WorldWideScience

Sample records for antinuclear groups

  1. Determination of Anti-Nuclear Antibody Seroprevalence in Adult Age Groups in Trabzon Province

    OpenAIRE

    Kaklıkkaya, Neşe; Akıneden, Altan; Topbaş, Murat; Aydın, Faruk

    2013-01-01

    Morinobu S, et al. Prevalence of disease-specific antinuclear an- tibodies in general population: estimates from annual physical examinations of residents of a small town over a 5-year period. Mod Rheumatol 2008;18:153-60. [CrossRef

  2. Antinuclear and third world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this book is about antinuclear, which describes nuclear and nuclear war, the lesson out of history, an idea of neutron bomb and antinuclear through life and thoughts. The second part of this book includes the relationship between human and antinuclear, threat of nuclear, third world and popular literature, for conversion of Japan, an atomic experience and literature and experience and testimony in Nagasaki.

  3. Safety, antinuclear and peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this report are two testimonies, Korean peninsula and nuclear problem including the US Army and nuclear weapon site in South Korea and antinuclear and peace movement in Korean peninsula, peace and church women, discussion on antiwar, antinuclear and peace, scripts of play on for peace nuclear kids, introduction movie prediction and guide and the business report of Korea Church Women United.

  4. Ideology, interest-group formation, and protest: the case of the anti-nuclear power movement, the Clamshell Alliance, and the New Left

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis analyzes the development of the Clamshell Alliance, the first and most successful anti-nuclear power protest group. The key question the dissertation asks is how did this organization stage such popular and well-attended protests during a period when leftist political activity seemed to have died out, and little mass protest was taking place. The thesis also explores why the Clamshell Alliance disintegrated at the same time as the anti-nuclear power movement's cause was gaining public acceptance in the wake of the Three Mile Island power-plant accident. The thesis finds that the principal resources the Clamshell drew upon to solve the problems of organizational formation were the activists, organizations, and ideology of the surviving New Left. The dissertation studies the struggles of the Clamshell Alliance as an example of the recurrent problems of leftist political activism in the U.S. It is concluded that only under special conditions can protest outside of regular political channels be both popular and effective. It is also proved that a larger organizational and ideological legacy of the sixties remains than is generally recongnized. Leftist beliefs continued to have adherents even after the protests stopped. Further, many individuals who came to political maturity after the sixties also were found to hold leftist beliefs. However, the political potential of this group can only be realized when an organization temporarily overcomes the barriers to mass leftist political action by developing an issue and a set of tactics that can appeal to leftists and nonleftists alike. Between such special acts of innovation the Left remains a political undercurrent outside of mainstream politics and without a means of effective influence because of its unwillingness to engage in conventional politics

  5. Anti-nuclear movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, heralded in the years after World War II as the answer to the world's energy needs, has in more recent times become the focus of intense ecological, political and economic debate. In this study, the current worldwide opposition to nuclear power is examined from its origins in expert dissent to the widespread development of grassroots activity. Chapter headings include: Social Movements: A Theoretical Framework; Creating the Preconditions for Public Protest; Local and Regional Opposition: Mobilizing the Grass Roots; Local Opposition and the Politicization of Nuclear Power; The Use of Local Opposition as a Political Resource; Local Opposition and Social Movement Analysis; The Removal of Political Stimuli: The Unpolitics of Nuclear Siting; Analyzing Host Community Attitudes: The Survey Evidence; Attitudes and Political Action of Nuclear Host Communities: Approaches and Explanations; Novel Siting Approaches and their Political Implications; Siting and Social Movement Analysis; Patterns and Outcomes of Nuclear Energy Conflicts; The Future of the Nuclear Energy Conflict. Throughout the text, analysis and theory are blended with detailed accounts of the growth and activities of individual anti-nuclear organizations in different countries. (author)

  6. Antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a social anthropological analysis of the antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee. This social movement was determined to halt the construction of proposed nuclear power plants in Tennessee, especially one the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) intended to build in Middle Tennessee. The data for the study were gathered by participant-observation interviewing, and the examination of documents from February 1973 through March 1975. The treatment of the data is based on transactional analysis and portions of the network model. This social movement was composed of a series of informally organized cells connected by a loose network of people who visited and talked with one another. Individual cells tended to be organized on a geographical basis, as was communication. Activity-initiators, however, often contacted antinuclear personnel in other Middle Tennessee cells. Movement activity for many of the antinuclear activists was short-lived. The strategic maneuvers of the movement utilized all the structurally and legally possible alternatives and the nuclear opponents hoped that the public would pressure public officials to oppose nuclear plants. Although the antinuclear activists worked very hard, they did not succeed in halting the planned construction of the Middle Tennessee nuclear plant. Indeed, they had not succeeded in the summer of 1977

  7. A review of countermeasures against antinuclear campaign in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In practical terms, the first antinuclear movement in Korea was initiated in 1982 when the Institute of Korea Anti pollution Problem was established by a group of dissentent, mainly the religious and students. Antinuclear movement has become serious social issue with increasing numbers of groups, and the influence has been expanded up to the general public. One of the notable characteristics of these groups is 'collaborative action' to demonstrate their capacity and to attract public's attention. In 1994, antinuclear groups extended the collaborative action to the international organizations, and two major international antinuclear events were held in my country - Visit of Greenpeace and No-Nuke Asian Forum. According to a survey conducted in October 1994, public support for additional construction of nuclear power plants has tended to rise from 61.1 percent in 1989 to 73.7 percent in 1994. Even though many Korean still feel a strong sense of attachment to the place they five and oppose the construction of nuclear facilities near their backyards they do not show keen interest on antinuclear activities in general. The lesson we learn is that wars are not -von by defensive strategies, however soundly based. A merely defensive response to antinuclear group will not do. We must concern ourselves with positive measures, based on our own initiatives both to maximize and promote the advantage of nuclear energy. It was reconfirmed that building trust and creating positive relationships with the media are the very essential task to achieve in nuclear PA activity.Advanced preparedness depending on the opponent's strategy and concentration of available resources ill greatly helpful to win the game

  8. Protest as participation: the significance of the antinuclear movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-nuclear movement includes a diversity of ideologies and strategies that has spawned an equal diversity of interpretations. The author examines the concerns of each group, focusing on environmentalists, scientists, feminists, churches, and other antinuclear activities whose organizations totaled 937 in 1980. She notes that while diversity suggests the grassroots strength of the movement, diversity has also kept it from achieving the coordination of effort that would give it political strength. Further, the movement reflects a general fear of technological change - as well as of nuclear power - a fear that can become enculturated as a desire to return to a smaller, more human scale. 22 references

  9. The anti-nuclear disinformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having briefly identified the origin of anti-nuclear disinformation in France in the ecologist movement, the author recalls the very different information that were spread after the Chernobyl accident, and how some aspects were immediately exploited by antinuclear ecologists. He also comments the various information and data which were published on this accident during the following years, notably about the victims, casualties and health impacts. He comments data published by international and French bodies or agencies (Nuclear Energy Agency, UNSCEAR, InVS). He outlines a continuous practice of disinformation by media, notably about wastes, evokes the consequences in terms of safety, risks and risk perception. He finally browses several issues related to the Fukushima accident

  10. Trends in anti-nuclear protests in the United States, 1984-1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondaatje, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report updates previous RAND research on U.S. anti-nuclear protest groups, examines trends in anti-nuclear and related protests, and assess what these trends may imply for possible terrorist violence, either by terrorists infiltrating the anti-nuclear movement or violent elements arising within the movement. Two recent trends in protest activity may signal greater militancy in the movement. First, the number of protesters who are willing to face arrest, fines, and imprisonment has steadily increased over the past four years. In the first eleven months of 1987, nearly 3,000 protesters were arrested for anti-nuclear civil disobedience, compared with 1,056 in 1984. Second, some large, diverse groups of protesters have stretched the ability of their own organizers to control events involving civil disobedience. Consequently, the number of skirmishes between protesters and security personnel has increased. Third, radical environmentalist groups previously uninvolved in anti-nuclear activities have recently organized protests at uranium mines. Regular involvement by such groups in anti-nuclear protests, coupled with the trend toward greater cooperation between peace activists and environmentalists over such issues as uranium mining, nuclear testing, land and sea use, and transport and storage of toxic waste, could signal a more volatile, though not necessarily more violent, future for the anti-nuclear movement.

  11. ANTI DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID AND ANTINUCLEAR ANTIGEN ANTIBODIES IN GRAVES’ DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    H. Mostafavi

    2005-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by presence of antibodies directed against thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor or nearby region. Other serological abnormalities like antibodies to double stranded DNA (ds–DNA) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have also been observed. We studied antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in our patients with Graves’ disease and compared them with control group. Sera of 84 patients (29 males, 55 females) with diagnosis of Graves’ disease were pr...

  12. Antinuclear antibodies: clinical significance of fluorescence patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-four patients with 212 sera positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were studied to: 1) determine the immunofluorescent nuclear staining patterns using Burnham's technique and simplified classification; 2) note the specificity of fluorescence patterns among the various connective tissue diseases; 3) study comparatively the fluorescence paterns employing 5 different antigen substrates; 4) correlate ANA titers and fluorescence patterns with renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It was observed: 1) most of the sera gave nonparticulate fluorescent patterns: peripheral, homogeneous, or peripheral-homogeneneous; 2) 55,5% of the patients had LE and most of those sera showed nonparticulate fluorescent patterns; 3) the sera displayed no specificity for any of the following antigen substrates: imprints of human normal spleen, frozen rat liver and kidney sections, frozen mouse kidney sections and perypheral human blood smears; 4) imprints of normal human spleen were the best substrate for accurate identification of fluorescent patterns; 5) sera from SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher ANA titers in relation to patients without renal involvement; both groups of sera gave similar ANA fluorescent patterns. (Author)

  13. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  14. Antinuclear antibody testing: discordance between commercial laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Aryeh M; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Abeles, Micha; Honiden, Shyoko

    2016-07-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test results frequently affect the course of patients' evaluations, diagnosis, and treatment, but different laboratory centers may yield conflicting results. This study investigated the degree of agreement between laboratory results in a group of subjects who had ANA testing performed at two commercial laboratories. This was a chart review study, in which all ANA tests ordered by the authors from one commercial laboratory over a 4-year period were queried. Corresponding patient charts were reviewed, and if ANA testing had also been performed at the second commercial laboratory, subjects were entered into the study. The primary measurement was agreement between paired ANA results, and we performed sensitivity analysis using varying criteria defining agreement (criteria A to criteria D [strictest to most lenient definition of agreement]). Other data captured included relevant data obtained through the course of evaluation (e.g., presenting complaints, exam findings, other laboratory data) and final diagnoses. Of 101 paired ANA tests, there was 18 % agreement according to the strictest criteria and 42 % according to the most lenient. Of the seven subjects with ANA-associated rheumatic disease, none of the paired tests were in agreement according to criteria A (two agreed according to criteria D). Our findings demonstrate poor agreement between paired ANA tests performed at two commercial laboratories. The low level of agreement may have far-reaching clinical implications. Specifically, this finding calls into question the reliability of ANA testing as it is currently performed and suggests that results may in part depend upon the laboratory center to which patients are referred. PMID:27044430

  15. Antinuclear antibodies are not increased in the early phase of Borrelia infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiewak, R.W.; Stojek, NM; Chmielewska-Badora, J

    2004-01-01

    In the literature, there are case reports suggesting that Borrelia burgdorferi infection may induce autoimmune diseases dependent on antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The present study was undertaken in order to verify this possibility in a prospective manner. The study group comprised 78 consecutive pa

  16. ANTI DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID AND ANTINUCLEAR ANTIGEN ANTIBODIES IN GRAVES’ DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mostafavi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by presence of antibodies directed against thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH receptor or nearby region. Other serological abnormalities like antibodies to double stranded DNA (ds–DNA and antinuclear antibodies (ANA have also been observed. We studied antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in our patients with Graves’ disease and compared them with control group. Sera of 84 patients (29 males, 55 females with diagnosis of Graves’ disease were prepared and level of antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA were measured and compared with 41 healthy persons (15 males, 26 females. The level of antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in patients and control group did not show any significant difference. Our results were different from other studies in other countries. The difference may be explained by difference in our method of antibody measurement or genetic background which needs to be confirmed by HLA studies of our population.

  17. Antinuclear antibodies are not increased in the early phase of Borrelia infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiewak, R.W.; Stojek, NM; Chmielewska-Badora, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the literature, there are case reports suggesting that Borrelia burgdorferi infection may induce autoimmune diseases dependent on antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The present study was undertaken in order to verify this possibility in a prospective manner. The study group comprised 78 consecutive patients (51 women and 27 men, median age 41.5 years) referred to our Department for the serologic diagnosis of Borrelia infection. The patients' sera were tested for Borrelia-specific IgM and IgG (R...

  18. Maintenance of nuclear knowledge in an antinuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work authors present the maintenance of nuclear knowledge in an antinuclear environment in Austria. Participation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in the Atominstitut in different courses, in research projects and education is presented.

  19. Public Attitudes on Nuclear Energy and Anti-Nuclear Movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More and more the Division of Public Information of the IAEA is contacted by journalists and members of the public as well as international groups whenever a nuclear incident or accident occurs or when there is even a rumour of an accident or incident. This has increased with the introduction of the seven step international nuclear event scale INIS of the IAEA. Under the INIS scheme Member States report nuclear events, incidents and accidents to the IAEA. An important purpose of INIS and its seven level severity ranking scale is to help media and the public to comprehend the degree of seriousness of any such events. Please allow me now to present a short overview on the attitudes on nuclear energy and anti-nuclear movements in different countries on the basis of my own experience. I want to point out that it is my own opinion and not that of the International Atomic Energy Agency. At the end of 1992 nuclear power again showed up as a considerable source of electricity production in the world. Overall 425 nuclear power plants were in operation in 28 countries. They provided about 17 percent of the world's electricity, almost as much as the hydropower plants

  20. Social-movement analysis of the American antinuclear movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing data from a survey of participants at the May 6, 1979 antinuclear rally in Washington, DC (N = 420), this dissertation explored some of the major structural and ideological characteristics of the American Antinuclear Movement. By organizing the data around three of the key analytical concepts in the study of social movements - mobilization, recruitment, and ideology - the author was able to derive from the demonstration sample a descriptive and illustrative analysis of those individuals, organizations, and processes involved in the national antinuclear crusade. Given that few researchers have actively studied the antinuclear movement beyond the scope of local or regional protests, this work constitutes the only empirical study to date examining a cross section of the movement's participants from a sociological perspective. It is also one of the few attempts to use a national demonstration as a social laboratory for the study of a social movement in general. In terms of the mobilization variables examined in the study, it was found that organizational networks, past movement activism, and individual resources were important factors in the May 6 mobilization effort. While less than one-half of the demonstrators were part of the antinuclear organizational network per se, most of them had been active in the major protest movements of the 1960's and 1970's. The demonstrators were relatively high in socio-economic resources and had occupational or educational schedules conducive to creating the necessary discretionary time for movement participation

  1. Stemming the tide of anti-nuclear activism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having taught nuclear physics at senior university level I have long been concerned by the gross misinformation dealt to the public on such matters. Having no connection with the nuclear industry I am uniquely placed to counter the ceaseless anti-nuclear propaganda in the media. Therefore I have embarked on a personal project to publish factual booklets for informing readers of the real issues. The first provides answers to forty widespread anti-nuclear claims, and a second one treats nuclear radiation in a non-alarmist way. Two more, on the nuclear fuel cycle and on the realities of alternative energy generation, are in preparation

  2. Systemic sclerosis without antinuclear antibodies or Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneeberger, D.; Tyndall, A.; Walker, U.A.; Kay, J.; Søndergaard, Klaus; Carreira, P.E.; Morgiel, E.; Deuschle, K.; Derk, C.T.; Widuchowska, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess patients with SSc who present without circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP). Methods: 5390 patients who fulfilled the ACR criteria for SSc and were enrolled in the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) database were screened for the...

  3. Abstracts of 3. congress of global anti-nuclear alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3 congress of global anti-nuclear alliance was held on 18-20 May, 2000 in Astana. There were 55 reports on different aspects of nuclear disarmament; nuclear safeguards; safe operation of nuclear power plants; rehabilitation of population and lands, damaged from many-years tests in Semipalatinsk site; radiobiological monitoring of ecosystems and others presented at the congress

  4. Antinuclear human autoantibodies as markers in Nicotiana tabacum pollen tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Poggialini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we report on the use of antinuclear human autoantibodies as specific markers in Nicotiana tabacum pollen tubes. The antibodies have been tested by fluorescence techniques using a confocal laser scanning microscope. All the antibodies showed specifc labelling pattern and the results, although preliminary in nature, could open new perspectives of research.

  5. Science in europe/the antinuclear movement takes hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, N

    1977-09-16

    Five months after the announcement of President Carter's nonproliferation policy, the common wisdom in this country is that Europe has hardly wavered in its rush toward nuclear power. The cry that "Europe will do what it wants whether the United States builds a breeder or not" is often heard from American nuclear interests, with apparent justification as the State Department has shown little visible progress in negotiating new agreements and some signs of retreating from its original goals. But popular protest against nuclear power has reached a pitch in Europe that would be barely imaginable today in this country, and the political strength of the antinuclear forces has become formidable, not only in Sweden where nuclear power was a pivotal issue last year, but across the continent. West Germany's research minister recently predicted that that country's two ruling coalition parties will vote for a complete moratorium on nuclear construction when they meet this fall, and some observers predict that any moratorium contingent on creation of a waste disposal site could last up to 12 years. Beyond public opposition, the plutonium breeder is running into trouble in Germany for many of the same reasons it has in the United States; program delays, safety concerns, and cost overruns threaten to undermine the claim that it can one day become an economically competitive energy source. Nuclear opposition is far from being a single-issue movement in Europe, as groups of many political persuasions embrace it for their own reasons. But as the following report by Nigel Hawkes details, the Carter administration policy is not the only thing holding back nuclear power in Europe.-W.D.M. PMID:17753327

  6. Anticardiolipin and antinuclear antibodies in the adult healthy Omani individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the prevalence and normal versus abnormal levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) in a healthy adult popultion of Omani's and whether a correlation exists in between aCL and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in this Omani population. A total of 521 healthy Omani individuals (333 males and 188) females aged between 17-54 years were investigated for the presence and quntities of aClL (immunoglubolin G (IgG)) and IgM isotypesusing a conventional enzyme linked immunosobrent assay. ANA were were detacted in this group, using standard indirect immunofloresence techniques. This study was conducted during the period 2002 through 2003 at the Immunology Laboratories, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al Khod, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman. The prevalence of of aCL in healthy Omani population was estimated to be 2.5% for IgG 3.1% for IgM. The cut off points for IgG and IgM were determined for the whole population as 22.5 IgG phospholipid (GPL) units and 15.7 IgM phospholipid (MPL) units, using the mean plus 5 standard deviations. Using these cut off values, aCL were not detected in the the majority of individuals (97%) and in the remainig 3% the levels were not very high. There was no significant difference between the levels of aCL in either the male or female groups and no significant correlation for the presence of aCL with the age in this studied population. ANA were detected in 76/521 (14.6%)of the population studied, with some individuals studied, with some individuals (0.8%) showing titers of 1:640, but there was no association with aCL. Although ANA is present in this healthy Omani population at high frequency and some individuals at high levels of aCL do not occur and their presence may be an indicator of autoimmune mediated pathalogy. (author)

  7. Distinction between antinuclear antibody and P-ANCA.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, S. S.; Lawton, J W; Chak, W

    1991-01-01

    To differentiate between perinuclear immunofluorescence staining of antinuclear antibody (ANA) and the perinuclear form of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (P-ANCA), the pattern after formaldehyde vapour fixation of normal human neutrophils was compared with that of standard ethanol fixation. Fifteen out of 17 myeloperoxidase antibody positive sera showed cytoplasmic staining on formaldehyde vapour fixed cells; 30 of the 32 ANA positive samples became negative or gave weak nuclear stainin...

  8. Prevalence and clinical significance of rare antinuclear antibody patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Pieter; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    While some of the more frequent antinuclear (auto)antibodies (ANA) patterns such as homogenous nuclear staining have been extensively studied, the prevalence and clinical significance of rare antinuclear antibody patterns are not well understood. For the purpose of this review, we defined rare patterns as patterns occurring in less than 1% of patients that test positive on indirect immunofluorescence. The prevalence of different ANA patterns was determined in 68,128 consecutive patients who attended the outpatient clinic or were hospitalized at the University Hospitals Leuven over a 14-year period (1998-2011). To avoid bias, we only included the first sample for each patient and patients who tested positive in the period 1980-1997 were excluded. There were 9268 patients who tested positive for ANA. With the exception of the clinical association of anti-multiple nuclear dots (at higher titers) and anti-nuclear envelope autoantibodies with autoimmune liver disease, there was no good clinical association of rare ANA patterns with the diagnosis of auto-immune disorders. The most important non-autoimmune cause of rare ANA patterns was carcinoma, particularly in patients with rare cell-cycle related ANAs. PMID:23583982

  9. Effects of phenytoin on man's immunity. Evaluation of changes in serum immunoglobulins, complement, and antinuclear antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardana, E J; Gabourel, J D; Davies, G H; Craig, S

    1983-02-01

    To determine the effects of phenytoin on serum immunoglobulins, complement, and antinuclear antibody conversion, a prospective, five-year longitudinal study was undertaken in 118 patients. Three major diagnostic groups were evaluated: 27 patients with idiopathic epilepsy, 50 with secondary epilepsy, and 41 with neuropathic syndromes without epilepsy. In addition, 83 normal volunteers were studied in a similar manner. Evaluations were performed prior to administration of phenytoin and at six-month intervals thereafter. Prior to treatment, patients with idiopathic epilepsy had a higher than expected incidence (13.5 percent, p less than 0.01) of low serum IgA (less than 61 mg/dl). Patients with secondary epilepsy and neuropathic disorders without epilepsy had a greater than expected incidence (9.2 percent, p less than 0.01; and 12 percent, p less than 0.01, respectively) of high serum IgA (greater than 417 mg/dl). Phenytoin treatment was associated with further decreases in serum IgA in patients with idiopathic epilepsy (p = 0.063) and secondary epilepsy (p = 0.008). Total serum IgE concentrations also decreased significantly in all patient categories during treatment with phenytoin. Minor decreases in serum IgG and IgM were noted, but serum IgD and complement remained unaffected. Antinuclear antibodies were observed with essentially the same frequency (10 percent) before and after phenytoin therapy. PMID:6600585

  10. The anti-nuclear credo - for or against?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Fukushima accident, the nuclear debate, dominated by the ecologists, seems to be closed. This book opens again the discussion about sensible topics: safety of facilities, wastes management, steps and cost of power plants dismantling, relation between civil nuclear industry and proliferation, nuclear energy cost, etc. In this book, the author tones down the reasoning of the anti-nuclear movement and supplies the necessary information to the reader to let him evaluate himself the pros and cons of this energy source. In a future world dominated by energy shortage and global warming, this book aims at analysing the energy question with lucidity and courage

  11. Environmental problems on Kazakhstan and the Nevada-Semipalatinsk antinuclear movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this coherent and consistently - argued article, the authors explore ecological problems in Kazakhstan, a process of Kazakhstan's integration into international antinuclear movement. They look at what a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing Semipalatinsk meant to peoples in Kazakhstan. The authors research a history of the Nevada-Semipalatinsk antinuclear movement. (author)

  12. Association of Immunofluorescence pattern of Antinuclear Antibody with Specific Autoantibodies in the Bangladeshi Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, S; Ahmed, S; Abu Saleh, A; Rahman, F; Choudhury, M R; Hassan, M M

    2014-08-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) is useful in the diagnosis of connective tissue disorder (CTD). Association of specific autoantibodies with the immunofluorescence pattern of ANA in CTD, noted in western literature has been considered as reference in all over the world. However, in Bangladesh no such research work or data correlating the autoantibodies and their ANA patterns is found. Objective of the study was to identify an association between immunofluorescence patterns of antinuclear antibody on HEp-2 cell and more specific antinuclear reactivities (e.g. anti-dsDNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen) in the serum samples of CTD patients. Serum samples of 152 CTD patients (Systemic lupus erythematosus, Rhumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, Systemic sclerosis, Polymyositis, Mixed connective tissue disease) were diagnosed clinically, attending at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during the study period of January, 2010 to December, 2010. Samples were subjected for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cell (ALPHADIA) in dilution of 1:40, anti-dsDNA by ELISA and anti- extractable nuclear antigen (anti-ENA) by Dot Immunoblot. Dot blot strips were tested for anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, anti-Scl-70 and anti-Jo-1. Out of 152 patients 110 (72.3%) cases were ANA positive by IIF on HEp-2 cell. ANA positive sera exhibited four fluorescence patterns such as speckled (50.8%), peripheral (21.6%) , homogenous (18.1%) and nucleolar pattern (9%). Peripheral pattern and homogenous pattern was predominantly associated with anti-dsDNA (p RNP (25.7%) then anti-Scl-70 (20%), anti-SSA (14.2%) and anti-SSB (5.7%). Multiple anti-ENA reactivities were identified in 34.28% cases. Peripheral and homogenous pattern is strongly associated with anti-dsDNA and speckled pattern may predict anti-ENA (specially ribonucleoprotiens). As a definite correlation between the ANA patterns and the group of antibodies was detected by dot immunoblot

  13. Detection of antinuclear antibodies by solid-phase immunoassays and immunofluorescence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Wiik, Allan; Høier-Madsen, Mimi; Lykkegaard, Jens Jørgen; Rozenfeld, Teresa; Hansen, Michael S; Samsoe, Bente Danneskjold; Jacobsen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are associated with several inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present work was to evaluate enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and compare them with classic immunofluorescent analysis (IFA) for the detection of ANA. METHODS: Seven enzyme immunoassays...

  14. Original Approach for Automated Quantification of Antinuclear Autoantibodies by Indirect Immunofluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Bertin; Noémie Jourde-Chiche; Pierre Bongrand; Nathalie Bardin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is the gold standard method for the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) which are essential markers for the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. For the discrimination of positive and negative samples, we propose here an original approach named Immunofluorescence for Computed Antinuclear antibody Rational Evaluation (ICARE) based on the calculation of a fluorescence index (FI). Methods. We made comparison between FI and vis...

  15. Antinuclear antibodies and the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    OpenAIRE

    Allard, S A; Charles, P. J.; Herrick, A. L.; McColl, K E; Scott, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the previously postulated association of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and porphyria 38 patients with various types of porphyria were investigated for clinical and laboratory evidence of a connective tissue disease. Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were found in 8/15 (53%) patients with acute intermittent porphyria. These patients were more likely to have had a recent acute attack of porphyria, but only one patient had clinical evidence of SLE. Antinuclear antibodies were not...

  16. Nuclear lobby group launches television ad campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is the green wave of the future, according to a television advertising campaign launched by Canada's nuclear industry and designed to help counter the anti-nuclear messages delivered by groups such as Green peace and Energy Probe

  17. Antinuclear, Cytoskeletal, Antineuronal Antibodies in the Serum Samples of Children with Tic Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işık Görker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available streptococcus infections in the development of tic and obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD is controversial. The autoimmune hypothesis states that during infection, formation of autoantibodies leads to an autoimmune disorder, which in turn results in movement disorders, tic disorders and/or OCD. In order to test this hypothesis, we assayed these antibodies in children and adolescents diagnosed with tic disorders and/or OCD.Material and Methods: Children and adolescents who were diagnosed with either tic disorders or OCD according to DSM-IV criteria (n=28, were compared with healthy controls (n=15 having similar age and gender characteristics. Regardless of a streptococcus infection history, serum samples of all patients and controls underwent antinuclear, cytoskeletal, and antineuronal antibody assay using indirect immunofluorescence.Results: The rates of antinuclear antibody positivity were 21% and 20% in the patient and control groups respectively (p>0.05. Antineuronal antibody was positive in 2 (7% of 28 patients versus in 1 (6% of 15 controls (p>0.05.Conclusion: These results suggest that such antibodies may not be involved in the pathogenesis of tic disorders/OCD.

  18. Anti-nuclear weapons activism in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This study is a response to the lacuna in empirical research into political activism and the nuclear issue and seeks to ascertain the social and value characteristics, political attitudes, and political behavior of activists in the United States and Great Britain. Consideration is also given to gender differences in light of evidence of an emerging gender gap in these two countries. The study investigates the common forces cited in two sets of literature - post-industrialism and anti-nuclear weapons movements - which provide a framework for analysis. Survey research data is employed to assess cross-national similarities and differences. The findings obtained indicate that while American and British activists exhibit common social and value characteristics, British activists appear more integrated in their political opposition to nuclear weapons compared with their American counterparts. Survey results indicate that the political-action repertoire of these activists is quite diverse, suggesting a new style of politics in advanced industrial democracies. Gender-based analysis reveals two important findings. First, activist American men differ significantly from the other three social groups in their attitudes towards nuclear weapons. Second, activist women in both national settings participate at a level equal to or exceeding that of activist men.

  19. A consideration on public acceptance on nuclear engineering. Anti-nuclear leader is radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many-times an introduction of nuclear engineering to the public, makes some confusion on their usage and safety aspects. Even what in easy to be understood to pro-nuclear people, could not be so easily accepted by the anti-nuclear people. It might be a big problem for them. To fill the difference between them, it might not go well because they do not know well on the nuclear, and anti-nuclear leader might be more skillful and attractive to talk to the people. He has a better technique to talk to the public. His talk makes the people to feel better to join to his party. But non emotional people would not go in that way, because he knows the way to think and his pile up knowledge points would not be broken down so easily. We should know the difference and use it to talk with the anti-nuclear leader. (author)

  20. Autoimmune thyroiditis in antinuclear antibody positive children without rheumatologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkachaisri Thaschawee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children are commonly referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for the laboratory finding of an Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA of undetermined significance. Previous studies regarding adult rheumatology patients have supported an association between ANA and anti-thyroid antibodies, with the prevalence of thyroid antibodies being significantly higher in patients referred to a rheumatology center for an ANA without evidence of connective tissue disease compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of thyroid antibodies in children referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for a positive ANA without evidence of a connective tissue disease. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who were referred to our pediatric rheumatology center between August 2003 and March 2007 for positive ANA with concurrent thyroid antibody and thyroid function tests performed who did not fulfill criteria for a specific connective tissue disease. Laboratory and clinical features were recorded and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe continuous data. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare proportions between variables. Results One-hundred and four ANA-positive patients with concurrent thyroid studies were evaluated (88% female, 93% Caucasian, mean age 11.9 ± 4.0 years. Half of patients had an ANA titer ≥ 1:320. The ANA pattern was speckled in 60% of the patients. Thyroid antibodies were detected in 30% of the patients. Anti-Thyroglobulin (ATG was detected in 29% and Anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO in 21% of the patients; of these children, 14% had hypothyroidism. ANA pattern and titer were not associated with anti-thyroid antibody positivity. Conclusion Thyroid antibodies associated with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, ATG and ATPO, were detected significantly higher in ANA-positive children without a rheumatologic condition (30% as

  1. A Comparison of Anti-Nuclear Antibody Quantification Using Automated Enzyme Immunoassays and Immunofluorescence Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baronaite, Renata; Engelhart, Merete; Mørk Hansen, Troels; Thamsborg, Gorm; Slott Jensen, Hanne; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal Bela

    2014-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) have traditionally been evaluated using indirect fluorescence assays (IFA) with HEp-2 cells. Quantitative immunoassays (EIA) have replaced the use of HEp-2 cells in some laboratories. Here, we evaluated ANA in 400 consecutive and unselected routinely referred patients...

