WorldWideScience

Sample records for antineutrons

  1. Antineutron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bressani, Tullio

    2003-01-01

    Antineutrons ($\\overline{n}$'s) have been used only in the last few years as projectiles for nuclear and particle physics experiments, mainly in the low momentum region. The reason is that, in spite of some undoubted advantages (absence of Coulomb corrections, pure I=1 state for the ($\\overline{n}p$) system), the difficulties in obtaining beams of $\\overline{n}$'s of suitable intensity and energy definition were overwhelming. The setting-up of suitable beams at BNL and mainly at CERN LEAR (with momentum lower than 400 MeV/c) allowed a first round of interesting experiments. In this review a summary of the most important experimental issues obtained in this field will be presented. They range from studies on the antineutron annihilation dynamics, intended to shed light on the mechanisms responsible for the particles production as well as for the possible formation of quasinuclear nucleon-antinucleon bound states, to meson spectroscopy researches, aiming to identify the existence of new, possibly exotic, resona...

  2. Prospects for neutron-antineutron transition search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamyshkov, Y.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1996-01-01

    Presently-available sources of free neutrons can allow an improvement in the discovery potential of a neutron-antineutron transition search by four orders of magnitude as compared to that of the most recent reactor-based search experiment performed at ILL in Grenoble. This would be equivalent to a characteristic neutron-antineutron transition time limit of >10 10 seconds. With future dedicated neutron-source Facilities, with further progress in cold-neutron- moderator techniques, and with a vertical experiment layout, the discovery potential could ultimately be pushed by another factor of ∼100 corresponding to a characteristic transition time limit of ∼10 11 seconds. Prospects for, and relative merits of, a neutron-antineutron oscillation search in intranuclear transitions are also discussed

  3. Search for free neutron-antineutron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressi, G.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Dolfini, R.; Genoni, M.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Mauri, F.; Piazzoli, A.; Ratti, S.P.; Torre, P.; Bini, C.; Conversi, M.; De Zorzi, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Massa, F.; Zanello, D.; Cardarelli, R.; Santonico, R.; Scannicchio, D.; Terrani, M.

    1989-01-01

    A search for free neutron-antineutron oscillations has been carried out at the Pavia Triga Mark II research reactor. A thin carbon target is crossed by a beam of thermal neutrons propagating in a 18.5 m long channel where the earth magnetic field is attenuated by a factor of 50. The total neutron current through the target is 3.2x10 10 n/s. Possible antineutron annihilations are identified by a large track detector surrounding the target. A lower limit on the oscillation time of 4.7x10 5 s (90% C.L.) has been reached. (orig.)

  4. Search for free neutron-antineutron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressi, G.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Dolfini, R.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Mauri, F.; Piazzoli, A.; Ratti, S.P.; Scannicchio, D.; Torre, P.; Conversi, M.; De Zorzi, G.; Massa, F.; Zanello, D.; Cardarelli, R.; Santonico, R.; Terrani, M.

    1989-01-01

    Small violations of the baryon number conservation law are predicted by the Grand Unified Theories. Several attempts have been made to observe a ΔB = 1 violation in proton decay experiments. The negative result of these searches can also be interpreted to give a lower limit in the range 10 7 /10 8 sec to the characteristic time of the ΔB = 2 process of n-anti n oscillations. But this limit rests on nuclear model assumptions. Only one experiment has been carried out so far to search directly for free neutron-antineutron oscillations, using cold neutrons from the ILL Grenoble reactor. (orig./HSI)

  5. Study of Antineutron Production at LEAR

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the study of antineutron ($\\bar{n}$) production at LEAR as a first step for the investigation of $\\bar{n}$-p $\\bar{n}$-n physics. A good method of producing high-quality $\\bar{n}$ beams is that of using the charge-exchange (CEX) reaction @*p~@A~$\\bar{n}$n on an external LH^2 target. The production of $\\bar{n}$ at 0|0 (see figure) may be most useful for some experiments, the production at different angles with the simultaneous detection of the associated neutron (tagged beam) most powerful for other measurements.\\\\ \\\\ The $\\bar{n}$ calorimeter consists of ten equal modules: each one is made of an iron slab, a scintillator wall and a plane of x-y streamer tubes, with a detecting area of @=~1~m|2. The $\\bar{n}$ calorimeter allows the determination of the time and the location of $\\bar{n}$ annihilations.

  6. Antineutron physics at BNL and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenstein, D; Chu, C.; Hungerford, E.

    1985-01-01

    The history of antineutron counter experiments below 1 GeV/c is rather short. Several measurements of the charge exchange total and differential cross-sections have been reported. In addition there have been a few low statistics attempts to measure the (anti np transmission and annihilation cross-sections. In 1981 at BNL, AGS Experiment 767 was proposed to simultaneously measure both the annihilation and the transmission cross-sections for anti np). The data were taken during the winter and spring of 1984 and very preliminary results were reported at Durham in July 1984. The results presented here represent a significantly more complete data analysis but some sources of systematic error are still under investigation, and as such only relative cross-sections will be quoted which should still be regarded as preliminary to some degree

  7. Neutron-antineutron transition search at HFIR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamyshkov, Yuri A.

    1997-01-01

    A new experiment to search for neutron-antineutron transitions was recently proposed for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this paper the physics motivation of a new search, the scheme and the discovery potential of the proposed HFIR-based experiment are discussed

  8. Neutron-antineutron transition search at HFIR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamyshkov, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    A new experiment to search for neutron-antineutron transitions was recently proposed for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this paper the physics motivation of a new search, the scheme and the discovery potential of the proposed HFIR-based experiment are discussed

  9. Future prospects for neutron→antineutron transition searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamyshkov, Yu.A.; Bugg, W.M.; Cohn, H.O.; Condo, G.T.; Efremenko, Yu.V.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Lillie, R.A.; Plasil, F.; Raman, S.; Rennich, M.J.; Shmakov, K.D.; Wilson, R.; Young, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    An ORNL-UTK-UW-Harvard group is exploring the possibility of performing a new experiment to search for neutron-antineutron transitions either at the ORNL HFIR reactor or at a new proposed neutron spallation source. The advanced layout, based on a large mirror focusing reflector proposed for this experiment, should allow improving the discovery potential of searches for an n→n-bar transition by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in relation to the most recent similar experiment at ILL-Grenoble. It should be possible to establish a limit on the characteristic transition time of τnn-bar > or approx. 1010 s

  10. An apparatus to search for free neutron-antineutron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressi, G.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Dolfini, R.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Mauri, F.; Piazzoli, A.; Ratti, S.P.; Scannicchio, D.; Torre, P.; Conversi, M.; De Zorzi, G.; Massa, F.; Zanello, D.; Cardarelli, R.; Santonico, R.; Terrani, M.

    1987-01-01

    After recalling the phenomenology of neutron-antineutron oscillations expected to occur if the baryon number is not rigorously conserved, the apparatus developed and used in a search for such a process, currently being carried out at the Pavia nuclear reactor, is described in some detail. The apparatus involves a large volume neutron channel (≅ 20 m 3 ) in which the earth magnetic field has been reduced by a factor 50, and large area detectors (scintillators, flash chambers and 'resistive plate counters') operating under conditions of extremely severe background from the reactor. (orig.)

