the sniff test improved. Topical application of an antiperspirant containing aluminium chloride reduced sweat production in plantar hyperhidrosis significantly. As both 12.5% and 30% were efficacious and safe, we would recommend 12.5% for outpatient treatment. © The Author • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  17. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measurements and mechanisms of toxicological actions on breast biology. Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry 2013; 128:257-261. [PubMed Abstract] Willhite CC, Karyakina NA, Yokel RA, et al. Systematic review of potential health risks posed by pharmaceutical, ...

  18. The management of Frey's syndrome with aluminium chloride hexahydrate antiperspirant.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, M. J.; Gunn, A.

    1990-01-01

    Nine patients suffering from gustatory sweating (Frey's syndrome) following parotidectomy have been treated by topical applications of aluminium chloride hexahydrate. Treatment has successfully controlled gustatory sweating using application intervals varying from 1 to 50 days.

  19. The management of Frey's syndrome with aluminium chloride hexahydrate antiperspirant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, M. J.; Gunn, A.

    1990-01-01

    Nine patients suffering from gustatory sweating (Frey's syndrome) following parotidectomy have been treated by topical applications of aluminium chloride hexahydrate. Treatment has successfully controlled gustatory sweating using application intervals varying from 1 to 50 days. Images Figure 1 PMID:2301903

  20. Body Odor (For Young Men)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sweat better than other materials. Should I use deodorant or deodorant with antiperspirant? What’s the difference? You’ve got two options: regular deodorant or deodorant antiperspirant. Regular deodorant helps to get ...

  1. Do deodorants/underarm cosmetics cause cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Öztürkcan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of deodorant use on breast cancer development has generated considerable interest in both the scientific community and the mainstream media. Primary observational studies and numerous reviews investigating the effect of regular deodorant use on breast cancer development have been undertaken. There is no consensus in this regard. Some epidemiological studies have attempted to directly address the issue of underarm cosmetic use and breast cancer. On the other hand, many studies found no association between antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer. There is no difference in the current use of antiperspirant/deodorant products between breast cancer patients and nonaffected matched controls. There is no scientific evidence or research data that ingredients in underarm antiperspirants or deodorants cause cancer.

  2. 75 FR 763 - Dibenzylidene Sorbitol; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... minimum of 96% DBS. DBS is not expected to pose a hazard when used for its proposed use pattern. A skin... benzaldehyde in the body. Sorbitol is a natural constituent and is considered non-carcinogenic and benzaldehyde..., DBS has reported uses in personal care products, such as antiperspirants, shampoos, conditioners, and...

  3. 21 CFR 330.5 - Drug categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.5 Drug categories. Monographs promulgated pursuant to the provisions of... designated categories: (a) Antacids. (b) Laxatives. (c) Antidiarrheal products. (d) Emetics. (e) Antiemetics. (f) Antiperspirants. (g) Sunburn prevention and treatment products. (h) Vitamin-mineral products. (i...

  4. antibacterial activities of different brands of deodorants marketed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    wicks the moisture away from the skin and aids in keeping the skin dry enough to prevent ... products. While the most frequent active ingredient in commercial antiperspirants are Aluminium chlorohydrate and Aluminium zirconium tetrachorohydrate gly, deodorants are usually ..... Drug and cosmetics Industry. Flexibility is the.

  5. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  6. [Ventricular fibrillation following deodorant spray inhalation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F; Le Tacon, S; Maria, M; Pierrard, O; Monin, P

    2008-01-01

    We report one case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation following butane poisoning after inhalation of antiperspiration aerosol. An early management using semi-automatic defibrillator explained the success of the resuscitation. The mechanism of butane toxicity could be an increased sensitivity of cardiac receptors to circulating catecholamines, responsible for cardiac arrest during exercise and for resuscitation difficulties. The indication of epinephrine is discussed.

  7. Trade marketing značky AXE v České republice

    OpenAIRE

    Moravec, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this graduation thesis is to provide detailed description of actual state of Czech male deodorant and antiperspirant market with putting emphasis on Axe brand, which makes efforts to become the leading brand of this dynamic market. The thesis is structured into three chapters. First chapter is mapping Czech male deodorant market and Czech retail market as well. Axe brand and its local and global activities are introduced in the second chapter. Last chapter of graduation thesis exte...

  8. Nanosized aerosols from consumer sprays: experimental analysis and exposure modeling for four commercial products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christiane; Hagendorfer, Harald; von Goetz, Natalie; Kaegi, Ralf; Gehrig, Robert; Ulrich, Andrea; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2011-08-01

    Consumer spray products are already on the market in the cosmetics and household sector, which suggest by their label that they contain engineered nanoparticles (ENP). Sprays are considered critical for human health, because the lungs represent a major route for the uptake of ENP into the human body. To contribute to the exposure assessment of ENP in consumer spray products, we analyzed ENP in four commercially available sprays: one antiperspirant, two shoe impregnation sprays, and one plant-strengthening agent. The spray dispersions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and (scanning-) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). Aerosols were generated by using the original vessels, and analyzed by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and (S)TEM. On the basis of SMPS results, the nanosized aerosol depositing in the respiratory tract was modeled for female and male consumers. The derived exposure levels reflect a single spray application. We identified ENP in the dispersions of two products (shoe impregnation and plant spray). Nanosized aerosols were observed in three products that contained propellant gas. The aerosol number concentration increased linearly with the sprayed amount, with the highest concentration resulting from the antiperspirant. Modeled aerosol exposure levels were in the range of 1010 nanosized aerosol components per person and application event for the antiperspirant and the impregnation sprays, with the largest fraction of nanosized aerosol depositing in the alveolar region. Negligible exposure from the application of the plant spray (pump spray) was observed.