  2. The anti-nuclear movement and its critics: the social base of support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of the anti-nuclear movement can be defined in terms of its current status and those actively involved in it, with the aim of delineating areas for combatting anti-nuclear protest. The ωnatural' course of a social movement tends to be cyclical. The anti-nuclear movement is apparently in the coalescence or second stage of progression. The Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility (CCNR) is a movement having many issues, concerns and strategies which typify the anti-nuclear movement. The strategy of the CCNR is to attempt to make the environment a major political issue which will polarize the public around nuclear power in Canada. The Canadian movement cannot achieve the status of that in the U.S. without first developing a tighter organizational structure and greater co-ordination, a large base of numbers and resources, extended division of labour, and regular political thrusts. It may also have to shed its environmentalist image and become a social and political movement. As environmentalists are the chief critics of nuclear power a sociological profile has been developed for them, including a breakdown of typical aims, beliefs, background and position on issues within the movement, as an aid to anticipating future actions against the nuclear industry. (J.T.A.)

  3. Blame for climatic catastrophe. An unholy alliance of reactor engineers and antinuclear campaigners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May be that dedicated climate protectors harm the climate than protect it? LWRs should'nt play a role in future because of their remaining risk but HTRs without this risk should be promoted and can so reduce CO2 emission. But envy of concurrence of the LWR lobby and dogmatic stubborness of the antinuclear campaigners take steps against this nonpolluting perspective

  4. The situation of anti-nuclear movements and the concept for development of public acceptance in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By 1989, Japan had 36 commercial nuclear reactors in operation. With a 28,700 MW total capacity, nuclear energy represents 17.4 percent in terms of capacity and 26 percent in terms of electricity generated. The Japan Atomic Energy Commission, in 1987, forecast nuclear energy at 53 GW or 25 percent of generating capacity and 40 percent of total electricity by the year 2000. Japan has seen an increase in the activities of the anti-nuclear groups in recent years. The increase has occurred because the sense of crisis due to excessive dependence on imported oil has eroded; there is more emphasis on quality and safety of life; there is unease and suspicion about advanced technologies such as biotechnology, computerization, space development, nuclear energy development, and mega-technologies, and lastly the nuclear energy utilities system for public awareness must be improved. Surveys in Japan indicate that 60 percent of people agree that nuclear energy is an important energy source, but there still remains uncertainty on nuclear power development. Japan's public awareness (PA) strategy is to strive constantly to attain a high level of safety and stability in operation, and to provide easy to comprehend information in a manner the public will be able to visualize the state of stable operation for nuclear reactors. the latter will include providing firsthand information to mass media in the event of failure or trouble. Also easy to understand pamphlets, videotapes, and books will be developed. Lecture programs and opinion advertisements int he nation-wide newspaper will be done. make nuclear energy more visible to people via tours and scale models of nuclear reactors. Finally the mass media must be given accurate information on nuclear energy to correct the misleading and inaccurate information of the anti-nuclear movements

  5. [Antinuclear antibodies without connective tissue disease : Antibodies against LEDGF/DSF70].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierau, R

    2016-05-01

    Testing for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence test (IFT) is regarded as a fundamental serological screening method for diagnosing connective tissue diseases (CTD). In the case of a negative result exclusion of certain CTDs is indicated, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and a positive ANA result is the starting point for further tests aimed at finding disease-specific autoantibodies. The recently discovered antibodies against lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/DSF70) deviate from the normal interpretation pattern in ANA diagnostics. These antibodies give rise to a characteristic dense fine speckled (DSF) immunofluorescence pattern in IFT and target the ubiquitously expressed nuclear stress protector protein LEDGFp75. They can be detected, sometimes in high titers, not only in patients with diverse disorders of the skin or eyes and with neoplasms but also in persons with relatively mild or unspecific complaints and even in apparently healthy individuals; however, they are less frequent in CTD. These anti-LEDGF antibodies can be found in all age groups with a tendency to a higher prevalence in younger people and the frequency does not increase in advanced age. The vast majority of anti-LEDGF carriers are female. The CTDs with isolated anti-LEDGF antibodies, i. e. unaccompanied by autoantibodies typical for the respective CTD, are extremely rare. Detection of ANA exclusively with a DSF immunofluorescence pattern and confirmed by a specific anti-LEDGF binding assay, does not therefore indicate the presence of CTD but is indicative of exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and an ANA-associated overlap syndrome, similar to a completely negative ANA result. PMID:26820723

  6. Correlation of antinuclear antibody immunofluorescence patterns with immune profile using line immunoassay in the Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wendy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunity status, individual response to disease and types of antibodies produced are well known to vary from person to person, place to place and probably from population to population. A broad spectrum of specific auto antibodies that have so far been associated with specific rheumatic diseases, as noted in Western literature, has been well taken as a reference standard all over the world. There is neither research work nor any data correlating the auto antibodies and their antinuclear antibody (ANA patterns with the immunoprofile in the Indian population to date. Aims: To understand a definite association between ANA patterns and specific antibodies in the serum in the Indian study population and to document similarities / differences with the West. Settings and Design: This prospective and retrospective double blind study was undertaken on the South Indian population referred for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence method and by immunoline methods. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of patients from a random South Indian population who sought medical help for rheumatic disease were subjected for ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF method and line immunoassay during the study period of 27 months. Serum samples were processed in dilution of 1:100 using HEp - 2010 / liver biochip (Monkey (EUROIMMUN AG. The serum samples which were further processed for line immunoassay were treated in 1:100 dilution on nylon strips coated with recombinant and purified antigens as discrete lines with plastic backing (EUROIMMUN AG coated with antigens nRNP / Sm, Sm, SSA, Ro-52, SSB, Scl-70, PM-Scl, PCNA, Jo-1, CENP-B, dsDNA, nucleosomes, histones, ribosomal protein-P, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA-M2 along with a control band. The analysis was done by comparing the intensity of the reaction with positive control line by image analysis. Results: The antinuclear antibody indirect immunofluorescence (ANA - IIF patterns obtained

  7. Respuesta autoinmune sistémica en pacientes con aterosclerosis coronaria Autoimmunity, antinuclear antibodies, coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor de la C. Heres Álvarez

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Se ha sugerido la existencia de un papel de la autoinmunidad en la aterosclerosis. Se realizó este trabajo para determinar si una respuesta autoinmune sistémica, caracterizada por la presencia de anticuerpos antinucleares (ANA, factor reumatoideo (FR y alteraciones de las inmunoglobulinas séricas (Igs está asociada con la aterosclerosis coronaria. Se estudió el suero de 2 grupos de pacientes; 41 sujetos con al menos 50 % de estenosis en las 3 arterias coronarias principales (EAC y 26 sujetos sin evidencia de lesiones coronarias (NEAC determinada mediante angiografía coronaria. Se determinaron los ANA mediante inmunofluorescencia en secciones criostáticas de hígado de rata; el FR por fijación en látex y la cuantificación de IgG, IgA e IgM por inmunoturbidimetría. Se halló que la frecuencia de autoanticuerpos detectados en el grupo EAC resultó muy similar a la del grupo NEAC (ANA: 17 % vs. 15 %, p = 0,856; FR: 7 % vs. 4 %, p = 0,559. Se comprobó que las diferencias de los valores promedio de las inmunoglobulinas séricas entre ambos grupos de pacientes no fueron estadísticamente significativas (IgG: 12,4 g/L vs. 13,0 g/L; IgA: 3,6 g/L vs. 3,6 g/L; IgM: 1,2 g/L vs. 1,4 g/L; p = 0,328, p = 0,946, p = 0.157, respectivamente.Se concluyó que según los resultados, la presencia de ANA, FR y concentraciones anormales de Igs séricas carecen de utilidad para identificar sujetos con aterosclerosis avanzada.It has been suggested that autoimmunity plays a role in atherosclerosis. The aim of this paper was to determine wether a systemic autoimmune response, characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA, rheumatoid factor (RF and alterations of serum immunglobulins (Igs, is associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The serum of 2 groups of patients was studied; 41 subjects with at least 50 % of stenosis in the 3 main coronary arteries (SCA and 26 subjects with no evidence of coronary injuries (NECI determined by coronary

  8. Treating the anti-nuclear allergy in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The British nuclear industry has set up a small group to tackle the problem of developing a Strategy to improve public attitudes towards nuclear power. The Nuclear Electricity Information Group (NEIG) aims to create a better public understanding of the basic issues and concepts involved in a nuclear power programme. (UK)

  9. Automated Indirect Immunofluorescence Evaluation of Antinuclear Autoantibodies on HEp-2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jörn Voigt; Christopher Krause; Edda Rohwäder; Sandra Saschenbrecker; Melanie Hahn; Maick Danckwardt; Christian Feirer; Konstantin Ens; Kai Fechner; Erhardt Barth; Thomas Martinetz; Winfried Stöcker

    2012-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on human epithelial (HEp-2) cells is considered as the gold standard screening method for the detection of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). However, in terms of automation and standardization, it has not been able to keep pace with most other analytical techniques used in diagnostic laboratories. Although there are already some automation solutions for IIF incubation in the market, the automation of result evaluation is still in its infancy. Therefore, the E...

  10. Antinuclear antibody and HLA-B27 positive uveitis: combination of two diseases ?

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch-Driessen, E.H.; Lardy, N.M.; Rothova, A

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis concerns two different clinical entities: firstly, antinuclear antibody (ANA) positive patients who have a chronic anterior uveitis with severe complications and often a poor visual prognosis; secondly, usually HLA-B27 positive children, predominantly boys, with unilateral recurrent anterior uveitis. Three patients are described who had a combination of clinical and laboratory features of both diseases.
METHODS—Retros...

  11. Comparison of indirect immunofluorescence and multiplex antinuclear antibody screening in systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Swistowski, Donna R.; Saddic, Nicole; Wang, Hong; Steen, Virginia D.

    2011-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibodies (IIF-ANA) are detected in approximately 90% of scleroderma patients, and the staining pattern correlates with scleroderma-specific antibody subsets. Solid-phase ANA assays that are dependent on multiplex bead technology (MULTIPLEX-ANA) are replacing immunofluorescence in many commercial labs; however, performance of these assays has not been compared to IIF-ANA in scleroderma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a proportion of ...

  12. Have we been wise enough in the past? Lysenkoism and antinuclear movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why is the anti-nuclear movement so strong? How come that it exists at all? It is easy to ask these questions but it is difficult to give an answer. In the Western World not many people are familiar with the development and demise of a pseudo-scientific teaching, commonly called Lysenkoism, that flourished in the Soviet Union from about 1929 up to 1966. During this period Lysenkoism did an enormous harm to the development of Biological Sciences in the Soviet Union and even to the overall national economy. In 1967, Zhores A. Medvedev wrote a historical account of that sad period. The book The Riseand Fall of T. D. Lysenko (MEDV 67) was published two years later in the United States (Columbia University Press, 1969), and in 1993 in Moscow (MEDV 93). On page 244 (MEDV 67), when discussing impact of Lysenkoism on the Soviet society, science and economy, Medvedev wrote: 'No single answer can be given to explain how an obvious pseudo science could maintain a monopoly for so long, nor how clearly harmful and absurd recommendations could be adopted into the national economy.' In the Western industrialized world , in the second half of the twentieth century, a very strong antinuclear movement developed that has almost terminated any further developments and applications of nuclear power for the production of electricity. The similarity between two movements exists, and, in my view, it is very appropriate to modify the Medvedev's statement as follows: 'No single answer can be given to explain how an obvious pseudo science, the antinuclear movement, could maintain a monopoly for so long, nor how clearly harmful and absurd recommendations to stop developments of nuclear power could be adopted into national economies of many nations.' The object of this paper is to review briefly the rise and demise of Lysenkoism, a much better known history of antinuclear movement and finally to discuss similarities and differences between the two. (author)

  13. Outcome of asbestos exposure (lung fibrosis and antinuclear antibodies) with respect to skin reactivity: an 8-year longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred seventy asbestos workers were examined during an 8-year period. During this time five consecutive surveys were completed. Skin tests with streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD), tuberculin (PPD), and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were performed in the middle of this period. The results of these tests were related to X-ray chest film results and the appearance of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). In all surveys, except the first, X-ray films with small irregular opacities with a profusion ≥1/1 belonged more frequently to asbestos workers who did not respond to SK-SD or PHA. Thirty-one cases of asbestosis were diagnosed at that time, 23 of them became asbestotic after the skin tests were performed. Asbestotic cases contributed more frequently to the group with energy as compared to asbestos workers lacking asbestosis. Furthermore, asbestosis was correlated with lack of response to second strength of SK-SD in males and PHA in both sexes. Lack of response to these activators was predictive of asbestosis. Asbestos workers with ANA frequently displayed a lack of response to the first strength of SK-SD, PPD, and PHA. This was partly due to the presence of asbestotic cases in the group. However, low responders to all these activators were found frequently in the group with ANA independent of the presence of asbestosis

  14. Prevalencia de anticuerpos anti envoltura nuclear y sus isotipos en sueros positivos para anticuerpos antinucleares Prevalence of antinuclear envelope antibodies and their isotypes in sera positive for antinuclear antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Arcavi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Los anticuerpos antinucleares detectados por inmunofluorescencia indirecta en células HEp-2 presentan una gran variedad de imágenes, entre ellas el patrón de envoltura nuclear que suele ser un hallazgo poco frecuente. Se procesaron 2594 sueros en los cuales se detectó un 37.6% de anticuerpos antinucleares. La prevalencia de anticuerpos anti-envoltura nuclear (ANEA fue del 1.2% presentando una alta asociación con hepatopatías autoinmunes (83% y baja con lupus eritematoso sistémico. En los 21 sueros de los pacientes que presentaron ANEA no se detectaron anticuerpos anti-ADNn hallándose 28.6% de anticuerpos anti-músculo liso y 19% de anticuerpos anti-mitocondriales. El corte triple de tejido de rata mostró ser un sustrato menos sensible que HEp-2 para la detección de ANEA. Al utilizar conjugados dirigidos contra diferentes isotipos de anticuerpos para la detección de ANEA, se encontró: 90.5% de IgG, 66.6% de IgA y 9.5% de IgM. Dos de los pacientes presentaron ANEA-IgA a altos títulos (³1:160 en ausencia de ANEA-IgG. En este trabajo se destaca la importancia de realizar pruebas complementarias que detecten anticuerpos anti-músculo liso, anti-mitocondriales y anti-ADNn, para orientar el diagnóstico clínico de los pacientes que presentan ANEA. Además, sostiene la postura de utilizar como conjugado para IFI-HEp2 anticuerpos anti-inmunoglobulinas totales en lugar de anti-IgG hasta tanto se clarifique el rol que juegan los anticuerpos IgA en estas enfermedades autoimunes.Antinuclear antibodies detected in HEp-2 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assay display a great variety of images, including the nuclear envelope pattern. This is quite a less frequent finding. Two thousand five hundred and ninety-four sera were processed, and 37.6% of ANA were detected. The prevalence of anti-nuclear envelope antibodies (ANEA was of 1.2%, with a high association with autoimmune liver diseases (83% and a low association with systemic lupus

  15. The Political Styles of Local Anti-Nuclear Waste Movements in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to analyse the political styles of local anti-nuclear waste movements in Finland. The main focus is on the tension between the environmental impact assessment process (EIA) and the activity of local opposing groups. According to the EIA Act the purpose of the EIA process is to provide information and opportunities for citizens to participate in planning. It therefore aims to enhance the transparency of the decision-making process. The Finnish nuclear waste company, Posiva Oy, made great efforts locally to create opportunities for participation, but was much criticised by local activists. My questions are the following: How did these local movements participate in Posiva's EIA process? What kind of local differences were there in participating and how can these differences be explained? And finally; what did the EIA process mean to the political styles of movements? EIA meant a temporary change in political style on local level. Firstly; because it brought science into local politics very clearly. Secondly EIA with the Nuclear Energy Act framed decision-making with a timetable, which Posiva emphasised when local groups wanted to make a decision immediately. Thirdly EIA enabled the problem to be defined according to local needs but on the other hand plan level EIA separated nuclear waste issue from the use of nuclear power. Fourthly dialogue in the EIA process favoured rational discourse. Although local views were heard, the process did try to teach the people how to speak with the decision-making system, in the system's language. Thus the purpose of EIA was to make the local discussion controllable. All the local groups, the Romuvaara, Kivetty and Loviisa Movements and the Friends of the Earth in Pori region, took part in EIA dialogue but the reactions were different. The Romuvaara Movement was very active in participating and succeeded in exploiting EIA locally whereas the Loviisa Movement tried to displace the whole process. The Loviisa Movement

  16. The Political Styles of Local Anti-Nuclear Waste Movements in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Matti [Univ. of Tampere (Finland). Dept. of Political Science and International Relations

    2001-07-01

    This paper aims to analyse the political styles of local anti-nuclear waste movements in Finland. The main focus is on the tension between the environmental impact assessment process (EIA) and the activity of local opposing groups. According to the EIA Act the purpose of the EIA process is to provide information and opportunities for citizens to participate in planning. It therefore aims to enhance the transparency of the decision-making process. The Finnish nuclear waste company, Posiva Oy, made great efforts locally to create opportunities for participation, but was much criticised by local activists. My questions are the following: How did these local movements participate in Posiva's EIA process? What kind of local differences were there in participating and how can these differences be explained? And finally; what did the EIA process mean to the political styles of movements? EIA meant a temporary change in political style on local level. Firstly; because it brought science into local politics very clearly. Secondly EIA with the Nuclear Energy Act framed decision-making with a timetable, which Posiva emphasised when local groups wanted to make a decision immediately. Thirdly EIA enabled the problem to be defined according to local needs but on the other hand plan level EIA separated nuclear waste issue from the use of nuclear power. Fourthly dialogue in the EIA process favoured rational discourse. Although local views were heard, the process did try to teach the people how to speak with the decision-making system, in the system's language. Thus the purpose of EIA was to make the local discussion controllable. All the local groups, the Romuvaara, Kivetty and Loviisa Movements and the Friends of the Earth in Pori region, took part in EIA dialogue but the reactions were different. The Romuvaara Movement was very active in participating and succeeded in exploiting EIA locally whereas the Loviisa Movement tried to displace the whole process. The Loviisa

  17. Screening for IgG antinuclear autoantibodies by HEp-2 indirect fluorescent antibody assays and the need for standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copple, Susan S; Giles, S Rashelle; Jaskowski, Troy D; Gardiner, Anna E; Wilson, Andrew M; Hill, Harry R

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated 5 commercially available HEp-2 antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) assays using patient serum samples from 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 50 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 35 with scleroderma, 20 with Sjögren syndrome, 10 with polymyositis, and 100 healthy control subjects. In addition, 12 defined serum samples from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and 100 patient serum samples sent to ARUP Laboratories (Salt Lake City, UT) for ANA IFA testing were also examined (n = 372). Standardization among the HEp-2 IFA assays occurred when they exhibited the same titer ± 1 doubling dilution. Agreement of the 5 assays was 78%. Within the specific groups of serum samples, agreement ranged from 44% in scleroderma serum samples to 93% in healthy control subjects, with 72% agreement in the SLE group. Variations in slide and substrate quality were also noted (ie, clarity, consistency of fluorescence, cell size, number and quality of mitotic cells). Along with subjectivity of interpretation, HEp-2 IFA assays are also vulnerable to standardization issues similar to other methods for ANA screening. PMID:22523223

  18. Effects of abstract and concrete antinuclear filmed presentations on participation in a petition campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal was to examine the effects of abstract and concrete anti-nuclear images and previous political activity on interest in the topic of nuclear war and participation in an anti-nuclear petition campaign. Subjects were 254 undergraduate students at Hofstra University in three political science classes, three psychology classes and three communication classes: 128 males and 126 females. They were assigned by class to one of three image conditions: concrete, abstract, or no image. After completing a questionnaire measuring their previous level of political activity, students in the concrete condition saw The Last Epidemic, a 30-minute video depicting the aftermath of a nuclear explosion. Subjects in the abstract condition saw Preventing Nuclear War-First Step, a 30 minute video conveying factual information about missile systems and the arms race. Subjects in the no-image condition were not exposed to a video and served as controls. They were asked to respond to a short questionnaire that elicited emotional and intellectual reactions to the topic of nuclear war. After viewing the video tape, subjects in the abstract and concrete conditions responded to a brief questionnaire that elicited emotional and intellectual reactions to the videos. Subjects in all three conditions were asked to provide their names addresses if they were interested in receiving more information on this topic. Subjects who provided their name and addresses were mailed, within 24-hours, a one page petition advocating an anti-nuclear position. Recipients were asked to sign the petition, gather as many signature as possible, and return the petition. Participation was measured by the number of signatures gathered. Data were analyzed by analyzes of variance. The type of image had no effect on either interest or participation in the petition campaign. A modest positive relationship was found between previous political activity and interest

  19. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several differe...

  20. The anti-nuclear credo - for or against?; Le credo antinucleaire - Pour ou contre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, Pierre

    2012-05-07

    Since the Fukushima accident, the nuclear debate, dominated by the ecologists, seems to be closed. This book opens again the discussion about sensible topics: safety of facilities, wastes management, steps and cost of power plants dismantling, relation between civil nuclear industry and proliferation, nuclear energy cost, etc. In this book, the author tones down the reasoning of the anti-nuclear movement and supplies the necessary information to the reader to let him evaluate himself the pros and cons of this energy source. In a future world dominated by energy shortage and global warming, this book aims at analysing the energy question with lucidity and courage

  1. Original Approach for Automated Quantification of Antinuclear Autoantibodies by Indirect Immunofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bertin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF is the gold standard method for the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA which are essential markers for the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. For the discrimination of positive and negative samples, we propose here an original approach named Immunofluorescence for Computed Antinuclear antibody Rational Evaluation (ICARE based on the calculation of a fluorescence index (FI. Methods. We made comparison between FI and visual evaluations on 237 consecutive samples and on a cohort of 25 patients with SLE. Results. We obtained very good technical performance of FI (95% sensitivity, 98% specificity, and a kappa of 0.92, even in a subgroup of weakly positive samples. A significant correlation between quantification of FI and IIF ANA titers was found (Spearman's ρ=0.80, P<0.0001. Clinical performance of ICARE was validated on a cohort of patients with SLE corroborating the fact that FI could represent an attractive alternative for the evaluation of antibody titer. Conclusion. Our results represent a major step for automated quantification of IIF ANA, opening attractive perspectives such as rapid sample screening and laboratory standardization.

  2. Pathogenic effects of maternal antinuclear antibodies during pregnancy in women with lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lupus is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects young women of childbearing age. Fertility rates in lupus patients depend on various factors, including disease activity, nephritis, and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies; however, after lupus patients become pregnant, different factors may affect the course of pregnancy, such as the production of autoantibodies, pre-existing renal disease, and eclampsia, among others. The placenta is a temporary hemochorial organ that prevents immunological conflict due to exposure to alloantigens at the maternal-fetal interface; placental regulatory T cells play a major role in maternal-fetal tolerance. Typically, significant amounts of maternal IgG class antibodies cross the placenta and enter the fetal circulation. This transition depends on the distribution of Fc receptors along the syncytiotrophoblast. The production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA is a hallmark of lupus, and these autoantibodies can form immune complexes that are typically trapped in the placenta during gestation. However, the entry of ANA into the fetal circulation depends on the IgG-ANA concentration and the FcR placental density. Maternal antinuclear antibodies with anti-Ro or anti-La specificity might be pathogenic to the fetus if transfused by the placental pathway and could induce neonatal pathologies, such as neonatal lupus and congenital heart block. Here, we review the experimental and clinical data supporting a pathogenic role for maternal autoantibodies transmitted to the fetus

  3. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis in patients with antinuclear antibody negative systemic lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Yeon; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Song, Soon Young [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) occurring in association with collagen vascular disease is an unusual combination that presents with intramural gas in the gastrointestinal tract. We report two cases of PCI, one with antinuclear antibody (ANA) negative SLE and the other with dermatomyositis, with a review of the relevant literature.

  4. Anti-nuclear Protest and the Public Acceptance Program in the Republic of Korea: A Sociological Intervention on Anyon Island, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we start with the description of the nature of AMU anti-nuclear protest movement, taking into consideration that the nuclear waste management program is an important political issue as it is linked to the problem of public acceptance of nuclear power. According to nuclear experts, AMU might have been appropriately chosen as the site for radioactive waste management, with a multitude of technical criteria, including site ecology, geology and seismic activity, local population density, land use, and proximity of hazardous facilities. However, anti-nuclear protest from the local population and administration has made it extremely difficult to carry out the government plan to find an acceptable site for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Nuclear power is one of the controversial but most valuable sources of energy production in the future. The first nuclear power station which the Korean nationals have ever has is Kori Plant in Youngness County of Kyongnam Province: it began to be constructed in 1970; and since its completion in 1978, has been under full operation. Since the construction of the first station, eight additional plants have been under either operation or construction. Unfortunately, however, a majority of Korean citizens have extremely imitated access to the information currently available and, as a consequence, they tend to treat nuclear power as the object of great fear and threat. Variations prevail with respect to the perception toward nuclear power, depending upon individuals, groups, and nations. Underlying a presentation of this paper are two propositions, which the World Health Organization had pointed out about 30 years ago: the public will need protection from undue anxieties and fears toward nuclear energy; and any nuclear enterprise will itself need protection from the repercussion aroused by these anxieties and fears, which may impede its work on the local, national, and international level

  5. Staining pattern classification of antinuclear autoantibodies based on block segmentation in indirect immunofluorescence images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqian Li

    Full Text Available Indirect immunofluorescence based on HEp-2 cell substrate is the most commonly used staining method for antinuclear autoantibodies associated with different types of autoimmune pathologies. The aim of this paper is to design an automatic system to identify the staining patterns based on block segmentation compared to the cell segmentation most used in previous research. Various feature descriptors and classifiers are tested and compared in the classification of the staining pattern of blocks and it is found that the technique of the combination of the local binary pattern and the k-nearest neighbor algorithm achieve the best performance. Relying on the results of block pattern classification, experiments on the whole images show that classifier fusion rules are able to identify the staining patterns of the whole well (specimen image with a total accuracy of about 94.62%.

  6. Demystifying the Positive Antinuclear Antibody Test in Children: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Martha; Tesher, Melissa S; Wagner-Weiner, Linda

    2015-06-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with knee pain, associated with a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA). She denied joint swelling or morning stiffness and remained physically active despite the pain. A physical examination was unremarkable except for articular hypermobility. Laboratory results were also unremarkable. Therefore, the positive ANA was determined to be nonspecific, and not concerning. In the evaluation of children with musculoskeletal complaints, unusual rash, or fatigue, an ANA assessment is frequently considered. When is this test most likely to be useful? What is the appropriate follow up for a positive result? Which results are concerning for an autoimmune process? This article reviews the literature to address these practical concerns. Understanding the indications for ordering an ANA, and the correct interpretation of a positive ANA, may reduce unnecessary referrals and costly tests. Moreover, the misperception that a positive ANA indicates a rheumatologic disease can cause significant patient and parental anxiety. PMID:26114367

  7. Detection and identification of antinuclear autoantibodies in the serum of normal blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vlam, K; De Keyser, F; Verbruggen, G; Vandenbossche, M; Vanneuville, B; D'Haese, D; Veys, E M

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in the serum of 485 healthy volunteer blood donors was assessed. Sixty two sera displayed nuclear immunofluorescence staining on Hep-2 cells using a polyvalent anti-Ig conjugate. In general, the titer of these antibodies was low (42/62 sera displaying a titer lower than or equal to 1:80). In only 23 sera were the ANA of the IgG isotype, which is the more disease-related immunoglobulin class of autoantibodies. In order to define the frequency of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens and dsDNA within this population, sera were further analyzed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Western blot and the Crithidia luciliae assay. One serum displayed weak antids DNA reactivity; another serum had anti-SSA/Ro activity. On Western blot several patterns were found. They could not be identified with any of the available reference antisera. PMID:8403584

  8. Antinuclear antibody detection by automated multiplex immunoassay in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op De Beéck, Katrijn; Vermeersch, Pieter; Verschueren, Patrick; Westhovens, René; Mariën, Godelieve; Blockmans, Daniel; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Fully automated multiplex immunoassays are increasingly used as first line screening for antinuclear antibodies. The diagnostic performance of such multiplex assays in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis has not been reported. Antinuclear antibodies were measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) (dilution 1:160) and by BioPlex 2200 ANA screen (antibodies to dsDNA, chromatin, ribosomal protein, SSA-52, SSA-60, SSB, Sm, SmRNP, RNP-A, RNP-68, Scl-70, Jo-1, and centromere B) in 236 patients with a systemic rheumatic disease at the time of diagnosis, 149 blood donors, 139 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and 134 diseased controls. BioPlex ANA screen and IIF were positive in, respectively, 79% and 90% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 60% and 60% with cutaneous lupus, 72% and 93% with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 100% and 100% with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 89% and 56% with primary Sjögren's (SS) syndrome, 36% and 36% with polymyositis/dermatomyositis, 5.4% and 6% of blood donors, 7.2% and 3.6% of patients with CFS, and 11% and 18% of diseased controls. BioPlex test result interval specific likelihood ratios increased with increasing antibody concentration. The simultaneous presence of at least three antibodies by BioPlex was found in 35% of patients with SLE, 4% with SSc, 100% with MCTD, 64% with SS, 7% with inflammatory myopathy, 0.7% of CFS and diseased controls, and none of the blood donors. In conclusion, test result specific likelihood ratios and the presence of multiple autoantibodies help with the interpretation of data generated by multiplex immunoassays. PMID:22387973

  9. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Mahler; Pier-Luigi Meroni; Xavier Bossuyt; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading syste...

