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Sample records for antineutrino flux measurements

  1. Testing Geological Models with Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Dye, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Uranium and thorium are the main heat producing elements in the earth. Their quantities and distributions, which specify the flux of detectable antineutrinos generated by the beta decay of their daughter isotopes, remain unmeasured. Geological models of the continental crust and the mantle predict different quantities and distributions of uranium and thorium. Many of these differences are resolvable with precision measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. This precision depends on bo...

  2. Testing Geological Models with Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Uranium and thorium are the main heat producing elements in the earth. Their quantities and distributions, which specify the flux of detectable antineutrinos generated by the beta decay of their daughter isotopes, remain unmeasured. Geological models of the continental crust and the mantle predict different quantities and distributions of uranium and thorium. Many of these differences are resolvable with precision measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. This precision depends on both statistical and systematic uncertainties. An unavoidable background of antineutrinos from nuclear reactors typically dominates the systematic uncertainty. This report explores in detail the capability of various operating and proposed geo-neutrino detectors for testing geological models.

  3. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

  4. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Stephen T

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This research report describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a mid-continental and a mid-oceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understa...

  5. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This research report desc...

  6. Monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Reactor Using Anti-Neutrino Flux Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Ozturk, Sertac; Ozcan, V Erkcan; Unel, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    We present a simulation based study for monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant's activity using anti-neutrino flux originating from the reactor core. A water Cherenkov detector has been designed and optimization studies have been performed using Geant4 simulation toolkit. A first study for the design of a monitoring detector facility for Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant has been discussed in this paper.

  7. Improved Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J -H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y -C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C -H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    A new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GW$_{\\mathrm{th}}$ nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (510~m and 560~m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1580~m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be $0.946\\pm0.020$ ($0.992\\pm0.021$) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9 $\\sigma$ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4-6~MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4 $\\sigma$. A reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent p...

  8. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dove, J; Draeger, E; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, K Y; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Kebwaro, J Monari; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GW$_{th}$ nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579~m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 $\\pm$ 0.04) $\\times$ 10$^{-18}$~cm$^2$/GW/day or (5.92 $\\pm$ 0.14) $\\times$ 10$^{-43}$~cm$^2$/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is $0.946\\pm0.022$ ($0.991\\pm0.023$) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2$\\sigma$ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to $\\sim$4$\\sigma$ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum...

  9. A Precise Measurement of Reactor Antineutrino at RENO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    RENO is the reactor experiment to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ1 3 by observing the disappearance of the reactor antineutrino. Antineutrinos from six reactors at Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant in Korea, are detected and compared by two identical detectors located at 294 m and 1383 m, respectively, from the center of the reactor array. The far (near) detector observes 73 (780) electron antineutrino candidate events per day after background subtraction with the precise measurement of reactor antineutrino flux. In this paper, an updated result is presented about the energy spectra of antineutrino signals in RENO detectors. A precise measurement of reactor antineutrino flux is also presented in comparison with expectations.

  10. A Precise Measurement of Reactor Antineutrino at RENO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RENO is the reactor experiment to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ13 by observing the disappearance of the reactor antineutrino. Antineutrinos from six reactors at Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant in Korea, are detected and compared by two identical detectors located at 294 m and 1383 m, respectively, from the center of the reactor array. The far (near) detector observes 73 (780) electron antineutrino candidate events per day after background subtraction with the precise measurement of reactor antineutrino flux. In this paper, an updated result is presented about the energy spectra of antineutrino signals in RENO detectors. A precise measurement of reactor antineutrino flux is also presented in comparison with expectations

  11. Reactor antineutrino fluxes - status and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we describe the current understanding of reactor antineutrino fluxes and point out some recent developments. This is not intended to be a complete review of this vast topic but merely a selection of observations and remarks, which despite their incompleteness, will highlight the status and the challenges of this field.

  12. High flux lithium antineutrino source with variable hard spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lyashuk, V I

    2016-01-01

    The high flux antineutrino source with hard antineutrino spectrum based on neutron activation of 7Li and subsequent fast beta-decay (T 1/2 = 0.84 s) of the 8Li isotope with emission of antineutrino with energy up to 13 MeV - is discussed. Creation of the intensive isotope neutrino source of hard spectrum will allow to increase the detection statistics of neutrino interaction and it is especially urgent for oscillation experiments. The scheme of the proposed neutrino source is based on the continuous transport of the created 8Li to the neutrino detector, which moved away from the place of neutron activation. Analytical expressions for lithium antineutrino flux is obtained. The discussed source will ensure to increase the cross section for reactions with deuteron from several times to tens compare to the reactor antineutrino spectrum. An another unique feature of the installation is the possibility to vary smoothly the hardness of the antineutrino spectrum.

  13. Precisely determined the spent nuclear fuel antineutrino flux and spectrum for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X B; Chen, Y X; Zhong, W L; An, F P

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) antineutrino flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino flux prediction. However, if one want to determine the contribution of spent fuel, many data are needed, such as the amount of spent fuel in the pool, the time after discharged from the reactor core, the burnup of each assembly, and the antineutrino spectrum of the isotopes in the spend fuel. A method to calculate the contribution of SNF is proposed in this study. In this method, reactor simulation code verified by experiment have been used to simulate the fuel depletion by taking into account more than 2000 isotopes and fission products, the quantity of SNF in each six spend fuel pool, and the antineutrino spectrum of SNF varying with time after SNF discharged from core. Results show that the contribution of SNF to the total antineutrino flux is about 0.26%~0.34%, and the shutdown impact is about 20%. The SNF spectrum would distort the softer part of antineutrino spectra, and the maximum contribution fro...

  14. Antineutrino flux from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez-Estrada, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    We present a a calculation of the antineutrino flux produced by the reactors at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in M\\'exico, based on the antineutrino spectra produced in the decay chains of the fission fragments of the main isotopes in the reactor core, and their fission rates, that have been calculated using the DRAGON simulation code. We also present an estimate of the number of expected events in a detector made of plastic scintillator with a mass of 1 ton, at 100 m from the reactor cores.

  15. Long Distance Reactor Antineutrino Flux Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven; Bergevin, Marc; Bernstein, Adam

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of antineutrino detection as an unambiguous and unshieldable way to detect the presence of distant nuclear reactors has been studied. While KamLAND provided a proof of concept for long distance antineutrino detection, the feasibility of detecting single reactors at distances greater than 100 km has not yet been established. Even larger detectors than KamLAND would be required for such a project. Considerations such as light attenuation, environmental impact and cost, which favor water as a detection medium, become more important as detectors get larger. We have studied both the sensitivity of water based detection media as a monitoring tool, and the scientific impact such detectors might provide. A next generation water based detector may be able to contribute to important questions in neutrino physics, such as supernova neutrinos, sterile neutrino oscillations, and non standard electroweak interactions (using a nearby compact accelerator source), while also providing a highly sensitive, and inherently unshieldable reactor monitoring tool to the non proliferation community. In this talk I will present the predicted performance of an experimental non proliferation and high-energy physics program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-674192.

  16. Which reactor antineutrino flux may be responsible for the anomaly?

    CERN Document Server

    Giunti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate which among the reactor antineutrino fluxes from the decays of the fission products of $^{235}\\text{U}$, $^{238}\\text{U}$, $^{239}\\text{Pu}$, and $^{241}\\text{Pu}$ may be responsible for the reactor antineutrino anomaly. We find that it is the $^{235}\\text{U}$ flux, which contributes to the rates of all reactor neutrino experiments. From the fit of the data we obtain the precise determination $ \\sigma_{^{235}\\text{U}} = ( 6.34 \\pm 0.10 ) \\times 10^{-43} \\, \\text{cm}^2 / \\text{fission} $ of the $^{235}\\text{U}$ cross section per fission, which is more precise than the calculated value and differs from it by $2.0\\sigma$.

  17. Improved Measurement of Electron Antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Beriguete, W; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Brown, R L; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Carr, R; Chan, W T; Chang, J F; Chang, Y; Chasman, C; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, S J; Chen, S M; Chen, X C; Chen, X H; Chen, X S; Chen, Y; Chen, Y X; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; Deng, Z Y; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dong, L; Draeger, E; Dwyer, D; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Fang, S D; Fu, J Y; Fu, Z W; Ge, L Q; Gill, R L; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Gornushkin, Y A; Greenler, L S; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Hahn, R L; Hans, S; He, M; He, Q; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Hinrichs, P; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Huang, H X; Huang, H Z; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Issakov, V; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jetter, S; Ji, X L; Ji, X P; Jiang, H J; Jiang, W Q; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lai, C Y; Lai, W C; Lai, W H; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lewis, C A; Li, B; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, J; Li, Q J; Li, S F; Li, W D; Li, X B; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, J; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S K; Lin, S X; Lin, Y C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, B J; Liu, D W; Liu, J C; Liu, J L; Liu, S; Liu, Y B; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Luk, A; Luk, K B; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y Q; McDonald, K T; McFarlane, M C; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mohapatra, D; Morgan, J E; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Nemchenok, I; Ngai, H Y; Ngai, W K; Nie, Y B; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pagac, A; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Shih, K; Steiner, H; Stoler, P; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tam, Y H; Tanaka, H K; Tang, X; Tagg, N; Themann, H; Torun, Y; Trentalange, S; Tsai, O; Tsang, R H M; Tsang, K V; Tull, C; Tung, Y C; Viren, B; Virostek, S; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, L S; Wang, L Y; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webber, D M; Wei, Y D; Wen, L J; Wenman, D L; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wilhelmi, J; Williamson, Y; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, J; Worcester, E T; Wu, F F; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xiang, S T; Xiao, Q; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J; Xu, J; Xu, J L; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Yeh, Y S; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, F H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Q X; Zhang, S H; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, Z Y; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    We report an improved measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. We exclude a zero value for $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ with a significance of 7.7 standard deviations. Electron antineutrinos from six reactors of 2.9 GW$_{\\rm th}$ were detected in six antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (flux-weighted baselines of 470 m and 576 m) and one far (1648 m) underground experimental halls. Using 139 days of data, 28909 (205308) electron antineutrino candidates were detected at the far hall (near halls). The ratio of the observed to the expected number of antineutrinos assuming no oscillations at the far hall is $0.944\\pm 0.007({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.003({\\rm syst.})$. An analysis of the relative rates in six detectors finds $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.089\\pm 0.010({\\rm stat.})\\pm0.005({\\rm syst.})$ in a three-neutrino framework.

  18. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurements with the MINOS near detector

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barnes, JR; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Devenish, N. E.; Falk, E.; Harris, P.G.; Hartnell, J.; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    The energy dependence of the neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron inclusive charged-current cross sections and their ratio have been measured using a high-statistics sample with the MINOS Near Detector exposed to the NuMI beam from the Main Injector at Fermilab. Neutrino and antineutrino fluxes were determined using a low hadronic energy subsample of charged-current events. We report measurements of neutrino-Fe (antineutrinoFe) cross section in the energy range 3-50 GeV (5-50 GeV) with precisi...

  19. An improved measurement of muon antineutrino disappearance in MINOS

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Danko, I. Z.

    2012-01-01

    We report an improved measurement of muon anti-neutrino disappearance over a distance of 735km using the MINOS detectors and the Fermilab Main Injector neutrino beam in a muon anti-neutrino enhanced configuration. From a total exposure of 2.95e20 protons on target, of which 42% have not been previously analyzed, we make the most precise measurement of the anti-neutrino "atmospheric" delta-m squared = 2.62 +0.31/-0.28 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) and constrain the anti-neutrino atmospheric mixing ...

  20. The upper limit of the solar antineutrino flux according to the LSD array data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the experimental data obtained at the LSD liquid scintillation detector is carried out with the aim of searching the possible flux of electron antineutrinos from Sun. The most strong at present upper limit for the electron antineutrino flux of solar origin is determined: ≤ 1.0 x 105 cm-2 x s-1 (the reliability level of 90%)

  1. Opportunities for applied measurements using the PROSPECT antineutrino detector: reactor physics and safeguards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Nathaniel; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Disagreement of reactor antineutrino spectrum and flux measurements with updated predictions indicates that we have much to learn about the complicated processes underlying antineutrino production in reactors, as well as hinting at new physics. A number of new efforts seek to address these questions, including the PROSPECT experiment planned at the HFIR research reactor. In addition to greatly advancing our understanding of reactor antineutrino emissions, PROSPECT can support a rich applied physics program. The detection technology developed for PROSPECT will enable precision antineutrino spectrum measurements close to essentially any reactor type. Here we describe how such measurements provide opportunities to probe fissile isotope and fission daughter distributions, and their potential use for reactor physics and safeguards applications. LLNL-ABS-673983. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. aCORN: A Measurement of the Beta-Antineutrino Correlation in Neutron Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    The aCORN experiment has measured the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient (the ``a'' coefficient) in free neutron decay. aCORN uses the dependence of the recoil proton momentum on the opening angle between the electron and the neutrino to form an asymmetry. The apparatus accepts decays where the antineutrino is restricted to two momentum groups having equal solid angle. In this geometry, proton time of flight distinguishes between decays with a large or small opening angle between the electron and the antineutrino. The correlation coefficient is determined from the asymmetry between two branches of the time of flight spectrum. The asymmetry was measured on the NG-6 neutron beam at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), and a subsequent measurement has been started on the higher flux NG-C beam. An overview of the method and systematic effects will be presented, including results from the NG-6 dataset. National Science Foundation.