  9. The clinical study of the optimalization of surgical treatment and the traditional Chinese medicine intervention on palmar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yan, Zhikun; Fu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Liwen; Xu, Linhai; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Genmiao

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the efficacy of different surgical methods in treating palmar hyperhidrosis and the compensatory hyperhidrosis after surgery and to observe the efficacy of "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula" on postsurgical hyperhidrosis patients. Two-hundred patients were randomly assigned to groups A (Chinese and Western medicine, T4 transection plus "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula") and B (Western medicine, T4 transection). The surgical efficiency, recurrence rate, compensatory hyperhidrosis, and the long-term life quality were compared. Another 100 cases (group C, T2 transection) were analyzed as a control group. After surgery, the palmar hyperhidrosis and armpit sweating were relieved in all the three group patients and in 34 % of patients combined with plantar hyperhidrosis, the symptoms were relieved. Transient palmar hyperhidrosis was found in three cases at day 2 to day 5 postoperatively. One case of Horner's syndrome and one case recurrence were found in group C patients. The compensatory sweating of various degrees occurred in all the three groups. There were 25, 24, and 43 cases in groups A, B, and C, respectively. There is a significant difference between groups C, A, and B. The compensatory sweating in 13 cases of group A and four cases of group B had different degrees of improvement in the follow-up 6 months after surgery. There is a significant difference. Thoracoscopic bilateral T4 sympathetic chain and the Kuntz resection are the optimized surgical treatments for the palmar hyperhidrosis. "Energy-boosting and Yin-nourishing anti-perspirant formula" is effective in treating the postoperative compensatory sweating.

  10. Sunscreen Use and Sweat Production in Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Aburto Corona, Jorge Alberto; Aragón Vargas, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Context: Sunscreen lotions are important to protect the skin during outdoor exercise, but they may interfere with sweating. Objective: To measure the effect of two different water-resistant sunscreen products on local sweat production in men and women exercising in the heat, and to compare it with the expected inhibition resulting from the use of an antiperspirant. Design: Randomized Crossover Study Design. Setting: Exercise in the heat (30.2 ± 0.4°C d.b. and 58 ± 4.3% r.h, mean ± ...

  11. Topical therapies in hyperhidrosis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David M; Ballard, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis affects 3% of the US population; about the same number as psoriasis. More than half of these patients have primary focal axillary hyperhidrosis: sweating that is beyond what is anticipated or necessary for thermoregulation. Most topical therapies are based on aluminum salts, which work by a chemical reaction that forms plugs in the eccrine sweat ducts. Topical anticholinergics may also be used. Instruction on proper methods and timing of antiperspirants enhances effect and may be effective alone or in combination with other treatments in patients with hyperhidrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iontophoresis for palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David M; Ballard, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Iontophoresis is a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective primary treatment of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis. Decades of clinical experience and research show significant reduction in palmoplantar excessive sweating with minimal side effects. To get the best results from iontophoresis, health care professionals need to provide education on the mechanism of action and benefits, evidence of its use, and creation of a future patient-specific plan of care for continued treatments at home or in the physician's office. Iontophoresis may be combined with other hyperhidrosis treatments, such as topical antiperspirants and botulinum toxin injections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Management of hyperhidrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, H; Lecouflet, M

    2015-04-01

    Hyperhidrosis continues to be undertreated in our view, despite its propensity to considerably impair quality of life. We shall break down therapeutic approaches to hyperhidrosis into several steps: (a) determine the physiological causes of excess sweating; (b) establish the type of hyperhidrosis involved and screen for causes of secondary hyperhidrosis before diagnosing essential hyperhidrosis; (c) evaluate the severity of the hyperhidrosis by means of a validated scale (HDSS score), Minor's starch-iodine test or gravimetric analysis; (d) select one of the medical therapies currently available, i.e. topical therapy (antiperspirants, iontophoresis or botulinum toxin injection), systemic therapy (oxybutynin) or surgery (thoracic sympathectomy). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Acute axillary eczema caused by mercury compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippen, H

    1979-01-01

    Not every axillary dermatitis is caused by an allergy against corresponding cosmetics (deodorants or anti-perspirants). This is shown in a 24-year-old man with an acute contact dermatitis in the left axilla. Sensitization probably developed against mercury salts due to the regular use of thermometers which were kept in a disinfecting solution containing phenylmercuric borate. The patient was in two hospitals for a check up before heart surgery and temperature was regularly measured in the left axilla. In both clincis phenylmercuric borate was used for desinfection of the thermometers. The sensitivity was proofed by positive patch tests.

  15. A novel washing algorithm for underarm stain removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikgoz Tufan, H.; Gocek, I.; Sahin, U. K.; Erdem, I.

    2017-10-01

    After contacting with human sweat which comprise around 27% sebum, anti-perspirants comprising aluminium chloride or its compounds form a jel-like structure whose solubility in water is very poor. In daily use, this jel-like structure closes sweat pores and hinders wetting of skin by sweat. However, when in contact with garments, they form yellowish stains at the underarm of the garments. These stains are very hard to remove with regular machine washing. In this study, first of all, we focused on understanding and simulating such stain formation on the garments. Two alternative procedures are offered to form jel-like structures. On both procedures, commercially available spray or deo-stick type anti-perspirants, standard acidic and basic sweat solutions and artificial sebum are used to form jel-like structures, and they are applied on fabric in order to get hard stains. Secondly, after simulation of the stain on the fabric, we put our efforts on developing a washing algorithm specifically designed for removal of underarm stains. Eight alternative washing algorithms are offered with varying washing temperature, amounts of detergent, and pre-stain removal procedures. Better algorithm is selected by comparison of Tristimulus Y values after washing.