  10. Choosing wisely: Review and commentary on anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2016-03-01

    Choosing Wisely®: Next Steps in Improving Healthcare Value is an initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. The driving forces for the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign include rising and unstainable health care expenditures and evidence that there is lack of fiscal stewardship of health care resources. The American College of Rheumatology and the Canadian Rheumatology Association published their top five Choosing Wisely recommendations, the first of which pertained to antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ANA subserology testing. Concerns about the wasteful use of these tests prompted an analysis of the expenditures attributable to ANA testing as a proportion of total health care expenditures and based on a financial model was in the range of 0.00125%. It is suggested that if the sole use of ANA testing is to add evidence to support a diagnosis when the pre-test probability is high, then the ANA test has limited clinical value. Accordingly, the goal of ANA testing needs to be reconsidered and expanded beyond an approach to simply confirming a diagnosis with 'intention to treat' to a goal of case finding of 'pre- or early disease' with an 'intent to prevent' disease. This an area where more significant inroads can be made in preventing end organ disease and thereby reducing health care expenditures HCE. One CW recommendation that bears emphasizing is that, with a few possible exceptions, repeat ANA or ANA subserology testing has little clinical value in monitoring disease activity or predicting a flare. PMID:26687321

  11. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome showing elevated levels of antinuclear and anticentromere antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Seisuke; Kasahara, Akinori; Tada, Shoko; Tanaka, Takehiro; Umena, Sachio; Fukatsu, Haruka; Noguchi, Toshio; Matsumura, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female initially visited an otorhinolaryngologist because of an impaired sense of taste in September, 2010 and was referred to our facility in October, 2010. She was diagnosed with Basedow's disease for which she underwent subtotal thyroidectomy in 1984 and arthritis involving multiple joints, primarily affecting her hands. In addition, the anticentromere antibody (ACA) level was markedly high. On physical examination, alopecia as well as hyperpigmentation of the dorsum of the hands and back was observed. Dystrophic changes of the fingernails and a bilateral thumb abduction deformity were observed. Antinuclear antibodies were elevated. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed the mucosa carpeted with strawberry-like polypoid lesions. Histopathological examination of the biopsied specimen of the stomach revealed a corkscrew-like appearance. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS). She admitted to our hospital in November, 2010. Oral prednisolone was administered with success. In July, 2012, her antimitochondrial M2 antibody level was elevated. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first patient with CCS, a history of Basedow's disease, and elevated levels of ACA and antimitochondrial M2 antibody. We consider the present case suggests CCS could be caused by immunological abnormality. PMID:25518819

  12. Nuclear energy in postwar Japan and anti-nuclear movements in the 1950s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2009-01-01

    The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 revealed the most destructive power to-date of man-made weapons. Their impact was so great that Japanese scientists thought that a bigger disaster could be prevented only if war was abolished. Thus they welcomed the international control of atomic energy. It was, however, only after the occupation that the Japanese general public began to learn about the horror of these atomic disasters due to the censorship imposed by the occupational forces. The hydrogen bomb test by the US in the Bikini atoll on March 1, 1954 renewed fears of nuclear weapons. The crew of a Japanese fishing vessel, the "Daigo Fukuryu Maru" (Lucky Dragon No. 5) suffered from exposure to radiation from the test. Even after the incident the US did not stop nuclear tests which continued to radioactively contaminate fish and rains in Japan. As a result, the petition movement for the ban of nuclear trials suddenly spread all over the country. By the summer of 1955 the number of the signatures grew to more than one third of Japan's population at the time. Under the strong influence of anti-nuclear Japanese public opinion the Science Council of Japan announced the so-called three principles of atomic energy: "openness," "democracy," and "independence" to ensure atomic energy was used for peaceful uses only. These principles were included in the Atomic Energy Basic Law established in December 1955. With this law, military uses of nuclear energy were strictly forbidden. PMID:20521422

  13. Anti-Nuclear Antibodies in Daily Clinical Practice: Prevalence in Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Y. Avery

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD, patients are screened for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA. ANA, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF, have a poor specificity. This hampers interpretation of positive results in clinical settings with low pretest probability of SARD. We hypothesized that the utility of positive ANA IIF results increases from primary to tertiary care. We retrospectively determined ANA, anti-ENA, and anti-dsDNA antibody prevalence in patient cohorts from primary (n=1453, secondary (n=1621, and tertiary (n=1168 care settings. Results reveal that from primary care to tertiary care, ANA prevalence increases (6.2, 10.8, and 16.0%, resp.. Moreover, in primary care low titres (70% versus 51% and 52% in secondary and tertiary care, resp. are more frequent and anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities are less prevalent (21% versus 39% in secondary care. Typically, in tertiary care the prevalence of anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities (21% is lower than expected. From this descriptive study we conclude that positive ANA IIF results are more prone to false interpretation in clinical settings with low pretest probabilities for SARD, as in primary care. Whether alternative approaches, that is, immunoadsorption of anti-DFS70 antibodies or implementation of anti-ENA screen assays, perform better, needs to be determined.

  14. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  15. A Comparison of Anti-Nuclear Antibody Quantification Using Automated Enzyme Immunoassays and Immunofluorescence Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Baronaite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA have traditionally been evaluated using indirect fluorescence assays (IFA with HEp-2 cells. Quantitative immunoassays (EIA have replaced the use of HEp-2 cells in some laboratories. Here, we evaluated ANA in 400 consecutive and unselected routinely referred patients using IFA and automated EIA techniques. The IFA results generated by two independent laboratories were compared with the EIA results from antibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, from ANA screening, and from tests of the seven included subantigens. The final IFA and EIA results for 386 unique patients were compared. The majority of the results were the same between the two methods (n=325, 84%; however, 8% (n=30 yielded equivocal results (equivocal-negative and equivocal-positive and 8% (n=31 yielded divergent results (positive-negative. The results showed fairly good agreement, with Cohen’s kappa value of 0.30 (95% confidence interval (CI = 0.14–0.46, which decreased to 0.23 (95% CI = 0.06–0.40 when the results for dsDNA were omitted. The EIA method was less reliable for assessing nuclear and speckled reactivity patterns, whereas the IFA method presented difficulties detecting dsDNA and Ro activity. The automated EIA method was performed in a similar way to the conventional IFA method using HEp-2 cells; thus, automated EIA may be used as a screening test.

  16. Biosensor for total antinuclear antibody determination at the point-of-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N

    2016-09-15

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are important in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with autoimmune conditions. The current increase in ANA requests is driven by broadening the use of ANA from a test for lupus to a test for diverse autoimmune diseases, but the standard method is protracted, cumbersome and prone to error. We describe an electrochemical method for quantifying total ANA for use as a point-of-care diagnostic aid. In this technology the target autoantigens are derived from a protein/nucleoprotein mixture prepared from an inexpensive source and adsorbed to a porous membrane with high protein binding capacity. Serum is slowly drawn through the membrane comprising the high density autoantigen mixture to induce rapid binding of patient autoantibodies. After rinsing, peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG is drawn through the membrane followed by rinsing, insertion of an electrode assembly, and addition of the enzyme substrate. Substrate peroxidation is measured by microamperage-level current accompanying electrochemical reduction of the intermediate product. Values are comparable to a standard ANA test but require a total processing time of ~20min. This method has the promise to greatly expand ANA testing in clinical settings for initial patient assessment of autoimmune disease. PMID:27132005

  17. Prevalence of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies associated with chronic exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals in well water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Criteria for the recognition of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were applied to 362 subjects exposed to trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, inorganic chromium, and other chemicals in water obtained from wells in an industrially contaminated aquifer in Tucson, Arizona. Their antinuclear autoantibodies were measured by fluorescence (FANA) in serum. Ten patients with clinical SLE and/or other collagen-vascular diseases were considered separately. Results were compared to an Arizona control group, to published series, and to laboratory controls. Frequencies of each of 10 ARA symptoms were higher in exposed subjects than in any comparison group except those with clinical SLE. The number of subjects with 4 or more symptoms was 2.3 times higher compared to referent women and men. FANA titers > 1:80 was approximately 2.3 times higher in women but equally frequent in men as in laboratory controls. ARA score and FANA rank were correlated with a coefficient (cc) of .1251, r{sup 2} = .0205 in women and this correlation was almost statistically significant in men cc = .1282, r{sup 2} = .0253. In control men and women neither correlation was significant. Long-term low-dose exposure to TCE and other chemicals in contaminated well water significantly increased symptoms of lupus erthematosus as perceived by the ARA score and the increased FANA titers.

  18. Identification of specific antinuclear antibodies in dogs using a line immunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Hanna D; Lattwein, Erik; Renneker, Stefanie; Lilliehöök, Inger; Rönnelid, Johan; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2015-12-15

    Circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are commonly present in the systemic autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and in other systemic rheumatic diseases, in humans as well as in dogs. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF)-ANA test is the standard method for detecting ANA. Further testing for specific ANA with immunoblot techniques or ELISAs is routinely performed in humans to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Several specific ANA identified in humans have been identified also in suspected canine SLE but, in contrast to humans, investigation of autoantibodies in canine SLE is mainly restricted to the IIF-ANA test. Our aim was to identify both known and novel specific ANA in dogs and to investigate if different IIF-ANA patterns are associated with different specific ANA in dogs. Sera from 240 dogs with suspicion of autoimmune disease (210 IIF-ANA positive (ANA(pos)) and 30 IIF-ANA negative (ANA(neg))) as well as sera from 27 healthy controls were included. The samples were analysed with a line immunoassay, LIA (Euroline ANA Profile 5, Euroimmun, Lübeck, Germany) and four different ELISAs (Euroimmun). The ANA(pos) dogs were divided in two groups depending on the type of IIF-ANA pattern. Of the 210 ANA(pos) samples 68 were classified as ANA homogenous (ANA(H)) and 141 as ANA speckled (ANA(S)), one sample was not possible to classify. Dogs in the ANA(H) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) and anti-nucleosome ANA. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were confirmed in some dogs with the Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT). The frequency of ANA(H) dogs with values above those observed in the healthy group was significantly higher compared to ANA(S) dogs for anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-histone reactivity. Dogs in the ANA(S) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-ribonucleoproteins (RNP) and

  19. Chronic malaria revealed by a new fluorescence pattern on the antinuclear autoantibodies test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Hommel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA. METHODS: We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. RESULTS: We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. CONCLUSION: In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy.

  20. Evaluation of Anti-Nuclear antibody test results in clinical practice

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    Nevreste Çelikbilek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Aim of this study is to evaluate anti-nuclear antibody (ANA test results obtained between 2009 and 2011. Methods: Of a totally 5068 cases tested for ANA by indirect immunofluorescence method (IIFA, randomly chosen 982 ANA-positive cases were reviewed in terms of gender, level and pattern of fluorescence, anti-dsDNA (anti-double stranded DNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA profile. Anti-dsDNA levels and anti-ENA profiles were determined by enzyme linked immune assay (ELISA and immune-blotting (IB, respectively. Results: Sex distribution of ANA positive patients was determined as 756 (77% females and 226 (23% males. Fifty per cent of the cases were from rheumatology department, 20% from gastroenterology and 30% from other units. Fluorescence levels were considered borderline or weak positive in 62.6% of the samples. The most frequent patterns were homogeneous (23%, speckled (22%, homogeneous-speckled (15.5% and nucleolar (13.5%. Anti-dsDNA were studied in 759 ANA positive patients and 66 (8.7% samples were found positive, being 44 of them (68.8% with homogeneous pattern and the rest with speckled, nucleolar, nuclear dots, centromeric or midbody patterns. Totally 131 (31.6% of 414 samples studied for anti-ENA profile were found positive. The first four frequent profiles were SSA (34.4%, SSA-SSB (16.8%, Scl70 (16% and Sm/RNP (9.2%. Conclusion: Our results are similar with the current related literature. It is known that autoantibodies can be detectable before clinical symptoms being apparent, especially in SLE. Therefore, borderline or weak fluorescence levels should also be reported and the patients having them should be followed-up carefully. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(2: 63-68

  1. Comparative evaluations of the detection of antinuclear antibodies by means of various immunofluorescence techniques and by means of a radioimmunoassay under particular consideration of disseminated Lupus erythematodus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On a group of 146 test persons (in 50 cases desseminated lupus erythematodus had been confirmed), for the first time comparative evaluations were made with four methods (A to D) under the application of a repurified fluorescinisothiocyanat FITC) serum, in order to detect antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The ANA detection was obtained by immunofluorescence (IFL) on frozen sections of mouse livers; by IFL on chicken erythrocytes smears, previously treated with hydrochloric acid; by IFL on ethanol-fixed flagellates Crithidia luciliae; and by the radioimmunoassay (RIA) of a test kit with reference sera. These two tests served to detect antibodies - with respect to negative DNA - which are of particular importance in lupous nephritis. A good correlation of both methods was proved by means of various statistic methods and by follow-up observations and examinations of the reference sera. Possible reasons responsible for the deviations, which were found between the two tests, are described. Of all 4 tests, RIA and IFL on Crithida resulted to be the most closely ones to the relevant laboratory values and reflect very evidently the activity of the desseminated lupus erethematodus. The particularly well correlation with the blood sedimentation rate, proteinuria and with the complement level becomes very obvious. The advantages and disadvantages of the applied methods are discussed and it is emphasized that at present the method of choice for the detection of DNA antibodies is the combined examination of the patient serum, both, in the IFL on Crithidia and in the RIA. (orig./MG)

  2. Screening for IgG4-type anti-nuclear antibodies in IgG4-related disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyama, Kazuhiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Kandou, Tsugumitsu; Hosono, Yuji; Kitagori, Koji; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Ohmura, Koichiro; Fujii, Takao; Kawabata, Daisuke; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and infiltration of IgG4+ plasma cells into multiple organs. It is not known whether serum IgG4 is autoreactive in IgG4-RD. Methods We measured anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) in 19 IgG4-RD cases, determined IgG subclasses of the ANA, and compared them with those of other systemic autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis), using sub...

  3. Use and predictive value of the determination of antinuclear antibodies in a national health reference hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective review of the clinical and demographic data was made in a teaching hospital of 950 beds. A consecutive sample of inpatients and outpatients with medical request of indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibodies test (IIF-ANA) in a period of 18 months was taken to define the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPP) of the IIF-ANA, anti-ds DNA antibodies, and anti-extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) for the diagnosis of SLE and connectivopathies. The PPV and the NPP of the IIF-ANA for the detection of anti-DNA antibodies and anti-ENA were also calculated. It was found that 2 113 patients had been referred for the determination of IIF-ANA, of whom 273 were determined anti-doble strand DNA antibodies (anti-ds DNA) and 233 anti-extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA). 651 were registered with diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD), and 97 of them with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The predictive values of the positive results of IFI-ANA for the CTD and SLE were 59.8 and 22.8 %, respectively, whereas this same value of the anti-ENA for the CTD was 99.0 %, and that of the anti-ds DNA for the SLE was 97.3 %. The predictive values of the negative results of the IFI-ANA for the CTD and the SLE were 76.0 and 99.7 %, respectively. The predictive value of the negative results of the anti-ENA for the CTD was 28.4 % and that of the anti-ds DNA for the SLE was 87.9 %. It was concluded that most of the results of the IIF-ANA were negative and they were required for patients without connectivopathies, which gave rise to low predictive values and to a questionable clinical usefulness. These data suggest an inadequate overuse of the IIF-ANA test out of a logical clinical context. This situation may be corrected with a careful pre selection of the patients based on the presence of various recognized clinical criteria of the connectivopathies

  4. The political construction of the nuclear energy issue and its impact on the mobilization of anti-nuclear movements in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the relation between objective conditions and grievances on the one hand, and the construction of the nuclear energy 'problem' and the mobilization of anti-nuclear movements in Western Europe, on the other. Using data on protest reactions to the Chernobyl disaster in Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, we first discuss the effects of so-called 'suddenly imposed grievances'. We then turn to the frame alignment model, which emphasizes the importance of processes of definition and interpretation for the mobilization of social movements, and confront this model with data on public attitudes towards nuclear energy and anti-nuclear movement mobilization in Western Europe. Our analysis indicates that objective conditions as such have little explanatory power, and that similar events and conditions have led to widely diverging interpretations and levels of anti-nuclear mobilization in different countries. We find that the differential success of the interpretative efforts of anti-nuclear movements does neither depend on the nature of the discursive struggle itself, nor on the evidential base for the anti-nuclear movement's claims. Our data show that the movements' political opportunities, and the resulting cross-national variations in the degree to which anti-nuclear movements have been able to block or slow down the expansion of nuclear energy, have been crucial determinants both of the movements' impacts on public opinion, and of the movements' levels of mobilization. We therefore conclude that a combination of the political opportunity and framing perspectives is most fruitful in making sense of the differential careers of the nuclear energy conflict in Western Europe. (orig.)

  5. Avaliação clínico-laboratorial de pacientes com síndrome antifosfolípide primária segundo a frequência de anticorpos antinucleares (FAN Hep-2 Clinical and laboratory evaluation of patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome according to the frequency of antinuclear antibodies (ANA Hep-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozélio Freire de Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a frequência de manifestações clínicas e laboratoriais em pacientes com síndrome antifosfolípide primária (SAFP com anticorpos antinucleares positivos (FAN Hep-2+, comparados àqueles com esses anticorpos negativos (FAN Hep-2 -. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal em 58 pacientes (82,8% mulheres com SAFP. Foram avaliados os dados demográficos, clínicos, comorbidades, medicações e anticorpos antifosfolípides. RESULTADOS: Dos 58 pacientes incluídos no estudo, vinte (34,5% apresentaram presença de FAN Hep-2. Comparando-se o grupo de pacientes FAN Hep-2+ com aqueles FAN Hep-2 -, verificou-se que ambos os grupos de pacientes com SAFP não diferiram estatisticamente em relação aos dados demográficos, bem como em relação ao tempo de doença. Em relação às manifestações clínicas e laboratoriais, o grupo com FAN Hep-2 + apresentou maior frequência de trombose venosa profunda (85 versus 52,6%, P = 0,04, uma frequência estatística e significativamente maior de anticardiolipina IgG (85 versus 52,6%, P = 0,02 e uma tendência para anticardiolipina IgM (80% versus 52,6%, P = 0,05, bem como maiores medianas desses anticorpos [33 (0-128 versus 20 (0-120 GPL, P = 0,008] e [33 (0-120 versus 18,5 (0-120 MPL, P = 0,009]. Tal diferença não foi observada no que se refere a outras manifestações da SAF, presença de comorbidades, estilo de vida e uso de medicações. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes com SAFP que apresentam FAN Hep-2+ têm maior frequência de trombose venosa profunda e anticardiolipinas IgG e IgM.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of clinical and laboratory manifestations in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS with positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA Hep-2+ compared to those in whom this antibody is negative (ANA Hep-2-. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a transversal study with 58 patients (82.8% females with PAPS. Demographic and clinical data, comorbidities, medications, and

  6. Current concepts and future directions for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges. PMID:24868563

  7. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mahler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA, is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD. Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges.

  8. [Evaluation of a Computer-Aided Microscope System and Its Anti-Nuclear Antibody Test Kit for Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuhide; Saegusa, Jun; Uto, Kenichi; Oyabu, Chinami; Saito, Toshiharu; Sato, Itsuko; Kawano, Seiji; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2016-02-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing is indispensable for diagnosing and understanding clinical conditions of autoimmune diseases. The indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is the gold standard for ANA screening, and it can detect more than 100 different antibodies, such as anti-PCNA as well as anti-cytoplasmic antibodies. However, complicated procedures of conventional IFA and visual interpretation require highly skilled laboratory staff. This study evaluates the capability, characteristics, and applicability of the recently developed ANA detection system (EUROPattern Cosmic IFA System, EPA) using HEp20-10 cells and the automated pattern recognition microscope. Findings using EPA and conventional methods were compared in 282 sera obtained from connective tissue disease patients and 250 sera from healthy individuals. The concordance of the positivity rate, antibody titer (within +/- 1 tube difference), and the accurate recognition rate of ANA patterns between the automated EPA method and the microscopic judgement of the EPA image by eye was 98.9, 97.4, and 55.3%, respectively. The EPA method showed concordance of the positivity rate as high as 93.3% and concordance of the antibody titer as high as 94.0% (within +/- 1 titer) compared with the conventional method. Regarding the four typical patterns of ANA (homogeneous, speckled, nucleolar, and centromere), large differences between the EPA and conventional methods were not observed, and the rate of concordance between the final EPA result and the conventional method was from 94.1 to 100%. The positivity rate of ANA using the EPA and conventional methods showed marked agreement among the six connective tissue diseases (SLE, MCTD, SSc, PM/DM, and SS) and healthy individuals. Although the EPA system is not considered a complete system and laboratory staff should verify the results, it is a useful system for routine ANA analysis because it contributes to ANA standardization and an efficient workflow. PMID:27311277

  9. Prevalence of antinuclear and anti-liver-kidney-microsome type-1 antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Li; FENG Zhen-ru; LU Hai-ying; LI Wen-gang; YU Min; XU Xiao-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may induce autoimmune response and autoantibodies can be detected in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. However, the reported positive rate of autoantibodies in CHC patients in China varies considerably. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-liver-kidney-microsome type 1 autoantibodies (anti-LKM-1) in a large cohort of CHC patients, and analyzed the factors related to the presence of the autoantibodies. Methods A total of 360 CHC patients were enrolled in this study. Serum ANA and anti-LKM-1 were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Clinical analysis was performed to disclose the related factors to autoantibody production. Results The prevalence of ANA and anti-LKM-1 in CHC patients was 12.5% (45/360) and 2.5% (9/360), respectively. Women had a higher prevalence than men (18.9% vs 11.4%, P=0.046). Patients with positive autoantibodies had lower HCV RNA levels (1.2x107 copies/L vs 7.2x107 copies/L, P <0.05). Positive ANA was associated with higher serum globulin (P<0.05). Stratified analysis showed that there were no significant differences in age, HCV genotype, disease course, clinical stage, prevalence of cirrhosis and interferon therapy between autoantibody-positive and-negative subgroups. Conclusion Autoantibodies can be induced in the course of CHC, and some CHC patients can even develop autoimmune hepatitis.

  10. Cytokine-associated neutrophil extracellular traps and antinuclear antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum infected children under six years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi Bangmboye B

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Plasmodium falciparum-infected children, the relationships between blood cell histopathology, blood plasma components, development of immunocompetence and disease severity remain poorly understood. Blood from Nigerian children with uncomplicated malaria was analysed to gain insight into these relationships. This investigation presents evidence for circulating neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs and antinuclear IgG antibodies (ANA. The presence of NETs and ANA to double-stranded DNA along with the cytokine profiles found suggests autoimmune mechanisms that could produce pathogenesis in children, but immunoprotection in adults. Methods Peripheral blood smear slides and blood samples obtained from 21 Nigerian children under six years of age, presenting with uncomplicated malaria before and seven days after initiation of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP treatment were analysed. The slides were stained with Giemsa and with DAPI. Levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF, CRP, and IL-6, select anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β and IL-10, and ANA were determined by immunoassay. Results The children exhibited circulating NETs with adherent parasites and erythrocytes, elevated ANA levels, a Th2 dominated cytokine profile, and left-shifted leukocyte differential counts. Nonspecific ANA levels were significant in 86% of the children pretreatment and in 100% of the children seven days after SP treatment, but in only 33% of age-matched control samples collected during the season of low parasite transmission. Levels of ANA specific for dsDNA were significant in 81% of the children both pre-treatment and post treatment. Conclusion The results of this investigation suggest that NET formation and ANA to dsDNA may induce pathology in falciparum-infected children, but activate a protective mechanism against falciparum malaria in adults. The significance of in vivo circulating chromatin in NETs and dsDNA ANA as a causative

  11. Antinuclear antibody levels in Polymorphic Light Eruption and their relation to the severity of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Hassan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PLE is an idiopathic photodermatosis characterised by a polymorphic eruption ranging from papulo-vesicular lesions to large plaques, located predominantly in a photoexposed distribution. It is an acquired disease and is the most common idiopathic photodermatosis. It is characterised by recurrent abnormal delayed reaction to sunlight. PLE is the most common idiopathic photodermatosis, the prevalence of which has been estimated to be around 10-20% in USA, England and Ireland. Previous studies have shown elevated levels of ANA in 2.9-19% of patients with PLE. Aim: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of ANA positivity in a cohort of patients of ethnic kashmiri origin with Polymorphic light eruption and to examine whether there is any relation of their levels with the severity of disease.Methods: Patients with Polymorphic light eruption clinically who attended the Outpatient Deptt. of Dermatology GMC Srinagar were referred to the Deptt. of Biochemistry GMC Srinagar where patients blood samples were analysed for ANA index by ELISA method (BRIO SEAC ITALY.Results: Our study consisted of 36 patients (with 23 males and 13 females with age group ranging between 15-65 years presenting with typical clinical features of PLE without associated autoimmune connected tissue diseases like discoid lupus erythematosus or systemic lupus erythematosus and 20 healthy age and sex matched controls. Two patients (1 male and 1female showed positive results and 1 patient (female showed equivocal results. Among the control group one patient showed ANA positivity. Thus total frequency of ANA positivity of of 5.55% was observed among the cases and 5% among the controls with frequency of 4.34% in males and 7.69% in females.Conclusion: ANA levels were found in 5.55% of patients with PLE, however there is no relation between the levels of ANA in PLE and with the severity of disease (p value >0.05.

  12. Two cases of food additive-induced severe liver damage associated with positive results on lymphocyte stimulation test and for antinuclear antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Rena; Ohishi, Chitose; Kim, Miniru; Shiina, Masaaki; Kusayanagi, Satoshi; Ogawa, Masazumi; Munakata, Kazuo; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Sato, Yuzuru

    2012-08-01

    Two cases of severe liver injury and positive result for antinuclear antibodies induced by food additives are reported. The first patient reported long-term intake of Mabo Ramen(®) noodle soup, nutritional supplements, and over-the-counter drugs. Total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were 9.6 mg/dL, 1,048, and 1,574 IU/L, respectively. Antinuclear antibody was 80×. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was positive for Mabo Ramen(®) and its additives such as Xanthan gum, guar gum, and Doubanjiang. Histologic examination of a liver biopsy specimen showed lymphocyte infiltration and necrosis. The autoimmune hepatitis score was 3. The second patient reported intake of dietary supplements, including Bimore C(®) and Chokora BB(®). Laboratory tests revealed that total bilirubin was 9.8 mg/dL, aspartate aminotransferase was 1,130 IU/L, and alanine aminotransferase was 1,094 IU/L. Antinuclear antibody was 320×. Co-existing pancreatic damage was confirmed by the findings on abdominal CT and elevation of serum lipase, span-1, and DUPAN-2. DLSTs were positive for both supplements. These two supplements contained additives such as titanium oxide, magnesium stearate, and hydroxypropylcellulose. DLSTs for all three additives were positive. Histologic examination revealed periportal necrosis and lymphocyte infiltration of lobular and portal areas. These two cases demonstrate that repeating DLSTs is useful for identifying causative constituents in foods and supplements. PMID:26182392

  13. Review for the generalist: The antinuclear antibody test in children - When to use it and what to do with a positive titer

    OpenAIRE

    Sailer-Hoeck Michaela; Mackinnon Murray J; Malleson Peter N; Spencer Charles H

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The antinuclear antibody test (ANA) is a much overused test in pediatrics. The ANA does have a role in serologic testing but it should be a very limited one. It is often ordered as a screening test for rheumatic illnesses in a primary care setting. However, since it has low specificity and sensitivity for most rheumatic and musculoskeletal illnesses in children, it should not be ordered as a screening test for non-specific complaints such as musculoskeletal pain. It should only be us...

  14. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice show increased titers of serum anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuehai [Cardiovascular Department, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Huang, Ziyang, E-mail: huangziyang666@126.com [Cardiovascular Department, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Lu, Huixia [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Shandong University, Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Lin, Huili; Wang, Zhenhua [Cardiovascular Department, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing [Department of Rheumatism and Immunology, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Ouyang, Qiufang [Cardiovascular Department, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Tang, Mengxiong; Hao, Panpan [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Shandong University, Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Ni, Jingqin [Cardiovascular Department, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Xu, Dongming [Department of Rheumatism and Immunology, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Qunye [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Shandong University, Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Lin, Ling [Department of Rheumatism and Immunology, Second Clinical Medical College, Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362000 (China); and others

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than C57B6/L mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spleen was greater and splenocyte apoptosis lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of TLR4 was lower in spleen tissue of ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in antibody production in spleen tissue. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice, atherosclerosis-prone mice, show an autoimmune response, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. We investigated the pathogenesis in female and male ApoE{sup -/-} mice. The spleens of all ApoE{sup -/-} and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were weighed. The serum IgG level and titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of spleen tissue was evaluated by TUNEL. TLR4 level in spleen tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Levels of MyD88, p38, phosphorylated p38 (pp38), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in spleen tissue were detected by Western blot analysis. We also survey the changes of serum autoantibodies, spleen weight, splenocyte apoptosis and the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue in male ApoE{sup -/-} mice after 4 weeks of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, administration. ApoE{sup -/-} mice showed splenomegaly and significantly increased serum level of IgG and titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody as compared with B6 mice. Splenocyte apoptosis and the expression of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue were significantly lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRF3, pp38, and Bax differed by sex in ApoE{sup -/-} spleen tissue. The

  15. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice show increased titers of serum anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were higher in ApoE−/− than C57B6/L mice. ► Spleen was greater and splenocyte apoptosis lower in ApoE−/− than B6 mice. ► Level of TLR4 was lower in spleen tissue of ApoE−/− than B6 mice. ► The TLR4 pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis. ► The TLR4 pathway may participate in antibody production in spleen tissue. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice, atherosclerosis-prone mice, show an autoimmune response, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. We investigated the pathogenesis in female and male ApoE−/− mice. The spleens of all ApoE−/− and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were weighed. The serum IgG level and titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of spleen tissue was evaluated by TUNEL. TLR4 level in spleen tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Levels of MyD88, p38, phosphorylated p38 (pp38), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in spleen tissue were detected by Western blot analysis. We also survey the changes of serum autoantibodies, spleen weight, splenocyte apoptosis and the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue in male ApoE−/− mice after 4 weeks of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, administration. ApoE−/− mice showed splenomegaly and significantly increased serum level of IgG and titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody as compared with B6 mice. Splenocyte apoptosis and the expression of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue were significantly lower in ApoE−/− than B6 mice. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRF3, pp38, and Bax differed by sex in ApoE−/− spleen tissue. The down-regulation of TLR4 signal molecules induced by LPS led to decreased expression of Bax and increased serum titers of ANA and anti

  16. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood may be due to: Chronic liver disease Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Myositis (inflammatory muscle disease) ... Saunders; 2011:chap 51. Read More Antibody Arthritis Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Liver disease Scleroderma Systemic ...

  17. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RhMSUS FAQs RhMSUS Designees RhMSUS Volunteer Opportunities Publications & Communications Journals A&R Table of Contents AC&R Table ... by the American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ...