  3. Measuring Antineutrino Oscillations with the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Justin John [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A manmade beam of predominantly muon neutrinos is detected both 1 km and 735 km from the production point by two functionally identical detectors. A comparison of the energy spectra measured by the two detectors shows the energy-dependent disappearance of muon neutrinos characteristic of oscillations and allows a measurement of the parameters governing the oscillations. This thesis presents work leading to measurements of disappearance in the 6% $\\bar{v}$μ background in that beam. A calibration is developed to correct for time-dependent changes in the responses of both detectors, reducing the corresponding uncertainty on hadronic energy measurements from 1.8% to 0.4% in the near detector and from 0.8% to 0.4% in the far detector. A method of selecting charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events is developed, with purities (efficiencies) of 96.5% (74.4%) at the near detector, and 98.8% (70.9%) at the far detector in the region below 10 GeV reconstructed antineutrino energy. A method of using the measured near detector neutrino energy spectrum to predict that expected at the far detector is discussed, and developed for use in the $\\bar{v}$μ analysis. Sources of systematic uncertainty contributing to the oscillation measurements are discussed. In the far detector, 32 charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events are observed below a reconstructed energy of 30 GeV, compared to an expectation of 47.8 for Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2 = Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2, sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = sin2(2θ23). This deficit, in such a low-statistics sample, makes the result difficult to interpret in the context of an oscillation parameter measurement. Possible sources for the discrepancy are discussed, concluding that considerably more data are required for a definitive solution. Running MINOS with a dedicated $\\bar

  4. Measuring Antineutrino Oscillations with the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Justin John; /Oxford U.

    2008-09-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A manmade beam of predominantly muon neutrinos is detected both 1 km and 735 km from the production point by two functionally identical detectors. A comparison of the energy spectra measured by the two detectors shows the energy-dependent disappearance of muon neutrinos characteristic of oscillations and allows a measurement of the parameters governing the oscillations. This thesis presents work leading to measurements of disappearance in the 6% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} background in that beam. A calibration is developed to correct for time-dependent changes in the responses of both detectors, reducing the corresponding uncertainty on hadronic energy measurements from 1.8% to 0.4% in the near detector and from 0.8% to 0.4% in the far detector. A method of selecting charged current {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events is developed, with purities (efficiencies) of 96.5% (74.4%) at the near detector, and 98.8% (70.9%) at the far detector in the region below 10 GeV reconstructed antineutrino energy. A method of using the measured near detector neutrino energy spectrum to predict that expected at the far detector is discussed, and developed for use in the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} analysis. Sources of systematic uncertainty contributing to the oscillation measurements are discussed. In the far detector, 32 charged current {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events are observed below a reconstructed energy of 30 GeV, compared to an expectation of 47.8 for {Delta}{bar m}{sub atm}{sup 2} = {Delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}) = sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}). This deficit, in such a low-statistics sample, makes the result difficult to interpret in the context of an oscillation parameter measurement. Possible sources for the discrepancy are discussed, concluding that considerably more data are required for a definitive solution. Running MINOS with a dedicated {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam would be the ideal continuation of this

  5. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-03-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 10{sup 6} neutrino events and 1.60 x 10{sup 5} antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section.

  6. The Improved Measurement of Electron-antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    With 2.5x the previously reported exposure, the Daya Bay experiment has improved the measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter sin^2(2theta_13) = 0.089+-0.010(stat)+-0.005(syst). Reactor anti-neutrinos were produced by six 2.9 GW(th) commercial power reactors, and measured by six 20-ton target-mass detectors of identical design. A total of 234,217 anti-neutrino candidates were detected in 127 days of exposure. An anti-neutrino rate of 0.944+-0.007(stat)+-0.003(syst) was measured by three detectors at a flux-weighted average distance of 1648 m from the reactors, relative to two detectors at 470 m and one detector at 576 m. Detector design and depth underground limited the background to 5+-0.3% (far detectors) and 2+-0.2% (near detectors) of the candidate signals. The improved precision confirms the initial measurement of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance, and continues to be the most precise measurement of theta_13.

  7. The diffuse neutrino flux from supernovae: upper limit on the electron neutrino component from the non-observation of antineutrinos at SuperKamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Lunardini, C

    2006-01-01

    I derive an upper bound on the electron neutrino component of the diffuse supernova neutrino flux from the constraint on the antineutrino component at SuperKamiokande. The connection between antineutrino and neutrino channels is due to the similarity of the muon and tau neutrino and antineutrino fluxes produced in a supernova, and to the conversion of these species into electron neutrinos and antineutrinos inside the star. The limit on the electron neutrino flux is 5.5 cm^-2 s^-1 above 19.3 MeV of neutrino energy, and is stronger than the direct limit from LSD by three orders of magnitude. It represents the minimal sensitivity required at future direct searches, and is intriguingly close to the reach of the SNO and ICARUS experiments. The electron neutrino flux will have a lower bound if the electron antineutrino flux is measured. Indicatively, the first can be smaller than the second at most by a factor of 2-3 depending on the details of the neutrino spectra at production.

  8. Method for measuring the electron antineutrino rest mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobashev, V.M.; Spivak, P.E.

    1985-10-15

    A method is proposed for measuring the tritium beta spectrum in order to determine the electron antineutrino rest mass. This method includes an electrostatic integral spectrometer with adiabatic collimation. The use of a source in the form of atomic polarized tritium in a strong magnetic field or of a gaseous molecular source is considered. (orig.).

  9. Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Asner, D. M.; Burns, K; Campbell, L. W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M. S.; Orrell, J. L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L. S.; Wootan, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurem...

  10. AGM2015: Antineutrino Global Map 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, S. M.; Jocher, G. R.; Dye, S. T.; McDonough, W. F.; Learned, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    Every second greater than 1025 antineutrinos radiate to space from Earth, shining like a faint antineutrino star. Underground antineutrino detectors have revealed the rapidly decaying fission products inside nuclear reactors, verified the long-lived radioactivity inside our planet, and informed sensitive experiments for probing fundamental physics. Mapping the anisotropic antineutrino flux and energy spectrum advance geoscience by defining the amount and distribution of radioactive power within Earth while critically evaluating competing compositional models of the planet. We present the Antineutrino Global Map 2015 (AGM2015), an experimentally informed model of Earth’s surface antineutrino flux over the 0 to 11 MeV energy spectrum, along with an assessment of systematic errors. The open source AGM2015 provides fundamental predictions for experiments, assists in strategic detector placement to determine neutrino mass hierarchy, and aids in identifying undeclared nuclear reactors. We use cosmochemically and seismologically informed models of the radiogenic lithosphere/mantle combined with the estimated antineutrino flux, as measured by KamLAND and Borexino, to determine the Earth’s total antineutrino luminosity at . We find a dominant flux of geo-neutrinos, predict sub-equal crust and mantle contributions, with ~1% of the total flux from man-made nuclear reactors.

  11. An Improved Measurement of Electron Antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, David M

    2012-01-01

    The theory of neutrino oscillations explains changes in neutrino flavor, count rates, and spectra from solar, atmospheric, accelerator, and reactor neutrinos. These oscillations are characterized by three mixing angles and two mass-squared differences. The solar mixing angle, {\\theta}_12, and the atmospheric mixing angle, {\\theta}_23, have been well measured, but until recently the neutrino mixing angle {\\theta}_13 was not well known. The Daya Bay experiment, located northeast of Hong Kong at the Guangdong Nuclear Power Complex in China, has made a precise measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance using six functionally-identical gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator-based detectors at three sites with distances between 364 and 1900 meters from six reactor cores. This proceeding describes the Daya Bay updated result, using 127 days of good run time collected between December 24, 2011 and May 11, 2012. For the far site, the ratio of the observed number of events to the expected number of events assumin...

  12. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the 'reactor anomaly', a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independent from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented. (authors)

  13. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  14. The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Filling System and Liquid Mass Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Band, H R; Draeger, E; Heeger, K M; Hinrichs, P; Lewis, C A; Mattison, H; McFarlane, M C; Webber, D M; Wenman, D; Wang, W; Wise, T; Xiao, Q

    2013-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13} to world-leading precision. The experiment uses eight antineutrino detectors filled with 20-tons of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator to detect antineutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear power plant through the inverse beta decay reaction. The precision measurement of sin^{2}2\\theta_{13} relies on the relative antineutrino interaction rates between detectors at near (400 m) and far (roughly 1.8 km) distances from the nuclear reactors. The measured interaction rate in each detector is directly proportional to the number of protons in the liquid scintillator target. A precision detector filling system was developed to simultaneously fill the three liquid zones of the antineutrino detectors and measure the relative target mass between detectors to <0.02%. This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of the system and the resulting precision measurement of the detectors' target liquid masses.

  15. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  16. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored

  17. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  18. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E_{\

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, L; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, D; Bradford, R; Brooks, W K; Budd, H; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A M; Castromonte, C M; Christy, M E; da Motta, H; Damiani, D S; Danko, I; Datta, M; Day, M; DeMaat, R; Devan, J; Diaz, G A; Dytman, S A; Eberly, B; Edmondson, D A; Felix, J; Fitzpatrick, T; Fiorentini, G A; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gobbi, B; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Howley, I J; Hurtado, K; Jerkins, M; Kafka, T; Kanter, M O; Keppel, C; Kordosky, M; Krajeski, A H; Kulagin, S A; Le, T; Leister, A G; Maggi, G; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Ochoa, N; O'Connor, C D; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Pena, C; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Sassin, K E; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Schneider, R M; Schulte, E C; Sedita, P; Simon, C; Snider, F D; Snyder, M C; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tan, W; Tice, B G; Tzanakos, G; Velasquez, J P; Walding, J; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wolthuis, B A; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2013-01-01

    We have isolated muon anti-neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic interactions occurring in the segmented scintillator tracking region of the MINERvA detector running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross-section, d{\\sigma}/dQ^2, and compare to several theoretical models of quasi-elastic scattering. Good agreement is obtained with a model where the nucleon axial mass, M_A, is set to 0.99 GeV/c^2 but the nucleon vector form factors are modified to account for the observed enhancement, relative to the free nucleon case, of the cross-section for the exchange of transversely polarized photons in electron-nucleus scattering. Our data at higher Q^2 favor this interpretation over an alternative in which the axial mass is increased.

  19. Antineutrino Geophysics with Liquid Scintillator Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rothschild, C G; Calaprice, F P; Rothschild, Casey G.; Chen, Mark C.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    1997-01-01

    Detecting the antineutrinos emitted by the decay of radioactive elements in the mantle and crust could provide a direct measurement of the total abundance of uranium and thorium in the Earth. In calculating the antineutrino flux at specific sites, the local geology of the crust and the background from the world's nuclear power reactors are important considerations. Employing a global crustal map, with type and thickness data, and using recent estimates of the uranium and thorium distribution in the Earth, we calculate the antineutrino event rate for two new neutrino detectors. We show that spectral features allow terrestrial antineutrino events to be identified above reactor antineutrino backgrounds and that the uranium and thorium contributions can be separately determined.

  20. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Colin E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  1. Antineutrino Geophysics with Liquid Scintillator Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, Casey G.; Chen, Mark C.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    1997-01-01

    Detecting the antineutrinos emitted by the decay of radioactive elements in the mantle and crust could provide a direct measurement of the total abundance of uranium and thorium in the Earth. In calculating the antineutrino flux at specific sites, the local geology of the crust and the background from the world's nuclear power reactors are important considerations. Employing a global crustal map, with type and thickness data, and using recent estimates of the uranium and thorium distribution ...