  16. Effects of aluminium chloride and aluminium chlorohydrate on DNA repair in MCF10A immortalised non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farasani, A; Darbre, P D

    2015-11-01

    Use of underarm aluminium (Al)-based antiperspirant salts may be a contributory factor in breast cancer development. At the 10th Keele meeting, Al was reported to cause anchorage-independent growth and double strand DNA breaks in MCF10A immortalised non-transformed human breast epithelial cells. We now report that exposure of MCF10A cells to Al chloride or Al chlorohydrate also compromised DNA repair systems. Long-term (19-21 weeks) exposure to Al chloride or Al chlorohydrate at a 10(-4) M concentration resulted in reduced levels of BRCA1 mRNA as determined by real-time RT-PCR and BRCA1 protein as determined by Western immunoblotting. Reduced levels of mRNA for other DNA repair genes (BRCA2, CHK1, CHK2, Rad51, ATR) were also observed using real-time RT-PCR. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene function has long been associated with inherited susceptibility to breast cancer but these results suggest that exposure to aluminium-based antiperspirant salts may also reduce levels of these key components of DNA repair in breast epithelial cells. If Al can not only damage DNA but also compromise DNA repair systems, then there is the potential for Al to impact on breast carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversibility of hyperhidrosis post axillary depilatory laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Josiane; Habre, Maya; Soutou, Boutros; Maatouk, Ismael; Ibrahim, Tony; Tomb, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis were lately reported as novel side effects of laser-assisted removal of axillary hair. The goal of our study was to evaluate the reversibility of these two side effects. An observational, single-center cohort study included over a 30-month screening period 30 patients with newly reported hyperhidrosis and/or bromhidrosis related to axillary depilatory laser. After 26 weeks of follow-up, each patient was assessed for spontaneous reversibility. A 12-week duration treatment with topical aluminum chloride was evaluated in patients with persisting hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis was assessed using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). Spontaneous reversibility was observed in 20% of patients. In total, 23 out of 30 patients recovered normal axillary transpiration either spontaneously or after treatment. Mean HDSS score was significantly lower in the treated group. It appears that axillary hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis, secondary to laser depilation, reverse either spontaneously or after using topical antiperspirant.

  18. Detection of potentially skin sensitizing hydroperoxides of linalool in fragranced products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Susanne; Dkhil, Hafida; Hendarsa, Prisca; Ellis, Graham; Natsch, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    On prolonged exposure to air, linalool can form sensitizing hydroperoxides. Positive hydroperoxide patch tests in dermatitis patients have frequently been reported, but their relevance has not been established. Owing to a lack of analytical methods and data, it is unclear from which sources the public might be exposed to sufficient quantities of hydroperoxides for induction of sensitization to occur. To address this knowledge gap, we developed analytical methods and performed stability studies for fine fragrances and deodorants/antiperspirants. In parallel, products recalled from consumers were analysed to investigate exposure to products used in everyday life. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with high mass resolution was found to be optimal for the selective and sensitive detection of the organic hydroperoxide in the complex product matrix. Linalool hydroperoxide was detected in natural linalool, but the amount was not elevated by storage in a perfume formulation exposed to air. No indication of hydroperoxide formation in fine fragrances was found in stability studies. Aged fine fragrances recalled from consumers contained a geometric mean linalool concentration of 1,888 μg/g and, corrected for matrix effects, linalool hydroperoxide at a concentration of around 14 μg/g. In antiperspirants, we detected no oxidation products. In conclusion, very low levels of linalool hydroperoxide in fragranced products may originate from raw materials, but we found no evidence for oxidation during storage of products. The levels detected are orders of magnitude below the levels inducing sensitization in experimental animals, and these results therefore do not substantiate a causal link between potential hydroperoxide formation in cosmetics and positive results of patch tests.

  19. Aluminium chloride promotes anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, André-Pascal; Buser, Raphaële; Lesne, Laurence; Gimelli, Stefania; Béna, Frédérique; Belin, Dominique; Mandriota, Stefano J

    2012-03-01

    Aluminium salts used as antiperspirants have been incriminated as contributing to breast cancer incidence in Western societies. To date, very little or no epidemiological or experimental data confirm or infirm this hypothesis. We report here that in MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells, a well-established normal human mammary epithelial cell model, long-term exposure to aluminium chloride (AlCl(3) ) concentrations of 10-300 µ m, i.e. up to 100 000-fold lower than those found in antiperspirants, and in the range of those recently measured in the human breast, results in loss of contact inhibition and anchorage-independent growth. These effects were preceded by an increase of DNA synthesis, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and senescence in proliferating cultures. AlCl(3) also induced DSBs and senescence in proliferating primary human mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, it had no similar effects on human keratinocytes or fibroblasts, and was not detectably mutagenic in bacteria. MCF-10A cells morphologically transformed by long-term exposure to AlCl(3) display strong upregulation of the p53/p21(Waf1) pathway, a key mediator of growth arrest and senescence. These results suggest that aluminium is not generically mutagenic, but similar to an activated oncogene, it induces proliferation stress, DSBs and senescence in normal mammary epithelial cells; and that long-term exposure to AlCl(3) generates and selects for cells able to bypass p53/p21(Waf1) -mediated cellular senescence. Our observations do not formally identify aluminium as a breast carcinogen, but challenge the safety ascribed to its widespread use in underarm cosmetics. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Aluminium and the human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Interventions for the treatment of Frey's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Wu, Fanglong; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Qinghong; Shi, Zongdao; Li, Longjiang