  18. Padrões de imunofluorescência do fator antinuclear (FAN) em células HEp-2 de soros reagentes para anti-SSA/Ro Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) immunofluorescent pattern’s in HEp-2 cells on samples positive for anti-SSA/Ro

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Schmidt Lora; Claudia Cilene Fernandes Correia Laurino; Adriana Estigarribia de Freitas; João Carlos T. Brenol; Odirlei Montecielo; Ricardo Machado Xavier

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: avaliar os padrões de imunofluorescência do fator antinuclear (FAN) em soros reagentes para anticorpos anti-SSA/Ro e sua associação clínica. MÉTODO: foi realizado um estudo transversal retrospectivo, no qual foram revisadas as solicitações de anticorpos antiantígenos nucleares extraíveis (anti-ENA) encaminhadas ao SPC/HCPA no período de dois anos. Das solicitações com resultado positivo para anti-ENA identificou-se qual ou quais auto-anticorpos estavam envolvidos (anti-SSA/Ro, anti-...

  19. Review for the generalist: The antinuclear antibody test in children - When to use it and what to do with a positive titer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailer-Hoeck Michaela

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The antinuclear antibody test (ANA is a much overused test in pediatrics. The ANA does have a role in serologic testing but it should be a very limited one. It is often ordered as a screening test for rheumatic illnesses in a primary care setting. However, since it has low specificity and sensitivity for most rheumatic and musculoskeletal illnesses in children, it should not be ordered as a screening test for non-specific complaints such as musculoskeletal pain. It should only be used as a diagnostic test for children with probable Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE or Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, (MCTD and other possible overlap-like illnesses. Such children should have developed definite signs and symptoms of a disease before the ANA is ordered. This review presents data supporting these conclusions and a review of the ANA literature in adults and children. By limiting ANA testing, primary care providers can avoid needless venipuncture pain, unnecessary referrals, extra medical expenses, and most importantly, significant parental anxieties. It is best not to do the ANA test in most children but if it ordered and is positive in a low titer (

  20. Anti-nuclear antibodies positive serum from systemic lupus erythematosus patients promotes cardiovascular manifestations and the presence of human antibody in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kelly-Worden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs in the serum of patients. These antibodies may cross over into the brain resulting in the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms and result in abnormal pathology in other organs such as the heart and kidneys. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if SLE pathology could be detected in the hearts and brains of rats injected with positive human ANA serum. Materials and Methods: Lewis rats (n = 31 were selected for this study due to documented research already performed with this strain in the investigation of serum sickness, encephalitis and autoimmune related carditis. Rats were injected once a week with either ANA positive or negative control serum or saline. Hearts were examined for initial signs of heart disease including the presence of lipid deposits, vegetation, increased ventricular thickness and a change in heart weight. Brains were examined for the presence of human antibody and necrotic lesions. Animals were observed for outward signs of neuropathy as well. Blood samples were taken in order to determine final circulating concentrations of IgG and monitor histamine levels. Results: Animals injected with ANA were significantly higher for lipid deposits in the heart and an increased ventricular thickness was noted. One animal even displayed Libman-Sacks endocarditis. Brains were positive for the presence of human IgG and diffuse internal lesions occurred in 80% of the ANA positive serum injected animals examined. Blood histamine levels were not significantly different, but actually lower than controls by the end of the experiment. Conclusion: Since human antibodies were detected in the brain, further studies will have to identify which antibody cross reactions are occurring within the brain, examine cell infiltration as well as characterize the antibodies associated with more destructive consequences such as

  1. Anticuerpos antinucleares, imágenes y características obtenidas por inmunofluorescencia: Importancia de los isotipos IgA, IgM e IgG Antinuclear antibodies, patterns and characteristics obtained by immunofluorescence: The importance of the IgA, IgM and IgG isotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Arcavi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La técnica de elección para el screening de anticuerpos antinucleares (ANA es la inmunofluorescencia indirecta que utiliza como sustrato una línea de células epiteliales de carcinoma de laringe humano (IFI-HEp2, y como antisuero, anti-IgG o anti-Ig totales. Los ANA-IgG son los más importantes para el diagnóstico y monitoreo de las enfermedades del tejido conectivo (ETC, mientras los ANA-IgM son de menor relevancia clínica en estos pacientes. Sin embargo, poco se sabe de los ANA-IgA ya que estos Ac han sido menos investigados. El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar la prevalencia de los diferentes isotipos de inmunoglobulinas de anticuerpos antinucleares en los pacientes con ETC y evaluar la conveniencia de utilizar conjugados monovalentes o polivalentes. Se procesaron 100 sueros de pacientes con diversas ETC empleando IFI-HEp2, en los cuales se detectó 38% de ANA-IgA (títulos ≥ 1:80 y 12% de ANA-IgM (títulos ≤ 1:160. En 29 casos se detectó IgA en ausencia de IgM, en 3 casos IgM en ausencia de IgA. En todos los casos los ANA-IgG estuvieron presentes. En 6 sueros se observó un cambio de imagen con conjugado anti-IgA y en 3 con conjugado anti-IgM. Debido a la alta prevalencia de ANA-IgA detectada por IFI-HEp2, se destaca la conveniencia de utilizar conjugado anti-Ig totales en lugar de anti-IgG, mientras se desconozca la relevancia de los ANA-IgA en el diagnóstico, pronóstico y seguimiento de las enfermedades reumáticas sistémicas.The indirect immunofluorescence with epitelial cell line from human laryngeal carcinoma as substrate (IIF-HEp2 and anti-IgG or anti-total Ig as antisera, is the technique currently used for the detection of antinuclear antibodies. The most important antibodies for the diagnosis and follow-up of connective tissue diseases (CTD are the IgG-ANA, while the IgM-ANA have no clinical relevance. However the IgA-ANA have not been thoroughly investigated so far. The aim of this work was to study the prevalence

  2. Public opinions and antinuclear contestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of demonstrating the importance of public opinion in the development of a nuclear program, a historical analysis of the different forms of anti-technological reactions is shown, starting with a study of the general aspects of mass communication and public opinion. The world-wide communication strategy adopted in the implantation of nuclear programs is discussed and, finally, the nuclear energy issue and public opinion in Brazil are analysed. (F.E.)

  3. Antinuclear antibodies defining autoimmunity pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Eng M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescent imaging has been a powerful technique in helping to identify intracellular nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules which are target antigens of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune disorders. Patterns of staining can be correlated with molecules engaged in specific cellular functions and distributed in distinct cellular domains. Different autoimmune disorders have different profiles of autoantibodies, and immunodiagnostics has become an important adjunct in differential diagnosis...

  4. Padrões de imunofluorescência do fator antinuclear (FAN em células HEp-2 de soros reagentes para anti-SSA/Ro Antinuclear antibodies (ANA immunofluorescent pattern’s in HEp-2 cells on samples positive for anti-SSA/Ro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Schmidt Lora

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os padrões de imunofluorescência do fator antinuclear (FAN em soros reagentes para anticorpos anti-SSA/Ro e sua associação clínica. MÉTODO: foi realizado um estudo transversal retrospectivo, no qual foram revisadas as solicitações de anticorpos antiantígenos nucleares extraíveis (anti-ENA encaminhadas ao SPC/HCPA no período de dois anos. Das solicitações com resultado positivo para anti-ENA identificou-se qual ou quais auto-anticorpos estavam envolvidos (anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, anti-RNP, anti-Sm, anti-Scl-70, bem como os padrões de imunofluorescência do FAN e os quadros clínicos dos pacientes anti-SSA/Ro positivo. As técnicas usadas para detecção e identificação foram FAN por imunofluorescência indireta (IFI em células HEp-2 e anti-ENA por hemaglutinação. RESULTADOS: das 392 solicitações analisadas 90 eram anti-ENA positivo. Houve um predomínio do sexo feminino (94% (86/91 e a idade média foi de 42 anos. O anti-SSA/Ro foi o mais freqüente (67,8% (61/90, sendo que todas as amostras anti-SSA/Ro positivas eram positivas para o FAN. O padrão de imunofluorescência nuclear pontilhado fino foi o predominante (68,9% (42/61 nos pacientes com anti-SSA/Ro positivo, e o quadro clínico mais encontrado foi de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, em 50,8% (31/61 dos pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: o teste de FAN por IFI utilizando células HEp-2 é um bom método de triagem para detecção de auto-anticorpos anti-SSA/Ro, apresentando maior associação com o padrão nuclear pontilhado fino. Diferente do que tem sido descrito na literatura, não encontramos nenhuma amostra de pacientes com anti-SSA/Ro que tenham apresentado FAN falso-negativo na IFI. Pelo menos na nossa experiência, esses dados questionam o custo-efetividade da solicitação de rotina desse exame em pacientes FAN negativo pelo teste de IFI.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the pattern at immunofluorescence of the antinuclear antibodies (ANA detected by the indirect

  5. A Study on the “Religious Imagination”in Kenzaburo Oe’ S Anti-nuclear Literature%大江健三郎反核文学中“宗教的想象力”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽华

    2013-01-01

    1961年首次访问“广岛”以来,大江健三郎即与“核”结下了不解之缘。他在密切关注“原子弹爆炸受害者生存状况”的同时,也在持续创作着反核题材的文学。大江的“反核文学”,以揭示“核时代人类的生存状况”为基本命题,通过政治、宗教、 SF等的想象力,创造了一个想象的世界,并在这个想象的世界中努力探索核时代人类“灵魂得以救赎”的出口。文章试图以《燃烧的绿树》《空翻》两部作品为中心,来考察大江反核题材文学中所构建的“宗教式救赎”这一体系的具体形态及本质。%Since the first visit of “Hiroshima” in 1961 , Kenzaburo Oe has been irrevocably committed to the issue of “atomic bomb” and “nuclear”.Meanwhile , He has been paying close attention to “the living conditions of the atomic bomb victims”, and has been continuing to create the literature on the theme of anti -nuclear.Oe’s anti-nuclear literature has created an imaginary world by the imagination of politics , religion , SF , etc, Which is to reveal the “the living conditions of human beings in nuclear age” and try to find the means to achieve the “salvation of soul” of the human beings .This paper attempts to clarify the nature of the“religious salvation” in Oe’ s anti-nuclear literature by analyzing the “religious imagination” in the works of The Flaming Green Tree Trilogy and Somersault .

  6. Group cubization

    OpenAIRE

    Osajda, Damian

    2016-01-01

    We present a procedure of group cubization: It results in a group whose some features resemble the ones of a given group, and which acts without fixed points on a CAT(0) cubical complex. As a main application we establish lack of Kazhdan's property (T) for Burnside groups. Other applications include new constructions of non-exact groups.

  7. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  8. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  9. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  10. Abelian Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, A.P.

    1995-10-15

    This fifth survey of reviews on abelian groups comprises papers reviewed in 1985-1992. Just as in the preceding surveys, the issues concerning finite abelian groups, topological groups, ordered groups, group algebras, modules (with rare exceptions), and topics on logic are not considered. The issues on the lattice of subgroups of an abelian group are included in Section 11. In contrast to the fourth survey, this one does not contain Sections 6 (N-high subgroups), 9 (rings with a given additive group), and 10 (valuated groups); since only a few papers treated these topics, the material discussed earlier in Sections 9, and 10 is now included in Section 11 and the material of the former Section 6 will be found in Sections 1, 7, 8, and 11 of this survey. On the other hand, the fifth survey has three new sections devoted to separable groups (a new Sect. 5), Butler groups (a new Sect. 6), and the endormorphism rings and automorphism groups of abelian groups (a new Sect. 9).

  11. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  12. Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  13. Galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Tully, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  14. Anti-nuclear liberals and the bomb: A comparative history of Kampf dem Atomtod and the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, 1957-1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The premises of Kampf dem Atomtod (KdA) and Citizens for a Sane Nuclear Policy (SANE) were based on nineteenth century traditions of liberal peace advocacy. Both groups gained substantial public support for their goals to prevent the nuclear armament of the Bundeswehr and to stop nuclear testing. Both organizations won well-educated middle-class and mostly white supporter. The dissertation examines the role of women: whether housewife or doctor, women stressed their special concerns as mothers. Both KdA and SANE had troubled relations with the labor movement. Their leaders hoped to gain government leaders' respect by winning a respectable, non-Communist constituency and claiming their goals were reasonable ones. Government officials attacked KdA and SANE as dupes of Moscow. Many supporters left the organizations because of their strict anti-Communism. Local groups accused their leaders of lacking initative. KdA and SANE's leaders wasted time and energy rehashing issues and postponing decisions. After a period of providing initiatives and ideas local committees disintegrated. Both organizations considered education their paramount goal but their arguments primarily reached the converted, who often preferred more political action. KdA and SANE's leaders instead chose to support respectable projects based on humanitarian ideals. Since these projects offered little in the way of concrete action agendas, supporters defected to more active organizations or slipped into apathy. Neither organization achieved its national goals. Both governments generally denied them access to the policymaking process, ignored them as irrelavant, or attacked them as Communist sympathizers. While SANE and KdA were heard by those concerned by nuclear policy, and while members of SANE's National Board did help muster support for the Partial Test Ban Treaty, both organizations failed to make liberal peace values productive in the nuclear decisionmaking process

  15. Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10^12 Msun are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosi...

  16. Hydra groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dison, Will

    2010-01-01

    We give examples of CAT(0), biautomatic, free-by-cyclic, one-relator groups which have finite-rank free subgroups of huge (Ackermannian) distortion. This leads to elementary examples of groups whose Dehn functions are similarly extravagant. This behaviour originates in manifestations of Hercules-versus-the-hydra battles in string-rewriting.

  17. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  18. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject of...... algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group-theorists, and to...

  19. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  20. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  1. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  2. Group representations

    CERN Document Server

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  3. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  4. Tectaria group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Polypodiaceae subfam. Dryopteridoideae section A, auct.: C. Chr. in Verdoorn, Man. Pteridol. (1938) 543, p.p. Aspidiaceae tribe Aspidieae auct.: Ching, Sunyatsenia 5 (1940) 250, excl. Lomariopsis and related genera. — Aspidiaceae, group of Ctenitis Copel., Gen. Fil. (1947) 153. Aspidiaceae auct.: Pi

  5. Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  6. Low radiation doses and antinuclear lobby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probability of mutations or diseases resulting from other than radiation causes is negatively dependent on radiation. Thus, for instance, the incidence of cancer, is demonstrably lower in areas with a higher radiation background. The hypothesis is expressed that there exist repair mechanisms for DNA damage which will repair the damage, and will give priority to those genes which are currently active. Survival and stochastic processes are not dependent on the overall repair of DNA but on the repair of critical function genes. New discoveries shed a different light on views of the linear dependence of radiation damage on the low level doses. (M.D.)

  7. Jean Rostand, an anti-nuclear biologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 70's, some scientists, like the French biologist Jean Rostand, were already militating in favour of solar-derived energy sources. One of his favored domain of thoughts was the one of relations between science, ethics and politics. Jean Rostand did not limit his writing work to biology but looked into the moral and political impacts of discoveries in the other scientific domains as well. From the 50's and during several years onward, he got strongly and deeply involved in a radical fight against the 'French atomic bomb'. He particularly stressed on the fact that 'the later we react, the harder will be the energy transition'. This book brings together his texts and conference talks against nuclear weapons and civil nuclear energy. From this compilation of documents, the author notices that, thirty five years later, these documents remain as topical as in the past, and that no energy reconversion has been undertaken by none of the successive French governments who remained under the double control of the petroleum and nuclear industry lobbies. This policy has led to limit the development of energy conservation and renewable energy sources and to increase the lateness of France in this domain with respect to other European countries

  8. Peaceful unification by antinuclear and antiwar movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of three parts. The first part is to make a new recognition of unification. It deals with articles, which are situation of the Korean peninsula by Lee, Jung Sick, nuclear strategy of and peace of the Korean peninsula by Glen page. The making peace, which includes three principles for national unification by student association of Seoul University, Changing international circumstances and the Korean peninsula by Hong, hyeongi. The third part is for major unified plan in 1980's. The includes many articles, which are 7.4 North and South joint statement and 7.7 presidential special declaration and so on.

  9. Emergence of interest groups on hazardous waste siting: how do they form and survive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the two components of the facilitative setting that are important for group formation. The first component, the ideological component, provides the basic ideas that are adopted by the emerging group. The ideological setting for group formation is produced by such things as antinuclear news coverage and concentration of news stories on hazardous waste problems, on ideas concerning the credibility of the federal government, and on the pervasivensee of ideas about general environmental problems. The organizational component of the facilitative setting provides such things as leadership ability, flexible time, resources, and experience. These are important for providing people, organization, and money to achieve group goals. By and large, the conditions conducive to group formation, growth, and survival are outside the control of decision-makers. Agencies and project sponsors are currently caught in a paradox. Actively involving the public in the decision-making process tends to contribute to the growth and survival of various interest groups. Not involving the public means damage to credibility and conflict with values concerning participatory democracy. Resolution in this area can only be achieved when a comprehensive, coordinated national approach to hazardous waste management emerges. 26 refs

  10. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea;

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the...... various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in...

  11. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  13. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence, the...... phase out the entire sourcing collaboration with Flextronics. This sudden change in its sourcing strategy posed LEGO management with a number of caveats. Despite the bright forecasts, the collaboration did not fulfill the initial expectations, and the company needed to understand why this had happened...

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  15. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  16. Results analysis of antinuclear antibodies spectrum tests in four kinds of autoimmune diseases%自身免疫性疾病的抗核抗体谱检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张园园; 潘宝龙; 马骏; 李俊娥

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨抗核抗体谱(ANAs)检测在系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)、干燥综合征(SS)、混合性结缔组织病(MCTD)、类风湿性关节炎(RA)患者中的诊断价值。方法回顾性分析1359例自身免疫性疾病患者血清抗核抗体谱16项检测,对单个抗体在4种疾病患者中的阳性率每种疾病中ANAs的构成比进行分析。结果 ANA在前3种疾病中阳性率均高于RA;抗ds-DNA、抗nRNP主要见于SLE和MCTD;抗Sm主要见于SLE;抗SSA、抗Ro-52、抗SSB阳性率表现为SS>MCTD>SLE>RA;抗SCL-70、抗PM-SCL、抗Jo-1均为较低阳性率;其余自身抗体阳性率表现为SLE>MCTD>SS≈RA。在数据基础上形成了4种自身免疫性疾病诊断的ANAs阳性率参考模型。结论可根据ANA谱中单个抗体在4种疾病中的阳性率特点,建立4种自身免疫性疾病诊断和鉴别诊断的ANAs阳性率参考模型。%ObjectiveTo explore the value of antinuclear antibodies(ANAs) spectrum tests in SLE、SS、MCTD and RA.Methods Retrospectively analyzed ANAs test results of 1359 cases patients with autoimmune diseases in our hospital since January 2011, made statistical analysis on positive rate of each autoantibody in four kinds of disease and ANAs constituent ratio in each disease.Results The positive rate of each autoantibody had certain characteristics :(1)The ANA positive rate in the previous three diseases reached more than 92.8%, while somewhat less in RA (48.5%);(2)Anti-dsDNA and anti-nRNP were mainly in SLE and MCTD;(3)Anti-Sm was mainly in SLE(26.5%);(4)The positive rates of anti-SSA,anti-Ro-52 and anti-SSB showed: SS>MCTD>SLE>RA; (5)The positive rates of anti-SCL70, anti-PM-SCL and anti-Jo1 were lower, no significant difference;(6)The other remaining autoantibodies were: SLE>MCTD>SS≈RA. The diagnostic reference model of ANAs constituent ratio of the four kinds of autoimmune disease: (1)SLE: ANA (93.1%), Ro-52 (50.4%), SSA (47.3%), Ans (42.5%), anti-dsDNA (41

  17. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  18. Group evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  19. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  20. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  2. 抗核抗体及抗核抗体谱的实验检测方法及结果分析%The Analysis of Antinuclear Antibodies and Antinuclear Antibody Spectrum Assay Method and Result of Autoimmune Dis-eases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱凤丹; 尹秀杉

    2014-01-01

    Objective :To explore the value and results that using indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblottingto detect ANA and ANAs .Methods :Analysis the 2 317 cases were grouped by age ,sex and the results of ANA and AN‐As .Results:In this 2 317 cases ,the positive of ANA and/or ANAs were 914 cases (39 .4% ) ,women accounted for 77.7% ,males accounted for 22 .3% ,36 years and over age group ,women accounted for 50 .1% ,accounting for 16 .1%of men;ANA positive 740 cases (31 .9% ) ,ANAs tested positive for 723 cases (31 .2% ) ,ANA and ANAs were posi‐tive in 549 cases ,ANA (+ ) and ANAs (+ ) in line with the rate of 74 .2% ,ANA (-) and ANAs (-) compliance rate of 89 .0% ,the overall compliance rate of 84 .2% .Conclusion:Combined detection of ANA and ANAs ,not only can reduce the false‐negative and false‐positive rate ,but also provide the basis for more effective laboratory diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune disease .%目的:探讨分析实验室采用间接免疫荧光法和免疫印迹法检测ANA和ANAs的结果及价值。方法:对2317例自身抗体受检者的年龄、性别及ANA和ANAs检测结果进行分析。结果:在2317例受检者中,ANA和/或ANAs阳性914例(39.4%),女性占77.7%,男性占22.3%,36岁及以上年龄段,女性占50.1%,男性的占16.1%;A N A阳性740例(31.9%),ANAs阳性723例(31.2%),ANA 和 ANAs 均阳性549例,ANA (+)和 ANAs (+)符合率74.2%,ANA(-)和ANAs(-)符合率89.0%,总体符合率84.2%。结论:联合检测ANA和ANAs ,不仅可以减低假阴性率和假阳性率,而且能为诊断和鉴别诊断自身免疫病提供更有力的实验室依据。

  3. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role of...... mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  4. 血清抗核抗体在视神经脊髓炎谱系疾病和多发性硬化中的分布%Distribution of antinuclear antibodies in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders and multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武雷; 黄德晖; 杨扬; 吴卫平

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究血清抗核抗体(ANAs)在视神经脊髓炎谱系疾病(NMOSDs)和多发性硬化(MS)中的分布.方法 收集2009-01-2011-03间在作者医院神经内科门诊和住院诊治并行血清ANAs筛查的NMOSDs患者74例,包括视神经脊髓炎(NMO)53例、复发长节段横贯性脊髓炎(rLETM)20例和复发性视神经炎(RON)1例,以及MS患者49例,统计其血清ANAs阳性率并进行分析.结果 NMOSDs患者血清ANAs阳性率为45.9%(34/74),其中ANA(本文中特指用间接免疫荧光法检测的抗核抗体)、抗dsDNA、抗着丝粒抗体(ACA)、抗SSA抗体、抗SSB抗体阳性率分别为36.5%(27/74)、5.4%(4/74)、1.4%(1/74)、27.0%(20/74)、9.5%(7/74),MS组仅1例ANAs阳性,阳性率为2.0%(1/49),两组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).血清ANAs诊断NMOSDs的灵敏度为45.9%,特异度达98.0%;NMO和rLETM患者血清ANAs阳性率分别为47.2%和40.0%,两者无统计学差异(P=0.635).结论 NMO和rLETM患者血清ANAs阳性率高于MS组,支持NMO和rLETM同属于NMOSDs的观点.ANAs有可能是NMOSDs和MS两组疾病的鉴别指标之一.%Objective To investigate the seroprevalence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Seventy-four patients with NMOSDs and 49 with MS were screened for serum ANAs and enrolled in the study. They were in hospital from January 2009 to March 2011. The NMOSDs group included 53 patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), 20 with recurrent longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (rLETM), 1 with recurrent optic neuritis (RON) and 49 with MS. Seroprevalence of ANAs was analyzed. Results Seroprevalence of ANAs in NMOSDs patients was 45.9% (34/74), of which the seroprevalence rates of ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere antibody (ACA), anti-SSA and anti-SSB were 36.5% (27/74), 5.4% (4/74), 1.4% (1/74), 27.0% (20/74) and 9. 5% (7/74), respectively. In the MS group, only 1 patient showed seropositive

  5. Analysis the Results of Line Immunoassay in 166 Patients with Antinuclear Antibodies Positive%166例ANA阳性者血清线性免疫ANA谱的结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 江超; 李季青; 陈琳洁; 李志军

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to analyze surem antinuclear antibodies positive in the Regions along Huaihe River and the North Anhui province the positive rate of common antibodies, and to explore the diagnosis value of ANALIA to the common autoimmune disease. Methods Line immunoassay method was used to detect with 166 patients serum that ANA ELISA analysis quantitative assessment screening greater than normal reference value of upper limit. Results 154 cases of 166 cases had positive results, the positive rate was 92. 8% ,139 cases had 2 or more bands of positive ,90. 3% of the positive results. 66 cases of anti-dsDNA antibody positive;70 cases of anti-nucleosome antibody positive;37 cases of anti-histones antibody positive;58 cases of anti-SmDl antibody positive;76 cases of anti-UlsnRNP antibody positive; 103 cases of anti-SSA/Ro60 antibody positive;77 cases of anti-SSA/Ro52 antibody positive;46 cases of anti-SSB/La antibody positive;40 cases of anti-PO antibody positive; 10 cases of anti-centromeres antibody positive;both of anti-Scl70 antibody and anti-Jol antibody have 7 case positive. Combined with clinical data; 101 patients were diagnosed as SLE;28 patients diagnosed as pSS;14 patients diagnosed as MCTD;7 patients diagnosed as SSc;3 patients diagnosed as UCTD;7 patients diagnosed as PM/DM;6 patients diagnosed as RA. Conclusion In the Regions along Huaihe River and the North Anhui province,ANA positive was most common in SLE,followed by patients with pSS and MCTD;line immunoassay (ANA-LIA) analysis of ANA-positive serum was helpful to clear the specific diagnosis of connective tissue disease.%目的 了解皖北及沿淮地区血清ANA阳性者中常见自身抗体的阳性率,探讨线性免疫分析法(LIA)对常见结缔组织病的诊断价值.方法 用LIA法检测166例患者ANA筛查ELISA检测值大于正常值上限的血清.结果 166例中154例有阳性结果,阳性率为92.8%,139例有2个或以上条带阳性,占阳性结果的90.3

  6. Korea's nuclear public information experiences-target groups and communication strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why public information activities in Korea are needed is first explained. There are three basic reasons; 1) to secure necessary sites for construction of large nuclear facilities; such as nuclear power plants, radwaste management facilities, and nuclear fuel-cycle related facilities 2) to maintain a friendly relationship between the local communities and the nuclear industries, 3) to promote better understanding about the nation's peaceful nuclear programs to the various target groups. Categorization of target groups and messages are reviewed. By whom the public information programs are implemented is also explained. An orchestrated effort together with the third communicators is stressed. Basic philosophy of nuclear public information programs is introduced. A high-profile information campaign and a low-profile information campaign are explained. Particular information strategies suitable to Korean situation as examined. In addition, the Korean general public perception on nuclear energy is briefly introduced. Also, some real insights of anti-nuclear movement in Korea together with the arguments are reviewed. In conclusion, the paper stresses that nuclear arguments became no more technical matters but almost socio-political issues. (author)

  7. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  8. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur as...... unit groups. We deduce this classification from a more general result, which holds for groups G with no non-trivial normal 2-subgroup....

  9. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  10. Group Composition, Group Interaction and Achievement in Cooperative Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated interaction and achievement in cooperative small groups in four junior high school mathematics classrooms. Ninety-six students learned a one-week unit on consumer mathematics in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Students in mixed-ability groups scored higher on a problem-solving test than students in uniform-ability…

  11. Group dynamic processes in email groups

    OpenAIRE

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed provide insight into email group interactions, but that...

  12. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  13. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  14. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended. PMID:24441299

  15. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  16. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  17. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  18. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Boya, Luis J

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the $1+1+16=18$ families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated "pariah" groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group $\\mathbb M$, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the $5+7+8+6=26$ sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  19. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  20. Experience with Group Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2006-01-01

    Supervision can take a few different forms. For example, it can be one-to-one supervision and it can also be group supervision. Group supervision is an important process within the scientific community. Many research groups use this form to supervise doctoral- and master students in groups. Some efforts have been made to study this process. For example, Samara (2002) studied the group supervision process in group writing. However, group supervision has not been studied thorough...

  1. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  2. Group B Strep Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Group B Strep Infection Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a certain kind ... in the intestine, rectum, and vagina (in women). Group B strep doesn’t usually cause problems in ...

  3. Redefining Cohesiveness in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann; Springston, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate and extend research on work of Kelly and Duran in assessing relationship of group member perceptions of group interaction to group effectiveness. Concludes perceived similarity may not always align with perceptions of cohesiveness. (Author/ABL)

  4. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos Gil, José Ignacio; Feliu, E.

    2009-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. The degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is ...

  5. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, J. I. Burgos; Feliu, Elisenda

    2012-01-01

    context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. For projective varieties the degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups defined by Gillet and Soulé, and in general with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is...... endowed with a product structure, which is commutative and associative....

  6. Assertive Training in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  7. Robust Group Linkage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Dong, Xin Luna; Guo, Songtao; Maurino, Andrea; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of group linkage: linking records that refer to entities in the same group. Applications for group linkage include finding businesses in the same chain, finding conference attendees from the same affiliation, finding players from the same team, etc. Group linkage faces challenges not present for traditional record linkage. First, although different members in the same group can share some similar global values of an attribute, they represent different entities so can also...

  8. Pretty Private Group Management

    CERN Document Server

    Heen, Olivier; Neumann, Christoph; Onno, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Group management is a fundamental building block of today's Internet applications. Mailing lists, chat systems, collaborative document edition but also online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter use group management systems. In many cases, group security is required in the sense that access to data is restricted to group members only. Some applications also require privacy by keeping group members anonymous and unlinkable. Group management systems routinely rely on a central authority that manages and controls the infrastructure and data of the system. Personal user data related to groups then becomes de facto accessible to the central authority. In this paper, we propose a completely distributed approach for group management based on distributed hash tables. As there is no enrollment to a central authority, the created groups can be leveraged by various applications. Following this paradigm we describe a protocol for such a system. We consider security and privacy issues inherently introduced by rem...

  9. Groups as Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha

    2009-01-01

    For the first time we represent every finite group in the form of a graph in this book. The authors choose to call these graphs as identity graph, since the main role in obtaining the graph is played by the identity element of the group. This study is innovative because through this description one can immediately look at the graph and say the number of elements in the group G which are self-inversed. Also study of different properties, like the subgroups of a group, normal subgroups of a group, p-sylow subgroups of a group and conjugate elements of a group are carried out using the identity graph of the group in this book. This book has four chapters. The first chapter is introductory. The second chapter represents groups as graphs. In the third chapter, we have defined similar types of graphs for algebraic structures like commutative semigroups, loops, commutative groupoids and commutative rings. The final chapter poses 52 problems.