  2. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanov, M.; Naples, D.; Boyd, S.; McDonald, J.; Radescu, V.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Avvakumov, S.; deBarbaro, L.; deBarbaro, P.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Fleming, B.T.; Frey, R.; /Pittsburgh U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Fermilab /Kansas State U. /Northwestern

    2005-09-01

    The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high statistics sample of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. Structure functions, F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and xF{sub 3}(x,Q{sup 2}), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

  3. Measurements of atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A S T; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Chapman, J D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of atmospheric neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the MINOS Far Detector, based on 2553 live-days (37.9 kton-years) of data. A total of 2072 candidate events are observed. These are separated into 905 contained-vertex muons and 466 neutrino-induced rock-muons, both produced by charged-current $\

  4. A new measurement of antineutrino oscillation with the full detector configuration at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F.P.; Band, H.R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G.F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W.R.; Chan, Y.L.; Chang, J.F.; Chang, L.C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, Q.Y.; Chen, S.M.; Chen, Y.X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y.P.; Cherwinka, J.J.; Chu, M.C.; Cummings, J.P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z.Y.; Ding, X.F.; Ding, Y.Y.; Diwan, M.V.; Draeger, E.; Dwyer, D.A.; Edwards, W.R.; Ely, S.R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G.H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W.Q.; Guan, M.Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, X.H.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K.M.; Heng, Y.K.; Hor, Y.K.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Hu, B.Z.; Hu, L.M.; Hu, L.J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E.C.; Huang, H.X.; Huang, X.T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K.L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X.P.; Ji, X.L.; Jiao, J.B.; Johnson, R.A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S.H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T.J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R.T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J.K.C.; Lewis, C.A.; Li, D.J.; Li, F.; Li, G.S.; Li, Q.J.; Li, S.C.; Li, W.D.; Li, X.N.; Li, X.Q.; Li, Y.F.; Li, Z.B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C.J.; Lin, G.L.; Lin, P.Y.; Lin, S.K.; Ling, J.J.; Link, J.M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Liu, D.W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.L.; Liu, J.C.; Liu, S.S.; Lu, C.; Lu, H.Q.; Lu, J.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Q.M.; Ma, X.Y.; Ma, X.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; McDonald, K.T.; McKeown, R.D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Kebwaro, J.Monari; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H.Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J.P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J.C.; Piilonen, L.E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C.S.J.; Qi, F.Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X.C.; Shao, B.B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G.X.; Sun, J.L.; Tang, W.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K.V.; Tull, C.E.; Tung, Y.C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C.H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N.Y.; Wang, R.G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.M.; Wei, H.Y.; Wen, L.J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C.G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H.L.H.; Wong, S.C.F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D.M.; Xia, J.K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z.Z.; Xu, J.Y.; Xu, J.L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M.S.; Yang, M.T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y.S.; Young, B.L.; Yu, G.Y.; Yu, Z.Y.; Zang, S.L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H.H.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, Q.M.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhang, Z.J.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q.W.; Zhao, Y.F.; Zhao, Y.B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W.L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zou, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance using the fully-constructed Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The final two of eight antineutrino detectors were installed in the summer of 2012. Including the 404 days of data collected from October 2012 to November 2013 resulted in a total exposure of 6.9$\\times$10$^5$ GW$_{\\rm th}$-ton-days, a 3.6 times increase over our previous results. Improvements in energy calibration limited variations between detectors to 0.2%. Removal of six $^{241}$Am-$^{13}$C radioactive calibration sources reduced the background by a factor of two for the detectors in the experimental hall furthest from the reactors. Direct prediction of the antineutrino signal in the far detectors based on the measurements in the near detectors explicitly minimized the dependence of the measurement on models of reactor antineutrino emission. The uncertainties in our estimates of $\\sin^{2}2\\theta_{13}$ and $|\\Delta m^2_{ee}|$ were halved as a result of these improvements. Ana...

  5. Earth Radioactivity Measurements with a Deep Ocean Anti-neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, S T; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Varner, G; Wilcox, M

    2006-01-01

    We consider the detector size, location, depth, backgrounds, and radio-purity required of a mid-Pacific deep-ocean instrument to accomplish the twin goals of making a definitive measurement of the electron anti-neutrino flux due to uranium and thorium decays from Earth's mantle and core, and of testing the hypothesis for a natural nuclear reactor at the core of Earth. We take the experience with the KamLAND detector in Japan as our baseline for sensitivity and background estimates. We conclude that an instrument adequate to accomplish these tasks should have an exposure of at least 10 kilotonne-years (kT-y), should be placed at least at 4 km depth, may be located close to the Hawaiian Islands (no significant background from them), and should aim for KamLAND radio-purity levels, except for radon where it should be improved by a factor of at least 40. With an exposure of 10 kT-y we should achieve a 24% measurement of the U/Th content of the mantle plus core. Exposure at multiple ocean locations for testing late...

  6. Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly with known \\theta_{13}

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C; Vogel, P

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the reactor antineutrino anomaly using the recent reactor flux independent determination of sizable theta?13 by considering the full set of the absolute reactor electron antineutrino flux measurements. When normalized to the predicted flux of Mueller et al. [1], the new world average, after including results from Palo Verde, Chooz, and Double Chooz, is 0.959 +- 0.009 (experiment uncertainty) +- 0.027 (flux systematics). Including the data with kilometer baseline, the new world average is only about 1.4 sigma lower than the unity, weakening the significance of the reactor antineutrino anomaly. The upcoming results from Daya Bay, RENO, and the Double Chooz will provide further information about this issue.

  7. First Measurement of the Muon Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double-Differential Cross-Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grange, Joseph M. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of the muon antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic double-differential cross section. These data significantly extend the knowledge of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the GeV range, a region that has recently come under scrutiny due to a number of conflicting experimental results. To maximize the precision of this measurement, three novel techniques were employed to measure the neutrino background component of the data set. Representing the first measurements of the neutrino contribution to an accelerator-based antineutrino beam in the absence of a magnetic field, the successful execution of these techniques carry implications for current and future neutrino experiments.

  8. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel elements as a function of time, and we illustrate the usefulness of antineutrino detectors in several benchmark scenarios. In particular, we demonstrate how a measurement of the antineutrino flux can help to re-verify the contents of a dry storage cask in case the monitoring chain by conventional means gets disrupted. We then comment on the usefulness of antineutrino detectors at long-term storage facilities such as Yucca mountain. Finally, we put forward antineutrino detection as a tool in locating underground "hot spots" in ...

  9. How Unequal Fluxes of High Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos and Antineutrinos can Fake New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2016-01-01

    Flavor ratios of very high energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be studied at the Earth by a neutrino telescope such as IceCube, can serve to diagnose their production mechanism at the astrophysical source. The flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos can be quite different as we do not know how they are produced in the astrophysical environment. Due to this uncertainty the neutrino and antineutrino flavor ratios at the Earth also could be quite different. Nonetheless, it is generally assumed that flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same at the Earth, in fitting the high energy astrophysical neutrino data. This is a reasonable assumption for the limited statistics for the data we currently have. However, in the future the fit must be performed allowing for a possible discrepancy in these two fractions in order to be able to disentangle different production mechanisms at the source from new physics in the neutrino sector. To reinforce this issue, in this work we show that a wrong as...

  10. Muon storage rings for a beam-systematic-free measurement of neutrino and antineutrino cross-sections at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Navas-Concha, S

    2002-01-01

    Precision neutrino cross-section measurements at low energies will be necessary to improve the results of the current and future big neutrino experiments. In order to achieve precision neutrino cross- sections, that will yield a comprehensive understand of the underlying physics, a rather extended program will be required: (1) measurement from kinematical thresholds up to a few GeV; (2) well known and controlled neutrino flux; (3) study of neutrinos and antineutrinos and possibly nu /sub e/ and nu /sub mu / flavors; (4) on several nuclear target; (5) with detectors capable of exclusive final state reconstruction. While the "standard" choice advocated relies on currently existing or on future "traditional" neutrino beams, that will provide very high intensities at near sites, we advocate that neutrinos from muon storage rings provide a better choice to criterias (1)-(3). The currently available statistics from the CERN AD and the FNAL-Debuncher would provide statistical precisions better than 10% in typ. 200 M...

  11. Measurement of the mixing leptonic parameter θ13 at the Double Chooz reactor antineutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Double Chooz experiment aims at measuring the neutrino mixing parameter θ13 by studying the oscillations of de ν-bare produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors located in France. The experimental concept consists in comparing the signal of two identical 10.3 m3 detectors, allowing to cancel most of the experimental systematic uncertainties. The near detector, whose goal is the flux normalization and a measurement without oscillation, is expected to be delivered in 2013. The farthest detector from the source is taking data since April 2011 and is sensitive to θ13, which is expected to affect both the rate and the shape of the measured de ν-bare. In this thesis, are first presented the Double Chooz experiment, with its ν-bare source, its detection method, and the expected signal and backgrounds. In order to perform a selection, important quantities have to be reconstructed, calibrated, and saved in data files. The channel time offsets determination, the energy and vertex reconstruction algorithm CocoReco, the reconstruction packages of the Common Trunk, and the light trees maker Cheetah are especially presented. Concerning the data analysis, all the selection cuts and results for signal and backgrounds are discussed, particularly the multiplicity cut, the multiple off time window method, the lithium veto cut, and the cosmogenic 9Li background studies. The Double Chooz experiment observed 8,249 de -bare candidates in 227.93 days in its far detector only. The reactor antineutrino flux prediction used the Bugey 4 flux measurement after correction for differences in core composition. The expectation in case of no-oscillation is 8,937 events and this deficit is interpreted as evidence for ν-bare disappearance. From a rate and shape analysis, is found sin22θ = 0,109± 0,030 (stat) ± 0,025 (syst), with Δm231 = 2,32 x 10-3 eV2, while the no-oscillation hypothesis is even excluded at 2.9 σ. (author)

  12. Measurement of antineutrino oscillation with the full detector configuration at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In this poster, we present the latest measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance using the fully constructed Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. A total exposure of $6.9 \\times 10^5$ GW$_{\\mathrm{th}}$ ton days was achieved in November 2013 after 617 day of data taking. The most precise estimates to date of the neutrino mass and mixing parameters $|\\Delta \\mathrm{m}^2_{ee}|$ and $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$ were obtained with an analysis of the relative antineutrino rates and energy spectra between detectors. The value of the two parameters was found to be $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13} = 0.084 \\pm 0.005$ and $|\\Delta \\mathrm{m}^2_{ee}| = (2.42 \\pm 0.11) \\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$. This report focuses in particular on describing how improvements in the calibration and in the energy response model contributed to achieve this result.

  13. Measurement of the electroweak coupling of neutrinos and antineutrinos on electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the analysis of the events induced by elastic scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on electrons and interprets the results in terms of the coupling strength of (anti)neutrino on electrons. The data for this analysis were obtained with the electronic calorimeter of the CHARM (Amsterdam, Cern, Hamburg, Moscow, Rome) collaboration during the wide band neutrino beam exposures of 1979, 1980 and 1981 in the neutrino facility of the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneva, Switzerland). In chapter 1 a historical overview of the early neutrino physics and a description of the phenomenological Lagrangian is given, followed by an introduction to the electroweak unification model. The neutrino detector of the CHARM collaboration is described in chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with the on-line monitoring system of this detector which has been under the responsibility of the author. The wide band neutrino facility of the CERN SPS is described in chapter 4, followed by a discussion of the experimental method to measure the neutrino energy spectra of the neutrino beams. The electromagnetic shower development process is reviewed in chapter 5 and is followed by a description of the technique that was used to separate showers of electromagnetic and hadronic origin. Chapter 6 discusses the observed signal of the (anti)neutrinos scattering on electrons and interprets these events in terms of the parameters related to the strength of the coupling of neutrinos to electrons. (Auth.)

  14. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, Joshua D. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low-$\

  15. Terrestrial and Reactor Antineutrinos in Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Calaprice, F. P.; Rothschild, C. G.

    1998-10-01

    The Earth is an abundant source of antineutrinos coming from the decay of radioactive elements in the mantle and crust. Detecting these antineutrinos is a challenge due to their small cross section and low energies. The Borexino solar neutrino experiment will also be an excellent detector for barν_e. With 300 tons of ultra-low-background liquid scintillator, surrounded by an efficient muon veto, the inverse-β-decay reaction: barνe + p arrow e^+ + n (Q = 1.8 MeV), can be exploited to detect terrestrial antineutrinos from the uranium and thorium decay chains, with little background. A direct measurement of the total uranium and thorium abundance would establish important geophysical constraints on the heat generation and thermal history of the Earth. Starting with the most recent uranium and thorium distribution and abundance data, and employing a global map of crustal type and thickness, we calculated the antineutrino fluxes for several sites. We estimate a terrestrial antineutrino event rate in Borexino of 10 events per year. This small signal can be distinguished over the neutrino background from the world's nuclear power reactors by measuring the positron energy spectrum from the barνe events. The possibility to perform a long-baseline oscillation experiment, reaching Δ m^2 ≈ 10-6 eV^2, using the nuclear reactors in Europe will also be discussed.

  16. Observation of electron-antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Beavis, D; Beriguete, W; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Brown, R L; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Carr, R; Chan, W T; Chang, J F; Chang, Y; Chasman, C; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, S J; Chen, S M; Chen, X C; Chen, X H; Chen, X S; Chen, Y; Chen, Y X; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; Deng, Z Y; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dong, L; Draeger, E; Du, X F; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Fang, S D; Fu, J Y; Fu, Z W; Ge, L Q; Ghazikhanian, V; Gill, R L; Goett, J; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Gornushkin, Y A; Greenler, L S; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Hahn, R L; Hans, S; He, M; He, Q; He, W S; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Hinrichs, P; Ho, T H; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, T; Huang, H X; Huang, H Z; Huang, P W; Huang, X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jetter, S; Ji, X L; Ji, X P; Jiang, H J; Jiang, W Q; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lai, C Y; Lai, W C; Lai, W H; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, M K P; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lewis, C A; Li, B; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, J; Li, Q J; Li, S F; Li, W D; Li, X B; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, J; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S K; Lin, S X; Lin, Y C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, B J; Liu, C; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J C; Liu, J L; Liu, S; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Luk, A; Luk, K B; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Ma, L H; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y Q; Mayes, B; McDonald, K T; McFarlane, M C; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mohapatra, D; Morgan, J E; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Nemchenok, I; Newsom, C; Ngai, H Y; Ngai, W K; Nie, Y B; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pagac, A; Patton, S; Pearson, C; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Seilhan, B; Shao, B B; Shih, K; Steiner, H; Stoler, P; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tam, Y H; Tanaka, H K; Tang, X; Themann, H; Torun, Y; Trentalange, S; Tsai, O; Tsang, K V; Tsang, R H M; Tull, C; Viren, B; Virostek, S; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, L S; Wang, L Y; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webber, D M; Wei, Y D; Wen, L J; Wenman, D L; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Whitten, C A; Wilhelmi, J; Wise, T; Wong, H C; Wong, H L H; Wong, J; Worcester, E T; Wu, F F; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xiang, S T; Xiao, Q; Xing, Z Z; Xu, G; Xu, J; Xu, J; Xu, J L; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Yeh, Y S; Yip, K; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, F H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, K; Zhang, Q X; Zhang, S H; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, Z Y; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. Antineutrinos from six 2.9 GW$_{\\rm th}$ reactors were detected in six antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (flux-weighted baseline 470 m and 576 m) and one far (1648 m) underground experimental halls. With 55 days of data, 10416 (80376) electron antineutrino candidates were detected at the far hall (near halls). The ratio of the observed to expected number of antineutrinos at the far hall is $R=0.940\\pm 0.011({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.004({\\rm syst})$. A rate-only analysis finds $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.092\\pm 0.016({\\rm stat})\\pm0.005({\\rm syst})$ in a three-neutrino framework.