    2015-03-17

    Frey's syndrome is a rare disorder, the symptoms of which include sweating, flushing and warming over the preauricular and temporal areas following a gustatory stimulus. It often occurs in patients who have undergone parotidectomy, submandibular gland surgery, radical neck dissection, infection and traumatic injury in the parotid region, and is caused by the aberrant regrowth of facial autonomic nerve fibres. Currently there are several options used to treat patients with Frey's syndrome; for example, the topical application of anticholinergics and antiperspirants, and the intradermal injection of botulinum toxin. It is uncertain which treatment is most effective and safe. To assess the efficacy and safety of different interventions for the treatment of Frey's syndrome. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 28 April 2014. We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in participants diagnosed with Frey's syndrome using a clinical standard such as Minor's starch-iodine test. We planned to include trials in which participants received any intervention versus no treatment (observation) or an alternative intervention, with or without a second active treatment. Our primary outcome measures were success rate (as assessed clinically by Minor's starch-iodine test, the iodine-sublimated paper histogram method, blotting paper technique or another method) and adverse events. Our secondary outcome measure was success rate as assessed by patients (disappearance or improvement of symptoms). We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We identified no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Our searches retrieved eight potentially relevant studies, but after

  2. Astragaloside IV Attenuates Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells through Raf-MEK-ERK Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongcai Yue

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV (AGS-IV is a main active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus Bunge, a medicinal herb prescribed as an immunostimulant, hepatoprotective, antiperspirant, a diuretic or a tonic as documented in Chinese Materia Medica. In the present study, we employed a high-throughput comparative proteomic approach based on 2D-nano-LC-MS/MS to investigate the possible mechanism of action involved in the neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Differential proteins were identified, among which 13 proteins survived the stringent filter criteria and were further included for functional discussion. Two proteins (vimentin and Gap43 were randomly selected, and their expression levels were further confirmed by western blots analysis. The results matched well with those of proteomics. Furthermore, network analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPI and pathways enrichment with AGS-IV associated proteins were carried out to illustrate its underlying molecular mechanism. Proteins associated with signal transduction, immune system, signaling molecules and interaction, and energy metabolism play important roles in neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV and Raf-MEK-ERK pathway was involved in the neuroprotective effect of AGS-IV against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. This study demonstrates that comparative proteomics based on shotgun approach is a valuable tool for molecular mechanism studies, since it allows the simultaneously evaluate the global proteins alterations.

  3. Characterization of the Anti-Influenza Activity of the Chinese Herbal Plant Paeonia lactiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yuan Ho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bai Shao (BS, the root of Paeonia lactiflora Pall., a common Chinese herb in many recipes used to treat viral infection and liver diseases, is recognized for its ability to nourish menstruation, its Yin convergence, and as an antiperspirant. However, the mechanism and components for its antiviral function remain to be elucidated. In this study, an ethanolic extract of BS was further partitioned into aqueous and organic parts (EAex for in vitro functional study and in vivo efficacy testing. EAex exhibited an IC50 of 0.016 ± 0.005 mg/mL against influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1, with broad-spectrum inhibitory activity against different strains of human influenza A viruses, including clinical oseltamivir-resistant isolates and an H1N1pdm strain. The synthesis of both viral RNA and protein was profoundly inhibited when the cells were treated with EAex. A time-of-addition assay demonstrated that EAex exerted its antiviral activity at various stages of the virus replication cycle. We addressed its antiviral activity at virus entry and demonstrated that EAex inhibits viral hemagglutination and viral binding to and penetration into host cells. In vivo animal testing showed that 200 mg/kg/d of EAex offered significant protection against viral infection. We conclude that BS possesses antiviral activity and has the potential for development as an anti-influenza agent.

  4. Clonidine is effective for the treatment of primary idiopathic hyperhidrosis and hot flushes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albadrani, Ahmed

    2017-01-17

    While primary hyperhidrosis can be seen in men, accompanying hot flushes is rarely seen in men. Primary hyperhidrosis is thought to be related to overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system while hot flushes are believed to be related to altered peripheral vascular reactivity and a narrowed thermoregulatory zone. I report the case of a 29-year-old man of Arab origin who presented to a dermatology clinic with a complaint of generalized sweating, with heavier involvement of his inguinal region, axilla, and lower back. His complaint was associated with a transient hot sensation and erythema over the affected areas. He did not respond to topical antiperspirants containing aluminum chloride, topical aluminum chloride, or to botulinum toxin A injected in both inguinal areas. He was then referred to an endocrinology clinic to rule out secondary causes of hyperhidrosis and hot flushes; a primary diagnosis was confirmed. He did not respond to oral glycopyrrolate and additionally was complaining of its anticholinergic side effects. The glycopyrrolate was then replaced with oral clonidine 0.15 mg twice a day. Clonidine was well tolerated without remarkable side effects and he quickly started to feel marked improvement which was maintained for 2 years. I report an atypical presentation of primary hyperhidrosis and hot flushes that was effectively controlled by clonidine without remarkable side effects. Further research on a large number of patients may be required before recommending clonidine in similar conditions.