  11. Antineutron-proton total cross section from 50 to 400 MeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Iazzi, F; Agnello, M; Astrua, M; Botta, E; Bressani, Tullio; Calvo, D; Costa, S; D'Isep, F; Filippi, A; Marcello, S; Minetti, B; Mirfakhraee, N; Balestra, F; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; Cerello, P G; Denisov, O Yu; Ferrero, L; Garfagnini, R; Maggiora, A; Panzarasa, A; Panzieri, D; Tosello, F; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; Capponi, M; De Castro, S; Donà, R; Galli, D; Giacobbe, B; Marconi, U; Massa, I; Piccinini, M; Poli, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Vagnoni, V M; Vecchi, S; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zoccoli, A; Bianconi, A; Bonomi, G; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Venturelli, L; Zenoni, A; Cicalò, C; Masoni, A; Mauro, S; Puddu, G; Serci, S; Usai, G L; Gorchakov, O E; Prakhov, S N; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Tretyak, V I; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lanaro, A; Lucherini, V; Petrascu, C; Lombardi, M; Ricci, R A; Vannucci, Luigi; Bendiscioli, G; Fontana, A; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Salvini, P; Tessaro, S

    2000-01-01

    The antineutron-proton total cross section has been measured in the low momentum range 50-400 MeV/c (below 100 MeV/c for the first time). The measurement was performed at LEAR (CERN) by the OBELIX experiment, thanks to its unique antineutron beam facility. A thick target transmission technique has been used. The measured total cross section shows an anomalous behaviour below 100 MeV/c. A dominance of the isospin I=0 channel over the I=1 one at low energy is clearly deduced. (28 refs).

  12. Neutron-antineutron oscillation and baryonic majoron: low scale spontaneous baryon violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhiani, Zurab [Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento delle Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    We discuss the possibility that baryon number B is spontaneously broken at low scales, of the order of MeV or even smaller, inducing the neutron-antineutron oscillation at the experimentally accessible level. An associated Goldstone particle-baryonic majoron can have observable effects in neutron to antineutron transitions in nuclei or dense nuclear matter. By extending baryon number to an anomaly-free B - L symmetry, the baryo-majoron can be identified with the ordinary majoron associated with the spontaneous breaking of lepton number, and it can have interesting implications for neutrinoless 2β decay with the majoron emission. We also discuss the hypothesis that baryon number can be spontaneously broken by QCD itself via the six-quark condensates. (orig.)

  13. A long neutron optical horn for the ILL neutron-antineutron oscillation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, T.; Eisert, F.; El-Muzeini, P.; Kessler, M.; Klemt, E.; Lippert, W.; Meienburg, W.; Dubbers, D.

    1992-01-01

    In the neutron-antineutron oscillation experiment at ILL the divergence of the free flying cold neutron beam was strongly reduced without loss of intensity by the use of a 34 m long neutron-optical horn system. The divergence reduction was accurately studied in order to maintain the total width of the neutron beam below 1.1 m after a neutron free flight distance of about 80 m. The fabrication and performance of this system are described. (orig.)

  14. Searches for Bound Neutron-Antineutron Oscillation in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewes, Jeremy E.T. [Manchester U.

    2017-01-01

    The next-generation Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment’s liquid argon detector represents an opportunity to probe previously unexplored parameter space for beyond-Standard Model processes. One such process is baryon number violating neutron-antineutron oscillation, the observation of which would have profound implications on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, and provide strong hints as to the nature of neutrino mass. A GENIE n

  15. Neutron-Antineutron oscillation as a test of a New Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addazi, A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose to search Neutron-Antineutron transitions, in condition of strong magnetic field rather than suppressed one. It is commonly accepted that such an oscillation has to be searched in no magnetic field conditions (for instance, the experiment have to be shielded by the Earth’s magnetic field). But, Neutron (and Antineutron) could be coupled to a 5. force spin-independent background Φ generated by the Earth, as eV Φ¯nγ 0 n. The background condensate simulates a difference in neutron and antineutron masses, in other words a CPT violation. Compatible with Equivalence Principle (EP) limits for a neutron inside nuclei, the 5. force background could be as high as Φ ∼ 10 −11 ÷ 10 −10 eV. As consequence, the transition probability is amplified rather than suppressed with a magnetic field of B ∼ 1–10 Gauss, if we consider neutrons immersed in a background saturating the EP limit. There are intriguing connections among: the existence of a Majorana neutron, Baryon violations Beyond the Standard Model, the Matter-Antimatter asymmetry in our Universe (Baryogenesis and Leptogenesis), the possibility of a new fifth force interaction, the possible apparent violation of the Equivalence Principle and the CPT. These strongly motivate an improvement of our current best limits in n-¯n physics.

  16. Super-light baryo-photons, weak gravity conjecture and exotic instantons in neutron-antineutron transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    In companion papers (A. Addazi, Nuovo Cim. C, 38(1): 21 (2015); A. Addazi, Z. Berezhiani, and Y. Kamyshkov, arXiv:1607.00348), we have discussed current bounds on a new super-light baryo-photon, associated with a U(1) B-L gauge, from current neutron-antineutron data, which are competitive with Eötvös-type experiments. Here, we discuss the implications of possible baryo-photon detection in string theory and quantum gravity. The discovery of a very light gauge boson should imply violation of the weak gravity conjecture, carrying deep consequences for our understanding of holography, quantum gravity and black holes. We also show how the detection of a baryo-photon would exclude the generation of all B–L violating operators from exotic stringy instantons. We will argue against the common statement in the literature that neutron-antineutron data may indirectly test at least the 300–1000 TeV scale. Searches for baryo-photons can provide indirect information on the Planck (or string) scale (quantum black holes, holography and non-perturbative stringy effects). This strongly motivates new neutron-antineutron experiments with adjustable magnetic fields dedicated to the detection of super-light baryo-photons.

  17. Experiment on search for neutron-antineutron oscillations using a projected UCN source at the WWR-M reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, A. K.; Serebrov, A. P.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Leonova, E. N.; Chaikovskii, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    We propose an experiment on search for neutron-antineutron oscillations based on the storage of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a material trap. The sensitivity of the experiment mostly depends on the trap size and the amount of UCN in it. In Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) a high-intensity UCN source is projected at the WWR-M reactor, which must provide UCN density 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sources. The results of simulations of the designed experimental scheme show that the sensitivity can be increased by ˜ 10-40 times compared to sensitivity of previous experiment depending on the model of neutron reflection from walls.

  18. A simple testable model of baryon number violation: Baryogenesis, dark matter, neutron-antineutron oscillation and collider signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2018-04-01

    We study a simple TeV-scale model of baryon number violation which explains the observed proximity of the dark matter and baryon abundances. The model has constraints arising from both low and high-energy processes, and in particular, predicts a sizable rate for the neutron-antineutron (n - n bar) oscillation at low energy and the monojet signal at the LHC. We find an interesting complementarity among the constraints arising from the observed baryon asymmetry, ratio of dark matter and baryon abundances, n - n bar oscillation lifetime and the LHC monojet signal. There are regions in the parameter space where the n - n bar oscillation lifetime is found to be more constraining than the LHC constraints, which illustrates the importance of the next-generation n - n bar oscillation experiments.

  19. On the anti-neutron bomb movement in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, T. van.

    1978-01-01

    The author reports on activities of the Dutch activists group Stop the neutron bomb in his country: Collection of signatures, statements made by about a hundred well-known theologians, two-thirds majority in parliament against the production and emplacement of the neutron bomb, International Forum 1978 in Amsterdam with mass demonstrations. President Carter is said to have been forced to delay the production of the neutron bomb temporarily by means of this international pressure. (HSCH) [de

  20. Signatures of cosmic-ray interactions on the solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckel, D.; Stanev, Todor; Gaisser, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    The fluxes of neutrinos, gamma rays, antiprotons, neutrons, and antineutrons that result from collisions of high-energy Galactic cosmic rays with the solar atmosphere are estimated. The results are sensitive to assumptions about cosmic-ray transport in the magnetic fields of the inner solar system. The high-energy photon flux should be observable by the Gamma Ray Observatory. The neutrino flux should produce less than one event per year in the next generation of neutrino telescopes. The antiproton flux is unobservable against the Galactic background. The neutron and antineutron fluxes are detectable only if neutrons produced in terrestrial cosmic-ray events may be discriminated against.