  17. Reactor anti-neutrinos: measurement of the θ13 leptonic mixing angle and search for potential sterile neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to measure the θ13 mixing angle through the disappearance -induced by the oscillation phenomenon - of anti-neutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties, the experiment relies on the relative comparison of detected signals in two identical liquid scintillator detectors. The near one, giving the normalization of the emitted flux, is currently being built and will be delivered in spring 2014. The far detector, sensitive to θ13, is located at about one kilometer and is taking data since 2011. In this first phase of the experiment, the far detector data are compared to a prediction of the emitted neutrino flux to estimate θ13. In this thesis, the Double Chooz experiment and its analysis are presented, especially the background studies and the rejection of parasitic signals due to light emitted by photo-multipliers. Neutron fluxes between the different detector volumes impact the definition of the fiducial volume of neutrino interactions and the efficiency of detection. Detailed studies of these effects are presented. As part of the Double Chooz experiment, studies were performed to improve the prediction of neutrino flux emitted by reactors. This work revealed a deficit of observed neutrino rates in the short baseline experiments of last decades. This deficit could be explained by an oscillation to a sterile state. The Stereo project aims to observe a typical signature of oscillations: the distortion of neutrino spectra both in energy and baseline. This thesis presents the detector concept and simulations as well as sensitivity studies. Background sources and the foreseen shielding are also discussed. (author)

  18. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Cheryl [Northwestern U.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  19. Monitoring Nuclear Reactors with Antineutrino Detectors: The ANGRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactors are intense source of antineutrinos and the thermal power released in the fission process is directly related to the emitted antineutrino flux. As antineutrinos interact very weekly with matter and escape the reactor containment without any significant change in their number, measuring the antineutrino flux can give quasi real time information on the reactor status (on/off) and thermal power. Furthermore as the amount of fissile elements change during the burn up of the nuclear fuel and each fissile isotope has a characteristic antineutrino energy spectrum, measuring the antineutrino energy spectrum escaping the reactor can give also information on the composition of the nuclear fuel. These unique features make antineutrino detectors good candidates to become in the near future a new safeguards tool for monitoring nuclear reactors through counting rates and spectral antineutrino measurements. We will present the status of the ANGRA Neutrinos project, aimed at developing an antineutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactor activity. The Angra experiment will be deployed at the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra II. A water Cherenkov detector of one ton target will be placed in a commercial container just outside the reactor containment, about 30 m of the reactor core. The 4 GW thermal power of the Angra II reactor will provide a few thousand antineutrino inverse beta decay interactions per day. The main challenge of the experiment will be to overcome the very high cosmic ray induced background at sea level, consisting mainly of muons, neutrons, gammas and electrons. We have estimated a muon flux of the order of 350 Hz and a neutron flux of about 4 Hz (left after the polyethylene shielding) in the target region. To overcome the background the detector will consist of three subsystems: 1) a muon veto 99% efficient placed in the outer most detector layer; 2) a neutron shield 30cm thick consisting of polyethylene sheets; 3) a central detector

  20. Hanohano:A Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Batygov, M.; Dye, S. T.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S.; Varner, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory being developed at Hawaii and elsewhere. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observaory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables preecision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and theta_13. At a mid-Pacific location, the observatory measures the flux of uranium and thorium decay serie...

  1. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aCORN experiment is designed to make a precision (<1%) measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. It uses a new method proposed in 1996 by Yerozolimsky and Mostovoy. Electrons and recoil protons from neutron decay in a cold beam are detected in coincidence. The momenta of the particles are selected so that the protons form two kinematically distinct time-of-flight groups as a function of electron energy. The count rate asymmetry in these two groups is proportional to the a-coefficient. Precision spectroscopy of the protons is not required. The apparatus is currently under construction. It will be integrated and tested at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) and then moved to the NIST Center for Neutron Research for the initial physics run.

  2. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs an attenuator circuit, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the attenuator circuit produce an output representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a true root mean square logarithmic output

  3. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  4. AGM2015: Antineutrino Global Map 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Usman, Shawn M; Dye, Stephen T; McDonough, William F; Learned, John G

    2015-01-01

    Every second greater than $10^{25}$ antineutrinos radiate to space from Earth, shining like a faint antineutrino star. Underground antineutrino detectors have revealed the rapidly decaying fission products inside nuclear reactors, verified the long-lived radioactivity inside our planet, and informed sensitive experiments for probing fundamental physics. Mapping the anisotropic antineutrino flux and energy spectrum advance geoscience by defining the amount and distribution of radioactive power within Earth while critically evaluating competing compositional models of the planet. We present the Antineutrino Global Map 2015 (AGM2015), an experimentally informed model of Earth's surface antineutrino flux over the 0 to 11 MeV energy spectrum, along with an assessment of systematic errors. The open source AGM2015 provides fundamental predictions for experiments, assists in strategic detector placement to determine neutrino mass hierarchy, and aids in identifying undeclared nuclear reactors. We use cosmochemically a...

  5. Contribution of Recently Measured Nuclear Data to Reactor Antineutrino Energy Spectra Predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured β decay properties of the 102,104,105,106,107Tc, 105Mo, and 101Nb nuclei in the calculation of the antineutrino (anti-ν) energy spectra arising after the fissions of the four main fissile isotopes 235,238U, and 239,241Pu in PWRs. These β feeding probabilities, measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS) at the JYFL facility of Jyväskylä, have been found to play a major role in the γ component of the decay heat for 239Pu in the 4-3000 s range. Following the fission product summation method, the calculation was performed using the MCNP Utility Reactor Evolution code (MURE) coupled to the experimental spectra built from β decay properties of the fission products taken from evaluated databases. These latest TAS data are found to have a significant effect on the Pu isotope energy spectra and on the spectrum of 238U showing the importance of their measurement for a better assessment of the reactor anti-ν energy spectrum, as well as importance for fundamental neutrino physics experiments and neutrino applied physics

  6. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Oscillations with an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-05-01

    T2K reports its first measurements of the parameters governing the disappearance of ν[over ¯]_{μ} in an off-axis beam due to flavor change induced by neutrino oscillations. The quasimonochromatic ν[over ¯]_{μ} beam, produced with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at J-PARC, is observed at the far detector Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away, where the ν[over ¯]_{μ} survival probability is expected to be minimal. Using a data set corresponding to 4.01×10^{20} protons on target, 34 fully contained μ-like events were observed. The best-fit oscillation parameters are sin^{2}(θ[over ¯]_{23})=0.45 and |Δm[over ¯]_{32}^{2}|=2.51×10^{-3}  eV^{2} with 68% confidence intervals of 0.38-0.64 and 2.26-2.80×10^{-3}  eV^{2}, respectively. These results are in agreement with existing antineutrino parameter measurements and also with the ν_{μ} disappearance parameters measured by T2K. PMID:27203315

  7. Contribution of Recently Measured Nuclear Data to Reactor Antineutrino Energy Spectra Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estienne, M., E-mail: magali.estienne@subatech.in2p3.fr [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, F-44307 Nantes (France); Fallot, M.; Cormon, S. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, F-44307 Nantes (France); Algora, A. [IFIC (CSIC-Univ. Valencia), Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Bui, V.M.; Cucoanes, A.; Elnimr, M.; Giot, L. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, F-44307 Nantes (France); Jordan, D. [IFIC (CSIC-Univ. Valencia), Valencia (Spain); Martino, J.; Onillon, A.; Porta, A.; Pronost, G.; Remoto, A. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, F-44307 Nantes (France); Taín, J.L. [IFIC (CSIC-Univ. Valencia), Valencia (Spain); Yermia, F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, F-44307 Nantes (France)

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this work is to study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured β decay properties of the {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei in the calculation of the antineutrino (anti-ν) energy spectra arising after the fissions of the four main fissile isotopes {sup 235,238}U, and {sup 239,241}Pu in PWRs. These β feeding probabilities, measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS) at the JYFL facility of Jyväskylä, have been found to play a major role in the γ component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range. Following the fission product summation method, the calculation was performed using the MCNP Utility Reactor Evolution code (MURE) coupled to the experimental spectra built from β decay properties of the fission products taken from evaluated databases. These latest TAS data are found to have a significant effect on the Pu isotope energy spectra and on the spectrum of {sup 238}U showing the importance of their measurement for a better assessment of the reactor anti-ν energy spectrum, as well as importance for fundamental neutrino physics experiments and neutrino applied physics.

  8. Hanohano:A Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Batygov, M; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Varner, G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory being developed at Hawaii and elsewhere. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observaory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables preecision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and theta_13. At a mid-Pacific location, the observatory measures the flux of uranium and thorium decay series antineutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral homogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle. These measurements have significance for earth energy studies.

  9. Total neutrino and antineutrino charged current cross section measurements in 100, 160, and 200 GeV narrow band beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrino and antineutrino total charged current cross sections on iron were measured in the 100, 160, and 200 GeV narrow band beams at the CERN SPS in the energy range 10 to 200 GeV. Assuming σ/E to be constant, the values corrected for non-isoscalarity are σν/E=(0.686 ±0.019)x10-38 cm2/(GeV . nucleon) and σν/E=(0.339±0.010)x10-38 cm2/(GeV . nucleon). Between 50 and 150 GeV no energy dependence of σ/E was observed within ±3% for neutrino and ±4% for antineutrino interactions. (orig.)

  10. The measurement of the total cross section for deep inelastic neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron reactions with charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section for deep inelastic neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron charge-exchange reactions was determined. The experiment was performed in the CERN-NBB at hadron beam momenta of 100 GeV/c, 160 GeV/c, and 200 GeV/c with both polarities. The events were registrated with the improved CDHS detector. The flux determination ensued indirectly via the measurement of the hadron flux respectively the muon flux. The neutrino flux determined by both methods agrees well. Within the accessible neutrino energy range (10 GeV ν ν = 0.331±0.003±0.009 ( . 10-38 cm2 (nucl. . GeV)-1), σν/Eν = 0.703±0.002±0.019 ( . 10-38 cm2 (nucl. . GeV)-1), and σ sub(anti ν)/σν = 0.471±0.005±0.007. The first error indication means the statistical, the second the systematical error. The systematic error is mainly conditioned by uncertainties in the flux determination. (orig./HSI)

  11. KamLAND and Solar Antineutrino Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, B C; Torrente-Lujan, E; Chauhan, Bhag C.; Pulido, Joao

    2004-01-01

    We use the recent KamLAND observations to predict the solar antineutrino spectrum at some confidence limits. We find that a scaling of the antineutrino probability with respect to the magnetic field profile --in the sense that the same probability function can be reproduced by any profile with a suitable peak field value-- can be utilised to obtain a general shape of the solar antineutrino spectrum. This scaling and the upper bound on the solar antineutrino event rate, that can be derived from the data, lead to: 1) an upper bound on the solar antineutrino flux, 2) the prediction of their energy spectrum, as the normalisation of the spectrum can be obtained from the total number of antineutrino events recorded in the experiment. We get $\\phi_{\\bar\

  12. A method for an improved measurement of the electron-antineutrino correlation in free neutron beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular correlation between the beta electron and antineutrino in nuclear beta decay is characterized by the dimensionless parameter a. The value of a for free neutron decay, when combined with other neutron decay parameters, can be used to determine the weak vector and axial vector coupling constants gV and gA and test the validity and self-consistency of the Electroweak Standard Model. Previous experiments that measured a in neutron decay relied on precise proton spectroscopy and were limited by systematic effects at about the 5% level. We present a new approach to measuring a for which systematic uncertainties promise to be much smaller

  13. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeger, Karsten M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  14. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Dye, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's ma...

  15. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for vμ → $\\bar{v}$μ transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |Δ$\\bar{m}$atm 2| = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat) ± 0.06(syst)) x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = 0.860-0.12+0.11(stat) ± 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  16. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I.; /Caltech

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |{Delta}{bar m}{sub atm}{sup 2}| = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}) = 0.860{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  17. Measuring temperature and thermal flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive temperature measuring device is described for detecting small temperature differences and associated thermal fluxes. Highly-doped silicon diodes operated at constant current are used in conjunction with suitable circuitry. (U.K.)