  5. Axillary hyperhidrosis: A review of the extent of the problem and treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Davis, Harriet; Wilson, Paul

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the extent of the problem of axillary hyperhidrosis and treatment modalities available. The benefits and disadvantages of various treatments are reflected on with the hope of providing a starting point to investigate new ways of treating hyperhidrosis. A literature search was conducted using various databases and search criteria. Current treatments include aluminium chloride antiperspirants, iontophoresis, botox injections and endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Botox therapy is usually the most effective treatment, without surgery or unpleasant side effects. However it has to be administered by a skilled clinician and involves around 20 injections to treat axillary hyperhidrosis. Other ways of giving Botox are being developed, the most promising one being the use of microneedles which are able to penetrate the skin and deliver drugs to the target area of the dermis without causing pain. In comparison to the temporary effects of microneedles, laser and microwave therapies are also assessed as they offer the hope of permanent relief from hyperhidrosis. There is a considerable dearth in the literature on the management of axillary hyperhidrosis. Further study in larger populations with longer follow up times is critical to access the long term effects of treatment. Microneedles could be the future treatment of choice with the potential to deliver drugs in a safe and pain free way. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemosignals of stress influence social judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Dalton

    Full Text Available Human body odors have important communicative functions regarding genetic identity, immune fitness and general health, but an expanding body of research suggests they can also communicate information about an individual's emotional state. In the current study, we tested whether axillary odors obtained from women experiencing psychosocial stress could negatively influence personality judgments of warmth and competence made about other women depicted in video scenarios. 44 female donors provided three types of sweat samples: untreated exercise sweat, untreated stress sweat and treated stress sweat. After a 'washout' period, a commercial unscented anti-perspirant product was applied to the left axilla only to evaluate whether 'blocking' the stress signal would improve the social evaluations. A separate group of male and female evaluators (n = 120 rated the women in the videos while smelling one of the three types of sweat samples. Women in the video scenes were rated as being more stressed by both men and women when smelling the untreated vs. treated stress sweat. For men only, the women in the videos were rated as less confident, trustworthy and competent when smelling both the untreated stress and exercise sweat in contrast to the treated stress sweat. Women's social judgments were unaffected by sniffing the pads. The results have implications for influencing multiple types of professional and personal social interactions and impression management and extend our understanding of the social communicative function of body odors.

  7. Compressed gas domestic aerosol valve design using high viscous product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nourian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current universal consumer aerosol products using high viscous product such as cooking oil, antiperspirants, hair removal cream are primarily used LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas propellant which is unfriendly environmental. The advantages of the new innovative technology described in this paper are: i. No butane or other liquefied hydrocarbon gas is used as a propellant and it replaced with Compressed air, nitrogen or other safe gas propellant. ii. Customer acceptable spray quality and consistency during can lifetime iii. Conventional cans and filling technology There is only a feasible energy source which is inert gas (i.e. compressed air to replace VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds and greenhouse gases, which must be avoided, to improve atomisation by generating gas bubbles and turbulence inside the atomiser insert and the actuator. This research concentrates on using "bubbly flow" in the valve stem, with injection of compressed gas into the passing flow, thus also generating turbulence. The new valve designed in this investigation using inert gases has advantageous over conventional valve with butane propellant using high viscous product (> 400 Cp because, when the valving arrangement is fully open, there are negligible energy losses as fluid passes through the valve from the interior of the container to the actuator insert. The use of valving arrangement thus permits all pressure drops to be controlled, resulting in improved control of atomising efficiency and flow rate, whereas in conventional valves a significant pressure drops occurs through the valve which has a complex effect on the corresponding spray.

  8. What Makes Us Smell: The Biochemistry of Body Odour and the Design of New Deodorant Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Today, axilla odours are socially stigmatized and are targeted with deodorants and antiperspirants representing a multi-billion market. Axilla odours aren't simple byproducts of our metabolism but specifically formed by an intricate interplay between i) specific glands, ii) secreted amino acid conjugates of highly specific odorants and iii) selective enzymes present in microorganisms colonizing our skin, providing a natural 'controlled-release' mechanism. Within a multidisciplinary research project, we were able to elucidate the structure of key body odorants, isolate and characterize secreted amino acid conjugates and identify the enzymes responsible for odour release. These enzymes then served as targets for the development of specific active compounds in an almost medicinal chemistry approach, an approach rarely used in the cosmetic field so far. Here we review the key new insights into the biochemistry of human body odour formation, with some remarks on the experimental steps undertaken and hurdles encountered. The development of deodorant actives and the difficult path to market for such specifically acting cosmetic actives is discussed. The basic insights into the biochemistry also opened the way to address some questions in population genetics: Why have large proportions of Asians lost the 'ability' to form body odours? Do twins smell the same? Are our typical body odours indeed influenced by the immune system as often claimed? After addressing these questions, I'll conclude with the key remaining challenges in this field on an ecological niche that is 'anatomically very close to our heart'.

  9. Sweat control in male by the use of alunogen and cypripedium pubescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Martini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of my study is to investigate upon the quality and quantity of the free fatty acids secreted by apocrine glands, as chief index to determine the real efficacy of a new model of antiperspirant-deodorant, that interferes directly with apocrine glands (by reducing drastically the secretion of free fatty acids and indirectly with eccrine glands, by minimising the salted water secretion. I created an innovative cosmetic formula that comprises the Alunogen, idest the heptadecahydrated form of aluminium sulphate, since the generic aluminium sulphate has been recently accused of the onset of the Alzheimer’s disease, when penetrating the epidermis, although definitive scientific proof is difficult to establish due to the lack of longitudinal studies, and therefore could be banished in the very next future. The formula comprises also the concrète of Cypripedium Pubescens (Lady’s slipper which contains, inter alia, the cypripedin, a quinine-analog, endowed by anticholinergic activities, that can be reputed useful as astringent agent with regards to eccrine glands, synergically to the action upon apocrine glands performed by alunogen. I recruited 11 young men, 11 bricklayers that customarily have to work 9 hours pro day after the hot summer sun and assert without doubt to sweat copiously, in order to carry out my experience.