  1. Monte-Carlo simulations on the antineutrino detection in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zude, E.

    1991-09-01

    Aim of the present thesis was to study, how far a large-area neutron detector with high efficiency operated at the Corporation for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt can also by applied for experiments on the sub-threshold antineutron production in heavy ion reactions for the study of the equation of state of highly excited nuclear matter. The experimental part consisted in the partition at the construction, the taking into operation, and the calibration measurements of the target-detector system, as well at the experiments with the LAND detector for the study of the Coulomb excitation of 136 Xe projectiles in the reaction 136 Xe+ 208 Pb at 700 respectively 800 MeV/u. Studies on the suppression of neutron events against antineutron events in the data acquisition in a typical SIS/LAND experiment on the antineutron production in heavy ion collisions were performed. The possibilities available on the level of the hardware trigger for the suppression of (multiple) neutron events were studied. Thereby resulted a reachable suppression factor of ≅ 10 -3 . Studies on the off-line analysis of antineutron events exhibited problems, which base on the high matter density in the detector. (orig./HSI) [de

  2. Observation of an antimatter hypernucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.I.; Braidot, E; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons—comprising an antiproton, an antineutron, and an

  3. Baryon number violation and novel canonical anti-commutation relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Tureanu, Anca

    2018-02-01

    The possible neutron-antineutron oscillation is described by an effective quadratic Lagrangian analogous to the BCS theory. It is shown that the conventional equal-time anti-commutation relations of the neutron variable n (t , x →) are modified by the baryon number violating terms. This is established by the Bjorken-Johnson-Low prescription and also by the canonical quantization combined with equations of motion. This novel canonical behavior can give rise to an important physical effect, which is illustrated by analyzing the Lagrangian that violates the baryon number but gives rise to the degenerate effective Majorana fermions and thus no neutron-antineutron oscillation. Technically, this model is neatly treated using a relativistic analogue of the Bogoliubov transformation.

  4. Measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross-section at low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Bianconi, A.; Corradini, M.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Murakami, Y.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Yamada, H.

    2018-02-01

    Systematic measurements of the annihilation cross sections of low energy antinucleons were performed at CERN in the 80's and 90's. However the antiproton data on medium-heavy and heavy nuclear targets are scarce. The ASACUSA Collaboration at CERN has measured the antiproton annihilation cross section on carbon at 5.3 MeV: the value is (1.73 ± 0.25) barn. The result is compared with the antineutron experimental data and with the theoretical previsions.

  5. Institute of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    A survey is given of the personnel and activities of the Institute of Physics. Research by staff of the Nuclear Physics Group includes mainly work on heavy ion reactions and investigations of rare earth nuclei. The Elementary Particle Group has studied antineutron and antiproton annihilations, neutral current pions minus and has used the CERN ISRs. The Cosmic Physics Group has used rockets, satellite data and balloons to study the electron and proton precipitation in the upper atmosphere and magnetosphere, and aurorae. (JIW)

  6. Neutron oscillations and the primordial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been claimed that a primordial magnetic field must exist in order to suppress possible oscillations of neutrons into antineutrons which would otherwise affect the cosmological synthesis of helium. We demonstrate that such oscillations, even if they do occur, have a negligible effect on primordial nucleosynthesis, thus refuting the above claim. Hence the possible existence of a primordial magnetic field, relevant to current speculations concerning superconducting 'cosmic strings', remains an open question. (author)

  7. Towards the results of global analysis of data on nucleon electromagnetic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilen'kaya, S.I.; Dubnicka, S.; Dubnickova, A.Z.; Strizenec, P.

    1991-01-01

    Peculiar features of the recent global analysis of data on the nucleon electromagnetic structure are discussed on the detail in order to reconsider reliability of the predicted result that the electron-positron annihilation into a neutron-antineutron cross-section is considerably larger that the cross-section of the electron-positron annihilation into a proton-antiproton pair. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR in the ACOL ERA. Proceedings of the 3. LEAR Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldi, U.; Klapisch, R.; Richard, J.M.; Tran Thanh Van, J. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    The programme covered the following topics: accelerator aspects (anti-p production, LEAR, advanced developments, cooling, LEAR design inspired machines). Nucleon antinucleon interactions (panti-p atom, scattering, annihilation, spin effects, antineutron physics, antibaryon physics). Spectroscopy (light mesons, hybrids, glueballs, baryonia, quarkonia). Rare channels (form factors, CP, CPT, C, T violation, quantum mechanics tests) anti-p nucleus interactions (exotic atoms, scattering, annihilation, hypernuclei). New ideas (antigravity, high precision experiments). New detectors (new experiments, general and/or technical aspects).

  9. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR in the ACOL ERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, U.; Klapisch, R.; Richard, J.M.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1985-01-01

    The programme covered the following topics: accelerator aspects (anti-p production, LEAR, advanced developments, cooling, LEAR design inspired machines). Nucleon antinucleon interactions (panti-p atom, scattering, annihilation, spin effects, antineutron physics, antibaryon physics). Spectroscopy (light mesons, hybrids, glueballs, baryonia, quarkonia). Rare channels (form factors, CP, CPT, C, T violation, quantum mechanics tests) anti-p nucleus interactions (exotic atoms, scattering, annihilation, hypernuclei). New ideas (antigravity, high precision experiments). New detectors (new experiments, general and/or technical aspects)

  10. A test of the Veneziano - like πNN form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cass, A.; Mckellar, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    Dominguez' Veneziano-like πNN form factor has been investigated by attempting to use it to fit dsigma/dt data for np → pn and (antiproton)p → (antineutron)n at 8 GeV/c and 23.5 GeV/c in the interval 0 2 . With n=5/2 as proposed by Dominguez it is not possible to fit the data. A fit can be obtaine for other values of n

  11. anti p and anti n facilities at the BNL AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenstein, D.I.

    The typical AGS operating conditions are given, and the six antiproton beams and the one antineutron beam currently under test are described. Information on the following is given in tabular form: (1) the possible beam running configurations; (2) the status and availability of beams at the end of FY75; (3) a brief synopsis of the experiments that have gotten beam time during the present year; and (4) a description of new experiments which will use antiproton beams. (U.S.)

  12. Production of n-bar's and Sigma-bar+-'s in e+e- annihilations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, T.; Buchanan, C.; Nodulman, L.; Poster, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Morehouse, C.C.; Vannucci, F.