  18. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Djurcic, Z.; Detwiler, J. A.; Piepke, A; Foster Jr., V. R.; Miller, L.; Gratta, G.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  19. Present status of sensitive detector of reactor’s antineutrinos using scintillating detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajt, L.; Mamedov, F.; Přidal, P.; Špavorová, M.; Štekl, I. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Belov, V.; Egorov, V. G.; Fomina, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Ponomarev, D.; Rozova, I.; Zhitnikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Burešová, H. [ENVINET a.s., Nuvia Group, Tǐebíč (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-17

    In 2011, the reanalysis of the reactor antineutrinos spectra led to the formulation of the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly (RAA) [1], which indicates the discrepancy between measured and expected antineutrino fluxes on short baselines. This discrepancy appears to favor the existence of the fourth “sterile” neutrino with |Δm{sup 2}|>1 eV{sup 2}. To confirm or reject this hypothesis a high sensitive antineutrino detector located close to the reactor is required. In addition to that such a detector could be used to online monitor the isotopic composition of the reactor core and to prevent illegal production and removal of{sup 239}Pu, which is the essential part of nuclear weapons. Detector DANSSino [2] already proved that even a compact antineutrino detector (∼ 1 m{sup 3}) based on polystyrene is capable of antineutrino detection in the close vicinity of a reactor core (∼ 10 m) with signal to background ratio about one. As a common activity between JINR Dubna and IEAP CTU a new prototype of detector (called S{sup 3}) has been proposed and is under construction. The construction design, selected results of Monte Carlo simulations and results of benchmark tests are presented.

  20. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  1. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  2. Development of PROSPECT detectors for precision antineutrino studies

    CERN Document Server

    Norcini, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    PROSPECT, the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, will use two segmented detectors positioned 7-20 m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure the U-235 antineutrino spectrum and perform a search for short-baseline oscillations as a signature of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. PROSPECT has developed Li-6 loaded liquid scintillator detectors for efficient identification of reactor antineutrinos and has measured reactor and cosmogenic backgrounds in the HFIR reactor building. Multiple test detectors have been built, operated, and characterized at HFIR and elsewhere to understand the optical performance of the scintillator and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities for enhanced background rejection. The results from this R&D effort are discussed, in the context of the design and physics potential of PROSPECT.

  3. CCD flux measurement system Prohermes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroger-Vodde, A. [University of Almeria, Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain); Hollander, A. [German Aerospace Center, Plataforma de Almeria, Head of Engineering (Spain)

    1999-03-01

    At the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) a new, PC based, 14 bit CCD video flux measurement system, called PROHERMES, has been introduced to improve the precision of data acquisition and includes with Optimas a flexible, more user friendly, easy adaptable software environment. The hardware and software is described. Macros have been created to meet the special requirements of the tasks at the PSA. As an example for a macro, the program flow structure is given for the acquisition of the moving-bar sequence to measure the performance of receivers like in the REFOS project. The results are exported to Excel. The comparison with the former measurement system HERMES II concludes the new system as an important progress. Future efforts will focus on the further automation of flux measurements and heliostat controls. (authors)

  4. KamLAND, solar antineutrinos and the solar magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, B C; Torrente-Lujan, E; Chauhan, Bhag C.; Pulido, Joao

    2003-01-01

    In this work the possibility of detecting solar electron antineutrinos produced by a solar core magnetic field from the KamLAND recent observations is investigated. We find a scaling of the antineutrino probability with respect to the magnetic field profile in the sense that the same probability function can be reproduced by any profile with a suitable peak field value. In this way the solar electron antineutrino spectrum can be unambiguosly predicted. We use this scaling and the negative results indicated by the KamLAND experiment to obtain upper bounds on the solar electron antineutrino flux. We get $\\phi_{\\bar\

  5. Precise Measurement of Dimuon Production Cross-Sections in muon neutrino Fe and muon antineutrino Fe Deep Inelastic Scattering at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, M; Alton, A; Bolton, T; Goldman, J; Spentzouris, P; Conrad, J; Fleming, B T; Formaggio, J A; Koutsoliotas, S; Kim, J H; McNulty, C; Romosan, A; Shaevitz, M H; Stern, E G; Vaitaitis, A G; Zimmerman, E D; Johnson, R A; Vakili, M; Suwonjandee, N; Bernstein, R H; Bugel, L; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Nienaber, P; Yu, J; De Barbaro, L; Buchholz, D; Schellman, H; Zeller, G P; Brau, J E; Drucker, R B; Frey, R; Mason, D; McDonald, J E; Naples, D; Tzanov, M; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, P; Bodek, Arie; Budd, H S; Harris, D A; McFarland, K S; Sakumoto, W K; Yang, U K

    2001-01-01

    We present measurements of the semi-inclusive cross-sections for muon neutrino and muon antineutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering interactions with two oppositely charged muons in the final state. These events dominantly arise from production of a charm quark during the scattering process. The measurement was obtained from the analysis of 5102 muon neutrino-induced and 1458 muon antineutrino-induced events collected with the NuTeV detector exposed to a sign-selected beam at the Fermilab Tevatron. We also extract a cross-section measurement from a re-analysis of 5030 muon neutrino-induced and 1060 muon antineutrino-induced vents collected from the exposure of the same detector to a quad-triplet beam by the CCFR experiment. The results are combined to obtain the most statistically precise measurement of neutrino-induced dimuon production cross-sections to date. These measurements should be of broad use to phenomenologists interested in the dynamics of charm production, the strangeness content of the nucleo...

  6. Analytical orbit calculation of the INS air-core π√2 β-ray spectrometer for the measurement of electron anti-neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurement of electron anti-neutrino rest mass with the INS air-core(iron-free) β-ray spectrometer, the orbit calculations were carried out for the case of simultaneous use of an extended source and a position-sensitive electron counter. Analytical calculation up to the 3rd-order approximation results in design parameters of 16cm x 7cm source area, 0.095% transmission, 4% momentum acceptance and 67.60 and 4.190 tilt angles of the source and the detector planes, respectively, for 0.05% momentum resolution. These values imply a 7 times larger sensitivity to the electron anti-neutrino mass than in the recent experiment by ITEP group. (author)

  7. Neutrino Data and Neutrino-Antineutrino Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeyev, E N

    2005-01-01

    A problem, whether a neutrino-antineutrino transition could be responsible for the muon neutrino deficit found in underground experiments (Super-Kamiokande, MACRO, Soudan 2) and in the accelerator long-baseline K2K experiment, is discussed in this paper. The intention of the work is not consideration of concrete models for muon neutrino-antineutrino transition but a desire to attract an attention to another possibility of understanding the nature of the measured muon neutrino deficit in neutrino experiments.

  8. Web Application for Modeling Global Antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos stream freely from rapidly decaying fission products within nuclear reactors and from long-lived radioactivity within Earth. Those with energy greater than 1.8 MeV are regularly observed by several kiloton-scale underground detectors. These observations estimate the amount of terrestrial radiogenic heating, monitor the operation of nuclear reactors, and measure the fundamental properties of neutrinos. The analysis of antineutrino observations at operating detectors or the planning of projects with new detectors requires information on the expected signal and background rates. We present a web application for modeling global antineutrino energy spectra and detection rates for any surface location. Antineutrino sources include all registered nuclear reactors as well as the crust and mantle of Earth. Visitors to the website may model the location and power of a hypothetical nuclear reactor, copy energy spectra, and analyze the significance of a selected signal relative to background.

  9. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  10. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  11. Low-energy Antineutrinos from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Pastor, S; Valle, José W F; Pastor, Sergio; Semikoz, Viktor B.; Valle, Jose W.F.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the sensitivity of future neutrino experiments in the low energy region, such as BOREXINO or HELLAZ, to a solar electron antineutrino signal. We show that, if neutrino conversions within the Sun result in partial polarization of initial solar neutrino fluxes, then a new opportunity arises to observe the electron antineutrinos and thus to probe the Majorana nature of the neutrinos. This is achieved by comparing the slopes of the energy dependence of the differential neutrino electron scattering cross section for different neutrino conversion scenarios. We also show how the \

  12. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  13. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  14. Hybrid method to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy by supernova (anti)neutrino induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, D.; Rauscher, T.; Paar, N.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a hybrid method to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by simultaneous measurements of responses of at least two detectors to antineutrino and neutrino fluxes from accretion and cooling phases of core-collapse supernovae. The (anti)neutrino-nucleus cross sections for 56Fe and 208Pb are calculated in the framework of the relativistic nuclear energy density functional and weak interaction Hamiltonian, while the cross sections for inelastic scattering on free protons p(bar nue,e+)n are obtained using heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The modelling of (anti)neutrino fluxes emitted from a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova include collective and Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects inside the exploding star. The particle emission rates from the elementary decay modes of the daughter nuclei are calculated for normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. It is shown that simultaneous use of (anti)neutrino detectors with different target material allows to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the ratios of νe- and bar nue-induced particle emissions. This hybrid method favors neutrinos from the supernova cooling phase and the implementation of detectors with heavier target nuclei (208Pb) for the neutrino sector, while for antineutrinos the use of free protons in mineral oil or water is the appropriate choice.

  15. Measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 and mass difference Δ mee2 from reactor antineutrino disappearance in the RENO experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2016-07-01

    RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) made a definitive measurement of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 in 2012, based on the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos. The experiment has obtained a more precise value of the mixing angle and the first result on neutrino mass difference Δ mee2 from an energy and baseline dependent reactor neutrino disappearance using ∼500 days of data. Based on the ratio of inverse-beta-decay (IBD) prompt spectra measured in two identical far and near detectors, we obtain sin2 ⁡ (2θ13) = 0.082 ± 0.009 (stat .) ± 0.006 (syst .) and | Δ mee2 | = [2.62-0.23+0.21 (stat .)-0.13+0.12 (syst .) ] ×10-3 eV2. An excess of reactor antineutrinos near 5 MeV is observed in the measured prompt spectrum with respect to the most commonly used models. The excess is found to be consistent with coming from reactors. A successful measurement of θ13 is also made in an IBD event sample with a delayed signal of neutron capture on hydrogen. A precise value of θ13 would provide important information on determination of the leptonic CP phase if combined with a result of an accelerator neutrino beam experiment.

  16. Experimental determination of the antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission of 238U contributes about 10 % to the antineutrino emission of a pressurized water reactor. In the present thesis, the beta spectrum of the fission products of 238U was determined in an experiment at the neutron source FRM II. This beta spectrum was subsequently converted into an antineutrino spectrum. This first measurement of the antineutrino spectrum supports all current and future reactor antineutrino experiments.

  17. Experimental determination of the antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of {sup 238}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Nils-Holger

    2013-10-09

    Fission of {sup 238}U contributes about 10 % to the antineutrino emission of a pressurized water reactor. In the present thesis, the beta spectrum of the fission products of {sup 238}U was determined in an experiment at the neutron source FRM II. This beta spectrum was subsequently converted into an antineutrino spectrum. This first measurement of the antineutrino spectrum supports all current and future reactor antineutrino experiments.

  18. Hybrid method to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy by supernova (anti)neutrino induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Vale, D; Paar, N

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a hybrid method to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by simultaneous measurements of responses of at least two detectors to antineutrino and neutrino fluxes from accretion and cooling phases of core-collapse supernovae. The (anti)neutrino-nucleus cross sections for $^{56}$Fe and $^{208}$Pb are calculated in the framework of the relativistic nuclear energy density functional and weak interaction Hamiltonian, while the cross sections for inelastic scattering on free protons $\\mathrm{p}(\\bar{\

  19. New measurements of the antineutrino-spin asymmetry in beta decay of the neutron and restrictions on the mass of a right-handed gauge boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of new measurements of the neutron antineutrino spin asymmetry coefficient B in the beta decay of polarized neutrons are considered. The measurements were carried out on the polarized neutron vertical channel of the WWR-M-Gatchina reactor. Basing on the combination of the results of measurements of the observed asymmetry P · B 0.6617 ± 0.0044 with those of the measurements on the neutron beam polarization P = (66.88 ± 0.22)% the value B = 0.9894 ± 0.0083 is obtained. This value implies that the mass of a hypothetical right-handed charged gauge boson in the left-right symmetric model of the weak interaction is greater than 281 GeV/c2 (90% CL). The conclusion on the agreement of this value with restrictions from muon decay and direct searches for an additional vector boson W is made. 9 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  20. The antineutrino energy structure in reactor experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Novella, P

    2015-01-01

    The recent observation of an energy structure in the reactor antineutrino spectrum is reviewed. The reactor experiments Daya Bay, Double Chooz and RENO have reported a consistent excess of antineutrinos deviating from the flux predictions, with a local significance of about 4$\\sigma$ between 4 and 6 MeV of the positron energy spectrum. The possible causes of the structure are analyzed in this work, along with the different experimental approaches developed to identify its origin. Considering the available data and results from the three experiments, the most likely explanation concerns the reactor flux predictions and the associated uncertainties. Therefore, the different current models are described and compared. The possible sources of incompleteness or inaccuracy of such models are discussed, as well as the experimental data required to improve their precision.