  10. Aluminum-26 as a biological tracer using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flarend, Richard Edward

    1997-06-01

    The development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided a practical method of detection for the only isotope of aluminum suitable as a tracer, 26Al. The use of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum has made possible the study of aluminum metabolism and the pharmacokinetics of aluminum-containing drugs at physiological levels. An overview of the various advantages of using 26Al as a tracer for aluminum and a general description of the AMS technique as applied to bio-medical applications is given. To illustrate the versatility of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum, 26Al studies of the past several years are discussed briefly. In addition, Two novel investigations dealing with 26Al-labeled drugs will be presented in more detail. In one of these studies, it was found that 26Al from aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate vaccine adjuvants appeared in the blood just one hour after intramuscular injection. This is a surprising result since the currently held theory of how adjuvants work assumes that adjuvants remain insoluble and hold the antigen at the injection site for a long period of time. In another project, 26Al-labeled antiperspirants are being characterized by combining AMS with traditional analytical and chromatographic techniques. Future directions for this and other possible studies are discussed.

  11. Laser treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Jessica; Perper, Marina; Eber, Ariel E; Fertig, Raymond M; Tsatalis, John P; Nouri, Keyvan

    2018-04-01

    Hyperhidrosis o`ccurs when the body produces sweat beyond what is essential to maintain thermal homeostasis. The condition tends to occur in areas marked by high-eccrine density such as the axillae, palms, and soles and less commonly in the craniofacial area. The current standard of care is topical aluminum chloride hexahydrate antiperspirant (10-20%), but other treatments such as anticholinergics, clonidine, propranolol, antiadrenergics, injections with attenuated botulinum toxin, microwave technology, and surgery have been therapeutically implicated as well. Yet, many of these treatments have limited efficacy, systemic side effects, and may be linked with significant surgical morbidity, creating need for the development of new and effective therapies for controlling excessive sweating. In this literature review, we examined the use of lasers, particularly the Neodynium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers, in treating hyperhidrosis. Due to its demonstrated effectiveness and limited side effect profile, our review suggests that Nd:YAG laser may be a promising treatment modality for hyperhidrosis. Nevertheless, additional large, randomized controlled trials are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment option.

  12. Aluminium and breast cancer: Sources of exposure, tissue measurements and mechanisms of toxicological actions on breast biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, Philippa D; Mannello, Ferdinando; Exley, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    This review examines recent evidence linking exposure to aluminium with the aetiology of breast cancer. The human population is exposed to aluminium throughout daily life including through diet, application of antiperspirants, use of antacids and vaccination. Aluminium has now been measured in a range of human breast structures at higher levels than in blood serum and experimental evidence suggests that the tissue concentrations measured have the potential to adversely influence breast epithelial cells including generation of genomic instability, induction of anchorage-independent proliferation and interference in oestrogen action. The presence of aluminium in the human breast may also alter the breast microenvironment causing disruption to iron metabolism, oxidative damage to cellular components, inflammatory responses and alterations to the motility of cells. The main research need is now to investigate whether the concentrations of aluminium measured in the human breast can lead in vivo to any of the effects observed in cells in vitro and this would be aided by the identification of biomarkers specific for aluminium action. © 2013.

  13. Aluminium, carbonyls and cytokines in human nipple aspirate fluids: Possible relationship between inflammation, oxidative stress and breast cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannello, F; Ligi, D; Canale, M

    2013-11-01

    The human breast is likely exposed to Al (aluminium) from many sources including diet and personal care products. Underarm applications of aluminium salt-based antiperspirant provide a possible long-term source of exposure, especially after underarm applications to shaved and abraded skin. Al research in breast fluids likely reflects the intraductal microenvironment. We found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids (NAF) from 19 breast cancer patients compared with 16 healthy control subjects (268 vs 131 μg/l, respectively; p Aluminium content and carbonyl levels showed a significant positive linear correlation (r(2) 0.6628, p aluminium salts) we also found a significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNF-α) and chemoattractant CC and CXC chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1α and MCP-1). In 12 invasive cancer NAF samples we found a significant positive linear correlation among aluminium, carbonyls and pro-inflammatory IL-6 cytokine (Y = 64.79x-39.63, r(2) 0.8192, p aluminium ions in oxidative and inflammatory status perturbations of breast cancer microenvironment, suggesting aluminium accumulation in breast microenvironment as a possible risk factor for oxidative/inflammatory phenotype of breast cells. © 2013.

  14. Tap water iontophoresis in the treatment of pediatric hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagash, Haitham; McCaffrey, Sinead; Mellor, Katie; Roycroft, Agnes; Helbling, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    The treatment options for localized hyperhidrosis include antiperspirants, anticholinergics, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin and surgery. Tap water iontophoresis (TWI) involves immersing the affected area in tap water and passing a small electrical current through the area. Our aim was to assess the success of this therapy in a pediatric cohort. Retrospective case note review of all patients younger than 18years who underwent TWI between 2002 and 2015. Demographic data, number of treatment sessions, side effects and overall success were analyzed. Individuals undergo 7 treatments over 4weeks. A positive outcome was determined as an improvement in symptoms. Pre- and posttreatment hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) was measured. Data are presented as mean (range). Statistical analysis was by paired t-test. A P value of hyperhidrosis (PPH) was present in 39/43 (91%) patients. Axillary hyperhidrosis (AH) was present in 19/43 (44%) patients. All patients (with the exception of one) underwent 7 sessions (5-7). Side effects included paresthesia (88%), pruritus (26%), pain (26%), erythema (14%), dryness (12%) as well as vesicle formation and abrasions in one patient (2%). A positive outcome was found in 84% (36/43) of patients. There was a significant reduction in mean HDSS (pre 3.5 vs. post 2; P=0.0001). TWI is a safe and effective modality of treatment for both PPH and AH in the pediatric population, with minimal side effects. Pediatric surgeons should offer this treatment option before considering more invasive surgical procedures. IV: Retrospective study. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of axillary deodorant and effect on acute skin toxicity during radiotherapy for breast cancer: a prospective randomized noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théberge, Valérie; Harel, François; Dagnault, Anne