    1979-01-01

    The production of antineutrons and charged Sigma-bar's in e + e - annihilations has been measured at √s +- production between 4 and 7 GeV is consistent with simple expectations for charmed-baryon production. A search for the decays Lambda-bar - /sub c/ → Sigma-bar +- π -+ π - and Sigma-baratsup asteriskat/sub c//Sigma-bar/sub c/ → Lambda-bar - /sub c/π +- yields no significant peaks. An upper limit, at the 90% confidence level, of sigmaatsub Lambda-baratc-italicB (Lambda-bar/sub c/ → Sigma-bar +- π -+ π - ) < 56 pb is set

  13. Some preliminary considerations on antiproton-nucleus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavin, A.I.

    1981-05-01

    The antiproton as a probe of the atomic nucleus is discussed in the expectation that fairly intense beams of high quality will be available in 1983 at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) facility at CERN and possibly also in some other laboratories at a later date. Several antiproton-nucleus experiments are proposed, and the possibility of observing antiprotonic nuclei as well as antineutronic nuclei is discussed. It is demonstrated that even for the study of the elementary nucleon-antinucleon systems it could be advantageous to use nuclei rather than protons as target. The possibility of investigating several antiprotonic atomic systems is also briefly discussed [fr

  14. Future prospects of baryon istability search in p-decay and n n(bar) oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J.; Kamyshkov, Y.A. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    These proceedings contain thirty-one papers which review both the theoretical and the experimental status and near future of baryon instability research. Baryon instability is investigated from the vantage point of supersymmetric and unified theories. The interplay between baryogenesis and antimatter is examined. Double beta decay experiments are discussed. The huge Icarus experiment is described with its proton decay capabilities. Neutron-antineutron oscillations investigations are presented, especially efforts with ultra-cold neutrons. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Base.

  15. Baryon- and lepton-number non-conserving processes and intermediate mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the possible mechanisms to mediate various baryon- and lepton-number non-conserving processes is presented. Processes considered include the Δ(B+L) = 0 proton decay, ΔB = 2 neutron-antineutron oscillations and neutrino Majorana masses. Among our results we find that, in the absence of elementary scalars and exotic fermions, all the renormalizable interactions of vector bosons and ordinary fermions conserve B-L. Therefore, the observation of Δ(B-L) not equal 0 processes would imply the existence of elementary scalars and/or exotic fermions. (orig.)

  16. Higgs mass scales and matter-antimatter oscillations in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senjanovic, G.

    1982-01-01

    A general discussion of mass scales in grand unified theories is presented, with special emphasis on Higgs scalars which mediate neutron-antineutron (n-anti n) and hydrogen-antihydrogen (H-anti H) oscillations. It is shown that the analogue of survival hypothesis for fermions naturally makes such particles superheavy, thus leading to unobservable lifetimes. If this hypothesis is relaxed, an interesting possibility of potentially observable n-anti n and H-anti H transitions, mutually related arises in the context of SU(5) theory with spontaneously broken B-L symmetry

  17. A New Form of Matter — Unmatter, Composed of Particles and Anti-Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Besides matter and antimatter there must exist unmatter (as a new form of matter in accordance with the neutrosophy theory that between an entity and its opposite there exist intermediate entities . Unmatter is neither matter nor antimatter, but something in between. An atom of unmatter is formed either by (1: electrons, protons, and antineutrons, or by (2: antielectrons, antiprotons, and neutrons. At CERN it will be possible to test the production of unmatter. The existence of unmatter in the universe has a similar chance to that of the antimatter, and its production also difficult for present technologies.

  18. Functional dependence of the lower hybrid power absorption coefficient in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Ekedahl, A.; Baranov, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The fraction of the coupled lower hybrid (LH) power adsorbed in divertor plasmas in JET has been determined experimentally with a method utilizing the time derivative of the total stored energy (plasma and magnetic). This method can account for the power adsorbed inside a normalized flux co-ordinate ψ ∼ 0.7. The experimental LH absorption coefficient reaches 100% at low plasma densities, antineutron e 19 m -3 and decreases to 25% at antineutron e > 3.5 x 10 19 m -3 . The LH wave accessibility to the plasma core has been found to play an important role in determining the power absorption and the radial deposition profile. The decreasing absorption is correlated with a gradual shift of the LH power deposition profile, as determined by the hard x-ray profiles, towards the plasma periphery. Similar behaviour is found in ray tracing + Fokker-Planck code calculations. The frequency spectrum of the LH pump wave as determined by a probe outside the tokamak vessel broadens strongly as the wave accessibility is reduced and the absorption drops. (author)

  19. Post-sphaleron baryogenesis and n- anti n oscillation in non-SUSY SO(10) GUT with gauge coupling unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Sudhanwa; Pritimita, Prativa

    2014-01-01

    ''Post-sphaleron baryogenesis'', a fresh and profound mechanism of baryogenesis accounts for the matter-antimatter asymmetry of our present universe in a framework of Pati-Salam symmetry. We attempt here to embed this mechanism in a non-SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory by reviving a novel symmetry breaking chain with Pati-Salam symmetry as an intermediate symmetry breaking step and as well to address post-sphaleron baryogenesis and neutron-antineutron oscillation in a rational manner. The Pati-Salam symmetry based on the gauge group SU(2) L x SU(2) R x SU(4) C is realized in our model at 10 5 -10 6 GeV and the mixing time for the neutron-antineutron oscillation process having ΔB = 2 is found to be τ n- anti n ≅ 10 8 -10 10 s with the model parameters, which is within the reach of forthcoming experiments. Other novel features of the model include low scale right-handed W R ± , Z R gauge bosons, explanation for neutrino oscillation data via the gauged inverse (or extended) seesaw mechanism and most importantly TeV scale color sextet scalar particles responsible for an observable n- anti n oscillation which may be accessible to LHC. We also look after gauge coupling unification and an estimation of the proton lifetime with and without the addition of color sextet scalars. (orig.)

  20. The n-n-bar oscillation experiment at the Pavia reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressi, G.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Dolfini, R.; Gigli, A.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Piazzoli, A.; Ratti, S.; Torre, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Conversi, M.; De Zorzi, G.; Massa, F.; Santonico, R.; Sebastiani, F.; Zanello, D.; Cesana, A.; Terrani, M.

    1986-01-01

    The n-n-bar oscillation experiment, presented at the Seventh European Conference of Triga Reactor Users in 1982, has recently entered the data collection phase. The possibility of a neutron-antineutron transition, under particular conditions, is foreseen by some Partial Unified Theory. The aim of the experiment is to detect any transition that should take place or to establish a lower limit for the transition time of at least 10 E7 s. A beam of slow neutrons, after a flight in a pipe, air exhausted and shielded against earth magnetic field, crosses a thin carbon target in which the produced antineutrons annihilate. The annihilation products (charged and neutral pions) are dejected in an apparatus situated all around the target. Due to the relatively low flux available a very large cross section beam (∼ 1 m 2 ) had to be used in order to obtain a neutron intensity adequate to the experimental requirements. This raised several problems concerning radiation protection and shielding, in particular in the detector region. The final experimental set up is described and the results concerning the shielding effectiveness and the intensity of the neutron beam obtained are compared with the values foreseen by computer code calculations. (author)

  1. String completion of an SU(3c⊗SU(3L⊗U(1X electroweak model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Addazi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The extended electroweak SU(3c⊗SU(3L⊗U(1X symmetry framework “explaining” the number of fermion families is revisited. While 331-based schemes can not easily be unified within the conventional field theory sense, we show how to do it within an approach based on D-branes and (unoriented open strings, on Calabi–Yau singularities. We show how the theory can be UV-completed in a quiver setup, free of gauge and string anomalies. Lepton and baryon numbers are perturbatively conserved, so neutrinos are Dirac-type, and their lightness results from a novel TeV scale seesaw mechanism. Dynamical violation of baryon number by exotic instantons could induce neutron–antineutron oscillations, with proton decay and other dangerous R-parity violating processes strictly forbidden.