  1. Antineutrino Monitoring of Thorium Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A; Norman, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuels types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring.Thorium molten salt reactors (MSR) breed U-233, that if diverted constitute an IAEA direct use material. The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of U-233 has been determined, the feasibility of detecting the diversion of a significant quantity, 8 kg of U-233, within the IAEA timeliness goal of 30 days has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario at a 25 meter standoff by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos. It was found that the diversion of a signifi...

  2. Methodological errors in radioisotope flux measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egnor, R.W.; Vaccarezza, S.G.; Charney, A.N. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, New York (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The authors examined several sources of error in isotopic flux measurements in a commonly used experimental model: the study of {sup 22}Na and {sup 36}Cl fluxes across rat ileal tissue mounted in the Ussing flux chamber. The experiment revealed three important sources of error: the absolute counts per minute, the difference in counts per minute between serial samples, and averaging of serial samples. By computer manipulation, they then applied hypothetical changes in the experimental protocol to generalize these findings and assess the effect and interaction of the absolute counts per minute, the sampling interval, and the counting time on the magnitude of the error. They found that the error of a flux measurement will vary inversely with the counting time and the difference between the consecutive sample counts per minute used in the flux calculations and will vary directly with the absolute counts per minute of each sample. Alteration of the hot side specific activity, the surface area of the tissue across which flux is measured and the sample volume have a smaller impact on measurement error. Experimental protocols should be designed with these methodological considerations in mind to minimize the error inherent in measuring isotope flux.

  3. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios in neutrino and antineutrino nucleon interactions and determination of the Weinberg angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section ratios of neutral and charged current interactions induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos in iron have been measured in the 200 GeV narrow-band beam at the CERN SPS. We find Rsub(ν)=0.301+-0.007 and Rsub(anti ν)=0.363+-0.015 for a hadron energy cut of 10 GeV. The results are in agreement with the standard model of electroweak interactions. In the MS renormalization scheme at the scale of the W boson mass sin2Osub(w)(msub(w))=0.226+-0.012 is obtained, where the error represents the experimental uncertainty. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be Δ sind2Osub(w)=+-0.006. (orig.)

  4. Neutron flux measurements in PUSPATI Triga Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron flux measurement in the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (PTR) was initiated after its commissioning on 28 June 1982. Initial measured thermal neutron flux at the bottom of the rotary specimen rack (rotating) and in-core pneumatic terminus were 3.81E+11 n/cm2 sec and 1.10E+12n/cm2 sec respectively at 100KW. Work to complete the neutron flux data are still going on. The cadmium ratio, thermal and epithermal neutron flux are measured in the reactor core, rotary specimen rack, in-core pneumatic terminus and thermal column. Bare and Cadmium covered gold foils and wires are used for the above measurement. The activities of the irradiated gold foils and wires are determined using Ge(Li) and hyperpure germinium detectors. (author)

  5. Measurements of neutron flux in the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes results of the following measurements performed at the RA reactor: thermal neutron flux in the experimental channels, epithermal and fast neutron flux, neutron flux in the biological shield, neutron flux distribution in the reactor cell

  6. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  7. Neutrino geophysics at Baksan I: possible detection of georeactor antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Herndon in 90s proposed a natural nuclear fission georeactor at the center of the Earth with a power output of 3 - 10 TW as an energy source to sustain the Earth magnetic field. R.S. Raghavan in 2002 pointed out that under certain condition antineutrinos generated in georeactor can be detected using massive scintillation detectors. It is considered that underground Baksan Neutrino Observatory (4880 m w.e.) as a possible site dor development in Geoneutrino physics. Here the intrinsic background level of less than 1 event/yr in a liquid scintillation ∼1000-t target detector can be achieved and the main source of background is the antineutrino flux from power reactors. It is find that this flux is ∼ 10 times lower than at KamLAND detector site and two times lower than at Gran Sasso laboratory and thus at Baksan the georeactor burning nuclear fuel by analysis of the antineutrino energy spectrum

  8. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  9. Neutron capture and the antineutrino yield from nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We identify a new, flux-dependent correction to the antineutrino spectrum as produced in nuclear reactors. The abundance of certain nuclides, whose decay chains produce antineutrinos above the threshold for inverse beta decay, has a nonlinear dependence on the neutron flux, unlike the vast majority of antineutrino producing nuclides, whose decay rate is directly related to the fission rate. We have identified four of these so-called nonlinear nuclides and determined that they result in an antineutrino excess at low-energies below 3.2MeV, dependent on the reactor thermal neutron flux. We develop an analytic model for the size of the correction and compare it to the results of detailed reactor simulations for various real existing reactors, spanning 3 orders of magnitude in neutron flux. In a typical pressurized water reactor the resulting correction can reach 0.9% of the low energy flux which is comparable in size to other, known low-energy corrections from spent nuclear fuel and the non-equilibrium correction...

  10. KamLAND, solar antineutrinos and their magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Aliani, P; Picariello, M; Torrente-Lujan, E

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting solar antineutrinos with the KamLAND experiment. These antineutrinos are predicted by spin-flavor oscillations at a significant rate even if this mechanism is not the leading solution to the SNP. The recent evidence from SNO shows that a) the neutrino oscillates, only around 34% of the initial solar neutrinos arrive at the Earth as electron neutrinos and b) the conversion is mainly into active neutrinos, however a non e, mu, tau component is allowed: the fraction of oscillation into non-mu-tau neutrinos is found to be cos^2(alpha) = 0.08^{+0.20}_{-0.40}. This residual flux could include sterile neutrinos and/or the antineutrinos of the active flavors. KamLAND is potentially sensitive to antineutrinos derived from solar ^8 B neutrinos. In case of negative results, we find that KamLAND could put strict limits on the flux of solar antineutrinos, Phi(^8 B) < 1.0 times 10^4 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, more than one order of magnitude smaller than existing limits, and on their app...

  11. Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sinev, V.

    2012-01-01

    Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using s...

  12. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  13. Statistical analysis of radon flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon emerging from the earth's surface can be used in classifying lands for development purposes. Radon flux is subject to diurnal variation, weather variables, seasonal fluctuations. Statistical sampling procedures are applied to this problem to ascertain the proper spacing of sampling points, the number of samples taken at each point per day, and the number of days in the sampling program to establish the exhalation rate at a known precision. Results from small and large pieces of land showed that reliable radon flux measurements require extensive sampling programs

  14. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    de Meijer, R J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  15. Observational biases in flux magnification measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Flux magnification is an interesting complement to shear-based lensing measurements, especially at high redshift where sources are harder to resolve. One measures either changes in the source density (magnification bias) or in the shape of the flux distribution (e.g. magnitude-shift). The interpretation of these measurements relies on theoretical estimates of how the observables change under magnification. Here we present simulations to create multi-band photometric mock catalogues of Lyman-break galaxies in a CFHTLenS-like survey that include several observational effects that can change these relations, making simple theoretical estimates unusable. In particular, we show how the magnification bias can be affected by photometric noise, colour selection, and dust extinction. We find that a simple measurement of the slope of the number-counts is not sufficient for the precise interpretation of virtually all observations of magnification bias. We also explore how sensitive the shift in the mean magnitude of a s...

  16. JUNO: A Next Generation Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The mass hierarchy and the CP phase are the main focus of the next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), as a medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment, can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy independent of the CP phase. The physics potential on the mass hierarchy, and other measurements are reviewed. The preliminary design options for a 20~kton detector with an energy resolution of $3\\%/\\sqrt{E_{vis}}$ are illustrated. The mai...

  17. Measurement of the angular correlation coefficient a between electron and antineutrino in neutron β-decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron β-decay is parametrized by several measurable correlation coefficients which are used to determine parameters of the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The aim of the retardation spectrometer aSPECT is to measure the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with an unprecedented accuracy of well below 1%. The coefficient is extracted from a high precision measurement of the proton energy spectrum. A central point of this PhD thesis is the analysis of the background, motivated by the observations of discharges during the beam time of 2011, and an earlier indication for a dependence on the retardation potential. During this thesis, several measurements were conducted off-line, without ionizing particles from neutron decay. An 'internal' background (X-rays and ions) was identified. It has an influence of 10-5 to 10-4 on Δa/a depending on the vacuum level (∼10-9 mbar) and the spectrometer settings. Within the analysis of the data from the beam time in 2013, a model was built to correct for backgrounds present in neutron decay experiment, taking into account its time dependence. The correction is about 3% on the coefficient for standard settings and vacuum but it can reach 7% for unfavorable settings. To reduce the background, a drift electric field was applied close to the maximum of the retardation potential. Additional measurements performed during this beam time included tests of systematics, in particular the edge effect (beam profile) and different electrode settings. In order to obtain the final result, the analysis has to be extended by including the different corrections and by comparing with simulations of the systematic effects. (author)

  18. Heat and Flux. Analysis of field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorsma, K. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    This report gives a description of the work done within the framework of the FLOW (Far and Large Offshore Wind) project on Heat and Flux. Hereto available field measurements at the ECN wind turbine test site EWTW (ECN Wind Turbine Test Site Wieringermeer) are analyzed. ECN holds a patent for the 'Heat and Flux' concept. This concept aims at maximizing the power output of a wind farm by adjusting the axial induction of the windward turbines below their individual optimum for power production. This will reduce the velocity deficit and turbulence in the wake and increase the output of the downwind turbines. Other benefits are decreased average loading of the upwind turbines and decreased fatigue loading of the turbines in the wake. The reported activities aimed at the quantification of the effects of 'Heat and Flux' farm control. To this means field measurements at the EWTW are analyzed from December 2004 until April 2009. Questions regarding the validity and usability of these results have initiated the current study. The test site is described in section 2. The adopted data reduction procedure is highlighted in section 3. The results are discussed in section 4 followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  19. Antineutrino oscillation study in the muon antineutrino → electron antineutrino channel at the Brookhaven accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to the E816 experiment which looked for (anti)neutrino oscillations. This experiment was performed in the neutrino beam of the Brookhaven AGS during spring 1986. Following a short recall of the theoretical and experimental status, the beam line and the apparatus are described. The analysis is exposed in details with a special emphasis on final states including at least one electromagnetic shower and one prong. Preliminary results have been obtained and show an excess of 23 ±8.7±14.6 events interpreted as charged current antineutrino electron interactions. In terms of a limit we obtain for the probability P(antineutrino muon → antineutrino electron): P<4.4% (95% C.L.)

  20. Antineutrino Oscillations and a Search for Non-standard Interactions with the MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvan, Zeynep [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    MINOS searches for neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab between two detectors. The Near Detector, located near the source, measures the beam composition before flavor change occurs. The energy spectrum is measured again at the Far Detector after neutrinos travel a distance. The mixing angle and mass splitting between the second and third mass states are extracted from the energy dependent difference between the spectra at the two detectors. NuMI is able to produce an antineutrino-enhanced beam as well as a neutrino-enhanced beam. Collecting data in antineutrino-mode allows the direct measurement of antineutrino oscillation parameters. From the analysis of the antineutrino mode data we measure $|\\Delta\\bar{m}^{2}_{\\text{atm}}| = 2.62^{+0.31}_{-0.28}\\times10^{-3}\\text{eV}^{2}$ and $\\sin^{2}(2\\bar{\\theta})_{23} = 0.95^{+0.10}_{-0.11}$, which is the most precise measurement of antineutrino oscillation parameters to date. A difference between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation parameters may indicate new physics involving interactions that are not part of the Standard Model, called non-standard interactions, that alter the apparent disappearance probability. Collecting data in neutrino and antineutrino mode independently allows a direct search for non-standard interactions. In this dissertation non-standard interactions are constrained by a combined analysis of neutrino and antineutrino datasets and no evidence of such interactions is found.

  1. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  2. Advanced Tethersonde for High-Speed Flux Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flux measurements of trace gases and other quantities, such as latent heat, are of great importance in scientific field research. One typical flux measurement setup...