  10. Fast Overlapping Group Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The group Lasso is an extension of the Lasso for feature selection on (predefined) non-overlapping groups of features. The non-overlapping group structure limits its applicability in practice. There have been several recent attempts to study a more general formulation, where groups of features are given, potentially with overlaps between the groups. The resulting optimization is, however, much more challenging to solve due to the group overlaps. In this paper, we consider the efficient optimization of the overlapping group Lasso penalized problem. We reveal several key properties of the proximal operator associated with the overlapping group Lasso, and compute the proximal operator by solving the smooth and convex dual problem, which allows the use of the gradient descent type of algorithms for the optimization. We have performed empirical evaluations using the breast cancer gene expression data set, which consists of 8,141 genes organized into (overlapping) gene sets. Experimental results demonstrate the eff...

  11. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  12. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some women carry in their intestines and ... Mosby; 2015:chap 55. Pannaraj PS, Baker CJ. Group B streptococcal infections. In: Cherry J, Harrison GJ, ...

  13. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  14. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  15. SUPPORT GROUPS IN ICEHEARTS

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Corey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cacho, Corey Support groups in Icehearts. 33 p., 0 appendices. Language: English. Spring 2016. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services, Bachelor of Social Services. The purpose of my thesis is to provide a social support group model for the employees of Icehearts. The social support group model covers the mental health and wellbeing of the employees. The aim of the support group model is to give the employees a creative way of ...

  16. Group Wage Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Bartik, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Using panel data on U.S. MSAs, this paper estimates how a typical MSA's wages of different demographic groups, and prices, are affected by overall MSA unemployment, the distribution of unemployment among different groups, and national prices and wages. MSA unemployment has strong effects on MSA wages and prices, but the distribution of unemployment among different groups has weak effects on wages and prices. Using these estimates, simulations show that targeting high-unemployment groups for u...

  17. Introduction to quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Podles, P.; Muller, E.

    1997-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to the theory of algebraic and topological quantum groups (in the spirit of S. L. Woronowicz). In particular, we recall the basic facts from Hopf (*-) algebra theory, theory of compact (matrix) quantum groups and the theory of their actions on compact quantum spaces. We also provide the most important examples, including the classification of quantum SL(2)-groups, their real forms and quantum spheres. We also consider quantum SL_q(N)-groups and quantum Loren...

  18. Graphical Cyclic Permutation Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    We establish conditions for a permutation group generated by a single permutation of a prime power order to be an automorphism group of a graph or an edge-colored graph. This corrects and generalizes the results of the two papers on cyclic permutation groups published in 1978 and 1981 by S. P. Mohanty, M. R. Sridharan, and S. K. Shukla.

  19. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  20. AREVA group overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  1. Groups, combinatorics and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A; Saxl, J

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the theory of groups in particular simplegroups, finite and algebraic has influenced a number of diverseareas of mathematics. Such areas include topics where groups have beentraditionally applied, such as algebraic combinatorics, finitegeometries, Galois theory and permutation groups, as well as severalmore recent developments.

  2. Microscopic group constants determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of microscopic group constants determination for nuclear reactor calculations is described in this paper. The principle of this method is group averaging of microscopic cross sections with respect to the standard spectrum. The group cross sections obtained are used for the calculation of fast critical assembly Jezebel. (author)

  3. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable...... intronic products of these pathways have the potential to integrate into targets and to form various types of circular RNA molecules. Thus, group I intron ribozymes and associated elements found within group I introns is a rich source of biological phenomena. This chapter provides a strategy and protocols...... for initial characterization of new group I intron ribozymes....

  4. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  5. Splittings of knot groups

    OpenAIRE

    Friedl, Stefan; Silver, Daniel S.; Williams, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Let K be a knot of genus g. If K is fibered, then it is well known that the knot group pi(K) splits only over a free group of rank 2g. We show that if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over non-free groups of arbitrarily large rank. Furthermore, if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over every free group of rank at least 2g. However, pi(K) cannot split over a group of rank less than 2g. The last statement is proved using the recent results of Agol, Przytycki-Wise and Wise.

  6. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  7. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  8. CHAOTIC GROUP ACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiEnhui; ZhouLizhen; ZhouYoucheng

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that there is no chaotic group actions on any topological space with free arc.In this paper the chaotic actions of the group like G×F,where F is a finite group,are studied.In particular,under a suitable assumption ,if F is a cyclic group,then the topological space which admits a chaotic action of Z×F must admit a chatotic homeomorphism.A topological space which admits a chaotic group action but admits no chaotic horneomorphism is constructed.

  9. On -nilpotent abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Nasrabadi; Ali Gholamian

    2014-11-01

    Let be a group and $A = \\text{Aut}(G)$ be the group of automorphisms of . Then, the element $[g, ] = g^{-1}(g)$ is an autocommutator of $g \\in G$ and $ \\in A$. Hence, for any natural number the -th autocommutator subgroup of is defined as $K_{m}(G)=\\langle [g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}]|g\\in G,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}\\in A\\rangle$, where $[g, _{1}, _{2},\\ldots, _{m}] = [[g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m−1}], _{m}]$. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of -nilpotent groups and classify all abelian groups which are -nilpotent groups.

  10. Perfect numbers and groups

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2001-01-01

    A number is perfect if it is the sum of its proper divisors; here we call a finite group `perfect' if its order is the sum of the orders of its proper normal subgroups. (This conflicts with standard terminology but confusion should not arise.) The notion of perfect group generalizes that of perfect number, since a cyclic group is perfect exactly when its order is perfect. We show that, in fact, the only abelian perfect groups are the cyclic ones, and exhibit some non-abelian perfect groups of...

  11. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment. PMID:26401798

  12. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  13. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    The chapter considers how groups might be relevant as objects of policies of toleration and the different senses 'group' might have in relation to questions of toleration. The chapter argues that groups can be relevant to toleration in several different ways as objects of toleration. Toleration is...... routinely defined as involving an objection component, a power requirement and an acceptance component. The objection and acceptance components refer to reasons or dispositions of the subjects of toleration, e.g. public authorities deciding how to act in relation to groups. The power condition refers to the...... toleration allows receivers of toleration to enjoy. The chapter shows how groups may be objects of toleration in different ways in relation to each of these components or conditions of toleration. The sense of 'group' relevant to toleration may differ when the group is an object of power, i.e. when others...

  14. Alternatives for pseudofinite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Houcine, Abderezak Ould

    2012-01-01

    The famous Tits' alternative states that a linear group either contains a nonabelian free group or is soluble-by-(locally finite). We study in this paper similar alternatives in pseudofinite groups. We show for instance that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudofinite group either contains a subsemigroup of rank $2$ or is nilpotent-by-(uniformly locally finite). We call a class of finite groups $G$ weakly of bounded rank if the radical $rad(G)$ has a bounded Pr\\"ufer rank and the index of the sockel of $G/rad(G)$ is bounded. We show that an $\\aleph_{0}$-saturated pseudo-(finite weakly of bounded rank) group either contains a nonabelian free group or is nilpotent-by-abelian-by-(uniformly locally finite). We also obtain some relations between this kind of alternatives and amenability.

  15. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  16. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  17. Blood groups systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  18. Stochastic Lie group integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Malham, Simon J A

    2007-01-01

    We present Lie group integrators for nonlinear stochastic differential equations with non-commutative vector fields whose solution evolves on a smooth finite dimensional manifold. Given a Lie group action that generates transport along the manifold, we pull back the stochastic flow on the manifold to the Lie group via the action, and subsequently pull back the flow to the corresponding Lie algebra via the exponential map. We construct an approximation to the stochastic flow in the Lie algebra via closed operations and then push back to the Lie group and then to the manifold, thus ensuring our approximation lies in the manifold. We call such schemes stochastic Munthe-Kaas methods after their deterministic counterparts. We also present stochastic Lie group integration schemes based on Castell--Gaines methods. These involve using an underlying ordinary differential integrator to approximate the flow generated by a truncated stochastic exponential Lie series. They become stochastic Lie group integrator schemes if...

  19. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  20. Group Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical

  1. Blood groups systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadhir Mitra; Nitasha Mishra; Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importa...

  2. Incentives and group identity

    OpenAIRE

    MASELLA, Paolo; Meier, Stephan; Zahn, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates in a principal-agent environment whether and how group membership influences the effectiveness of incentives and when incentives can have “hidden costs”, i.e., a detrimental effect. We show experimentally that in all interactions control mechanisms can have hidden costs for reasons specific to group membership. In within-group interactions control has detrimental effects because the agent does not expect to be controlled and reacts negatively when being controlled. In ...

  3. Group therapy for adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Nada Hribar

    2001-01-01

    The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed som...

  4. Bayesian Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Seppo; Klami, Arto; Khan, Suleiman A; Kaski, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a factor analysis model that summarizes the dependencies between observed variable groups, instead of dependencies between individual variables as standard factor analysis does. A group may correspond to one view of the same set of objects, one of many data sets tied by co-occurrence, or a set of alternative variables collected from statistics tables to measure one property of interest. We show that by assuming group-wise sparse factors, active in a subset of the sets, the variat...

  5. Semisimple Metacyclic Group Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurmeet K Bakshi; Shalini Gupta; Inder Bir S Passi

    2011-11-01

    Given a group of order $p_1p_2$, where $p_1,p_2$ are primes, and $\\mathbb{F}_q$, a finite field of order coprime to $p_1p_2$, the object of this paper is to compute a complete set of primitive central idempotents of the semisimple group algebra $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$. As a consequence, we obtain the structure of $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$ and its group of automorphisms.

  6. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  7. Factoring groups into subsets

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Decomposing an abelian group into a direct sum of its subsets leads to results that can be applied to a variety of areas, such as number theory, geometry of tilings, coding theory, cryptography, graph theory, and Fourier analysis. Focusing mainly on cyclic groups, Factoring Groups into Subsets explores the factorization theory of abelian groups. The book first shows how to construct new factorizations from old ones. The authors then discuss nonperiodic and periodic factorizations, quasiperiodicity, and the factoring of periodic subsets. They also examine how tiling plays an important role in n

  8. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  9. Lie groups for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  10. Weyl group invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Kameko, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    For any odd prime $p$, we prove that the induced homomorphism from the mod $p$ cohomology of the classifying space of a compact simply-connected simple connected Lie group to the Weyl group invariants of the mod $p$ cohomology of the classifying space of its maximal torus is an epimorphism except for the case $p=3$, $G=E_8$.

  11. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These pedagogical lectures contain some motivation for the study of quantum groups; a definition of ''quasi triangular Hopf algebra'' with explanations of all the concepts required to build it up; descriptions of quantised universal enveloping algebras and the quantum double; and an account of quantised function algebras and the action of quantum groups on quantum spaces. (author)

  12. Topologies on Abelian Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, E. G.; Protasov, I. V.

    1991-04-01

    A filter phi on an abelian group G is called a T-filter if there exists a Hausdorff group topology under which phi converges to zero. G{phi} will denote the group G with the largest topology among those making phi converge to zero. This method of defining a group topology is completely equivalent to the definition of an abstract group by defining relations. We shall obtain characterizations of T-filters and of T-sequences; among these, we shall pay particular attention to T-sequences on the integers. The method of T-sequences will be used to construct a series of counterexamples for several open problems in topological algebra. For instance there exists, on every infinite abelian group, a topology distinguishing between sequentiality and the Fréchet-Urysohn property (this solves a problem posed by V.I. Malykhin) we also find a topology on the group of integers admitting no nontrivial continuous character, thus solving a problem of Nienhuys. We show also that on every infinite abelian group there exists a free ultrafilter which is not a T-ultrafilter.

  13. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  14. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  15. Isotropy in group cohomology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben David, Nir; Ginosar, Yuval; Meir, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    The analog of Lagrangians for symplectic forms over finite groups is studied, motivated by the fact that symplectic G  -forms with a normal Lagrangian N◃G  are in one-to-one correspondence, up to inflation, with bijective 1-cocycle data on the quotients G/N  . This yields a method to construct...... groups of central type from such quotients, known as Involutive Yang–Baxter groups. Another motivation for the search of normal Lagrangians comes from a non-commutative generalization of Heisenberg liftings that require normality. Although it is true that symplectic forms over finite nilpotent groups...... always admit Lagrangians, we exhibit an example where none of these subgroups is normal. However, we prove that symplectic forms over nilpotent groups always admit normal Lagrangians if all their p  -Sylow subgroups are of order less than p 8   ....

  16. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  17. Intracellular and circulating neuronal antinuclear antibodies in human epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Iffland, Philip H.; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Trigunaite, Abhishek; Man, Shumei; Rasmussen, Peter; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Ghosh, Chaitali; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    There are overwhelming data supporting the inflammatory origin of some epilepsies (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis and limbic encephalitis). Inflammatory epilepsies with an autoimmune component are characterized by autoantibodies against membrane-bound, intracellular or secreted proteins (e.g., voltage gated potassium channels). Comparably, little is known regarding autoantibodies targeting nuclear antigen. We tested the hypothesis that in addition to known epilepsy-related autoantigens, human...

  18. Antinuclear Antibodies in Asthma Patients- A Special Asthma Phenotype?

    OpenAIRE

    Agache Ioana; Duca Liliana; Anghel Mariana; Pamfil Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    Several studies reported the appearance of asthma and autoimmune conditions in the same patient, but the clinical significance of this association was not yet assessed. One hundred asthmatic patients were observed for one year evolution with death, severe exacerbations, intake of > 1000 micrograms of beclometasone or equivalent (high ICS) and FEV1 decline >100 ml, in relation with ANA (ELISA), sputum and blood eosinophilia (EO), NSAID intolerance, BMI >25, chronic rhinosinusitis, smoking stat...

  19. Critical groups - basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. Quantum group connections

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Jerzy; Okolow, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The Ahtekar-Isham C*-algebra known from Loop Quantum Gravity is the algebra of continuous functions on the space of (generalized) connections with a compact structure Lie group. The algebra can be constructed by some inductive techniques from the C*-algebra of continuous functions on the group and a family of graphs embedded in the manifold underlying the connections. We generalize the latter construction replacing the commutative C*-algebra of continuous functions on the group by a non-commu...

  1. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  2. Group ring cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Cryptographic systems are derived using units in group rings. Combinations of types of units in group rings give units not of any particular type. This includes cases of taking powers of units and products of such powers and adds the complexity of the {\\em discrete logarithm} problem to the system. The method enables encryption and (error-correcting) coding to be combined within one system. These group ring cryptographic systems may be combined in a neat way with existing cryptographic systems, such as RSA, and a combination has the combined strength of both systems. Examples are given.

  3. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  4. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  5. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  6. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  7. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  8. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  9. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  10. Radiation Protection Group

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  11. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidelines Scientific Council Special Interest Groups Child & Adolescent Anxiety SIG Peer Consultation OCD & Related Disorders SIG Peer ... Jobs and Fellowships Journal & Multimedia Announcements Depression and Anxiety Podcasts & Videos Resources Clinical Practice Reviews & Teaching Tools ...

  12. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  13. Genomics Research Group Session

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, D.; Chittur, S.V.; Raghavachari, N.; N Jafari; Aquino, C.; Perera, A; Reyero, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    The Genomics Research Group (GRG) presentation is intended to describe the current activities of the group in applying the latest tools and technologies for transcriptome analysis to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each of the platforms. We will present three ongoing projects. In the first project, we specifically evaluated microarrays, QPCR and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms for examining the sensitivity and specificity of microRNA detection using synthetic miRNA st...

  14. Reactivity of nitrosyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivity of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes is considered. According to X-ray structure analysis data nitrogen oxide interaction with metals results in formation of two complexes. The first ones contain linear nitrosyls (valence bond angle 180 deg in M-NO grouping), the second ones - bend nitrosyls (the bond angle in M-N-O grouping 120-130 deg). The first type complexes react primarily with nucleophilic reagents (OH-, N3-), the second ones - with electrophilic reagents

  15. Introduction to group theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canals B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter is a concise mathematical introduction into the algebra of groups. It is build up in the way that definitions are followed by propositions and proofs. The concepts and the terminology introduced here will serve as a basis for the following chapters that deal with group theory in the stricter sense and its application to problems in physics. The mathematical prerequisites are at the bachelor level.1

  16. Arithmetic Cohomology Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sugahara, K.; Weng, L

    2015-01-01

    We first introduce global arithmetic cohomology groups for quasi-coherent sheaves on arithmetic varieties, adopting an adelic approach. Then, we establish fundamental properties, such as topological duality and inductive long exact sequences, for these cohomology groups on arithmetic surfaces. Finally, we expose basic structures for ind-pro topologies on adelic spaces of arithmetic surfaces. In particular, we show that these adelic spaces are topologically self-dual.

  17. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  18. Email Grouping Method

    OpenAIRE

    Taiwo Ayodele; Shikun Zhou; Rinat Khusainov

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we presents a neural network based system for automated email grouping into activities found in the email message- Email Grouping Method (EGM). Email users spend a lot of time reading, replying and organizing their emails and this seems to be time consuming and sometimes can resolves to less performance of daily duty, and un-necessary distractions. A new system that can manage mails on our behalf is required. EGM is developed to help organise email messages, intelligently struct...

  19. Membership in citizen groups

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Stefano; Mattozzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the coordination problem of agents deciding to join a group that uses membership revenues to provide a discrete public good and excludable benefits. The public good and the benefits are jointly produced, so that benefits are valued only if the group succeeds in providing the public good. With asymmetric information about the cost of provision, the static membership game admits a unique equilibrium and we characterize the optimal membership fee. We show that heterogeneity in valuati...

  20. Group Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Klami, Arto; Virtanen, Seppo; Leppäaho, Eemeli; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Factor analysis provides linear factors that describe relationships between individual variables of a data set. We extend this classical formulation into linear factors that describe relationships between groups of variables, where each group represents either a set of related variables or a data set. The model also naturally extends canonical correlation analysis to more than two sets, in a way that is more flexible than previous extensions. Our solution is formulated as variational inferenc...

  1. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. PMID:26851342

  2. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  3. N-ary Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'mak, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The book "N-ary Groups" (in Russian) consists of two Parts. It is intended on the one hand as an initial introduction to the theory of n-ary groups, and on the other hand it contains the published results by the author on this subject. At present, the theory of n-ary groups developing but slowly from group theory. Nonetheless, ternary and n-ary structures have recently been applied to modern models of elementary particle physics. One of the author's goals in this book is to draw the attention of mathematicians and theoretical physicists to the theory of n-ary groups, to some of its distinguishing features, and to details relevant to its further development and application. Part I: Theorems of Post and Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.1. Classical definitions of n-ary groups. Examples. 1.2. Analogies of identity and inverse elements. 1.3. Equivalent sequences. 1.4. Post's coset theorem. 1.5. Theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.6. Connection between the Post's coset theorem and theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. Addition and comments. Part ...

  4. Group 2. Grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the findings of the Grouting Working Group which met during the Workshop on Radioactive, Hazardous, and/or Mixed Waste Sludge Management. The scope of this working group was to identify issues related to laboratory-scale experimentation in support of operation and design of an actual plant. The group recognizes that several stabilization/solidification (S/S) host media are available and, whichever is chosen, must be proven appropriate for the specific disposal scenario. However, the group focused on developing a systematic approach for the selection of cement-based grouting as an option, because of the prevalence of its application. It should be recognized that many of the issues will be generic to any stabilization process. Prior to the workshop, this group's members identified over 30 issues for discussion. At a previous informal session, the group distilled these to four issues that are believed to be at the heart of the 30 considered. The four issues were: (1) that both standard and site process-specific performance criteria must be identified, (2) that the waste-binder chemical interactions and the subsequent effect of these interactions on the chemical and physical properties of the resulting waste form must be better understood, (3) that scale-up factors must be considered in order to improve the probability of successfully developing waste-form products, and (4) that if S/S technology is to remain a widely used treatment option, product quality and performance must be confirmed over time

  5. Independents' group posts loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices

  6. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  7. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  8. Linear algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Springer, T A

    1998-01-01

    "[The first] ten chapters...are an efficient, accessible, and self-contained introduction to affine algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. The author includes exercises and the book is certainly usable by graduate students as a text or for self-study...the author [has a] student-friendly style… [The following] seven chapters... would also be a good introduction to rationality issues for algebraic groups. A number of results from the literature…appear for the first time in a text." –Mathematical Reviews (Review of the Second Edition) "This book is a completely new version of the first edition. The aim of the old book was to present the theory of linear algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. Reading that book, many people entered the research field of linear algebraic groups. The present book has a wider scope. Its aim is to treat the theory of linear algebraic groups over arbitrary fields. Again, the author keeps the treatment of prerequisites self-contained. The material of t...

  9. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  10. Financial Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    carfí, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we see the evolution of a capitalized financial event e, with respect to a capitalization factor f, as the exponential map of a suitably defined Lie group G(f,e), supported by the half-space of capitalized financial events having the same capital sign of e. The Lie group G(f,e) depends upon the capitalization factor f and on the event e itself. After the extension of the definition of exponential map of a Lie group, we shall eliminate the dependence on the financial event e, recognizing the presence of essentially one unique financial Lie semigroup, supported by the entire space of capitalized financial events, determined by the capitalization factor f.

  11. Instructions to working groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  12. Group Psychotherapy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Göran

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the national developments of group psychotherapy (GPS) in Sweden during the period from World War II until the present time. Methods and concepts, imported primarily from England and the United States, inspired trainings and widespread psychodynamic and group analytic applications in schools, health treatment, and social care. Education in psychotherapy and GPS at universities opened new therapeutic and vocational areas during the period 1970-2005. Increasing criticism of psychodynamics, as in other Western societies, but more radical in Sweden, has in the last decades made group analytic GPS diminish in favor of cognitive behavioral therapy models. Prospects for GPS further development may presently look bleak but, in a longer perspective, are promising. PMID:26401795

  13. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  14. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  15. Colored Group Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2009-01-01

    Group field theories are higher dimensional generalizations of matrix models. Their Feynman graphs are fat and in addition to vertices, edges and faces, they also contain higher dimensional cells, called bubbles. In this paper, we propose a new, fermionic Group Field Theory, posessing a color symmetry, and take the first steps in a systematic study of the topological properties of its graphs. Unlike its bosonic counterpart, the bubbles of the Feynman graphs of this theory are well defined and readily identified. We prove that this graphs are combinatorial cellular complexes. We define and study the cellular homology of this graphs. Furthermore we define a homotopy transformation appropriate to this graphs. Finally, the amplitude of the Feynman graphs is shown to be related to the fundamental group of the cellular complex.

  16. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

     An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics. This...... problem is not only found at Aalborg University but also at the engineering colleges in Denmark. For that reason a course was developed with the aim of addressing the problem and showing, how it can be dealt with. So far the course has been offered several times to supervisors at the engineering colleges...

  17. Fourier Analysis on Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rudin, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1950s, many of the more refined aspects of Fourier analysis were transferred from their original settings (the unit circle, the integers, the real line) to arbitrary locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. Rudin's book, published in 1962, was the first to give a systematic account of these developments and has come to be regarded as a classic in the field. The basic facts concerning Fourier analysis and the structure of LCA groups are proved in the opening chapters, in order to make the treatment relatively self-contained.

  18. A Quantum Groups Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Shahn

    2002-05-01

    Here is a self-contained introduction to quantum groups as algebraic objects. Based on the author's lecture notes for the Part III pure mathematics course at Cambridge University, the book is suitable as a primary text for graduate courses in quantum groups or supplementary reading for modern courses in advanced algebra. The material assumes knowledge of basic and linear algebra. Some familiarity with semisimple Lie algebras would also be helpful. The volume is a primer for mathematicians but it will also be useful for mathematical physicists.

  19. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  20. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  1. Bell, group and tangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  2. The clinical study on the risk of permanent hair dye use for connective tissue disease with positive antinuclear antibodies%永久性染发剂与抗核抗体阳性结缔组织病发病风险的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫玉芳; 魏巧凤; 王秀花; 吕明; 李兴福

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of permanent hair dye use for connective tissue disease ( CTD ) with positive antinuclear antibodies ( ANA ).Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study to analyze 440 CTD patients from the department of our hospital.Four hundreds and forty patients' relatives or friends who were free from any CTD were selected as controls.Patients and controls were matched in sex and age.A face-to-face interview was adopted to finish questionnaires about subjects' demographic data and the use of permanent hair dye.Data about the duration,frequency,times of usage and allergy related to hair dye were collected.Medical history was also reviewed,such as the diagnosis,disease course,primary symptoms,serum tests and organ involvements.Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 17.0 software using x2 test and Logistic regression.Results The association between the use of permanent hair dye and CTD did not reach statistical significance (OR=1.282,95%CI 0.966-1.700,P=0.085 ),when the relationship of hair dye use with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was tested,the same result (OR=1.092,95%CI 0.795-1.500,P=0.587 ) could be revealed.Conclusion This preliminary study has shown that the use of permanent hair dye couldn't induce the occurrence of CTD.%目的 探讨使用永久性染发剂与抗核抗体阳性结缔组织病(CTD)发病的风险.方法 采用病例对照研究,对440例CTD患者和性别、年龄相匹配的440名健康的患者家属或朋友进行比较分析.采用面对面的交谈,以调查问卷的方式记录研究对象的基本信息和染发信息(包括染发时间、染发频率、染发次数及与染发相关的过敏).记录病例组的现病史,包括疾病的诊断、病程、初发症状、各脏器受累情况及各项实验室检查.应用SPSS 17.0软件进行x2检验和Logistic回归分析.结果 使用永久性染发剂与CTD发病无明确因果关系[比值比(OR)=1.282,95%可信区间(CI)0.966~1

  3. FAW Group Gorporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Feng

    2007-01-01

    @@ As the founder of China's automobile industry, FAW Group Corporation (FAW) has maintained a dominant position in the automotive industry since its founding in 1953 in terms of its total assets, Production capacity, domestic and international sales, market share, and brand recognition.

  4. Group theory in cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Blackburn, Simon R; Mullan, Ciaran

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a guide for the pure mathematician who would like to know more about cryptography based on group theory. The paper gives a brief overview of the subject, and provides pointers to good textbooks, key research papers and recent survey papers in the area.

  5. Group theory in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  6. Space Systems Academic Group

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) along with eight academic departments is an integral part of the Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. As an interdisciplinary association of professors it provides direction and guidance for two curricula: Space Systems Engineering and Space Systems Operations.

  7. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  8. Unclonable Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dupont, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael Østergaard

    We introduce and motivate the concept of unclonable group identification, that provides maximal protection against sharing of identities while still protecting the anonymity of users. We prove that the notion can be realized from any one-way function and suggest a more efficient implementation...

  9. Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H. Adriaanse

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae is an important cause of neonatal sepsis. Prevention is possible by intrapartum screening for maternal GBS carriership and antimicrobial treatment of colonized women with risk factors during labor. The conflicting results of diagnostic performance are reported both for the newly developed rapid GBS antigen tests and Gram's stain.

  10. Cohomology of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frønsdal, Christian

    1995-01-01

    Lecture notes. Introduction to the cohomology of algebras, Lie algebras, Lie bialgebras and quantum groups. Contains a new derivation of the classification of classical r-matrices in terms of deformation cohomology, and a calculation of the esoteric forms of quantum gl(N) by deformation theory.

  11. End Group Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Franzyk, Henrik

    , the most favorable hydrophobic activity-inducing moieties were found to be cyclohexylacetyl and pentafluorophenylacetyl groups, while the presence of a short PEG-like chain had no significant effect on activity. Introduction of cationic moieties conferred no effect or merely a moderate activity...

  12. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  13. Geodesic Renormalisation Group Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Brian P

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the renormalisation group flow in coupling constant space can be interpreted in terms of a dynamical equation for the couplings analogous to viscous fluid flow under the action of a potential. For free scalar field theory the flow is geodesic in two dimensions, while for $D \

  14. Teaching the renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renormalization group theory of continuous phase transitions is described with the use of a hands on model suitable for presentation as part of an undergraduate thermal physics course. It is an extension of the work of Maris and Kadanoff in that key concepts such as universality fixed points and critical surface are introduced

  15. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  16. Cohomology of kleinian groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kra, I

    1969-07-01

    Let [unk] be a (nonelementary) Kleinian group and q >/= 2 an integer. The group [unk] acts in a natural way on the vector space II(2q-2) of complex polynomials in one variable of degree group of [unk] with coefficients in II(2q-2). There are essentially two ways of constructing cohomology classes. One construction originated with Eichler and has recently been extended by Ahlfors. Another construction is due to Bers. We show that for finitely generated [unk], every cohomology class pepsilon H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) can be written uniquely (if one chooses an invariant union of components of [unk]) as a sum of a Bers cohomology class and an Eichler cohomology class. Similar decompositions are obtained for the subgroups of parabolic cohomology classes introduced by Ahlfors. Some information on the structure of H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) for infinitely generated groups [unk] is also obtained. PMID:16591774

  17. Anti- CC-Groups and Anti-PC-Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Russo

    2007-01-01

    subgroup H of G. An anti-PC group G is a group in which each nonfinitely generated subgroup K has the quotient group G/coreG(NG(K which is a polycyclic-by-finite group. Anti-CC groups and anti-PC groups are the subject of the present article.

  18. Nonequilibrium Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal equilibrium properties of many-body or field theories are known to be efficiently classified in terms of renormalization group fixed points. A particularly powerful concept is the notion of infrared fixed points, which are characterized by universality. These correspond to critical phenomena in thermal equilibrium, where a characteristic large correlation length leads to independence of long-distance properties from details of the underlying microscopic theory. In contrast, a classification of properties of theories far from thermal equilibrium in terms of renormalization group fixed points is much less developed. The notion of universality or critical phenomena far from equilibrium is to a large extent unexplored, in particular, in relativistic quantum field theories. Here the strong interest is mainly driven by theoretical and experimental advances in our understanding of early universe cosmology as well as relativistic collision experiments of heavy nuclei in the laboratory. In these lectures I will introduce the functional renormalization group for the effective average action out of equilibrium. While in equilibrium typically a Euclidean formulation is adequate, nonequilibrium properties require real-time descriptions. For quantum systems a generating functional for nonequilibrium correlation functions with given density matrix at initial time can be written down using the Schwinger-Keldysh closed time path contour. In principle, this can be used to construct a nonequilibrium functional renormalization group along similar lines as for Euclidean field theories in thermal equilibrium. However, important differences include the absence of time-translation invariance for general out-of-equilibrium situations. The nonequilibrium renormalization group takes on a particularly simple form at a fixed point, since it becomes independent of the initial density matrix. I will discuss some simple examples for which I derive a hierarchy of fixed point solutions

  19. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active...... thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice to that of...