  2. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group: Progress report, March 1, 1987-February 29, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Progress is reported on the OPAL experiment at LEP, including construction and assembly of the hadron calorimeter and development of OPAL software. Progress on the JADE experiment, which examines e + e - interactions at PETRA, and of the PLUTO collaboration are also discussed. Experiments at Fermilab are reported, including deep inelastic muon scattering at TeV II, the D0 experiment at TeV I, and hadron jet physics. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering and a search for point-sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are reported. Other activities discussed include polarization in electron storage rings, participation in studies for the SSC and LEP 200, neutron-antineutron oscillations, and the work of the electronics support group. High energy physics computer experience is also discussed. 158 refs

  3. Measurement of the $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{n}n$ Charge-Exchange Differential Cross-Section

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is a measurement of the differential cross-section of the $\\bar{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\bar{n}$n charge-exchange reaction with a point-to-point precision of 1\\% in the forward direction, and an absolute normalization error of 3\\%. The high precision of the data should allow, inter alia, a determination of the $\\pi$NN coupling constant to better than 2\\%.\\\\ \\\\ The measurement will be done using the existing neutron and antineutron detectors built for experiment PS199 and liquid hydrogen target. In one week of running time, with a $\\bar{p}$ beam intensity of 3 $ 10 ^{5} $ $\\bar{p}$/sec, the reaction will be measured at a few $\\bar{p}$ momenta, in the range 500 to 900~MeV/c.

  4. New paradigm for baryon and lepton number violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fileviez Pérez, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The possible discovery of proton decay, neutron–antineutron oscillation, neutrinoless double beta decay in low energy experiments, and exotic signals related to the violation of the baryon and lepton numbers at collider experiments will change our understanding of the conservation of fundamental symmetries in nature. In this review we discuss the rare processes due to the existence of baryon and lepton number violating interactions. The simplest grand unified theories and the neutrino mass generation mechanisms are discussed. The theories where the baryon and lepton numbers are defined as local gauge symmetries spontaneously broken at the low scale are discussed in detail. The simplest supersymmetric gauge theory which predicts the existence of lepton number violating processes at the low scale is investigated. The main goal of this review is to discuss the main implications of baryon and lepton number violation in physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. The HIBEAM Experiment at the ESS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) offers an opportunity for a fundamental physics program with a unique reach which is complementary to that at other facilities. In this talk, the HIBEAM project is described. The HIBEAM collaboration has proposed a suite of searches and measurements which would use the Large ESS Beam Port with a high cold neutron flux. The program includes searches for conversions of free neutrons to antineutrons and to mirror neutrons with regeneration, as well as precision measurements of parity violation in nucleon-nucleon interactions. The high cold neutron intensity at HIBEAM would provide a higher sensitivity for the searches and measurements than was achieved at earlier experiments. The physics program addresses some of the central unresolved questions in particle physics and cosmology such as the energy scale and mechanism for baryon number violation, the origin of the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry of the universe, the composition of dark matter, and the mechanism for neutrino mass...

  6. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  7. Quality surveillance for steel forgings of SA508 Gr.3 used on the main NI equipment of AP1000 nuclear island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lizhao

    2011-01-01

    Being a type of steel with ideal weldability, outstanding ability of anti-neutron irradiation embitterment and good property of fracture toughness and impact toughness, the steel of ASME SA508-3 was used widely for the nuclear island equipment of PWR Nuclear Power Plant. For the 3rd generation nuclear power plant AP1000, all large forgings and some critical components of the SG, RV and PRZ adopt this steel. Through analysis on the critical technical points during manufacturing of the SA508-3 forgings, this article try to identify the key points should be paid attention during the quality surveillance for this type of forgings, and to put forward the supervision method and focus during quality surveillance activities. (author)

  8. Unified TeV scale picture of baryogenesis and dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K S; Mohapatra, R N; Nasri, Salah

    2007-04-20

    We present a simple extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model which provides a unified picture of cosmological baryon asymmetry and dark matter. Our model introduces a gauge singlet field N and a color triplet field X which couple to the right-handed quark fields. The out-of-equilibrium decay of the Majorana fermion N mediated by the exchange of the scalar field X generates adequate baryon asymmetry for MN approximately 100 GeV and MX approximately TeV. The scalar partner of N (denoted N1) is naturally the lightest SUSY particle as it has no gauge interactions and plays the role of dark matter. The model is experimentally testable in (i) neutron-antineutron oscillations with a transition time estimated to be around 10(10)sec, (ii) discovery of colored particles X at LHC with mass of order TeV, and (iii) direct dark matter detection with a predicted cross section in the observable range.

  9. Long distance propagation of a polarized neutron beam in zero magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, U.; Bitter, T.; El-Muzeini, P.

    1992-01-01

    A beam of fully polarized cold neutrons was transported through a zero magnetic field region of 70 m length without loss of polarization. The purpose of this exercise was twofold: Firstly, to demonstrate that the new zero-field neutron spin-echo method will work also for very long neutron flight paths; secondly, to prove in the most direct way that the neutron free-flight region of the ILL neutron-antineutron oscillation experiment was indeed sufficiently field-free ('quasifree condition') by using the neutrons themselves as a magnetometer. To this purpose the residual magnetic field integrals in the long 'zero-field' region were measured with a conventional neutron spin-echo method. The overall spin precession angle of the neutrons during their flight through the long zero-field region was found to be less than 2 0 . (orig.)

  10. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  11. Observation of an antimatter hypernucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Alekseev, I; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderon, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Koroleva, L; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, N; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mal, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M K; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wingfield, E; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhou, W; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y

    2010-04-02

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons--comprising an antiproton, an antineutron, and an antilambda hyperon--produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 +/- 17 antihypertritons ((Lambda)(3)-H) and 157 +/- 30 hypertritons (Lambda3H). The measured yields of Lambda3H ((Lambda)(3)-H) and 3He (3He) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and of nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  12. В поисках альтернативы (Новая космологическая концепция без «Большого Взрыва»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Джахая Л. Г.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Metagalaxy in finite spatial and temporal boundaries is qualitatively certain material formation, a single, coherent financial system in the boundless expanse of the universe. Material substrate is Metagalaxy metagalactic vacuum as a real physical environment and the arena of action of all material processes in the Metagalaxy. In Metagalaxy there are two types of interactions: gravity and electromagnetism are two excited states Metagalactic vacuum, all the other interactions ("weak", "strong" are the consequence of these two fundamental interactions. Inertial motion of the real weight in a vacuum explains the paradox of d'Alembert-Euler, and gravity - "rolling up" in the "potential well" real masses and "black holes". The main feature of the metagalactic vacuum is its unequal optical density. In addition to the local optical inhomogeneities with the index of refraction greater than unity (n>1, the giant optical inhomogeneity is all metagalactic vacuum, with a maximum optical density (nmax in the center of Metagalaxy, c (n =1 "here" and "now" ("Time of Life " and then to (n <1 on the periphery of the Metagalaxy and s (n = 0 at its edge. At the heart of the author's cosmological model is based on two laws: the creation of pairs of particles and antiparticles in strong gravitational fields of rotating "cosmological black holes" and the Magnus effect. It's enough to born neutron-antineutrons páry, they scatter in opposite directions, and neutrons, according to the Magnus effect, go into outer space, and be absorbed antineutrons "black hole", all the remaining particles are obtained in the beta decay of a neutron into a proton, an electron and antineutrinos and is ready hydrogen. This calibration will gather around the "cosmological black hole" isotopes of hydrogen atoms (75% and helium (25%, which will form protogalaxies - on the principle of "one cosmological black hole - one protogalaxy" with a primary hydrogen-helium cloud, it is ejected from