  3. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X B; Chen, Y X; Zhong, W L; An, F P

    2014-01-01

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  4. Workshop applied antineutrino physics 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Applied Antineutrino Physics 2007' workshop is the fourth international meeting devoted to the opening of the neutrino physics to more applied fields, such as geophysics and geochemistry, nuclear industry, as well as the nonproliferation. This meeting highlights the world efforts already engaged to exploit the single characteristics of the neutrinos for the control of the production of plutonium in the civil nuclear power reactor. The potential industrial application of the measurement of the thermal power of the nuclear plants by the neutrinos is also approached. earth neutrinos were for the first time highlighted in 2002 by the KamLAND experiment. Several international efforts are currently underway to use earth neutrinos to reveal the interior of the Earth. This meeting is an opportunity to adapt the efforts of detection to the real needs of geophysicists and geochemists (sources of radiogenic heat, potassium in the court, feathers.) Finally more futuristic topics such as the detection of nuclear explosions, of low powers, are also discussed. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  5. Workshop applied antineutrino physics 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiri, T.; Andrieu, B.; Anjos, J.; Argyriades, J.; Barouch, G.; Bernstein, A.; Bersillon, O.; Besida, O.; Bowden, N.; Cabrera, A.; Calmet, D.; Collar, J.; Cribier, M.; Kerret, H. de; Meijer, R. de; Dudziak, F.; Enomoto, S.; Fallot, M.; Fioni, G.; Fiorentini, G.; Gale, Ph.; Georgadze, A.; Giot, L.; Gonin, M.; Guillon, B.; Henson, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kanamaru, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Kornoukhov, V.; Lasserre, Th.; Learned, J.G.; Lefebvre, J.; Letourneau, A.; Lhillier, D.; Lindner, M.; Lund, J.; Mantovani, F.; Mcdonough, B.; Mention, G.; Monteith, A.; Motta, D.; Mueller, Th.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Odrzywolek, A.; Petcov, S.; Porta, A.; Queval, R.; Reinhold, B.; Reyna, D.; Ridikas, D.; Sadler, L.; Schoenert, St.; Sida, J.L.; Sinev, V.; Suekane, F.; Suvorov, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Tang, A.; Tolich, N.; Tolich, K.; Vanka, S.; Vignaud, D.; Volpe, Ch.; Wong, H

    2007-07-01

    The 'Applied Antineutrino Physics 2007' workshop is the fourth international meeting devoted to the opening of the neutrino physics to more applied fields, such as geophysics and geochemistry, nuclear industry, as well as the nonproliferation. This meeting highlights the world efforts already engaged to exploit the single characteristics of the neutrinos for the control of the production of plutonium in the civil nuclear power reactor. The potential industrial application of the measurement of the thermal power of the nuclear plants by the neutrinos is also approached. earth neutrinos were for the first time highlighted in 2002 by the KamLAND experiment. Several international efforts are currently underway to use earth neutrinos to reveal the interior of the Earth. This meeting is an opportunity to adapt the efforts of detection to the real needs of geophysicists and geochemists (sources of radiogenic heat, potassium in the court, feathers.) Finally more futuristic topics such as the detection of nuclear explosions, of low powers, are also discussed. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  6. Measurement of the electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simson, Martin

    2010-09-21

    This thesis describes measurements with the retardation spectrometer aSPECT at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. The goal of the measurement is to determine the angular correlation coefficient a from the form of the proton recoil spectrum in the decay of the free neutron in order to determine a precise value for the ratio of the weak axial vector and vector coupling constants of the nucleon. A big improvement was achieved with the use of a silicon drift detector which was used here for the first time to detect low energetic protons. A saturation effect of the electronics that was only discovered during the analysis of the data from neutron decay proved to be not correctable. The findings from analysis, simulations and test experiments gained in this work should allow a measurement of a with high precision in a future beamtime. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of the electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes measurements with the retardation spectrometer aSPECT at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. The goal of the measurement is to determine the angular correlation coefficient a from the form of the proton recoil spectrum in the decay of the free neutron in order to determine a precise value for the ratio of the weak axial vector and vector coupling constants of the nucleon. A big improvement was achieved with the use of a silicon drift detector which was used here for the first time to detect low energetic protons. A saturation effect of the electronics that was only discovered during the analysis of the data from neutron decay proved to be not correctable. The findings from analysis, simulations and test experiments gained in this work should allow a measurement of a with high precision in a future beamtime. (orig.)

  8. Long-Term Testing and Properties of Acrylic for the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, M; Heeger, K M

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay reactor antineutrino experiment has recently measured the neutrino mixing parameter sin22{\\theta}13 by observing electron antineutrino disappearance over kilometer-scale baselines using six antineutrino detectors at near and far distances from reactor cores at the Daya Bay nuclear power complex. Liquid scintillator contained in transparent target vessels is used to detect electron antineutrinos via the inverse beta-decay reaction. The Daya Bay experiment will operate for about five years yielding a precision measurement of sin22{\\theta}13. We report on long-term studies of poly(methyl methacrylate) known as acrylic, which is the primary material used in the fabrication of the target vessels for the experiment's antineutrino detectors. In these studies, acrylic samples are subjected to gaseous and liquid environmental conditions similar to those experienced during construction, transport, and operation of the Daya Bay acrylic target vessels and detectors. Mechanical and optical stability of the ac...

  9. Measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in neutron beta decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzoldt, G.

    2007-08-29

    In the four beam times we performed at the FRM-II, we were able to show that the spectrometer works in principle and that a determination of a with it is possible. A set of routines has been written for decoding and analyzing the raw data. The routines are written in C using the ROOT libraries and can be easily adapted or expanded. We have found a reliable way to extract the proton count rates from the data by building pulseheight spectra for each measurement, subtracting background measurements from those and fitting the resulting peak with a Gaussian. The background of the measurements was studied in detail. The background caused by electrons from neutron decay is very well understood and conforms quantitatively to our expectation. Due to the spatial resolution of our detector and the time resolution provided by our DAQ electronics, we were able to study correlated electron-proton pairs from one neutron decay event. They form a clearly visible peak in a time- and channel-distance spectrum, which can be shifted in the channel-dimension by varying the voltages applied to the lower and upper E x B electrodes. Performing a pulseheight analysis for both involved particles allowed us to obtain a fairly clean energy spectrum of the background caused by electrons from neutron decay in our detector. Using these correlations for data analysis may be of interest for future neutron decay experiments which use segmented detectors. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in neutron beta decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the four beam times we performed at the FRM-II, we were able to show that the spectrometer works in principle and that a determination of a with it is possible. A set of routines has been written for decoding and analyzing the raw data. The routines are written in C using the ROOT libraries and can be easily adapted or expanded. We have found a reliable way to extract the proton count rates from the data by building pulseheight spectra for each measurement, subtracting background measurements from those and fitting the resulting peak with a Gaussian. The background of the measurements was studied in detail. The background caused by electrons from neutron decay is very well understood and conforms quantitatively to our expectation. Due to the spatial resolution of our detector and the time resolution provided by our DAQ electronics, we were able to study correlated electron-proton pairs from one neutron decay event. They form a clearly visible peak in a time- and channel-distance spectrum, which can be shifted in the channel-dimension by varying the voltages applied to the lower and upper E x B electrodes. Performing a pulseheight analysis for both involved particles allowed us to obtain a fairly clean energy spectrum of the background caused by electrons from neutron decay in our detector. Using these correlations for data analysis may be of interest for future neutron decay experiments which use segmented detectors. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of adjoint flux at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adjoint flux is of the great importance for determination of kinetic parameters of nuclear reactor (ρ, l and βeff) and for the interpretation of experiments with reactivity perturbations. In experimental reactor physics there are a few methods for the adjoint flux measurements. The method of reactivity perturbations with adequate samples is used for thermal reactors. According to the theory of reactivity perturbations the reactivity change due to sample of thermal neutrons absorbing material is proportional to product of flux and adjoint flux of thermal neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The reactivity change due to fissionable nuclide is proportional to product of thermal neutron flux and adjoint flux of fast neutrons (Φ2(r)Φ=2(r)). The axial distribution of adjoint flux is determined by reactivity measurements and measurements of axial distribution of thermal neutron flux. Thi results of this measurement will be used for interpretation of other experiments with reactivity perturbations at the RB reactor

  12. A study of antineutrino spectra from spent nuclear fuel at Daya Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin; RUAN Xi-Chao; NIE Yang-Bo; ZHOU Zu-Ying; AN Feng-Peng; CAO Jun

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment is designed to determine the as yet unknown neutrino mixing angle,θ13,by measuring the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from several nuclear reactor cores.The projected sensitivity in sin2(2θ13) of better than 0.01 at a 90% CL should be achieved after three years of data-taking.Antineutrinos emitted from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) distort the soft part of the energy spectrum.In this article,a calculation of the antineutrino spectra from the long-life isotopes in SNF is performed.A non-equilibrium generation of long half-life isotopes during the running time of the reactor is also analyzed.Finally,we show that the antineutrino event rate contribution from SNF,which has been stored in the SNF pool for several years,may be non-negligible.

  13. A study of antineutrino spectra from spent nuclear fuel at Daya Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment is designed to determine the as yet unknown neutrino mixing angle, θ13, by measuring the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from several nuclear reactor cores. The projected sensitivity in sin2 (2θ13) of better than 0.01 at a 90% CL should be achieved after three years of data-taking. Antineutrinos emitted from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) distort the soft part of the energy spectrum. In this article, a calculation of the antineutrino spectra from the long-life isotopes in SNF is performed. A non-equilibrium generation of long half-life isotopes during the running time of the reactor is also analyzed. Finally, we show that the antineutrino event rate contribution from SNF, which has been stored in the SNF pool for several years, may be non-negligible. (authors)

  14. Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick; Shea, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a non-proliferation measure. We demonstrate that an above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet and in some cases significantly exceed the verification goals identified by IAEA for plutonium production or diversion from declared inventories. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shutdown. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to re-establish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary.

  15. AmeriFlux Measurement Component (AMC) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    An AMC system was installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope Alaska (NSA) Barrow site, also known as NSA C1 at the ARM Data Archive, in August 2012. A second AMC system was installed at the third ARM Mobile Facility deployment at Oliktok Point, also known as NSA M1. This in situ system consists of 12 combination soil temperature and volumetric water content (VWC) reflectometers and one set of upwelling and downwelling PAR sensors, all deployed within the fetch of the Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System. Soil temperature and VWC sensors placed at two depths (10 and 30 cm below the vegetation layer) at six locations (or microsites) allow soil property inhomogeneity to be monitored across a landscape. The soil VWC and temperature sensors used at NSA C1 are the Campbell Scientific CS650L and the sensors at NSA M1 use the Campbell Scientific CS655. The two sensors are nearly identical in function, and vendor specifications are based on the CS650 unless otherwise stated.

  16. JUNO: A Next Generation Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The mass hierarchy and the CP phase are the main focus of the next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), as a medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment, can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy independent of the CP phase. The physics potential on the mass hierarchy, and other measurements are reviewed. The preliminary design options for a 20~kton detector with an energy resolution of $3\\%/\\sqrt{E_{vis}}$ are illustrated. The main technical challenges on the PMT and scintillator are discussed and the corresponding R\\&D efforts are presented.

  17. KamLAND Bounds on Solar Antineutrinos and neutrino transition magnetic moments

    CERN Document Server

    Torrente-Lujan, E

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting solar antineutrinos with the KamLAND experiment. These antineutrinos are predicted by spin-flavor oscillations at a significant rate even if this mechanism is not the leading solution to the SNP. The recent evidence from SNO shows that the solar flux could contain a residual component including sterile neutrinos and/or the antineutrinos of the active flavors. KamLAND is sensitive to antineutrinos originated from solar ${}^8$B neutrinos. From KamLAND negative results after 145 days of data taking, we obtain model independent limits on the total flux of solar antineutrinos $\\Phi({}^8 B)< 1.1-3.5\\times 10^4 cm^{-2} s^{-1}$, more than one order of magnitude smaller than existing limits,and on their appearance probability $P<0.15%$ (95% CL). Assuming a concrete model for antineutrino production by spin-flavor precession, this upper bound implies an upper limit on the product of the intrinsic neutrino magnetic moment and the value of the solar magnetic field $\\mu B&...

  18. Eddy Correlation Measurements of Sea Spray Aerosol Fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Moerman, M.M.; Zappa, C.J.; McGillis, W.R.; Norris, S.; Smith, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fluxes of primary marine aerosol in the sub-micron fraction were measured using a flux package consisting of a sonic anemometer, a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and an optical particle counter (OPC) equipped with a heated inlet. Whereas the CPC provides the total particle number flux of partic

  19. The first result of the neutrino magnetic moment measurement in the GEMMA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beda, A G; Demidova, E V; Egorov, V G; Gavrilov, M G; Shirchenko, M V; Starostin, A S; Vylov, T

    2007-01-01

    The first result of the neutrino magnetic moment measurement at the Kalininskaya Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) with the GEMMA spectrometer is presented. An antineutrino-electron scattering is investigated. A high-purity germanium detector of 1.5 kg placed 13.9 m away from the 3 GW reactor core is used in the spectrometer. The antineutrino flux is $2.73\\times 10^{13} \

  20. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  1. Neutrino Geophysics at Baksan I: Possible Detection of Georeactor Antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Herndon in the 1990s proposed a natural nuclear fission georeactor at the center of the Earth with a power output of 3-10 TW as an energy source to sustain the Earth magnetic field. R.S. Raghavan in 2002 pointed out that, under certain conditions, antineutrinos generated in such a georeactor can be detected using massive scintillation detectors. We consider the underground Baksan Neutrino Observatory (4800 m w.e.) as a possible site for developments in geoneutrino physics. Here, the intrinsic background level of less than 1 event/yr in a liquid scintillation ∼1000-t target detector can be achieved and the main source of background is the antineutrino flux from power reactors. We find that this flux is ∼10 times lower than at the KamLAND detector site and two times lower than at the Gran Sasso laboratory and thus at Baksan the georeactor hypothesis can be conclusively tested. We also discuss possible searches for the composition of georeactor burning nuclear fuel by analysis of the antineutrino energy spectrum

  2. Neutrino Geophysics at Baksan I: Possible Detection of Georeactor Antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Domogatski, G; Mikaelyan, L A; Sinev, V

    2004-01-01

    J.M. Herndon in 90-s proposed a natural nuclear fission georeactor at the center of the Earth with a power output of 3-10 TW as an energy source to sustain the Earth magnetic field. R.S. Raghavan in 2002 y. pointed out that under certain condition antineutrinos generated in georeactor can be detected using massive scintillation detectors. We consider the underground Baksan Neutrino Observatory (4800 m.w.e.) as a possible site for developments in Geoneutrino physics. Here the intrinsic background level of less than one event/year in a liquid scintillation ~1000 target ton detector can be achieved and the main source of background is the antineutrino flux from power reactors. We find that this flux is ~10 times lower than at KamLAND detector site and two times lower than at Gran Sasso laboratory and thus at Baksan the georeactor hypothesis can be conclusively tested. We also discuss possible search for composition of georector burning nuclear fuel by analysis of the antineutrino energy spectrum.