    2009-11-15

    To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

  16. Use of deodorants during adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a survey of compliance with standard advice, impact on patients and a literature review on safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, P H; Graham, J L

    2009-12-01

    Proscription of antiperspirant or deodorant use during adjuvant breast radiotherapy is common. The investigators were seeking an information base to facilitate design of an appropriate controlled trial of the use of deodorants during radiotherapy. The first component consisted of a survey of women after adjuvant breast radiotherapy seeking information about routine deodorant use and potential concern if deodorants were not permitted during radiotherapy. The second component comprised a literature search for any existing controlled evidence regarding harm from deodorant use during radiotherapy. Four hundred fourteen women completed surveys. Two hundred eighty recalled advice against deodorants. Two hundred ninety-nine women routinely used deodorants, 70% of whom used roll-on products. Forty-five continued deodorant use during radiation, 20 of these despite recalling advice not to wear a deodorant. Of the 233 women who routinely wore a deodorant but abstained during radiotherapy, 19% expressed a lot of concern about body odour and 45% were slightly concerned. Three controlled studies totalling 310 patients report specific deodorants versus no deodorant use which did not show statistically significantly increased skin reactions, but had only a small subset with axillary irradiation. The proscription of deodorant use during radiotherapy is of unproven benefit and causes body odour concern to the majority of women who are usual deodorant users. The next most appropriate trial would compare use of the usual deodorant versus no deodorant, would encompass a significant number of women with radiotherapy to the axilla or application of deodorant to irradiated skin areas, and include endpoints other than skin reaction alone.

  17. Aluminium chloride promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Tenan, Mirna; Ferrari, Paolo; Sappino, André-Pascal

    2016-12-15

    Aluminium salts, present in many industrial products of frequent use like antiperspirants, anti-acid drugs, food additives and vaccines, have been incriminated in contributing to the rise in breast cancer incidence in Western societies. However, current experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is limited. For example, no experimental evidence that aluminium promotes tumorigenesis in cultured mammary epithelial cells exists. We report here that long-term exposure to concentrations of aluminium-in the form of aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 )-in the range of those measured in the human breast, transform normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) epithelial cells in vitro as revealed by the soft agar assay. Subcutaneous injections into three different mouse strains with decreasing immunodeficiency, namely, NOD SCID gamma (NSG), NOD SCID or nude mice, revealed that untreated NMuMG cells form tumors and metastasize, to a limited extent, in the highly immunodeficient and natural killer (NK) cell deficient NSG strain, but not in the less permissive and NK cell competent NOD SCID or nude strains. In contrast, NMuMG cells transformed in vitro by AlCl 3 form large tumors and metastasize in all three mouse models. These effects correlate with a mutagenic activity of AlCl 3 . Our findings demonstrate for the first time that concentrations of aluminium in the range of those measured in the human breast fully transform cultured mammary epithelial cells, thus enabling them to form tumors and metastasize in well-established mouse cancer models. Our observations provide experimental evidence that aluminium salts could be environmental breast carcinogens. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  18. ANÁLISE SOBRE OS MÉTODOS E ESTRATÉGIAS DE PERDA DE PESO EM ATLETAS DE MIXED MARTIAL ARTS (M.M.A. EM PERÍODO PRÉ-COMPETITIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Maria Leite de Oliveira e Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mixed Martial Arts (M.M.A. is a sport that combines various types of fight modes in a single combat rule. It requires heavy training and attention to all details of the mixed martial arts in order for the athlete to be 100% fit and precise in the day of the fight. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods and strategies used in M.M.A. for weigh loss in the athlete’s physiological system, as well as to evaluate their performance. A questionnaire was given to the M.M.A. athletes for them to answer what they practice in order to accomplish rapid body mass loss. The program, Microsoft Excel 2007, was utilized for tab graphics. A total of 8 male athletes, from the ages of 21 to 35, responded to the questionnaire. The method used for weight loss by using sauna and antiperspirant clothes was 90% and the restriction of carbohydrate was 80% and liquid was 40%, being that this restriction and weight loss occurs in the pre-competitive week. These strategies cause harmful effects to the M.M.A. athletes, such as hormonal imbalance, electrolyte imbalance, cardiovascular system alterations, decreased renal function, impaired mental status in the long term, as well as mood changes. An Inadequate diet and short recovery time can lower the athlete's anaerobic performance, which prevails in M.M.A. This research can teach M.M.A athletes that through gradual changes and some nutritional rules, they can obtain a solution to impede rapid weight loss.