  13. Standard model baryogenesis through four-fermion operators in braneworlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J.H.; Dent, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We study a new baryogenesis scenario in a class of braneworld models with low fundamental scale, which typically have difficulty with baryogenesis. The scenario is characterized by its minimal nature: the field content is that of the standard model and all interactions consistent with the gauge symmetry are admitted. Baryon number is violated via a dimension-6 proton decay operator, suppressed today by the mechanism of quark-lepton separation in extra dimensions; we assume that this operator was unsuppressed in the early Universe due to a time-dependent quark-lepton separation. The source of CP violation is the CKM matrix, in combination with the dimension-6 operators. We find that almost independently of cosmology, sufficient baryogenesis is nearly impossible in such a scenario if the fundamental scale is above 100 TeV, as required by an unsuppressed neutron-antineutron oscillation operator. The only exception producing sufficient baryon asymmetry is a scenario involving out-of-equilibrium c quarks interacting with equilibrium b quarks

  14. Baryon number and lepton universality violation in leptoquark and diquark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Assad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We perform a systematic study of models involving leptoquarks and diquarks with masses well below the grand unification scale and demonstrate that a large class of them is excluded due to rapid proton decay. After singling out the few phenomenologically viable color triplet and sextet scenarios, we show that there exist only two leptoquark models which do not suffer from tree-level proton decay and which have the potential for explaining the recently discovered anomalies in B meson decays. Both of those models, however, contain dimension five operators contributing to proton decay and require a new symmetry forbidding them to emerge at a higher scale. This has a particularly nice realization for the model with the vector leptoquark (3,12/3, which points to a specific extension of the Standard Model, namely the Pati–Salam unification model, where this leptoquark naturally arises as the new gauge boson. We explore this possibility in light of recent B physics measurements. Finally, we analyze also a vector diquark model, discussing its LHC phenomenology and showing that it has nontrivial predictions for neutron–antineutron oscillation experiments.

  15. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  16. Search for n -n ¯ oscillation in Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iida, T.; Ishihara, K.; Kameda, J.; Koshio, Y.; Minamino, A.; Mitsuda, C.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Higuchi, I.; Ishihara, C.; Ishitsuka, M.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Mitsuka, G.; Nakayama, S.; Nishino, H.; Okumura, K.; Saji, C.; Takenaga, Y.; Clark, S.; Desai, S.; Dufour, F.; Herfurth, A.; Kearns, E.; Likhoded, S.; Litos, M.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Wang, W.; Goldhaber, M.; Casper, D.; Cravens, J. P.; Dunmore, J.; Griskevich, J.; Kropp, W. R.; Liu, D. W.; Mine, S.; Regis, C.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Vagins, M. R.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Jang, J. S.; Jeoung, I. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Scholberg, K.; Tanimoto, N.; Walter, C. W.; Wendell, R.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Tasaka, S.; Guillian, G.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Messier, M. D.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwashita, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Nitta, K.; Oyama, Y.; Suzuki, A. T.; Hasegawa, M.; Maesaka, H.; Nakaya, T.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, H.; Tanaka, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Haines, T. J.; Dazeley, S.; Hatakeyama, S.; Svoboda, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Gran, R.; Habig, A.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koike, T.; Jung, C. K.; Kato, T.; Kobayashi, K.; McGrew, C.; Sarrat, A.; Terri, R.; Yanagisawa, C.; Tamura, N.; Ikeda, M.; Sakuda, M.; Kuno, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Kim, S. B.; Yang, B. S.; Ishizuka, T.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Seo, H. K.; Gando, Y.; Hasegawa, T.; Inoue, K.; Ishii, H.; Nishijima, K.; Ishino, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Chen, S.; Deng, Z.; Liu, Y.; Kielczewska, D.; Berns, H. G.; Shiraishi, K. K.; Thrane, E.; Washburn, K.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search for neutron-antineutron (n -n ¯) oscillation was undertaken in Super-Kamiokande using the 1489 live-day or 2.45 ×1034 neutron-year exposure data. This process violates both baryon and baryon minus lepton numbers by an absolute value of two units and is predicted by a large class of hypothetical models where the seesaw mechanism is incorporated to explain the observed tiny neutrino masses and the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. No evidence for n -n ¯ oscillation was found; the lower limit of the lifetime for neutrons bound in 16O, in an analysis that included all of the significant sources of experimental uncertainties, was determined to be 1.9 ×1032 years at the 90% confidence level. The corresponding lower limit for the oscillation time of free neutrons was calculated to be 2.7 ×108 s using a theoretical value of the nuclear suppression factor of 0.517 ×1023 s-1 and its uncertainty.

  17. Utilization of FADC for reconstruction and analysis of the background data in the Chooz neutrino experiment; Utilisation des FADC pour la reconstruction et l`analyse des donnees de bruit de fond dans l`experience neutrino de Chooz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veron, Didier [Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-03-25

    This thesis describes a particular contribution to the Chooz experiment. The latter looks for the oscillations, over a distance of 1 km, of antineutrons emitted by two nuclear reactors. The electron-type antineutrinos are detected through their inverse beta interaction with a target`s proton. The neutron is detected through its capture by a gadolinium nucleus revealed by an 8 MeV gamma emission. In the first part we describe the reconstruction of events as simulated by the GIANT software. We show that the positron`s and neutron`s stopping point can actually be reconstructed with an accuracy of 10 and 20 cm respectively. In the second part, we proceed to the analysis of the calibration`s data as recorded with Fast Wave Form Digitizers. This confirms the reliability of the Monte-Carlo results and allows measurement of both the neutrons` capture probability and time by the target gadolinium. The last part deals with the background (reactor turned off) data analysis and the pin-pointing of its various sources. In order to reduce their contribution, we define spatial cuts. These cuts` reliability is validated by analysis of data obtained not only with a neutron source, but also with neutrons issued from cosmic rays. We end up with a background contribution of two to three events per day, about ten times less than the expected neutrino rate at full reactor power. (author) 81 refs., 152 figs.,43 tabs.

  18. Study of $ \\bar{p} $ and $ \\bar{n} $ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS201 Study of $\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{n}$ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer \\\\ \\\\OBELIX is designed to study exclusive final states of antiproton and antineutron annihilations at low energies with protons and nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The physics motivations of the experiment are:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{itemize} \\item (gg, ggg), hybrids ($ q \\bar{q} g $), multiquarks ($ q q \\bar{q} \\bar{q} $) and light mesons ($ q \\bar{q} $) produced in $ N \\bar{N} $ annihilations and study of their spectroscopy and decays. Also broad structures will be searched for by comparing identical decay modes in exclusive final states of the same type occuring from initial states with different angular momentum or isospin. \\item Study of the dynamics of $ N \\bar{N} $ interactions and of the dependence of the final and intermediate resonant states of annihilation upon the quantum numbers of the initial $ N \\bar{N} $ state (angular momentum: S and P-wave in $\\bar{p}p $ at...

  19. The coarsening effect of SA508-3 steel used as heavy forgings material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingqian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SA508Gr.3 steel is popularly used to produce core unit of nuclear power reactors due to its outstanding ability of anti-neutron irradiation and good fracture toughness. The forging process takes important role in manufacturing to refine the grain size and improve the material properties. But due to their huge size, heavy forgings cannot be cooled down quickly, and the refined grains usually have long time to grow in high temperature conditions. If the forging process is not adequately scheduled or implemented, very large grains up to millimetres in size may be found in this steel and cannot be eliminated in the subsequent heat treatment. To fix the condition which may causes the coarsening of the steel, hot upsetting experiments in the industrial production environment were performed under different working conditions and the corresponding grain sizes were measured and analysed. The observation showed that the grain will abnormally grow if the deformation is less than a critical value. The strain energy takes a critical role in the grain evolution. If dynamic recrystallization consumes the strain energy as much as possible, the normal grains will be obtained. While if not, the stored strain energy will promote abnormal growth of the grains.