  20. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  1. Two Abelian group constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let A be an Abelian group and n an integer >1. Let D be a divisible hull of A. Define A0sup((D))=A,Asub(r)sup((D)) = set containing x is an element of D|nx=y, for some y is an element of Asub(r=1)sup((D)), r=1,2,3,..., and Asub([n])sup((D))=Usub(r=0)sup(infinity)Asub(r)sup((D)). Then each Asub(r)sup((D)) is a subgroup of D and Asub([n])sup((D)) is the smallest n-divisible subgroup of D which contains A. Define Asub((D))sup([n])=Asub([n])sup((D))/A. A number of theorems and propositions are proved for the groups Asub([n])sup((D)) and Asub((D))sup([n])

  2. Group Formation in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  3. ST Quality Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, S

    2000-01-01

    When CERN engages contractors or outside enterprises for supply and service contracts, a Quality certification is requested. CERN itself has no global certification. Nor are quality assurance systems well understood by the majority of CERN staff. This has not precluded successful activity but it is felt that a structured approach would have some benefits: elimination of occasional accelerator perturbations, improved documentation, efficient use of existing resources, enhanced sharing of experience and knowledge, avoidance of improper handover periods when staff leave CERN. In some cases talented staff spend too much time doing remedial jobs when they are capable of achieving much more. The ST quality working group was formed to address these problems. The goal of this quality working group is to help ST division maintain and continuously improve the quality of its services and operations, and give confidence to ST staff and clients that the requirements for quality are being fulfilled, maintained and improved...

  4. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  5. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  6. The Areva Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  7. Working group 2: Freshwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group at a Canada-USA symposium on climate change in the Arctic addressed freshwater issues from the perspective of water resource planning and management. Two issues were selected for discussion and identification of relationships with resource management: hydroelectric production and waste disposal. Gaps in knowledge about climate and water resources were identified along with potential actions for response and adaptation to climate change. Recommendations are offered to improve knowledge of Arctic climate and hydrology

  8. Combinatorial group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lyndon, Roger C

    2001-01-01

    From the reviews: "This book (...) defines the boundaries of the subject now called combinatorial group theory. (...)it is a considerable achievement to have concentrated a survey of the subject into 339 pages. This includes a substantial and useful bibliography; (over 1100 ÄitemsÜ). ...the book is a valuable and welcome addition to the literature, containing many results not previously available in a book. It will undoubtedly become a standard reference." Mathematical Reviews, AMS, 1979.

  9. Equity valuation : Eurocash Group

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Ana Isabel Antunes de Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    Equity valuation is an extremely complex and subjective process, it depends not only on the theoretical models but also on the analysis and assumptions used by the analyst. This thesis focuses on the valuation of Eurocash Group, a leading wholesale distributor of fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) in Poland. In order to present stronger conclusions we decided to use two different models: the discounted cash-flow (DCF) model and the multiples method as a complement. The combination of both l...

  10. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  11. Holonomy groups and spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, G. S.; Lonie, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    A study is made of the possible holonomy group types of a space-time for which the energy-momentum tensor corresponds to a null or non-null electromagnetic field, a perfect fluid or a massive scalar field. The case of an Einstein space is also included. The techniques developed are also applied to vacuum and conformally flat space-times and contrasted with already known results in these two cases. Examples are given.

  12. Holonomy groups and spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, G S

    2000-01-01

    A study is made of the possible holonomy group types of a space-time for which the energy-momentum tensor corresponds to a null or non-null electromagnetic field, a perfect fluid or a massive scalar field. The case of an Einstein space is also included. The techniques developed are also applied to vacuum and conformally flat space-times and contrasted with already known results in these two cases. Examples are given.

  13. Hadron hadron collider group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies

  14. Heavy flavors study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy flavor study group concentrated on three issues. First the investigation of an energy transverse trigger to be used to select out charm and beauty events. Second, in a dedicated high sensitivity two-body B experiment is it possible to ''tag'' the beauty particle. Third, the design of a photoproduction experiment that could accumulate 108 charm particles in a single Fermilab running period

  15. Ocenenie Volkswagen Group

    OpenAIRE

    Šusták, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Objective of the thesis is determination of Volkswagen Group's equity intrinsic value. Basic starting point of the analysis is seggregation of consolidated financial statements into financial and production division, which are valuated separately. The production division is valuated using both enterprise discounted cashflow and discounted economic profit analysis. Equity cashflow valuation is used to derive value of the financial division. Results of valuation implied by income approach are t...

  16. Multibunch working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems

  17. Group process and group phenomena on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, H

    2001-07-01

    This article identifies group processes and group phenomena in discussion lists on the Internet and examines the differences and similarities with the processes in small and large groups. Group dynamics and phenomena, such as boundaries, cohesion, transference, scapegoating, and the leader's role are addressed. Large group features, such as alienation, vulnerability, and the vast amount of issues discussed in parallel are described. There are similarities between the discussion list and small groups on issues of cohesion and group norms, and in the psychological mechanisms of transference and scapegoating. There are differences regarding the contract, boundaries, leaving the group, and extra-group socialization. Although many of the phenomena described resemble a large group, a discussion list on the Internet maintains the illusion of being a small group and frequently acts like one. While a virtual therapy group would be somewhat different from a real group, it could nonetheless be useful. PMID:11447785

  18. Outer automorphism groups of certain 1-relator groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM; Goansu

    2010-01-01

    Grossman first showed that outer automorphism groups of 1-relator groups given by orientable surface groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable surfaces are residually finite.Allenby,Kim and Tang showed that outer automorphism groups of cyclically pinched 1-relator groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable and non-orientable surfaces are residually finite.In this paper we show that outer automorphism groups of certain conjugacy separable 1-relator groups are residually finite.

  19. Countable groups are mapping class groups of hyperbolic 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Frigerio, Roberto; Martelli, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    We prove that for every countable group G there exists a hyperbolic 3-manifold M such that the isometry group of M, the mapping class group of M, and the outer automorphism group of the fundamental group of M are isomorphic to G.

  20. Quality of Group Member Agendas and Group Session Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Jauquet, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Examined relationship between group members' (N=36) approach to group sessions and group session climate and relationship between length of time in group and agenda quality. Found average ratings of interpersonal and here-and-now dimensions of agendas were significantly related to average perception of group climate as more engaged and less…

  1. Technology working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The first group was on Technology. Utilities should consider required provisions capacity by properly maintaining and preserving the existing power plants to the extent practicable and taking into account growing demand, limits of energy conservation, and difficulties in finding new power plant sites. Generally, the extension of the life of nuclear power plant (e.g. from 40 years to 60 years) is an attractive option for utilities, as the marginal cost of most existing nuclear power plants is lower than that of almost all other power sources. It is also an attractive option for environmental protection. Consequently, PLIM has become an important issue in the context of the regulatory reform of the electricity markets. Therefore, the three main objectives of the Technology working group are: 1) Documenting how the safety of nuclear power plants being operated for the long-term has been confirmed, and suggesting ways of sharing this information. 2) Addressing development of advanced maintenance technologies necessary over the plant lifetime, and clarifying their technical challenges. 3) Suggesting potential areas of research and development that might, be necessary. Some potential examples of such research include: - improving the effectiveness of maintenance methods to assure detection of incipient faults; - providing cost effective preventive maintenance programmes; - furnishing systematic, cost-effective refurbishment programmes framed to be consistent with efforts to extend the time between re-fuelling; - developing a methodology that moves routine maintenance on-line without compromising safety. (author)

  2. Unilever Group : equity valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Susana Sofia Castelo

    2014-01-01

    The following dissertation has the purpose to value the Unilever Group, but more specifically Unilever N.V. being publicly traded in the Amsterdam Exchange Index. Unilever is seen as a global player and one of most successful and competitive fast-moving consumer goods companies. In order to valuate Unilever’s equity, a Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) approach is first carried out, since it is believed to be the most reliable methodology. The value estimated was €36.39, advising one to buy its s...

  3. Statistical Group Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  4. Bevalac computer support group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, a group was created and placed under the leadership of Charles McParland. This is an expansion of previous Bevalac software efforts and has responsibilities in three major hardware and software areas. The first area is the support of the existing data acquisition/analysis VAX 11/780s at the Bevalac. The second area is the continued support of present data acquisition programs. The third principal area of effort is the development of new data acquisition systems to meet the increasing needs of the Bevalac experimental program

  5. Theory and modeling group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  6. Arithmetic of Quaternion Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Jahangiri, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Let $p$ be a prime and $a$ a quadratic non-residue $\\bmod p$. Then the set of integral solutions of the diophantine equation $x_0^2 - ax_1^2 -px_2^2 + apx_3^2=1$ form a cocompact discrete subgroup $\\Gamma_{p,a}\\subset SL(2,\\mathbb{R})$ and is commensurable with the group of units of an order in a quaternion algebra over $\\mathbb{Q}$. The problem addressed in this paper is an estimate for the traces of a set of generators for $\\Gamma_{p,a}$. Empirical results summarized in several tables show ...

  7. GroupFinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Skovsgaard, Anders; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    The notion of point-of-interest (PoI) has existed since paper road maps began to include markings of useful places such as gas stations, hotels, and tourist attractions. With the introduction of geopositioned mobile devices such as smartphones and mapping services such as Google Maps, the retrieval...... existing proposals retrieve results at single-PoI granularity. We assume that a mobile device user issues queries consisting of keywords and an automatically supplied geo-position, and we target the common case where the user wishes to find nearby groups of PoIs that are relevant to the keywords. Such...

  8. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  9. The technical review group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the formation of a technical review group (TRG) as an early application of the quality assurance program for high-level waste processing. The objectives and functions for a TRG are summarized. Organizational structure is presented. Interfaces for the TRG are described by a flow diagram following the review process from the originator's document submittal to the final approval. Interfacing organizations and their responsibilities during the review are shown. Experience to date with TRG activities are described and QA interaction is discussed

  10. Grouping Synonyms by Definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Ingrid; Gardent, Claire; Jacquey, Evelyne; Venant, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for grouping the synonyms of a lemma according to its dictionary senses. The senses are defined by a large machine readable dictionary for French, the TLFi (Tr\\'esor de la langue fran\\c{c}aise informatis\\'e) and the synonyms are given by 5 synonym dictionaries (also for French). To evaluate the proposed method, we manually constructed a gold standard where for each (word, definition) pair and given the set of synonyms defined for that word by the 5 synonym dictionaries, 4 ...

  11. Quantum Group $\\sigma$ Models

    CERN Document Server

    Frishman, Yitzhak; Zakrzewski, W J

    1993-01-01

    Field-theoretic models for fields taking values in quantum groups are investigated. First we consider $SU_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model ($q$ real) expressed in terms of basic notions of noncommutative differential geometry. We discuss the case in which the $\\sigma$ models fields are represented as products of conventional $\\sigma$ fields and of the coordinate-independent algebra. An explicit example is provided by the $U_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model with $q\\sp{N}=1$, in which case quantum matrices $U_q(2)$ are realised as $2N\\times 2N$ unitary matrices. Open problems are pointed out.

  12. Quantum Group $\\sigma$ Models

    OpenAIRE

    Frishman, Y.; Lukierski, J.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Field-theoretic models for fields taking values in quantum groups are investigated. First we consider $SU_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model ($q$ real) expressed in terms of basic notions of noncommutative differential geometry. We discuss the case in which the $\\sigma$ models fields are represented as products of conventional $\\sigma$ fields and of the coordinate-independent algebra. An explicit example is provided by the $U_q(2)$ $\\sigma$ model with $q\\sp{N}=1$, in which case quantum matrices $U_q(2)$ ar...

  13. Representation Theory of Algebraic Groups and Quantum Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gyoja, A; Shinoda, K-I; Shoji, T; Tanisaki, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Invited articles by top notch expertsFocus is on topics in representation theory of algebraic groups and quantum groupsOf interest to graduate students and researchers in representation theory, group theory, algebraic geometry, quantum theory and math physics

  14. Quantum group gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a kind of solution in the effective theory of superstring. It was shown that extra time-like coordinates can solve the cosmological constant problem. To avoid the appearance of massless ghost we had to put some topological restrictions on the internal space K. One of this restriction is that K has no Killings vectors at all. Equation of motion got us that K has negative curvature. The simplest example of a manifold with negative curvature is an hyperboloid which is non-compact. In the σ-model approach this means that we have to deal with non-compact σ-models. Namely such type of σ-models is a subject of recent investigations in the context of the 2-dim gravity coupled with c=1 matter. However one can assume that K is a compact hyperbolic manifold. Such manifolds have rather complicated topology. In the usually adopted field theories fields take values in the simplest manifolds (line, plane, sphere, group, coset space, etc.). However adopted the possibility for signature to be the dynamical variable we have to deal with fields taken values in manifolds with complicate topology. One can go one step forward and try to consider field theories in which fields are more complicate objects, for example, are elements of quantum plane or quantum group

  15. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  16. Biology task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accomplishments of the task group studies over the past year are reviewed. The purposes of biological investigations, in the context of subseabed disposal, are: an evaluation of the dose to man; an estimation of effects on the ecosystem; and an estimation of the influence of organisms on and as barriers to radionuclide migration. To accomplish these ends, the task group adopted the following research goals: (1) acquire more data on biological accumulation of specific radionuclides, such as those of Tc, Np, Ra, and Sr; (2) acquire more data on transfer coefficients from sediment to organism; (3) Calculate mass transfer rates, construct simple models using them, and estimate collective dose commitment; (4) Identify specific pathways or transfer routes, determine the rates of transfer, and make dose limit calculations with simple models; (5) Calculate dose rates to and estimate irradiation effects on the biota as a result of waste emplacement, by reference to background irradiation calculations. (6) Examine the effect of the biota on altering sediment/water radionuclide exchange; (7) Consider the biological data required to address different accident scenarios; (8) Continue to provide the basic biological information for all of the above, and ensure that the system analysis model is based on the most realistic and up-to-date concepts of marine biologists; and (9) Ensure by way of free exchange of information that the data used in any model are the best currently available

  17. Business working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  18. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  19. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  20. On the Brauer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an arithmetic model X of a Fermat surface or a hyperkahler variety with Betti number b2(V otimes k-bar)>3 over a purely imaginary number field k, we prove the finiteness of the l-components of Br'(X) for all primes l>>0. This yields a variant of a conjecture of M. Artin. If V is a smooth projective irregular surface over a number field k and V(k)≠ nothing, then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(k) is an infinite group for every prime l. Let A1→M1 be the universal family of elliptic curves with a Jacobian structure of level N>=3 over a number field k supset of Q(e2πi/N). Assume that M1(k) ≠ nothing. If V is a smooth projective compactification of the surface A1, then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(M-bar1) is a finite group for each sufficiently large prime l

  1. Social group and mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltezarević Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our reality, having been subject to the numerous social crises during the last decades of the 20th century, is characterized by frequent incidences of powerlessness and alienation. The man is more frequently a subject to loneliness and overcomes the feeling of worthlessness, no matter whether he considers himself an individual or a part of a whole larger social. Such an environment leads to development of aggression in all fields of ones life. This paper has as an objective the pointing out of the mental harassment that is manifested in the working environment. There is a prevalence of mobbing cases, as a mode of pathological communication. The result of this is that a person, subjected to this kind of abuse, is soon faced with social isolation. This research also aspires to initiate the need for social groups self-organization of which victims are part of. The reaction modality of a social group directly conditions the outcome of the deliberate social drama, one is subjected to it as a result of mobbing.

  2. On Generalized PST-groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JUN-XIN; Du Xian-kun

    2011-01-01

    A finite group G is called a generalized PST-group if every subgroup contained in F(G) permutes all Sylow subgroups of G,where F(G) is the Fitting subgroup of G.The class of generalized PST-groups is not subgroup and quotient group closed,and it properly contains the class of PST-groups.In this paper,the structure of generalized PST-groups is first investigated.Then,with its help,groups whose every subgroup (or every quotient group) is a generalized PST-group are determined,and it is shown that such groups are precisely PST-groups.As applications,T-groups and PT-groups are characterized.

  3. Braided C*-quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sutanu

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general theory of braided quantum groups in the C*-algebraic framework. More precisely, we construct braided quantum groups using manageable braided multiplicative unitaries over a regular C*-quantum group. We show that braided C*-quantum groups are equivalent to C*-quantum groups with projection.

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit Mr = –18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  5. Group and ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrfritz, BAF

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic groups are built from cyclic groups in a specific way. They arise in many contexts within group theory itself but also more generally in algebra, for example in the theory of Noetherian rings. The first half of this book develops the standard group theoretic techniques for studying polycyclic groups and the basic properties of these groups. The second half then focuses specifically on the ring theoretic properties of polycyclic groups and their applications, often to purely group theoretic situations. The book is intended to be a study manual for graduate students and researchers co

  6. Gutzwiller renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yong-Xin; Deng, Xiaoyu; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We develop a variational scheme called the "Gutzwiller renormalization group" (GRG), which enables us to calculate the ground state of Anderson impurity models (AIM) with arbitrary numerical precision. Our method exploits the low-entanglement property of the ground state of local Hamiltonians in combination with the framework of the Gutzwiller wave function and indicates that the ground state of the AIM has a very simple structure, which can be represented very accurately in terms of a surprisingly small number of variational parameters. We perform benchmark calculations of the single-band AIM that validate our theory and suggest that the GRG might enable us to study complex systems beyond the reach of the other methods presently available and pave the way to interesting generalizations, e.g., to nonequilibrium transport in nanostructures.

  7. Group life insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  8. Doing focus group research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    interview data can be of some use if the distinction between natural and contrived data is given up and replaced with a distinction between interview data as topic or as resource. In greater detail, such scholars argue that interview data are perfectly adequate if the researcher wants to study the topic of......Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge that...... interview interaction, but inadequate as data for studying phenomena that go beyond the phenomenon of interview interaction. Neither of these more and less sceptical positions are, on the face of it, surprising due to the ethnomethodological commitment to study social order as accomplished in situ, not as...

  9. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  10. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  11. Introduction to complex reflection groups and their braid groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Weyl groups are particular cases of complex reflection groups, i.e. finite subgroups of GLr(C) generated by (pseudo)reflections. These are groups whose polynomial ring of invariants is a polynomial algebra. It has recently been discovered that complex reflection groups play a key role in the theory of finite reductive groups, giving rise as they do to braid groups and generalized Hecke algebras which govern the representation theory of finite reductive groups. It is now also broadly agreed upon that many of the known properties of Weyl groups can be generalized to complex reflection groups. The purpose of this work is to present a fairly extensive treatment of many basic properties of complex reflection groups (characterization, Steinberg theorem, Gutkin-Opdam matrices, Solomon theorem and applications, etc.) including the basic findings of Springer theory on eigenspaces. In doing so, we also introduce basic definitions and properties of the associated braid groups, as well as a quick introduction to Bessis' ...

  12. Harmonic Analysis and Group Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Figa-Talamanca, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: Lectures - A. Auslander, R. Tolimeri - Nilpotent groups and abelian varieties, M Cowling - Unitary and uniformly bounded representations of some simple Lie groups, M. Duflo - Construction de representations unitaires d'un groupe de Lie, R. Howe - On a notion of rank for unitary representations of the classical groups, V.S. Varadarajan - Eigenfunction expansions of semisimple Lie groups, and R. Zimmer - Ergodic theory, group representations and rigidity; and, Seminars - A. Koranyi - Some applications of Gelfand pairs in classical analysis.

  13. Working Group Versus Team Work

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina-Vasilica Zaharia; Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Dan-Marin Boaja

    2014-01-01

    The cell organization is represented by the working group and not the individual, groups that are a major feature of life organization. Quality circles were designed as tools for building team spirit in Japanese companies as a tool to enhance group cohesion and the training of employees. The essential characteristic of human behavior and organizational performance is given by the working group and the influence on group members, so members of the group leader should use in order to achieve a ...

  14. Cultural skepticism and 'group representation'

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Arguments for group representation have commonly faced three objections: (1) that representing people via their membership of a group promotes sectionalism, parochialism, and the pursuit of vested interests; (2) that it raises impossible questions about which groups qualify for group representation; (3) that it falsely presumes the existence of a group with sufficiently shared interests, perspectives, values, or concerns for some of those group members fairly to represent the others. I have s...

  15. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  16. Group Development and Situational Leadership: A Model for Managing Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Donald K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    An integration of the concepts of situational leadership with what is known about group development and functioning of work groups is discussed as a tool in helping managers, trainers, and group members understand group development and determine the appropriate leader behaviors to use in various situations to build unified, cohesive, and…

  17. On Sufism, Sufi Group Study and Group Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhorn, Jay

    1979-01-01

    Sufism is an ancient tradition of experiential human development. Sufi human development specialists utilize the group setting as a major study format. Comparison with group counseling might broaden perspectives on the possibilities and pitfalls of group process, and pinpoint several important issues relevant to group leadership. (Author)

  18. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  19. Automorphism Groups of Finite p-Groups: Structure and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Helleloid, Geir T

    2007-01-01

    This thesis has three goals related to the automorphism groups of finite $p$-groups. The primary goal is to provide a complete proof of a theorem showing that, in some asymptotic sense, the automorphism group of almost every finite $p$-group is itself a $p$-group. We originally proved this theorem in a paper with Martin; the presentation of the proof here contains omitted proof details and revised exposition. We also give a survey of the extant results on automorphism groups of finite $p$-groups, focusing on the order of the automorphism groups and on known examples. Finally, we explore a connection between automorphisms of finite $p$-groups and Markov chains. Specifically, we define a family of Markov chains on an elementary abelian $p$-group and bound the convergence rate of some of those chains.

  20. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    subscales: Cohesion (p< 0.05), Leader support (p=0.001), Expressiveness (p< 0.001), Task Orientation (p=0.01) and Order and Organization (p< 0.001). Conclusions: Substantial differences in the group milieu were seen. The systemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also to be...... randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...

  1. The analytic renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  2. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  3. Reflexive Analysis of Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Vladimir A.

    This chapter develops further a model I previously introduced, of an agent facing a choice between the positive and the negative poles. Here I will consider agents whose individual behavior depends on a ‘society’ compounded by all of them. Four ideas underlie the theory. The first idea is to consider relationships between the subgroups of agents, not just pairs of agents; this idea allows us to represent a decomposable graph corresponding to an agent or a group of agents as a tree of subgraphs. The second idea is to establish a correspondence between decomposable graphs and polynomials, allowing us to replace a tree of subgraphs with a tree of polynomials representing a computational process. The third idea consists of the interpretation of the tree of polynomials as an agent who has images of the self, which can have images of the self, etc. Finally, the fourth idea is putting an equation into correspondence to the agent, allowing us to find out the agent’s state. The theory is illustrated here with several examples from modern geopolitics, including scenarios of current interest.

  4. The Liabilities Management Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Liabilities Management Group (LMG) was initiated by DTI. It is a cooperative forum which was set up in 1995. The current participants are DTI, UKAEA, NLM (for BNFL), MOD and Magnox Electric. The LMG was initiated to produce closer cooperation between public sector liability management organizations, achieve more cost-effective management of UK nuclear liabilities and enhance development of the UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management strategy. The objectives are to compare practices between liabilities management organizations discuss the scope for collaboration identify priority areas for possible collaboration agree action plans for exploring and undertaking such collaboration.Four task forces have been formed to look at specific areas (R and D, safety, contracts, and project management) and each reports separately to the LMG. The LMG has achieved its original aim of bringing together those with public sector liability management responsibilities. All participants feel that the LMG has been useful and that it should continue. Looking to the future, there is a continuing need for the LMG to facilitate removal of barriers to the achievement of best value for money. The LMG might also consider addressing the 'business process' elements that a liability management organization must be good at in order to define best practice in these. (author)

  5. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  6. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOvA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  7. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  8. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  9. A Typology for Finite Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    This project classifies groups of small order using a group's center as the key feature. Groups of a given order "n" are typed based on the order of each group's center. Students are led through a sequence of exercises that combine proof-writing, independent research, and an analysis of specific classes of finite groups…

  10. About Hebei Jianxin Construction Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Hebei Jianxin Construction (Group) Ltd. was incorporated in August 1984. As the holding company, Hebei Jianxin Construction (Group)Ltd. along with five companies under its holding, such as Baoding New Generation Real Estate Development Co., Ltd. and Baoding New Generation Property Management Co., Ltd., formed Hebei Jianxin Architectural Group (hereafter, the Group).

  11. Anomaly-safe discrete groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that there is a class of finite groups, the so-called perfect groups, which cannot exhibit anomalies. This implies that all non-Abelian finite simple groups are anomaly-free. On the other hand, non-perfect groups generically suffer from anomalies. We present two different ways that allow one to understand these statements

  12. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ105 PREGNANCY Group B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be ... a planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of ...

  13. Holographic renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The holographic renormalization group (RG) is reviewed in a self-contained manner. The holographic RG is based on the idea that the radial coordinate of a space-time with asymptotically AdS geometry can be identified with the RG flow parameter of boundary field theory. After briefly discussing basic aspects of the AdS/CFT correspondence, we explain how the concept of the holographic GR emerges from this correspondence. We formulate the holographic RG on the basis of the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for bulk systems of gravity and scalar fields, as introduced by de Boer, Verlinde and Verlinde. We then show that the equations can be solved with a derivative expansion by carefully extracting local counterterms from the generating functional of the boundary field theory. The calculational methods used to obtain the Weyl anomaly and scaling dimensions are presented and applied to the RG flow from the N = 4 SYM to an N = 1 superconformal fixed point discovered by Leigh and Straussler. We further discuss the relation between the holographic RG and the noncritical string theory and show that the structure of the holographic RG should persist beyond the supergravity approximation as a consequence of the renormalizability of the nonlinear σ-model action of noncritical strings. As a check, we investigate the holographic RG structure of higher-derivative systems. We show that such systems can also be analyzed based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations and that the behavior of bulk fields are determined solely by their boundary values. We also point out that higher-derivative gravity systems give rise to new multicritical points in the parameter space of boundary field theories. (author)

  14. ASYNCHRONOUS ELECTRONIC DISCUSSION GROUP:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Lim Swee KIM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the practice of online discussion in a course specially tailored for in-service teachers who are pursuing their basic degree qualification at a teacher training institute. Analyses of postings to the asynchronous electronic discussion group were made according to the type of postings as proposed by Poole (2000. Four focus areas were looked into, that is, content, technical, procedural, or non-academic. Analyses were done for each quarter of the 12 weeks of interaction. At the end of the learners’ participation in the EDG and before their end-of-course examination, the participants were then given a paper-based questionnaire asking their perceptions on the use of EDG as part of their coursework on the whole. Six aspects of EDG were examined, these are;Ø technical aspects, Ø motivation to use the EDG, Ø quality of interaction, Ø tutor’s response, Ø perceived learning, and Ø attitude towards EDG. Analyses on postings for the EDG showed that the bulk of the postings were made in the last quarter of the online discussions. Further, 97.8% of the postings were on content and the types of content posting registered were predominantly questions (41.19% and those that sought clarification/elaboration (37.48%. Findings from this study suggest that overall the participants were satisfied with the six aspects of EDG examined. The aspect that recorded the highest mean was ‘motivation to read tutor’s responses’ whilst the lowest mean (and the only one with negative perception was for ‘worthiness of time spent on online discussions’.

  15. Graph-Constrained Group Testing

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cheraghchi; A. Karbasi; S. Mohajer; Saligrama, V.

    2012-01-01

    Non-adaptive group testing involves grouping arbitrary subsets of $n$ items into different pools. Each pool is then tested and defective items are identified. A fundamental question involves minimizing the number of pools required to identify at most $d$ defective items. Motivated by applications in network tomography, sensor networks and infection propagation, a variation of group testing problems on graphs is formulated. Unlike conventional group testing problems, each group here must confo...

  16. Embeddings into Thompson's group V and coCF groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bleak, Collin; Matucci, Francesco; Neunhöffer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Lehnert and Schweitzer show in [21] that R. Thompson's group V is a co-context-free (coCF ) group, thus implying that all of its finitely generated subgroups are also coCF groups. Also, Lehnert shows in his thesis that V embeds inside the coCF group QAut(T2;c), which is a group of particular bijections on the vertices of an infinite binary 2-edge-colored tree, and he conjectures that QAut(T2;c) is a universal coCF group. We show that QAut(T2;c) embeds into V , and thus obtain a new form for L...

  17. Groups possessing extensive hierarchical decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Januszkiewicz, T; Leary, I J

    2009-01-01

    Kropholler's class of groups is the smallest class of groups which contains all finite groups and is closed under the following operator: whenever $G$ admits a finite-dimensional contractible $G$-CW-complex in which all stabilizer groups are in the class, then $G$ is itself in the class. Kropholler's class admits a hierarchical structure, i.e., a natural filtration indexed by the ordinals. For example, stage 0 of the hierarchy is the class of all finite groups, and stage 1 contains all groups of finite virtual cohomological dimension. We show that for each countable ordinal $\\alpha$, there is a countable group that is in Kropholler's class which does not appear until the $\\alpha+1$st stage of the hierarchy. Previously this was known only for $\\alpha= 0$, 1 and 2. The groups that we construct contain torsion. We also review the construction of a torsion-free group that lies in the third stage of the hierarchy.

  18. Secure Group Communications for Large Dynamic Multicast Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jing; Zhou Mingtian

    2003-01-01

    As the major problem in multicast security, the group key management has been the focus of research But few results are satisfactory. In this paper, the problems of group key management and access control for large dynamic multicast group have been researched and a solution based on SubGroup Secure Controllers (SGSCs) is presented, which solves many problems in IOLUS system and WGL scheme.

  19. Infinitesimal group schemes as iterative differential Galois groups

    OpenAIRE

    Maurischat, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    This article is concerned with Galois theory for iterative differential fields (ID-fields) in positive characteristic. More precisely, we consider purely inseparable Picard-Vessiot extensions, because these are the ones having an infinitesimal group scheme as iterative differential Galois group. In this article we prove a necessary and sufficient condition to decide whether an infinitesimal group scheme occurs as Galois group scheme of a Picard-Vessiot extension over a given ID-field or not. ...

  20. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semi-groups on stratified groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lust-Piquard, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    We consider, in the setting of stratified groups G, two analogues of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semi-group, namely Markovian diffusion semi-groups acting on $L^q(pd g)$, whose invariant density $p$ is a heat kernel at time 1 on G.

  1. Structuring the Group Experience: A Format for Designing Psychoeducational Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents six-step model for moving from a general statement of purpose to a psychoeducational group design that includes didactic content, experiential activities, and processing. By following this model the group facilitator will be able to develop a psychoeducational group that provides a logical sequence of learning activities fostering…

  2. An Exploration of Group and Member Development in Experiential Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Prochenko, Yulia; Stulmaker, Hayley; Huffman, David; Fernando, Delini; Swan, Karrie

    2014-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, we explored 52 group members' development in experiential groups. Specifically, participants completed 10 weekly journal reflections about their experiences as members and also reflected on the group's overall development. Four overall themes--exploration, transition, working, closure--as well as multiple…

  3. PI-groups and PI-representations of groups

    OpenAIRE

    Aladova, E.; Plotkin, B.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that many famous Burnside-type problems have positive solutions for PI-groups and PI-algebras. In the present article we also consider various Burnside-type problems for PI-groups and PI-representations of groups.