  19. Aluminium induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated cell death in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line is independent of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Husain Mustafa Rizvi

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and its compounds are used in the form of house hold utensils, medicines and in antiperspirant etc. Increasing number of evidences suggest the involvement of Al+3 ions in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have attempted to investigate the role of Al in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the regulation of p53 during neuronal apoptosis using neuroblastoma cell line. We observed that Al caused oxidative stress by increasing ROS production and intracellular calcium levels together with depletion of intracellular GSH levels. We also studied modulation of key pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and found significant alterations in the levels of Nrf2, NQO1, pAKT, p21, Bax, Bcl2, Aβ1-40 and Cyt c together with increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress related proteins like CHOP and caspase 12. However, with respect to the role of p53, we observed downregulation of its transcript as well as protein levels while analysis of its ubiquitination status revealed no significant changes. Not only did Al increase the activities of caspase 9, caspase 12 and caspase 3, but, by the use of peptide inhibitors of specific and pan-caspases, we observed significant protection against neuronal cell death upon inhibition of caspase 12, demonstrating the prominent role of endoplasmic reticulum stress generated responses in Al toxicity. Overall our findings suggest that Al induces ER stress and ROS generation which compromises the antioxidant defenses of neuronal cells thereby promoting neuronal apoptosis in p53 independent pathway.

  20. The effect of personal grooming on self-perceived body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Paasschen, J; Walker, S C; Phillips, N; Downing, P E; Tipper, S P

    2015-02-01

    Grooming behaviours, including the application of fragranced products, are thought to reflect a means of managing social impressions and self-image. Although application of deodorants has previously been shown to make individuals appear more confident to others, few studies have specifically examined the psychological effects of such rituals on the wearer. Here, we investigated how grooming behaviours affect self-perceived body image, a central component of an individual's self-image. In two separate experiments, using a psychophysical forced choice task, male and female participants with a normal Body Mass Index (BMI) indicated whether projected life-size images of their own body were bigger or smaller than their actual size. In the experimental condition, participants applied a fragranced deodorant before performing the task, whereas in the control condition, no product was applied. Our dependent measures were the point of subjective equality (PSE), the size at which participants report their body is subjectively equal to their actual body size, and the difference limen (DL), the amount of change in body size distortion necessary for it to be reliably detected. These measurements provide an index of attitudinal and perceptual components of body image, respectively. Both male and female participants who, at baseline, overestimated their body size, made significantly more accurate judgments about their body size, as measured by the PSE, following application of a fragranced deodorant or antiperspirant than they did in the control condition. This effect was seen in the absence of differences in perceptual sensitivity to changes in body size (DL) across groups and conditions. People who underestimated their body size did not show this effect. Of note, both male and female overestimators had a significantly larger BMI than underestimators. These results demonstrate that the attitudinal component of body image is malleable and can be influenced by everyday grooming

  1. Experimental Characterization and Hygroscopicity Determination of Secondary Aerosol from D5 Cyclic Siloxane Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanier, C. O.; Janechek, N. J.; Bryngelson, N.; Marek, R. F.; Lersch, T.; Bunker, K.; Casuccio, G.; Brune, W. H.; Hornbuckle, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes are anthropogenic chemicals present in personal care products such as antiperspirants and lotions. These are volatile chemicals that are readily released into the atmosphere by product use. Due to their emission and relatively slow kinetics of their major transformation pathway, reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), these compounds are present in high concentrations in indoor environments and widespread in outdoor environments. Cyclic siloxane reaction with OH can lead to secondary organic aerosols, and due to the widespread prevalence of the parent compounds, may be an important source of ambient aerosols. Atmospheric aerosols have important influences to the climate by affecting the radiative balance and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which influence clouds. While the parent compounds have been well-studied, the oxidation products have received much less attention, with almost no ambient measurements or experimental physical property data. We report physical properties of aerosols generated by reacting the cyclic siloxane D5 with OH using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) photochemical chamber. The particles were characterized by SMPS, imaging and elemental analysis using both Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy systems (TEM-EDS and STEM-EDS), volatility measurements using Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (V-TDMA), and hygroscopicity measurements to determine CCN potential using a Droplet Measurement Technologies Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (DMT-CCN). Aerosol yield sensitivity to D5 and OH concentrations, residence time, and seed aerosols were analyzed. TEM-EDS and STEM-EDS analysis show spherical particle morphology with elemental composition consistent with aerosols derived from cyclic siloxane sources. Measured aerosol yields were 20-50% with typical aerosol concentrations 300,000 particles cm-3, up to

  2. Systematic review of potential health risks posed by pharmaceutical, occupational and consumer exposures to metallic and nanoscale aluminum, aluminum oxides, aluminum hydroxide and its soluble salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C.; Karyakina, Nataliya A.; Yokel, Robert A.; Yenugadhati, Nagarajkumar; Wisniewski, Thomas M.; Arnold, Ian M. F.; Momoli, Franco; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    leads to intrinsic apoptosis. In contrast, the toxicity of the insoluble Al oxides depends primarily on their behavior as particulates. Aluminum has been held responsible for human morbidity and mortality, but there is no consistent and convincing evidence to associate the Al found in food and drinking water at the doses and chemical forms presently consumed by people living in North America and Western Europe with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Neither is there clear evidence to show use of Al-containing underarm antiperspirants or cosmetics increases the risk of AD or breast cancer. Metallic Al, its oxides, and common Al salts have not been shown to be either genotoxic or carcinogenic. Aluminum exposures during neonatal and pediatric parenteral nutrition (PN) can impair bone mineralization and delay neurological development. Adverse effects to vaccines with Al adjuvants have occurred; however, recent controlled trials found that the immunologic response to certain vaccines with Al adjuvants was no greater, and in some cases less than, that after identical vaccination without Al adjuvants. The scientific literature on the adverse health effects of Al is extensive. Health risk assessments for Al must take into account individual co-factors (e.g., age, renal function, diet, gastric pH). Conclusions from the current review point to the need for refinement of the PTWI, reduction of Al contamination in PN solutions, justification for routine addition of Al to vaccines, and harmonization of OELs for Al substances. PMID:25233067