  20. Golden Jubilee photos: Welcome to the antiworld

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring).Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime (see Bulletin 28/04), so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been ...

  1. R-parity violation in F-theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romão, Miguel Crispim [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Karozas, Athanasios [Physics Department, Theory Division, Ioannina University,GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); King, Stephen F. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Leontaris, George K. [Physics Department, Theory Division, Ioannina University,GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Meadowcroft, Andrew K. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-14

    We discuss R-parity violation (RPV) in semi-local and local F-theory constructions. We first present a detailed analysis of all possible combinations of RPV operators arising from semi-local F-theory spectral cover constructions, assuming an SU(5) GUT. We provide a classification of all possible allowed combinations of RPV operators originating from operators of the form 10⋅5̄⋅5̄, including the effect of U(1) fluxes with global restrictions. We then relax the global constraints and perform explicit computations of the bottom/tau and RPV Yukawa couplings, at an SO(12) local point of enhancement in the presence of general fluxes subject only to local flux restrictions. We compare our results to the experimental limits on each allowed RPV operator, and show that operators such as LLe{sup c}, LQd{sup c} and u{sup c}d{sup c}d{sup c} may be present separately within current bounds, possibly on the edge of observability, suggesting lepton number violation or neutron-antineutron oscillations could constrain F-theory models.

  2. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  3. Utilization of FADC for reconstruction and analysis of the background data in the Chooz neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veron, Didier

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes a particular contribution to the Chooz experiment. The latter looks for the oscillations, over a distance of 1 km, of antineutrons emitted by two nuclear reactors. The electron-type antineutrinos are detected through their inverse beta interaction with a target's proton. The neutron is detected through its capture by a gadolinium nucleus revealed by an 8 MeV gamma emission. In the first part we describe the reconstruction of events as simulated by the GIANT software. We show that the positron's and neutron's stopping point can actually be reconstructed with an accuracy of 10 and 20 cm respectively. In the second part, we proceed to the analysis of the calibration's data as recorded with Fast Wave Form Digitizers. This confirms the reliability of the Monte-Carlo results and allows measurement of both the neutrons' capture probability and time by the target gadolinium. The last part deals with the background (reactor turned off) data analysis and the pin-pointing of its various sources. In order to reduce their contribution, we define spatial cuts. These cuts' reliability is validated by analysis of data obtained not only with a neutron source, but also with neutrons issued from cosmic rays. We end up with a background contribution of two to three events per day, about ten times less than the expected neutrino rate at full reactor power. (author)

  4. Optical model potential analysis of n ¯A and n A interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2018-05-01

    We use a momentum-dependent optical model potential to analyze the annihilation cross sections of the antineutron n ¯ on C, Al, Fe, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclei for projectile momenta plab ≲500 MeV /c . We obtain a good description of annihilation cross section data of Barbina et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 612, 346 (1997), 10.1016/S0375-9474(96)00331-4] and of Astrua et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 697, 209 (2002), 10.1016/S0375-9474(01)01252-0] which exhibit an interesting dependence of the cross sections on plab as well as on the target mass number A . We also obtain the neutron (n ) nonelastic reaction cross sections for the same targets. Comparing the n A reaction cross sections σrecn A to the n ¯A annihilation cross sections σannn ¯A, we find that σannn ¯A is significantly larger than σrecn A, that is, the σannn ¯A/σrecn A cross section ratio lies between the values of about 1.5 to 4.0 in the momentum region where comparison is possible. The dependence of the n ¯ annihilation cross section on the projectile charge is also examined in comparison with the antiproton p ¯. Here we predict the p ¯A annihilation cross section on the simplest assumption that both p ¯A and n ¯A interactions have the same nuclear part of the optical potential but differ only in the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Deviation from a such simple model extrapolation in measurements will provide new information on the difference between n ¯A and p ¯A potentials.

  5. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  7. DUSEL Theory White Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raby, S.; Walker, T.; Babu, K.S.; Baer, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Gabadadze, G.; Gal, A.; Gondolo, P.; Lande, K.; Olive, K.A.; Profumo, S.; Shrock, R.; Tavartkiladze, Z.; Whisnant, K.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2011-01-01

    The scientific case for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) located at the Homestake mine in Lead, South Dakota is exceptional. The site of this future laboratory already claims a discovery for the detection of solar neutrinos, leading to a Nobel Prize for Ray Davis. Moreover this work provided the first step to our present understanding of solar neutrino oscillations and a chink in the armor of the Standard Model of particle physics. We now know, from several experiments located in deep underground experimental laboratories around the world, that neutrinos have mass and even more importantly this mass appears to fit into the framework of theories which unify all the known forces of nature, i.e. the strong, weak, electromagnetic and gravitational. Similarly, DUSEL can forge forward in the discovery of new realms of nature, housing six fundamental experiments that will test the frontiers of our knowledge: (1) Searching for nucleon decay (the decay of protons and neutrons predicted by grand unified theories of nature); (2) Searching for neutrino oscillations and CP violation by detecting neutrinos produced at a neutrino source (possibly located at Brookhaven National Laboratory and/or Fermi National Laboratory); (3) Searching for astrophysical neutrinos originating from the sun, from cosmic rays hitting the upper atmosphere or from other astrophysical sources, such a supernovae; (4) Searching for dark matter particles (the type of matter which does not interact electromagnetically, yet provides 24% of the mass of the Universe); (5) Looking for the rare process known as neutrino-less double beta decay which is predicted by most theories of neutrino mass and allows two neutrons in a nucleus to spontaneously change into two protons and two electrons; and (6) Searching for the rare process of neutron- anti-neutron oscillations, which would establish violation of baryon number symmetry. A large megaton water Cherenkov detector for neutrinos and

  8. DUSEL Theory White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raby, S.; /Ohio State U.; Walker, T.; /Ohio State U. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Ohio State U., CCAPP; Babu, K.S.; /Oklahoma State U.; Baer, H.; /Florida State U.; Balantekin, A.B.; Barger, V.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Berezhiani, Z.; /Gran Sasso; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Dermisek, R.; /Princeton U.; Dolgov, A.; /Moscow, ITEP /Ferrara U.; Fileviez Perez, P.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Gabadadze, G.; /New York U.; Gal, A.; /Hebrew U.; Gondolo, P.; /Utah U.; Haxton, W.; /Washington U., Seattle; Kamyshkov, Y.; /Tennessee U.; Kayser, B.; /Fermilab; Kearns, E.; /Boston U.; Kopeliovich, B.; /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso; Lande, K.; /Pennsylvania U.; Marfatia, D.; /Kansas U. /Maryland U. /Northeastern U. /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Minnesota U. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /SUNY, Stony Brook /Oklahoma State U. /Iowa State U. /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2011-11-14