  4. Quantization on nilpotent Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a consistent development of the Kohn-Nirenberg type global quantization theory in the setting of graded nilpotent Lie groups in terms of their representations. It contains a detailed exposition of related background topics on homogeneous Lie groups, nilpotent Lie groups, and the analysis of Rockland operators on graded Lie groups together with their associated Sobolev spaces. For the specific example of the Heisenberg group the theory is illustrated in detail. In addition, the book features a brief account of the corresponding quantization theory in the setting of compact Lie groups. The monograph is the winner of the 2014 Ferran Sunyer i Balaguer Prize.

  5. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    Are people willing to sacrifice resources to save one's and others' face? In a laboratory experiment, we study whether individuals forego resources to avoid the public exposure of the least performer in their group. We show that a majority of individuals are willing to pay to preserve not only...... their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm....

  6. Group analysis of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1982-01-01

    Group Analysis of Differential Equations provides a systematic exposition of the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras and its application to creating algorithms for solving the problems of the group analysis of differential equations.This text is organized into eight chapters. Chapters I to III describe the one-parameter group with its tangential field of vectors. The nonstandard treatment of the Banach Lie groups is reviewed in Chapter IV, including a discussion of the complete theory of Lie group transformations. Chapters V and VI cover the construction of partial solution classes for the g

  7. Topologies induced by group actions

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrowolski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We introduce some canonical topologies induced by actions of topological groups on groups and rings. For $H$ being a group [or a ring] and $G$ a topological group acting on $H$ as automorphisms, we describe the finest group [ring] topology on $H$ under which the action of $G$ on $H$ is continuous. We also study the introduced topologies in the context of Polish structures. In particular, we prove that there may be no Hausdorff topology on a group $H$ under which a given action of a Polish gro...

  8. Group Lasso with Overlaps: the Latent Group Lasso approach

    CERN Document Server

    Obozinski, Guillaume; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We study a norm for structured sparsity which leads to sparse linear predictors whose supports are unions of prede ned overlapping groups of variables. We call the obtained formulation latent group Lasso, since it is based on applying the usual group Lasso penalty on a set of latent variables. A detailed analysis of the norm and its properties is presented and we characterize conditions under which the set of groups associated with latent variables are correctly identi ed. We motivate and discuss the delicate choice of weights associated to each group, and illustrate this approach on simulated data and on the problem of breast cancer prognosis from gene expression data.

  9. Two-transitive Lie groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Linus

    2001-01-01

    Using a characterization of parabolics in reductive Lie groups due to Furstenberg, elementary properties of buildings, and some algebraic topology, we give a new proof of Tits' classification of 2-transitive Lie groups.

  10. Opechowski's theorem and commutator groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the conditions of application of Opechowski's theorem for double groups of subgroups of O(3) are directly associated to the structure of their commutator groups. Some characteristics of the structure of classes are also discussed. (Author)

  11. Cognitive Development and Group Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidla, Debie D.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to integrate Perry's (1970) scheme of the cognitive development of college students with a model of group development adapted by Waldo (1985) based on Tuckman's (1965) formulation of developmental group stages. (Author)

  12. Group process among novice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumkin, M K

    1996-03-01

    This paper explores the experiences of a group of registered nurses returning to graduate school. The organizing framework used is an integration of Tuckman and Jensen's group process theory and Benner's novice to expert model. PMID:8716180

  13. Alternating Quotients of Fuchsian Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Brent

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that any finitely generated non-elementary Fuchsian group has among its homomorphic images all but finitely many of the alternating groups. This settles in the affirmative a conjecture of Graham Higman.

  14. On -supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Izabela Agata Malinowska

    2015-05-01

    A number of authors have studied the structure of a group under the assumption that some subgroups of are well located in . We will obtain some new criteria of -supersolvability and -nilpotency of groups.

  15. Criminal groups and criminal subculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a classification of criminal groups, structured by the following parameters: a) operation mode (secret/open), b) law-enforcement and administrative support (presence/absence). We describe four types of criminal groups: a) legitimized criminal organization, b) secret criminal organization engaged in illegal business, c) secret general crime group, and d) general crime group operating openly. The four types differ in the content of criminal subculture. Modern criminal subcult...

  16. Costs of Control in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Riener, Gerhard; Wiederhold, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of social groups in explaining the reaction to control.We propose a simple model with a principal using control devices and a controlledagent, which incorporates the existence of social groups. Testing experimentally theconjectures derived from the model and related literature, we find that agents in socialgroups (i) perform more than other (no-group) agents; (ii) expect less control thanno-group agents; (iii) decrease their performance substantially when actual c...

  17. Homogeneity in the free group

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, Chloé

    2010-01-01

    We show that any non abelian free group $\\F$ is strongly $\\aleph_0$-homogeneous, i.e. that finite tuples of elements which satisfy the same first-order properties are in the same orbit under $\\Aut(\\F)$. We give a characterization of elements in finitely generated groups which have the same first-order properties as a primitive element of the free group. We deduce as a consequence that most hyperbolic surface groups are not $\\aleph_0$-homogeneous.

  18. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    OpenAIRE

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, Grant; Blackwell, Paul; Goodall, Victoria; King, Ruth; Niu, Mu; Patterson, Toby; Pedersen, Martin; Skarin, Anna; Schick, Robert Schilling

    2013-01-01

    1). Group dynamics are a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognized, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However, to date, practical statistical methods, which can include group dynamics in animal movement models, have been lacking. 2). We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level ...

  19. R-groups and parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, Dubravka; Goldberg, David

    2011-01-01

    For classical groups we show the isomorphism of the Knapp-Stein $R$-group, which describes the structure of parabolically induced representations, and the Arthur $R$-group of the parameter associated to the inducing representation by the local Langlands conjecture. We do this in the case of inducing from discrete series representations. In the case of unitary groups we show this isomorphism under a mild assumption on the parameter, which we show holds in at least half the cases.

  20. Group Norms and Consumer Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Pillai, Rajasekharan; Rajan, Jainey S.; Variyamveettil, Sunitha; Mathew, Dhanu E.; Nath, Subodh S.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of group norms on forming consumer behaviour is an important attribute of man’s social life. The market segmentation principles acknowledge the presence of this phenomenon. People belong to different age group, professional status, income levels, educational status etc. are seemed to display some specific consumer behaviour that can be attributed to a particular group. The present study attempts to find the influence of certain selected group norms on consumption pattern.

  1. Group Theory: It's a SNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetinck, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Introduces concepts of modern algebraic group theory in the form of a game. Peg boards and rubber bands represent nonnumerical group elements and are manipulated under the operation of reorienting a regular polygon. Symmetry groups are used to explore set properties, as well as commutative and noncommutative operations. (CMS)

  2. Internal communication in corporate groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grzesik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to internal communication in corporate groups. It discusses internal communication systems operating in the explored corporate groups and their significance for effective human resources management in those organisations. The chapter presents both the theoretical analysis based on the results of literature studies, and empirical research carried out in the explored groups. Narodowe Centrum Nauki Katarzyna Grzesik

  3. The Variety of Group Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaoYanyan; YuZhihao

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid enrollment expansion in the recent years,the author feels it urgent to reform the traditional group work,and therefore to form a new and more effective pattern of group learning. The new of group word is based on the principles of cooperation and that of the task with the more flexible marking system.

  4. Defense Mechanisms in Group Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents considerations and strategies for conceptualizing, recognizing, and modifying defense mechanisms through the group counseling process. Provides awareness of defense mechanisms in planning for and implementation of group counseling, describes interaction patterns for identifying defenses among group participants, and clarifies modification…

  5. K-Kolmogorov homology groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we use the idea of the K-groups to define the K-Kolmogorov homology groups, and their induced homomorphisms and boundary operators for the case of a pair of discrete coefficient groups, where K denotes a locally-finite simplicial complex. Moreover, we prove that our homology construction is exact. (author)

  6. Group Counselling for Problem Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Gregory J.; Evans, Barry J.; Burrows, Graham D.

    2002-01-01

    Group counseling has been used to assist individuals to overcome difficulties associated with problem gambling behavior; however, there are few reports of this application in the clinical and research literature. This paper provides a brief review of group counseling, and describes the application of group counseling to assist individuals with…

  7. Torsion units in group rings

    OpenAIRE

    Bist, Vikas

    1992-01-01

    Let U(RG) be the unit group of the group ring RG. In this paper we study group rings RG whose support elements of every torsion unit are torsion, where R is either the ring of integers Z or a field K.

  8. Hierarchical classification of social groups

    OpenAIRE

    Витковская, Мария

    2001-01-01

    Classification problems are important for every science, and for sociology as well. Social phenomena, examined from the aspect of classification of social groups, can be examined deeper. At present one common classification of groups does not exist. This article offers the hierarchical classification of social group.

  9. Ultrafilters and topologies on groups

    CERN Document Server

    Zelenyuk, Yevhen

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the relationship between ultrafilters and topologies on groups. It shows how ultrafilters are used in constructing topologies on groups with extremal properties and how topologies on groups serve in deriving algebraic results aboutultrafilters. Topics covered include: topological and left topological groups, ultrafilter semigroups, local homomorphisms and automorphisms, subgroups and ideal structure of ßG, almost maximal spaces and projectives of finite semigroups, resolvability of groups. This is a self-contained book aimed at graduate students and researchers working in to

  10. Invariant operators of inhomogeneous groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning the invariant operators of the W(p, q) Weyl group of arbitrary dimension are considered. The Weyl group relative invariants, which do not contain the dilatation operators and which are the absolute invariants of the ISO (p, q) group, are searched for. The invariant operators of the Weyl group are represented in the form of the ratio of the Cazimir operators of the inhomogeneous pseudoorthogonal subgroup. It is shown that all the invariant operators of the W(p, q) Weyl group are rational and their number is [p+q-1/2

  11. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.;

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...... in an encamped state. Though the attraction to the group centroid is relatively weak, our model successfully captures group-influenced movement dynamics. Specifically, as compared to a regular mixture of correlated random walks, the group dynamic model more accurately predicts the non-diffusive behaviour...

  12. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam;

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged in...... large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...... cluster actors according to a number of key background characteristics and second assess how the categories of the different interest group typologies relate to these clusters. We demonstrate that background characteristics do align to a certain extent with certain interest group types but also find...

  13. Sur le groupe de Cremona et ses sous-groupes

    OpenAIRE

    Usnich, Alexandr

    2008-01-01

    Ce travail peut être divisé en trois partie: 1. Théorie des groupes. Il s'agit ici d'une étude de la structure du groupe T de Thompson. On explique la notion de la mutation linéaire par morceaux et on obtient la nouvelle présentation de ce groupe en termes des génerateurs et relations. 2. Géometrie birationnelle. On étudie en détail le groupe de Cremona qui est un groupe des automorphismes birationnels du plan projectif. En particulier on s'interesse à son sous-groupe Symp des elements qui pr...

  14. Isomorphic Commutative Group Algebras of p-Mixed Warfield Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter V.DANCHEV

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a p-mixed Warfield Abelian group and F a field of char F = p ≠ 0. It is proved that if for any group H the group algebras FH and FG are F-isomorphic, then H is isomorphic to G.This presentation enlarges a result of W. May argued when G is p-local Warfield Abelian and published in Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. (1988).

  15. Group Members’ Assessment of Their Conductor in Small Analytic Group

    OpenAIRE

    Vlastelica, Mirela; Urlić, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    In this pilot study the authors present the group members’ assessment of their conductor in group analysis – the treatment conducted in accordance with concept »groupas- a-whole« of S. H. Foulkes. There will be presented the results obtained by scale for evaluation of characteristics of the group therapist. In the scale, developed by the authors of the study, there were 30 items and by factorial analysis it gave three interpretable factors: authenticity, empathy and distrust. B...

  16. Developing HR processes at group level: Case Halton Group

    OpenAIRE

    Sorvari, Iina

    2016-01-01

    The case company, Halton Group, as many other global technology companies worldwide, is investigating the possibility of taking a global human resource information system into use globally. In order to have a successful implementation process for the project, it is essential to have human resource processes described at the group level. This study aimed to develop the key HR processes in a global technology organization at the group level in order to enable modelling the group’s HR proce...

  17. Linear groups as right multiplication groups of quasifields

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Gábor P.

    2012-01-01

    For quasifields, the concept of parastrophy is slightly weaker than isotopy. Parastrophic quasifields yield isomorphic translation planes but not conversely. We investigate the right multiplication groups of finite quasifields. We classify all quasifields having an exceptional finite transitive linear group as right multiplication group. The classification is up to parastrophy, which turns out to be the same as up to the isomorphism of the corresponding translation planes.

  18. Mapping class group representations from Drinfeld doubles of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fjelstad, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We investigate representations of mapping class groups of surfaces that arise from the untwisted Drinfeld double of a finite group G, focusing on surfaces without marked points or with one marked point. We obtain concrete descriptions of such representations in terms of finite group data. This allows us to establish various properties of these representations. In particular we show that they have finite images, and that for surfaces of genus at least 3 their restriction to the Torelli group is non-trivial iff G is non-abelian.

  19. Duality group actions on fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Pantev, T

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we look at the action of T-duality and string duality groups on fermions, in maximally-supersymmetric theories and related theories. Briefly, we argue that typical duality groups such as SL(2,Z) have sign ambiguities in their actions on fermions, and propose that pertinent duality groups be extended by Z_2, to groups such as the metaplectic group. Specifically, we look at duality groups arising from mapping class groups of tori in M theory compactifications, T-duality, ten-dimensional type IIB S-duality, and (briefly) four-dimensional N=4 super Yang-Mills, and in each case, propose that the full duality group is a nontrivial Z_2 extension of the duality group acting on bosonic degrees of freedom, to more accurately describe possible actions on fermions. We also walk through U-duality groups for toroidal compactifications to nine, eight, and seven dimensions, which enables us to perform cross-consistency tests of these proposals.

  20. Group conflict and faculty engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In educational settings, substantial scholarly interest has focused on student engagement as an antecedent for educational development and positive school outcomes. Very limited research, however, has focused on the engagement of academic staff members. This may be a crucial oversight because...... assessed the effect of group trust, group relational conflict and group task conflict on indicators of behavioural, cognitive and emotional engagement. Our findings show a strong positive association between group trust and all academic staff engagement variables as well as a strong negative association...... between group relational conflict and all staff engagement variables. Task conflict was negatively associated with indicators of staff cognitive engagement. However, surprisingly, group trust did not have any moderating effect. Implications for educational organisation managers and policy makers are...

  1. Group theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thapa, Ram Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Every molecule possesses symmetry and hence has symmetry operations and symmetry elements. From symmetry properties of a system we can deduce its significant physical results. Consequently it is essential to operations of a system forms a group. Group theory is an abstract mathematical tool that underlies the study of symmetry and invariance. By using the concepts of symmetry and group theory, it is possible to obtain the members of complete set of known basis functions of the various irreducible representations of the group. I practice this is achieved by applying the projection operators to linear combinations of atomic orbital (LCAO) when the valence electrons are tightly bound to the ions, to orthogonalized plane waves (OPW) when valence electrons are nearly free and to the other given functions that are judged to the particular system under consideration. In solid state physics the group theory is indispensable in the context of finding the energy bands of electrons in solids. Group theory can be applied...

  2. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment. PMID:26015581

  3. The Local Group and other neighboring galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, rapid progress has been made in distance measurements for nearby galaxies based on the magnitude of the tip of red giant branch stars. Current CCD surveys with HST and large ground- based telescopes bring $\\sim$10%-accurate distances for roughly a hundred galaxies within 5 Mpc. The new data on distances to galaxies situated in (and around) the nearest groups: the Local Group, M81 group, CenA/M83 group, IC342/Maffei group, Sculptor filament, and Canes Venatici cloud allowed us to determine their total mass from the radius of the zero- velocity surface, $R_0$, which separates a group as bound against the homogeneous cosmic expansion. The values of $R_0$ for the virialized groups turn out to be close each other, in the range of 0.9 -- 1.3 Mpc. As a result, the total masses of the groups are close to each other, too, yielding total mass-to-blue luminosity ratios of 10 -- 40 $M_{\\sun}/L_{\\sun}$. The new total mass estimates are 3 -- 5 times lower than old virial mass estimates of these gro...

  4. Picard Groups and Class Groups of Monoid Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Jaret; Weibel, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We define and study the Picard group of a monoid scheme and the class group of a normal monoid scheme. To do so, we develop some ideal theory for (pointed abelian) noetherian monoids, including primary decomposition and discrete valuations. The normalization of a monoid turns out to be a monoid scheme, but not always a monoid.

  5. Group Performance in Information Systems Project Groups: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahli, Bouchaib; Buyukkurt, Meral Demirbag

    2005-01-01

    The importance of teamwork in Information Systems Development (ISD) practice and education has been acknowledged but not studied extensively to date. This paper tests a model of how groups participating in ISD projects perform and examines the relationships between some antecedents of this performance based on group research theory well…

  6. Group Risk Plan and Group Risk Income Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, William M.

    2003-01-01

    Group Risk Plan (GRP) and Group Risk Income Protection (GRIP) are low-cost insurance programs designed to help farmers protect their crops from disastrous losses. GRP and GRIP are alternatives to the traditional Multiple Peril Crop Insurance and revenue insurance products.

  7. Presentations of Graph Braid Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, Daniel; Sabalka, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a graph. The (unlabeled) configuration space of n points on G is the space of all n-element subsets of G. The fundamental group of such a configuration space is called a graph braid group. We use a version of discrete Morse theory to compute presentations of all graph braid groups, for all finite connected graphs G and all natural numbers n.

  8. Taxonomy Working Group Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie S.; Beil, Robert J.; Terrone, Mark; Barth, Timothy S.; Panontin, Tina L.; Wales, Roxana; Rackley, Michael W.; Milne, James S.; McPherson, John W.; Dutra, Jayne E.; Shaw, Larry C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Taxonomy Working Group was to develop a proposal for a common taxonomy to be used by all NASA projects in the classifying of nonconformances, anomalies, and problems. Specifically, the group developed a recommended list of data elements along with general suggestions for the development of a problem reporting system to better serve NASA's need for managing, reporting, and trending project aberrant events. The Group's recommendations are reported in this document.

  9. Permutation Polytopes of Cyclic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Baumeister, Barbara; Haase, Christian; Nill, Benjamin; Paffenholz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the combinatorics and geometry of permutation polytopes associated to cyclic permutation groups, i.e., the convex hulls of cyclic groups of permutation matrices. We give formulas for their dimension and vertex degree. In the situation that the generator of the group consists of at most two orbits, we can give a complete combinatorial description of the associated permutation polytope. In the case of three orbits the facet structure is already quite complex. For a large class of...

  10. Strategies of learning in groups

    OpenAIRE

    Göğüş, Aytaç; Gogus, Aytac; Arıkan, Huriye; Arikan, Huriye

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical bases and applications of learning in groups and the impact of a student support program on supporting the quality of learning in higher education. A student support program, Academic Support Program (ASP) that captures the basis for various ‘active learning’ methods by implementing ‘learning in groups and learning from peers’ strategies, is represented in this paper. The peer study discussion groups of ASP allow university students to have permanent and me...

  11. Complex cobordism and formal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchstaber, Viktor M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper surveys the current state of the theory of cobordism, focusing on geometric and universal properties of complex cobordism, the Landweber-Novikov algebra, and the formal group law of geometric cobordisms. The relationships with K-theory, algebraic cycles, formal group laws, compact Lie group actions on manifolds, toric topology, infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, and nilmanifolds are described. The survey contains key results and open problems. Bibliography: 124 titles.

  12. Group discussion improves lie detection

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Detecting lies is difficult. Accuracy rates in experiments are only slightly greater than chance, even among trained professionals. Costly programs aimed at training individual lie detectors have mostly been ineffective. Here we test a different strategy: asking individuals to detect lies as a group. We find a consistent group advantage for detecting small “white” lies as well as intentional high-stakes lies. This group advantage does not come through the statistical aggregation of individual...

  13. Classifying Virtually Special Tubular Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhouse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    A group is tubular if it acts on a tree with $\\mathbb{Z}^2$ vertex stabilizers and $\\mathbb{Z}$ edge stabilizers. We prove that a tubular group is virtually special if and only if it acts freely on a locally finite CAT(0) cube complex. Furthermore, we prove that if a tubular group acts freely on a finite dimensional CAT(0) cube complex, then it virtually acts freely on a three dimensional CAT(0) cube complex.

  14. Structure of a supergravity group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supergravity group is found to be the direct product of general covariance groups in complex conjugated left and right handed superspaces. The ordinary space-time coordinate and the axial gravitational superfield are the real and imaginary parts of the complex coordinate, respectively. It is pointed out that a number of questions concerning the formalism remains open. For instance how to define superfields with external indices, supercovariant derivatives and invariants of the group, etc. However, the extremely simple and clear geometrical picture of the supergravity group given here will provide an adequate basis for the supergravity theory

  15. The Nearest Group of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Bergh, S

    1999-01-01

    The small Antlia-Sextans clustering of galaxies is located at a distance of only 1.36 Mpc from the Sun, and 1.72 Mpc from the adopted barycenter of the Local Group. The latter value is significantly greater than the radius of the zero- velocity surface of the Local Group which, for an assumed age of 14 Gyr, has Ro = 1.18 " 0.15 Mpc. This, together with the observation that the members of the Ant-Sex group have a mean redshift of +114 " 12 km s-1 relative to the centroid of the Local Group, suggests that the Antlia-Sextans group is not bound to our Local Group, and that it is expanding with the Hubble flow. If this conclusion is correct, then Antlia-Sextans may be the nearest external clustering of galaxies. The total galaxian population of the Ant-Sex group is ~ 1/5 that of the Local Group. However, the integrated luminosity of Ant-Sex is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Local Group. Subject headings: Galaxies - clusters: individual (Antlia-Sextans)

  16. Automorphism groups of some algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PARK Hong Goo; LEE Jeongsig; CHOI Seul Hee; CHEN XueQing; NAM Ki-Bong

    2009-01-01

    The automorphism groups of algebras are found in many papers. Using auto-invariance, we find the automorphism groups of the Laurent extension of the polynomial ring and the quantum n-plane (respectively, twisting polynomial ring) in this work. As an application of the results of this work, we can find the automorphism group of a twisting algebra. We define a generalized Weyl algebra and show that the generalized Weyl algebra is simple. We also find the automorphism group of a generalized Weyl algebra. We show that the generalized Weyl algebra Am,m+n is the universal enveloping algebra of the generalized Witt algebra W(m, m+n).

  17. Visual Grouping by Neural Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guoshen

    2008-01-01

    Distributed synchronization is known to occur at several scales in the brain, and has been suggested as playing a key functional role in perceptual grouping. State-of-the-art visual grouping algorithms, however, seem to give comparatively little attention to neural synchronization analogies. Based on the framework of concurrent synchronization of dynamic systems, simple networks of neural oscillators coupled with diffusive connections are proposed to solve visual grouping problems. Multi-layer algorithms and feedback mechanisms are also studied. The same algorithm is shown to achieve promising results on several classical visual grouping problems, including point clustering, contour integration and image segmentation.

  18. Exponentially generic subsets of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Robert; Osin, Denis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the generic, i.e., typical, behavior of finitely generated subgroups of hyperbolic groups and also the generic behavior of the word problem for amenable groups. We show that a random set of elements of a nonelementary word hyperbolic group is very likely to be a set of free generators for a nicely embedded free subgroup. We also exhibit some finitely presented amenable groups for which the restriction of the word problem is unsolvable on every sufficiently large subset of words.

  19. Automorphism groups of some algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PARK; Hong; Goo; LEE; Jeongsig; CHOI; Seul; Hee; NAM; Ki-Bong

    2009-01-01

    The automorphism groups of algebras are found in many papers. Using auto-invariance, we find the automorphism groups of the Laurent extension of the polynomial ring and the quantum n-plane (respectively, twisting polynomial ring) in this work. As an application of the results of this work, we can find the automorphism group of a twisting algebra. We define a generalized Weyl algebra and show that the generalized Weyl algebra is simple. We also find the automorphism group of a generalized Weyl algebra. We show that the generalized Weyl algebra Am,m+n is the universal enveloping algebra of the generalized Witt algebra W(m,m + n).

  20. Bosonization and Lie Group Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Yuan K

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a concise quantum operator formula for bosonization in which the Lie group structure appears in a natural way. The connection between fermions and bosons is found to be exactly the connection between Lie group elements and the group parameters. Bosonization is an extraordinary way of expressing the equation of motion of a complex fermion field in terms of a real scalar boson in two dimensions. All the properties of the fermion field theory are known to be preserved under this remarkable transformation with substantial simplification and elucidation of the original theory, much like Lie groups can be studied by their Lie algebras.

  1. The Nearest Group of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, Sidney

    1999-06-01

    The small Antlia-Sextans clustering of galaxies is located at a distance of only 1.36 Mpc from the Sun and 1.72 Mpc from the adopted barycenter of the Local Group. The latter value is significantly greater than the radius of the zero-velocity surface of the Local Group that, for an assumed age of 14 Gyr, has R0=1.18+/-0.15 Mpc. This, together with the observation that the members of the Ant-Sex group have a mean redshift of 114+/-12 km s-1 relative to the centroid of the Local Group, suggests that the Antlia-Sextans group is not bound to our Local Group and that it is expanding with the Hubble flow. If this conclusion is correct, then Antlia-Sextans may be the nearest external clustering of galaxies. The total galactic population of the Ant-Sex group is ~1/5 that of the Local Group. However, the integrated luminosity of Ant-Sex is 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the Local Group.

  2. Group decision-making: Factors that affect group effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Osmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are operating in a dynamic and turbulent environment. In these conditions, they have to make decisions for new problems or situations. Most of decisions are therefore non-programmed and unstructured, accompanied by risk and uncertainty. Moreover, the problems and situations are complex. All organizations are oriented towards group decisionmaking processes, as useful tools to cope with uncertainty and complexity. Apart from the necessity, companies are turning towards participatory processes also to benefit from the important advantages that these processes offer. Organizations have realized the importance of group decision-making processes to contribute to the creation of sustainable competitive advantages. Main objective of this paper is to show that group decision-making processes do not offer guarantee for good decisions, because the effectiveness of group is affected by many factors. So, the first thing done in this paper is discussing about the benefits and limitations that accompany the use of groups with decision-making purpose. Afterwards, we stop on the different factors that influence the group’s ability to make good decisions. The aim is to emphasize that regardless of the many advantages of groups, some factors as group size, type of communication within the group, leadership style, the norms, the differentiation of roles and statuses, cohesion and compliance degree should be the main elements to keep into consideration because they affect the effectiveness of group. In this regard, is discussed how such factors influence the quality of decision and then we try to draw some conclusions that can improve and make better and easier group decision-making processes.

  3. New properties of arithmetic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, Vladimir P [Scientific Research Institute for System Studies of RAS (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-25

    New substantial results including the solutions of a number of fundamental problems have been obtained in the last decade or so: the first and rather unexpected examples of arithmetic groups with finite extensions that are not arithmetic were constructed; a criterion for arithmeticity of such extensions was found; deep rigidity theorems were proved for arithmetic subgroups of algebraic groups with radical; a theorem on the finiteness of the number of conjugacy classes of finite subgroups in finite extensions of arithmetic groups was proved, leading to numerous applications, in particular, this theorem made it possible to solve the Borel-Serre problem (1964) on the finiteness of the first cohomology of finite groups with coefficients in an arithmetic group; the problem posed more than 30 years ago on the existence of finitely generated integral linear groups that have infinitely many conjugacy classes of finite subgroups was solved; the arithmeticity question for solvable groups was settled. Similar problems were also solved for lattices in Lie groups with finitely many connected components. This paper is a survey of these results. Bibliography: 27 titles.

  4. Dirac Induction for loop groups

    OpenAIRE

    Posthuma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Using a coset version of the cubic Dirac operators for affine Lie algebras, we give an algebraic construction of the Dirac induction homomorphism for loop group representations. With this, we prove a homogeneous generalization of the Weyl-Kac character formula and show compatibility with Dirac induction for compact Lie groups.

  5. Lenzing Group: Expanding in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2007-01-01

    @@ On April 10th,the Lenzing Group started operation of its new viscose fiber plant at Nanjing(China).The new viscose fiber plant is the second production site for this fiber of theLenzing Group in Asia and its sixth production site globally.

  6. ASPECTS ON ORGANIZED CRIMINAL GROUPS

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe-Iulian IONIŢĂ

    2014-01-01

    The author presents the concept of organized criminal group as defined in regional/international documents and in internal regulations, the incrimination of criminal groups in the Romanian legislation and some of the problems generated by the amendment to the criminal legislation and the entry into force of the new Criminal Code on the issue.

  7. Independence property and hyperbolic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Jaligot, Eric; Muranov, Alexey; Neman, Azadeh

    2008-01-01

    In continuation of [JOH04, OH07], we prove that existentially closed CSA-groups have the independence property. This is done by showing that there exist words having the independence property relative to the class of torsion-free hyperbolic groups.

  8. Group Development: Extending Tuckman's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Mary F.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a framework for extending the Tuckman model of developmental sequence in small groups. Considers Tuckman's stages of forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning lacking in descriptive depth and clear definition. Gathered and organized group dynamics graduate students' assessments of characteristics of stages over five-year…

  9. Second Anthropocene Working Group meeting

    OpenAIRE

    Edgeworth, Matt; Waters, Colin; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Stoddart, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The second meeting of the Anthropocene Working Group (AWG) was held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, on 24th and 25th November 2015. It took the form of a workshop with 12 members of the working group and numerous archaeologists from the Institute in lively conversation with each other. Dis...

  10. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Ravindra; Pankaj Agrawal; Rahul Basu; Satyaki Bhattacharya; J Blümlein; V Del Duca; R Harlander; D Kosower; Prakash Mathews; Anurag Tripathi

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings.

  11. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  12. Nonverbal Interventions in Clinical Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadish, William R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of nonverbal with verbal clinical group interventions suggested that some traditional self-report devices show less differentiation between these two interventions than do measures of group cohesion. A strong, replicable manipulation tested these findings, which were consistent with previous research. (Author/BEF)

  13. Partners: group practices and hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryver, D L

    1990-02-01

    Many hospital executives see the emergence of medical group practices as a threat to their autonomy. However, the degree of future success of hospitals and group practices may depend on their willingness and ability to develop common goals and strategies. PMID:10106349

  14. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  15. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam; Marquez, Luz Maria Muñoz; Rasmussen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged in l...

  16. New properties of arithmetic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New substantial results including the solutions of a number of fundamental problems have been obtained in the last decade or so: the first and rather unexpected examples of arithmetic groups with finite extensions that are not arithmetic were constructed; a criterion for arithmeticity of such extensions was found; deep rigidity theorems were proved for arithmetic subgroups of algebraic groups with radical; a theorem on the finiteness of the number of conjugacy classes of finite subgroups in finite extensions of arithmetic groups was proved, leading to numerous applications, in particular, this theorem made it possible to solve the Borel-Serre problem (1964) on the finiteness of the first cohomology of finite groups with coefficients in an arithmetic group; the problem posed more than 30 years ago on the existence of finitely generated integral linear groups that have infinitely many conjugacy classes of finite subgroups was solved; the arithmeticity question for solvable groups was settled. Similar problems were also solved for lattices in Lie groups with finitely many connected components. This paper is a survey of these results. Bibliography: 27 titles.