    The scientific case for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory [DUSEL] located at the Homestake mine in Lead, South Dakota is exceptional. The site of this future laboratory already claims a discovery for the detection of solar neutrinos, leading to a Nobel Prize for Ray Davis. Moreover this work provided the first step to our present understanding of solar neutrino oscillations and a chink in the armor of the Standard Model of particle physics. We now know, from several experiments located in deep underground experimental laboratories around the world, that neutrinos have mass and even more importantly this mass appears to fit into the framework of theories which unify all the known forces of nature, i.e. the strong, weak, electromagnetic and gravitational. Similarly, DUSEL can forge forward in the discovery of new realms of nature, housing six fundamental experiments that will test the frontiers of our knowledge: (1) Searching for nucleon decay (the decay of protons and neutrons predicted by grand unified theories of nature); (2) Searching for neutrino oscillations and CP violation by detecting neutrinos produced at a neutrino source (possibly located at Brookhaven National Laboratory and/or Fermi National Laboratory); (3) Searching for astrophysical neutrinos originating from the sun, from cosmic rays hitting the upper atmosphere or from other astrophysical sources, such a supernovae; (4) Searching for dark matter particles (the type of matter which does not interact electromagnetically, yet provides 24% of the mass of the Universe); (5) Looking for the rare process known as neutrino-less double beta decay which is predicted by most theories of neutrino mass and allows two neutrons in a nucleus to spontaneously change into two protons and two electrons; and (6) Searching for the rare process of neutron- anti-neutron oscillations, which would establish violation of baryon number symmetry. A large megaton water Cherenkov detector for neutrinos and

  9. PREFACE: Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2009-10-01

    fundamental nature, the structure of the neutron itself can be used to probe hadronic structure, via measurement of its electromagnetic form factors and/or polarizabilities. This aspect of neutron physics is discussed in the article by Daniel Phillips. In a set of measurements at Grenoble, the neutron has been used to study its quantum mechanical gravitational bound state in the vicinity of the Earth's surface. This work is described in the article by Stefan Baessler. Finally, possible beyond standard model physics is probed by experimental searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations, as discussed in the article by Rabi Mohaptatra. There exist many other areas wherein the neutron has been used as a probe of fundamental pieces of contemporary physics. Examples include the use of neutron interferometry to measure the Earth's rotation and gravitational field and the recent use of light cone methods to study the transverse charge distribution of the neutron. Indeed, a full report on all such aspects could fill an entire volume of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics. The six articles which appear here in this focus section are presented rather as a brief overview, to possibly whet the appetite of the reader for such work. Hungrier readers can fill their plate with additional and more detailed information available in the many references cited by the focus articles or in more extensive discussions available elsewhere. An example is the article on experiments in fundamental neutron physics by Jeff Nico and Mike Snow published in Annual Reviews of Nuclear and Particle Science 2005 55 27-69, but there are many others.

  10. Negative numbers and antimatter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsan, Ung Chan

    2012-01-01

    Dirac's equation states that an electron implies the existence of an antielectron with the same mass (more generally same arithmetic properties) and opposite charge (more generally opposite algebraic properties). Subsequent observation of antielectron validated this concept. This statement can be extended to all matter particles; observation of antiproton, antineutron, antideuton … is in complete agreement with this view. Recently antihypertriton was observed and 38 atoms of antihydrogen were trapped. This opens the path for use in precise testing of nature's fundamental symmetries. The symmetric properties of a matter particle and its mirror antimatter particle seem to be well established. Interactions operate on matter particles and antimatter particles as well. Conservation of matter parallels addition operating on positive and negative numbers. Without antimatter particles, interactions of the Standard Model (electromagnetism, strong interaction and weak interaction) cannot have the structure of group. Antimatter particles are characterized by negative baryonic number A or/and negative leptonic number L. Materialization and annihilation obey conservation of A and L (associated to all known interactions), explaining why from pure energy (A = 0, L = 0) one can only obtain a pair of matter particle antimatter particle — electron antielectron, proton and antiproton — via materialization where the mass of a pair of particle antiparticle gives back to pure energy with annihilation. These two mechanisms cannot change the difference in the number of matter particles and antimatter particles. Thus from pure energy only a perfectly symmetric (in number) universe could be generated as proposed by Dirac but observation showed that our universe is not symmetric, it is a matter universe which is nevertheless neutral. Fall of reflection symmetries shattered the prejudice that there is no way to define in an absolute way right and left or matter and antimatter

  11. Grands principes de symétrie à l'épreuve de l'expérience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depommier, P.

    interesting observable seems to be the electric dipole moment of the neutron, which vanishes under time-reversal invariance (assuming parity violation). The magnitude of the theoretical predictions varies considerably, therefore the electric dipole moment of the neutron constitutes a very valuable test of time-reversal invariance. The conservation of parity and time reversal in the strong interaction raises a delicate problem in Quantum Chromodynamics. In order to get rid of parity and time reversal violating terms in the QCD Lagrangian one invokes a new symmetry which introduces a light pseudoscalar particle, the axion. This particle has been searched for but not found. Recent findings in heavy-ion collisions (the famous e+ -e- pairs) have probably nothing to do with axions. Chapter 7 deals with baryon number nonconservation. Grand unification theories have been introduced to cure several deficiencies of the Standard Model. One of the most dramatic consequences of these theories is the violation of baryon number conservation, resulting in the instability of the nucleon and other effects like neutron-antineutron oscillations. The economical model based on the unification group SU(5) fails in the prediction of the proton lifetime. Alternative unification groups have been proposed. Proton decay and neutron-antineutron searches are fundamental experiments which are pushed very strongly with a variety of experimental techniques. Lepton number nonconservation is the subject of chapter 8. The search for nuclear neutrinoless double beta decay is another activity which has become important in the attempt to elucidate the nature of the neutrino. Neutrinoless double beta decay can only occur with Majorana neutrinos if these neutrinos are massive and/or weak currents are not exactly V — A. In the context of the gauge theories the observation of this process would be a proof of massive Majorana neutrinos. Various isotopes can be used to search for double beta decay (with or without

  12. CMB and the elementary particles structure deduced from QFT of non-dot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    electron. The p (+) and p (-) : (5) m + (4) m + ({3) }m + ({2) -1}m(2) = 1836 m_{e}, its outside layer is (2) m_{0} ({2) }(120 m _{nu}), \\underline{e} (18 m _{nu}) and one _{0} nuυ with 139 m_{nu} = (139/1369) m _{e} = 0.1 m_{e}, it is just the proton p (+) with 1836.10 m_{e}. The antiproton p (-) : with 1836.10 \\underline{m}_{e}, one e and one nuυ_{0}. The n and \\underline{n} : In p (+) outside layer the _{0} nuυ (1 m _{nu} ), e (18 m_{nu}) and (2) m_{0} (2) (120 m _{nu}) are replaced by two nuυ_{mu}(0) and one sub-nuυ_{mu} (0) which (5) m_{0} exchange into (4) m_{0}) become 1838.64 m_{e}), again absorb one vacuum nuυ_{0} become the neutron n. The anti-neutron n has 1838.64 \\underline{m}_{e} and one _{0}nuυ. The essence of strangeness is that: one left turn anti-mass ({2) -1} \\underline{m}(2) (132 m_{e}) interfuse in great right mass particle then the strange number S = -1, such as K (0) , LambdaΛ(0) , Sigma∑(0,+,-) , two (2-1) \\underline{m}(2) then S = -2 such as XiΞ(0,-) ; one right turn mass ({2) -1}m(2) (132 m_{e}) interfuse in great left turn anti-mass particle then the strange number S = + 1 such as \\underline{K}(0) , \\underline{LambdaΛ} (0) , \\underline{Sigma∑}(0,+,-) , two ({2) -1}m(2) then S = + 2 such as \\underline{XiΞ}(0,-) . All strange particles as positive -negative pair to be produced from the particle’s momentum in accelerator, on the fountainhead, all come from the neutral microwave photons. Only from the collective structure of the photons, rest mass and charge quanta we can understand the strange particles producing process and the strange number invariable law. From the structure of elementary particles it may be obtained that the gravitational constant is likely dependent on the absolute velocity of galaxy.