  17. Group Counseling for Navy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchum, Nancy Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Conducted six-session group counseling program for Navy children (n=22) enrolled in public schools whose fathers were on deployment. Pretest and posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory suggest that participation in the group counseling unit positively affected self-esteem of Navy children whose fathers were on deployment. Found…

  18. My Career: Group Fitness Instructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Tammy Kenney, who teaches a yoga-Pilates class in several different gyms. In this interview, Kenney talks about her career as a group fitness instructor and gives her best advice for someone who wants to teach group fitness.

  19. Coxeter groups and hyperbolic manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Brent

    2002-01-01

    The rich theory of Coxeter groups is used to provide an algebraic construction of finite volume hyperbolic n-manifolds. Combinatorial properties of finite images of these groups can be used to compute the volumes of the resulting manifolds. Three examples, in 4,5 and 6-dimensions, are given, each of very small volume, and in one case of smallest possible volume.

  20. Loop groups and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Carpi, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    We describe the representation theory of loop groups in terms of K-theory and noncommutative geometry. This is done by constructing suitable spectral triples associated with the level l projective unitary positive-energy representations of any given loop group LG. The construction is based on certain supersymmetric conformal field theory models associated with LG.

  1. Glycerin derivatives with thiocyanic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to glycerin derivatives with thiocyanic group. The results of studies of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of chlorine atom in linear and cyclic glycerin derivatives on thiocyanic group were considered. The composition, structure and purity of synthesized substances was defined by means of element analysis, molecular refraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thin-layer chromatography methods.

  2. All About the Grains Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MyPlate What Is MyPlate? Fruits All About the Fruit Group Nutrients and Health Benefits Tips to Help You Eat Fruits Food ... Gallery What Is MyPlate? Fruits All About the Fruit Group Nutrients and Health Benefits Tips to Help You Eat Fruits Food ...

  3. Composite materials having thiol groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A composite material having thiol groups comprises a rigid support material. The composite material may comprise a deformable gel (eg agarose) having thiol groups retained within the pore structure of a porous rigid support material (e.g. Kieselghur). The particles of composite material are used to prepare a radioactive gold isotope from a mercury 'parent' isotope. (author)

  4. Metrizable TAP and STAP groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tarieladze, Xabier Domínguez Vaja

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper by D. Shakhmatov and J. Sp\\v{e}v\\'ak [Group-valued continuous functions with the topology of pointwise convergence, Topology and its Applications (2009), doi:10.1016/j.topol.2009.06.022] the concept of a ${\\rm TAP}$ group is introduced and it is shown in particular that the ${\\rm NSS}$ groups are ${\\rm TAP}$. We prove that conversely, the Weil complete metrizable ${\\rm TAP}$ groups are ${\\rm NSS}$. We define also the narrower class of ${\\rm STAP}$ groups, show that the ${\\rm NSS}$ groups are if fact ${\\rm STAP}$ and that the converse statement is true in metrizable case. A remarkable characterization of pseudocompact spaces obtained in the paper by D. Shakhmatov and J. Sp\\v{e}v\\'ak asserts: a Tychonoff space $X$ is pseudocompact if and only if $C_p(X,\\mathbb R)$ has the ${\\rm TAP}$ property. We show that for no infinite Tychonoff space $X$, the group $C_p(X,\\mathbb R)$ has the ${\\rm STAP}$ property. We show also that a metrizable locally balanced topological vector group is ${\\rm STAP}$ iff ...

  5. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W; Dancey, Janet E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Horvath, L Elise; Perez, Edith A; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a longstanding history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the US-based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the United States, and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the United States or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the United States and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to US policies that restrict drug distribution outside the United States. This article serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. PMID:26433551

  6. Fusion Systems for Profinite Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Stancu, Radu; Symonds, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a pro-fusion system on a pro-p group, which generalizes the notion of a fusion system on a finite p-group. We also prove a version of Alperin's Fusion Theorem for pro-fusion systems.

  7. Energy Innovation. IVO Group`s Research and Development Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, P.; Laiho, Y.; Kaikkonen, H.; Leisio, C.; Hinkkanen, S. [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This annual booklet of the IVO Group`s research and development activities presents a number of articles, written by experts from IVO. The products described are examples of the environmentally-oriented selection made available by the IVO Group. In fact, the entire energy technology developed in Finland is environmentally oriented, if seen from the international perspective. The new business potential of environmental technology is great, and it is believed that in the year 2000, exportation of Finnish know-how in the field of energy-saving and efficiency will exceed the value of out energy imports

  8. 2002 annual report EDF group; 2002 rapport annuel groupe EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  9. Punctured torus groups and 2-bridge knot groups

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyoshi, Hirotaka; Wada, Masaaki; Yamashita, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    This monograph is Part 1 of a book project intended to give a full account of Jorgensen's theory of punctured torus Kleinian groups and its generalization, with application to knot theory. Although Jorgensen's original work was not published in complete form, it has been a source of inspiration. In particular, it has motivated and guided Thurston's revolutionary study of low-dimensional geometric topology. In this monograph, we give an elementary and self-contained description of Jorgensen's theory with a complete proof. Through various informative illustrations, readers are naturally led to an intuitive, synthetic grasp of the theory, which clarifies how a very simple fuchsian group evolves into complicated Kleinian groups.

  10. Energy Innovation. IVO group`s research and development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, P.; Laiho, Y.; Kaikkonen, H.; Leisio, C.; Hinkkanen, S.; Fletcher, R. [eds.

    1997-11-01

    This annual booklet of the IVO Group`s research and development activities presents a number of articles, written by experts from IVO. The products described are examples of the environmentally-oriented selection made available by the IVO Group. In fact, the entire energy technology developed in Finland is environmentally oriented, if seen from the international perspective. The new business potential of environmental technology is great, and it is believed that in the year 2000, exportation of Finnish know-how in the field of energy-saving and efficiency will exceed the value of out energy imports

  11. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin;

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of psychological problems is high in prisons. Many prisoners have unmet needs for appropriate treatments. Although previous studies have suggested music therapy to be a successful treatment modality for prisoners, more rigorous evidence is needed. This parallel randomised controlled...... study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  12. Chaotic renormalization-group trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Poul H.; Thorleifsson, G.

    1991-01-01

    regions where the renormalization-group flow becomes chaotic. We present some explicit examples of these phenomena for the case of a Lie group valued spin-model analyzed by means of a variational real-space renormalization group. By directly computing the free energy of these models around the parameter......Under certain conditions, the renormalization-group flow of models in statistical mechanics can change dramatically under just very small changes of given external parameters. This can typically occur close to bifurcations of fixed points, close to the complete disappearance of fixed points, or in...... regions in which such nontrivial modifications of the renormalization-group flow occur, we can extract the physical consequences of these phenomena....

  13. Groups and Geometries : Siena Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kantor, William; Lunardon, Guglielmo; Pasini, Antonio; Tamburini, Maria

    1998-01-01

    On September 1-7, 1996 a conference on Groups and Geometries took place in lovely Siena, Italy. It brought together experts and interested mathematicians from numerous countries. The scientific program centered around invited exposi­ tory lectures; there also were shorter research announcements, including talks by younger researchers. The conference concerned a broad range of topics in group theory and geometry, with emphasis on recent results and open problems. Special attention was drawn to the interplay between group-theoretic methods and geometric and combinatorial ones. Expanded versions of many of the talks appear in these Proceedings. This volume is intended to provide a stimulating collection of themes for a broad range of algebraists and geometers. Among those themes, represented within the conference or these Proceedings, are aspects of the following: 1. the classification of finite simple groups, 2. the structure and properties of groups of Lie type over finite and algebraically closed fields of f...

  14. Decision Dynamics in Group Evacuation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Fangqiu; Schlesinger, Kimberly J; Gür, Izzeddin; Carlson, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors that affect human decision making and quantifying their influence remain essential and challenging tasks for the design and implementation of social and technological communication systems. We report results of a behavioral experiment involving decision making in the face of an impending natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, we characterize individual and group evacuation decision making influenced by several key factors, including the likelihood of the disaster, available shelter capacity, group size, and group decision protocol. Our results show that success in individual decision making is not a strong predictor of group performance. We use an artificial neural network trained on the collective behavior of subjects to predict individual and group outcomes. Overall model accuracy increases with the inclusion of a subject-specific performance parameter based on laboratory trials that captures individual differences. In parallel, we demonstrate that the social media activit...

  15. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    -established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...... to the communication with local community psychiatry centres. Furthermore, the GPs experienced that supervision had a positive 'spill-over effect' on everyday consultations, and that the supervision group became a forum for coping with other difficulties in their professional life as well. Trust and continuity were......AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long...

  16. EDF group - annual report 2003; Groupe EDF - rapport annuel 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document contains the magazine, the financial statements and the sustainable development report of Electricite de France (EdF) group for 2003: 1 - the magazine (chairman's statement, group profile, vision and strategy); 2 - the consolidated financial statements for the period ended 31 December 2003 (statutory auditors' report on the consolidated financial statements, EDF's summary annual financial statements); 3 - sustainable development report (transparency and dialogue, responsibility, commitment, partnerships for progress). (J.S.)

  17. On Double Groups and the Poincar\\'e group

    CERN Document Server

    Majard, Dany

    2011-01-01

    In [22], Crane and Sheppard considered the structure of the Poincare group as a 2-Group, and derived important information about its representations in a 2-Category suited for representations of non-compact 2-groups, following a lead of [23]. In this paper, starting from the position that the most natural structure to describe cobordisms with corners, as in the recently published work of A. Voronov [27], is the cubical approach to higher category theory of Ehreshman, we explore some possibilities given by double groups to build TQFTs. Our main theorem is an extension of the work of [4], where we prove a theorem on the structure of maximally exclusive double groups. This result gives a presentation of the Poincar\\'e group where the distinction between boosts, rotations and translations is part of the structure, from which a TQFT could be build with space and spacetime transformations kept separate. This article drafts a program that will hopefully yield new state sum models of physical interest.

  18. Bayesian hierarchical grouping: Perceptual grouping as mixture estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2015-10-01

    We propose a novel framework for perceptual grouping based on the idea of mixture models, called Bayesian hierarchical grouping (BHG). In BHG, we assume that the configuration of image elements is generated by a mixture of distinct objects, each of which generates image elements according to some generative assumptions. Grouping, in this framework, means estimating the number and the parameters of the mixture components that generated the image, including estimating which image elements are "owned" by which objects. We present a tractable implementation of the framework, based on the hierarchical clustering approach of Heller and Ghahramani (2005). We illustrate it with examples drawn from a number of classical perceptual grouping problems, including dot clustering, contour integration, and part decomposition. Our approach yields an intuitive hierarchical representation of image elements, giving an explicit decomposition of the image into mixture components, along with estimates of the probability of various candidate decompositions. We show that BHG accounts well for a diverse range of empirical data drawn from the literature. Because BHG provides a principled quantification of the plausibility of grouping interpretations over a wide range of grouping problems, we argue that it provides an appealing unifying account of the elusive Gestalt notion of Prägnanz. PMID:26322548

  19. 2002 annual report EDF group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  20. Permutation Polytopes of Cyclic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Barbara; Nill, Benjamin; Paffenholz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the combinatorics and geometry of permutation polytopes associated to cyclic permutation groups, i.e., the convex hulls of cyclic groups of permutation matrices. We give formulas for their dimension and vertex degree. In the situation that the generator of the group consists of at most two orbits, we can give a complete combinatorial description of the associated permutation polytope. In the case of three orbits the facet structure is already quite complex. For a large class of examples we show that there exist exponentially many facets.

  1. Geometry, rigidity, and group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Farb, Benson; Zimmer, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The study of group actions is more than a hundred years old but remains to this day a vibrant and widely studied topic in a variety of mathematic fields. A central development in the last fifty years is the phenomenon of rigidity, whereby one can classify actions of certain groups, such as lattices in semi-simple Lie groups. This provides a way to classify all possible symmetries of important spaces and all spaces admitting given symmetries. Paradigmatic results can be found in the seminal work of George Mostow, Gergory Margulis, and Robert J. Zimmer, among others.The p

  2. MODELLING OF ONLINE GROUP DISCOUNTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Kotarac

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Web pages for group discounts have become very popular in the past few years. In this paper we concentrate on the group discounts for the service industry in which a quality of the service plays an important role in retaining customers which in return affects business profitability. We present a model of the group discount offer from a merchant’s point view. A merchant decides about the size of the discount offered, having in mind quality of the service offered which is affected by the number of customers who use the service. Finally, we derive the first order optimality conditions.

  3. Picard groups in Poisson geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bursztyn, Henrique; Weinstein, Alan

    2003-01-01

    We study isomorphism classes of symplectic dual pairs P P-, where P is an integrable Poisson manifold, S is symplectic, and the two maps are complete, surjective Poisson submersions with connected and simply-connected fibres. For fixed P, these Morita self-equivalences of P form a group Pic(P) under a natural ``tensor product'' operation. We discuss this group in several examples and study variants of this construction for rings (the origin of the notion of Picard group), Lie groupoids, and ...

  4. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  5. Character theory of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacs, I Martin

    2011-01-01

    ""The book is a pleasure to read. There is no question but that it will become, and deserves to be, a widely used textbook and reference."" - Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society.Character theory provides a powerful tool for proving theorems about finite groups. In addition to dealing with techniques for applying characters to ""pure"" group theory, a large part of this book is devoted to the properties of the characters themselves and how these properties reflect and are reflected in the structure of the group.Chapter I consists of ring theoretic preliminaries. Chapters 2 to 6 and 8

  6. Induction functors for group corings

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Quan-Guo; Wang, Ding-Guo

    2015-01-01

    In the paper, we prove that the induction functor stemming from every morphism of group coring versus coring has a left adjoint, called ad-induction functor. The separability of the induction functor is characterized, extending some results for corings.

  7. Group-level traits emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Paul E

    2014-06-01

    Most commentators supported the thesis of the target article, though there were also those who were less fully persuaded. I will begin with a response to the most critical commentaries. First, I will justify an evolutionary perspective that includes group organization and nongenetic inheritance. Next, I will discuss the concept of emergence. Following that, I will transition to an exploration of ideas and concerns brought up by some of the more supportive commentators. This will include a discussion of different types of groups; the psychology of group-level traits; the uses and limitations of an institutional perspective; the link between transmission, adaptation, and selection; current and future methodologies; and the variety of fields that may benefit from a group-level traits perspective. PMID:25101360

  8. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  9. KAM Theorem and Renormalization Group

    OpenAIRE

    E. Simone; Kupiainen, A.

    2007-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of the analytic KAM theorem by reducing it to a Picard iteration of a PDE with quadratic nonlinearity, the so called Polchinski renormalization group equation studied in quantum field theory.

  10. Linac working group technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group looked at linac injectors for a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) or Hadron Facility. Discussion includes rf power, a possible strawman linac, ion source/injector, radio-frequency quadrupole, and coupled-cavity linac

  11. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  12. Kloosterman sheaves for reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Heinloth, Jochen; Yun, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    Deligne constructed a remarkable local system on $\\bP^1-\\{0,\\infty\\}$ attached to a family of Kloosterman sums. Katz calculated its monodromy and asked whether there are Kloosterman sheaves for general reductive groups and which automorphic forms should be attached to these local systems under the Langlands correspondence. Motivated by work of Gross and Frenkel-Gross we find an explicit family of such automorphic forms and even a simple family of automorphic sheaves in the framework of the geometric Langlands program. We use these automorphic sheaves to construct l-adic Kloosterman sheaves for any reductive group in a uniform way, and describe the local and global monodromy of these Kloosterman sheaves. In particular, they give motivic Galois representations with exceptional monodromy groups G_2,F_4,E_7 and E_8. This also gives an example of the geometric Langlands correspondence with wild ramifications for any reductive group.

  13. Nondisclosure in psychotherapy group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichelt, Sissel; Gullestad, Siri Erika; Hansen, Bjørg Røed;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of nondisclosure in a sample of 55 student therapists, working within a group format of supervision. The study constituted one part of a larger study, with the other, parallel part addressing nondisclosure in supervisors. The participants were recr...... of students experienced that the groups became more closed throughout the supervision, and blamed their supervisors for inadequate handling of the group process. This is an issue that needs further exploration.......The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of nondisclosure in a sample of 55 student therapists, working within a group format of supervision. The study constituted one part of a larger study, with the other, parallel part addressing nondisclosure in supervisors. The participants were...

  14. Injuries in group kept horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdell, C.M.; Jorgensen, G.M.; Keeling, L.;

    2014-01-01

    Group housing of horses is not very widespread, despite obvious advantages for their development and mental well-being. One often expressed rationale for this is that horse owners are worried about the risk of injuries due to kicks, bites or being chased into obstacles. To address this concern, we...... developed and validated a scoring system for external injuries in horses to be able to record the severity of a lesion in a standardized and simple way under field conditions. The scoring system has five categories from insignificant loss of hair to severe, life threatening injuries. It was used...... to categorize 1124 injuries in 478 horses. Most of these horses were allocated to groups to study the effect of group composition (i.e. same age or mixed, same gender or mixed, socially stable or unstable groups) on behaviour and injuries. The material included mainly riding and leisure purpose horses...

  15. Plug Off: Target Group Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Kortbaek, Allan; Neubauer, Nathalie; Carreras, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This project is a study of how a sample of defined target group of a campaign, build meaning through their introduction to such a campaign. With ethno-methodology as a focal point within the overlying context of discourse psychology and more importantly, social constructivism, the aim is to analyze how a defined target group make sense of a proto awareness raising campaign. Proto in this case denotes a planned communication effort in the form of a campaign encouraging responsible use of wirel...

  16. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  17. Territorial analysis of discriminated groups

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Hrisanta MOSORA

    2013-01-01

    Labour market discrimination may lead to segregation resulting in the separation between the majority and the minority group at the local level, occupational level, educational level in public spaces etc. In this study we analysed the distribution of the Rroma population at local level, because they are regarded as the most vulnerable group in Romania. We also analysed the extent to which spatial localization affects the poverty rate in this community. Data were provided by “A social map of P...

  18. EDF group - annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the magazine, the financial statements and the sustainable development report of Electricite de France (EdF) group for 2003: 1 - the magazine (chairman's statement, group profile, vision and strategy); 2 - the consolidated financial statements for the period ended 31 December 2003 (statutory auditors' report on the consolidated financial statements, EDF's summary annual financial statements); 3 - sustainable development report (transparency and dialogue, responsibility, commitment, partnerships for progress). (J.S.)

  19. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author)

  20. Group C rotaviruses in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Pedley, S.; McCrae, M A

    1986-01-01

    Atypical rotaviruses obtained from human feces from Australia, Brazil, and the United Kingdom were shown by a combination of techniques--immunoelectron microscopy, immunofluorescence, genome profile analysis, terminal fingerprint analysis of genome segments, and dot-blot hybridization--to be related to group C porcine rotaviruses. The prevalence of antibody to group C rotaviruses was found to be low in human sera and immunoglobulin pools from six countries. No signs of infection were obtained...

  1. Lecture Notes in Lie Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2011-01-01

    These lecture notes in Lie Groups are designed for a 1--semester third year or graduate course in mathematics, physics, engineering, chemistry or biology. This landmark theory of the 20th Century mathematics and physics gives a rigorous foundation to modern dynamics, as well as field and gauge theories in physics, engineering and biomechanics. We give both physical and medical examples of Lie groups. The only necessary background for comprehensive reading of these notes are advanced calculus ...

  2. On $n$-Kappe groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadollah Faramarzi Salles

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $G$ be an infinite group and $nin {3‎, ‎6}cup{2^k| kin mathbb{N}}$‎. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we prove that $G$ is an $n$-Kappe group if and only if for any two infinite subsets $X$ and $Y$ of $G$‎, ‎there exist $xin X$ and $yin Y$ such that $[x^n‎, ‎y‎, ‎y]=1$‎.

  3. On $n$-Kappe groups

    OpenAIRE

    Asadollah Faramarzi Salles; Hassan Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Let $G$ be an infinite group and $nin {3‎, ‎6}cup{2^k| kin mathbb{N}}$‎. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we prove that $G$ is an $n$-Kappe group if and only if for any two infinite subsets $X$ and $Y$ of $G$‎, ‎there exist $xin X$ and $yin Y$ such that $[x^n‎, ‎y‎, ‎y]=1$‎.

  4. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base

  5. Bosonic colored group field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Geloun, Joseph [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France); University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou (BJ). International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA-UNESCO Chair); Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Departement de Mathematiques et Informatique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Dakar (Senegal); Magnen, Jacques [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Physique Theorique, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rivasseau, Vincent [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    Bosonic colored group field theory is considered. Focusing first on dimension four, namely the colored Ooguri group field model, the main properties of Feynman graphs are studied. This leads to a theorem on optimal perturbative bounds of Feynman amplitudes in the ''ultraspin'' (large spin) limit. The results are generalized in any dimension. Finally, integrating out two colors we write a new representation, which could be useful for the constructive analysis of this type of models. (orig.)

  6. Scaling Group Testing Similarity Search

    OpenAIRE

    Iscen, Ahmet; Amsaleg, Laurent; Furon, Teddy

    2016-01-01

    The large dimensionality of modern image feature vectors, up to thousands of dimensions, is challenging the high dimensional indexing techniques. Traditional approaches fail at returning good quality results within a response time that is usable in practice. However, similarity search techniques inspired by the group testing framework have recently been proposed in an attempt to specifically defeat the curse of dimensionality. Yet, group testing does not scale and fails at indexing very large...

  7. Ethnic Female Journalists Group Founded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    ACROSS such a multi-national country as China with 56 ethnic groups, up to one third of those in the press circle are women journalists, among whom 56.2 percent are in the broadcasting and television arenas, 42.5 percent in newspapers and magazines and 1.3 percent in news agencies. Statistics from National Unity shows that 42 of China's minority groups have produced female

  8. CEC natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second meeting of the CEC Natural Analogue Working Group took place on June 17-19, 1986, hosted by the Swiss NAGRA in Interlaken (CH). A review of recent progress in natural analogue programmes was carried out, and complemented by detailed discussions about geomicrobiology, archaeological analogues, natural colloids, and use of analogues to increase confidence in safety assessments for radioactive waste disposal. A statement drafted by the Group, and the presentations made, are put together in this report

  9. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, D.R.F. (comp.)

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base.

  10. Metrizability of ordered additive groups

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chuan; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    In terms of General Topology, we consider ordered additive groups having the order topology, including ordered fields. Namely, we investigate metrizability of these groups or fields, and topological properties of ordered fields in terms of Archimedes' axiom or the axiom of continuity. Also, we give a negative answer to a question in [9]. Finally, we revise the proof of [2, Theorem 2.6], and give some related results.

  11. Double groups and projective representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, S. L.; Herzig, P.

    Some problems are discussed in relation to the usual treatment of improper groups through their double groups, in particular the identification (rather than the mere isomorphism) of such groups as C3v and D3. The enhancement of SU(2) by the addition of the inversion is analysed for this purpose. This requires a careful discussion of the behaviour of spinors under inversion and two types of spinors are defined, Cartan and Pauli spinors, that behave differently with respect to inversion, although it is shown that this difference merely entails a choice of gauge in the language of projective representations. A distinction is proposed between the inversion operation and the parity operator: when the former is realized as a binary rotation in 4-space, the latter can be identified with its infinitesimal generator. The passage from SO(3) to O(3) (group of all proper and improper rotations) is studied and a hitherto unknown faithful projective representations of O(3) is given. It is shown how spinor representations can be constructed for improper point groups in either the Cartan or Pauli gauges. A choice of gauge is proposed to ensure agreement with current practice in angular momentum theory and with that in single point groups. As an example, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients are constructed for C3v.

  12. Anatomy of grand unifying groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cartan-Dynkin theory of classical groups is considered with the aid of a lemma proposed in this work. The lemma says that all the Weyl conjugates of a dominant weight will have a common form with the dominant weight when they are expressed as linear combinations of fundamental representation weights (FRW) of the group. This reformulation of the Cartan-Dynkin theory simplifies the calculations concerning grand unifying schemes. Especially, the specification of the weights of a representation, the property of being real or complex, the branchings of a representation under its subgroups and the decomposition of a direct product are reduced to simple permutational calculations. We introduce the notion of ''modular decomposition'' to study the group representations. This work includes only the groups SU(N+1) because they have characteristics different from others, such as SO(2N+1), SP(2N), SO(2N) and exceptional groups. In the two successive applications the idea shall be completed also for these groups. (author)

  13. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  14. S3T working group. Report 1: group aims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work group S3T which is aimed to designing and developing devices using unconventional holographic optics is presented. These devices find applications that are classified here in four items high resolution spectrometers, high definition imaging, high flux devices, metrology and interferometry. The problems to solve and the aims of the group in each of these cases are presented. Three synthesis of lectures are in this report. The main one concerns stigmatism conditions of concave holographic gratings used in normal incidence. This new process of focusing is very interesting for hot plasma diagnostics

  15. Unitary Representations of Gauge Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerfano, Ruth Stella

    I generalize to the case of gauge groups over non-trivial principal bundles representations that I. M. Gelfand, M. I. Graev and A. M. Versik constructed for current groups. The gauge group of the principal G-bundle P over M, (G a Lie group with an euclidean structure, M a compact, connected and oriented manifold), as the smooth sections of the associated group bundle is presented and studied in chapter I. Chapter II describes the symmetric algebra associated to a Hilbert space, its Hilbert structure, a convenient exponential and a total set that later play a key role in the construction of the representation. Chapter III is concerned with the calculus needed to make the space of Lie algebra valued 1-forms a Gaussian L^2-space. This is accomplished by studying general projective systems of finitely measurable spaces and the corresponding systems of sigma -additive measures, all of these leading to the description of a promeasure, a concept modeled after Bourbaki and classical measure theory. In the case of a locally convex vector space E, the corresponding Fourier transform, family of characters and the existence of a promeasure for every quadratic form on E^' are established, so the Gaussian L^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space is constructed. Chapter III finishes by exhibiting the explicit Hilbert space isomorphism between the Gaussian L ^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space and the complexification of its symmetric algebra. In chapter IV taking as a Hilbert space H the L^2-space of the Lie algebra valued 1-forms on P, the gauge group acts on the motion group of H defining in an straight forward fashion the representation desired.

  16. Pride, Shame, and Group Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sánchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does? This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject "group-identifies" with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being) a member of a group - the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong. By looking into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject's conative states like desires or intentions. PMID:27199797

  17. Quantum group and quantum symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a self-contained review on the theory of quantum group and its applications to modern physics. A brief introduction is given to the Yang-Baxter equation in integrable quantum field theory and lattice statistical physics. The quantum group is primarily introduced as a systematic method for solving the Yang-Baxter equation. Quantum group theory is presented within the framework of quantum double through quantizing Lie bi-algebra. Both the highest weight and the cyclic representations are investigated for the quantum group and emphasis is laid on the new features of representations for q being a root of unity. Quantum symmetries are explored in selected topics of modern physics. For a Hamiltonian system the quantum symmetry is an enlarged symmetry that maintains invariance of equations of motion and allows a deformation of the Hamiltonian and symplectic form. The configuration space of the integrable lattice model is analyzed in terms of the representation theory of quantum group. By means of constructing the Young operators of quantum group, the Schroedinger equation of the model is transformed to be a set of coupled linear equations that can be solved by the standard method. Quantum symmetry of the minimal model and the WZNW model in conformal field theory is a hidden symmetry expressed in terms of screened vertex operators, and has a deep interplay with the Virasoro algebra. In quantum group approach a complete description for vibrating and rotating diatomic molecules is given. The exact selection rules and wave functions are obtained. The Taylor expansion of the analytic formulas of the approach reproduces the famous Dunham expansion. (author). 133 refs, 20 figs

  18. The anatomy of group dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David F

    2014-04-01

    The dysfunction of the radiology group has 2 components: (1) the thinking component-the governance structure of the radiology group; how we manage the group; and (2) the structural component-the group's business model and its conflict with the partner's personal business model. Of the 2 components, governance is more important. Governance must be structured on classic, immutable business management principles. The structural component, the business model, is not immutable. In fact, it must continually change in response to the marketplace. Changes in the business model should occur only if demanded or permitted by the marketplace; instituting changes for other reasons, including personal interests or deficient knowledge of the deciders, is fundamentally contrary to the long-term interests of the group and its owners. First, we must learn basic business management concepts to appreciate the function and necessity of standard business models and standard business governance. Peter Drucker's The Effective Executive is an excellent primer on the subjects of standard business practices and the importance of a functional, authorized, and fully accountable chief executive officer. PMID:24503047

  19. Focus group report, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Policy Institute, through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), conducted two focus groups with people who live or work near DOE sites. The purpose of the focus groups was to gain a better understanding of the general community's information needs about the development of innovative technologies that are used in the cleanup of the sites. The authors wanted to better understand of what role these people want to play in the development of new technologies, how OST communication products can help facilitate that role, and the usefulness of current OST communication products. WPI held the focus groups in communities near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) because they are among the DOE sites that cannot be cleaned up before 2006. To include many facets of the communities, WPI randomly selected participants from membership lists of organized groups in each community including: elected officials, school boards, unions, chambers of commerce, economic development organizations, environmental organizations, health and human service organizations, and area clergy. While in the communities, WPI also interviewed stakeholders such as tribal representatives and a Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) member. Qualitative data gathered during the focus group sessions give some indication of general stakeholder opinions. However, the authors caution readers not to make broad assumptions about the general stakeholder audience based on the opinions of a limited number of general community stakeholders

  20. Differential geometry of group lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of publications we developed ''differential geometry'' on discrete sets based on concepts of noncommutative geometry. In particular, it turned out that first-order differential calculi (over the algebra of functions) on a discrete set are in bijective correspondence with digraph structures where the vertices are given by the elements of the set. A particular class of digraphs are Cayley graphs, also known as group lattices. They are determined by a discrete group G and a finite subset S. There is a distinguished subclass of ''bicovariant'' Cayley graphs with the property ad(S)S subset of S. We explore the properties of differential calculi which arise from Cayley graphs via the above correspondence. The first-order calculi extend to higher orders and then allow us to introduce further differential geometric structures. Furthermore, we explore the properties of ''discrete'' vector fields which describe deterministic flows on group lattices. A Lie derivative with respect to a discrete vector field and an inner product with forms is defined. The Lie-Cartan identity then holds on all forms for a certain subclass of discrete vector fields. We develop elements of gauge theory and construct an analog of the lattice gauge theory (Yang-Mills) action on an arbitrary group lattice. Also linear connections are considered and a simple geometric interpretation of the torsion is established. By taking a quotient with respect to some subgroup of the discrete group, generalized differential calculi associated with so-called Schreier diagrams are obtained