  3. Search for Differences in Oscillation Parameters for Atmospheric Neutrinos and Antineutrinos at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Lee, K P; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Martens, K; Vagins, M R; Labarga, L; Magro, L M; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Ishizuka, T; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Wilkes, R J

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for differences in the oscillations of antineutrinos and neutrinos in the Super-Kamiokande -I, -II, and -III atmospheric neutrino sample. Under a two-flavor disappearance model with separate mixing parameters between neutrinos and antineutrinos, we find no evidence for a difference in oscillation parameters. Best fit antineutrino mixing is found to be at (dm2bar, sin2 2 thetabar) = (2.0x10^-3 eV^2, 1.0) and is consistent with the overall Super-K measurement.

  4. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range

  5. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kerry [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: ktlee@ems.jsc.nasa.gov; Pinsky, Lawrence [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Andersen, Vic [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Zeitlin, Cary [National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cleghorn, Tim [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cucinotta, Frank [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A and M University, P.O. Box 519, Prairie View, TX 77446-0519 (United States); Atwell, William [The Boeing Company, Houston, TX (United States); Turner, Ron [Advancing National Strategies and Enabling Results (ANSER), Arlington, Virginia (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range.

  6. Observation of Reactor Electron Antineutrino Disappearance at RENO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) has obtained a definitive measurement of the smallest neutrino mixing angle of θ13 by observing the disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted from a nuclear reactor, excluding the no-oscillation hypothesis at 4.9 σ. From the deficit, the best fit value of sin22θ13 is obtained as 0.113±0.013(stat.)±0.019(syst.) based on a rate-only analysis. Antineutrinos from six 2.8 GWth reactors at the Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant in Korea, are detected by two identical detectors at 294 m and 1383 m, respectively, from the reactor array center. In the 229 day data-taking period between 11 August 2011 and 26 March 2012, the far (near) detector observed 17102 (154088) electron antineutrino candidate events with a background fraction of 5.5% (2.7%). The ratio of observed to expected numbers of the reactor antineutrinos in the far detector is 0.920±0.009(stat.)±0.014(syst.)

  7. Flux Density Measurement on Large-Scale Receivers

    OpenAIRE

    Röger, Marc; Herrmann, Patrik; Ebert, Miriam; Prahl, Christoph; Ulmer, Steffen; Göhring, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Commercial solar tower plants have much larger aperture surfaces than the receiver prototypes tested in earlier R&D projects. Existing methods to measure the solar flux density in the receiver aperture face new challenges regarding the receiver size. Also, the requirements regarding costs, accuracy, spatial resolution, and measuring speed are different. Flux density measurement delivers the spatial distribution of the concentrated solar radiation on a receiver aperture, measures receiver inpu...

  8. A new Measuring Method of Flux Linkage of SRM

    OpenAIRE

    Chuntang Zhang; Hui Kong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a indirect method of measuring flux characteristics based on DSP. By measuring current and voltage on a phase winding circuit and transfer them to PC by communication program, combined with the Simpson’s rule, the magnetization characteristics are obtained. The experimental instruments needed in this method are common, and the test platform is easy to be built, thus the expense is lowered in measurement of flux. The test indicates the measuring process is simple to impleme...

  9. An alternative method for the measurement of neutron flux

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupa Sarkar; Prasanna Kumar Mondal; Barun Kumar Chatterjee

    2015-10-01

    A simple and easy method for measuring the neutron flux is presented. This paper deals with the experimental verification of neutron dose rate–flux relationship for a non-dissipative medium. Though the neutron flux cannot be obtained from the dose rate in a dissipative medium, experimental result shows that for non-dissipative medium one can obtain the neutron flux from dose rate. We have used a 241 AmBe neutron source for neutron irradiation, and the neutron dose rate and count rate were measured using a NM2B neutron monitor and R-12 superheated droplet detector (SDD), respectively. Here, the neutron flux inferred from the neutron count rate obtained with R-12 SDD shows an excellent agreement with the flux inferred from the neutron dose rate in a non-dissipative medium.

  10. An alternative method for the measurement of neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and easy method for measuring the neutron flux is presented. This paper deals with the experimental verification of neutron dose rate-flux relationship for a non-dissipative medium. Though the neutron flux cannot be obtained from the dose rate in a dissipative medium, experimental result shows that for non-dissipative medium one can obtain the neutron flux from dose rate. We have used a 241AmBe neutron source for neutron irradiation, and the neutron dose rate and count rate were measured using a NM2B neutron monitor and R-12 superheated droplet detector (SDD), respectively. Here, the neutron flux inferred from the neutron count rate obtained with R-12 SDD shows an excellent agreement with the flux inferred from the neutron dose rate in a non-dissipative medium. (author)

  11. Simulation results for light propagation in the central detector for the Angra anti-neutrinos experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An antineutrino detector to be installed in the surrounding area of the Angra II nuclear reactor in Angra dos Reis is currently under development. The related experiment is intended to create a new tool capable of measuring the antineutrino flux coming from the reactor, making use of detection system placed near the reactor dome, and correlate it to the nuclear fuel fission and burn-up. The proposed detector is a box- shaped volume filled with water doped with 0.2% Gadolinium. The photons generated by the passage of particles are collected by 40 photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Aiming to evaluate the importance of reflecting inner surfaces and to provide directives concerning the best positioning of the PMTs inside the detector, a simulation of light propagation in its active volume has been done. Photons are supposed to be point-like entities traveling in straight lines. In the simulation, we investigate the overall photon counting efficiency by analyzing the number of reflections and the length travelled by the photons before being collected or absorbed, as well as the distribution of these photons in different configurations of the PMTs. Different light reflecting structures around the PMTs are also simulated, in order to find those that reduce the probability for a photon to be bounced back to the direction from which it was emitted. We show that a configuration in which the photon emission direction is preserved may be used as VETO for cosmic events. (author)

  12. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of $1/f$ magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDS and $q$-bits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe in...

  13. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  14. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ∼75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ∼7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm. (authors)

  15. Geoneutrinos and reactor antineutrinos at SNO+

    CERN Document Server

    Baldoncini, M; Wipperfurth, S A; Fiorentini, G; Mantovani, F; McDonough, W F; Ricci, B

    2016-01-01

    In the heart of the Creighton Mine near Sudbury (Canada), the SNO+ detector is foreseen to observe almost in equal proportion electron antineutrinos produced by U and Th in the Earth and by nuclear reactors. SNO+ will be the first long baseline experiment to measure a reactor signal dominated by CANDU cores ($\\sim$55\\% of the total reactor signal), which generally burn natural uranium. Approximately 18\\% of the total geoneutrino signal is generated by the U and Th present in the rocks of the Huronian Supergroup-Sudbury Basin: the 60\\% uncertainty on the signal produced by this lithologic unit plays a crucial role on the discrimination power on the mantle signal as well as on the geoneutrino spectral shape reconstruction, which can in principle provide a direct measurement of the Th/U ratio in the Earth.

  16. Reactor Antineutrinos Signal all over the world

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, B; Baldoncini, M; Esposito, J; Ludhova, L; Zavatarelli, S

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated estimate of reactor antineutrino signal all over the world, with particular attention to the sites proposed for existing and future geo-neutrino experiment. In our calculation we take into account the most updated data on Thermal Power for each nuclear plant, on reactor antineutrino spectra and on three neutrino oscillation mechanism.

  17. Footprint prediction of scalar fluxes - Reliability and implications for airborne flux measurements over the FIFE site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepp, P. H.; Desjardins, R. L.; Macpherson, J. I.; Leclerc, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the location and extension of the upwind ground area that affects flux observations most directly are examined to determine the reliability of airborne versus near-ground flux measurements. The theoretical issues regarding the 'footprint' are examined, and specific observations are analyzed by studying the data over a grid regarding sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and greenness. The grid is footprint-corrected to correlate better with independently observed surface characteristics, and an optimized footprint is developed that satisfies the relationships between the observed variables. Optimized mapping of the surface flux is given which demonstrates the importance of considering local advection to correlate airborne and ground-based flux observations. The technique is particularly applicable to situations in which significant variations in the surface flux density exist.

  18. Validating CERES Radiative Fluxes in the Arctic with Airborne Radiative Flux Measurements from the ARISE Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J.; Bucholtz, A.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on board NASA's Terra, Aqua, and Soumi-NPP satellites provide the only measurements of reflected solar shortwave and emitted longwave radiative flux over the Arctic. Various methods have shown the uncertainty of CERES fluxes over sea ice to be higher than other scene types. However validation against an independent radiative flux measurement has never been attempted. We present here an attempt to better quantify the uncertainty of time-and-space averaged CERES flux measurements using airborne measurements from the Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea Ice Experiment (ARISE). The ARISE campaign took place during September of 2014 based out of Fairbanks, Alaska, with most of the measurements taken in the vicinity of the sea ice edge between 125°W and 150°W, and 71°N to 77°N. For six of the flights, measurements were taken in a lawnmower type pattern over either 100 x 200 km box regions at a constant altitude of >6 km, or 100 x 100 km box regions at an altitude of between 200 m to 500 m. They were designed to resemble the CERES Level 3 spatial averaging grids, and were located and timed to coincide with a high number of CERES overpasses. On board the aircraft were a set of upward and downward facing shortwave and longwave broadband radiometers (BBR), along with other instruments measuring meteorological conditions and cloud properties. We have compared the broadband radiative fluxes from BBR with those from CERES for the three days where the aircraft was flying the high altitude pattern. We use the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to account for differences in the measurement altitude between BBR and CERES. We will present results of the comparisons between the computed fluxes and the measured longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes.

  19. FNR demonstration experiments Part II: Subcadmium neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNR HEU-LEU Demonstration Experiments include a comprehensive set of experiments to identify and quantify significant operational differences between two nuclear fuel enrichments. One aspect of these measurements, the subcadmium flux profiling, is the subject of this paper. The flux profiling effort has been accomplished through foil and wire activations, and by rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) mappings. Within the experimental limitations discussed, the program to measure subcadmium flux profiles, lead to the following conclusions: (1) Replacement of a single fresh HEU element by a fresh LEU element at the center of an equilibrium HEU core produces a local flux depression. The ratio of HEU to LEU local flux is 1.19 ± .036, which is, well within experimental uncertainty, equal to the inverse of the U-235 masses for the two elements. (2) Whole core replacement of a large 38 element equilibrium HEU core by a fresh or nearly unburned LEU core reduces the core flux and raises the flux in both D2O and H2O reflectors. The reduction in the central core region is 40% to 10.0% for the small fresh 29 element LEU core, and 16% to 18% for a 31 element LEU core 482) with low average burnup 2O reflector fluxes relative to core fluxes as measured by SPND with a fixed value of sensitivity, are in gross disagreement with the same flux ratios measured by Fe and Rh wire activations. Space dependent refinements of S are calculated to give some improvement in the discrepancy but the major part of the correction remains to be resolved

  20. A new approach to anti-neutrino running in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib K; Link, Jonathan M; Mohapatra, Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility to replace the anti-neutrino run of a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, with anti-neutrinos from muon decay at rest. The low energy of these neutrinos allows the use of inverse beta decay for detection in a Gadolinium-doped water Cerenkov detector. We show that this approach yields a factor of five times larger anti-neutrino event sample. The resulting discovery reaches in theta_13, the mass hierarchy and leptonic CP violation are compared with those from a conventional superbeam experiment with combined neutrino and anti-neutrino running. We find that this approach yields a greatly improved reach for CP violation and theta_13 while leaving the ability to measure the mass hierarchy intact.

  1. Reactor antineutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Haoqi

    2014-01-01

    Neutrinos are elementary particles in the standard model of particle physics. There are 3 flavors of neutrinos that oscillate among themselves. Their oscillation can be described by a 3$\\times$3 unitary matrix, containing three mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$, $\\theta_{23}$, $\\theta_{13}$, and one CP phase. Both $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$ are known from previous experiments. $\\theta_{13}$ was unknown just two years ago. The Daya Bay experiment gave the first definitive non-zero value in 2012. An improved measurement of the oscillation amplitude $\\sin^{2}2(\\theta_{13})$ = $0.090^{+0.008}_{-0.009}$ and the first direct measurement of the $\\bar\

  2. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chupp, T.E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Physics Labs.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  3. Is Deuterium Nuclear Fusion Catalyzed by Antineutrinos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Isaac

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of Fischbach and Jenkins that neutrinos emitted from the sun accelerate radioactive decay is noted. It is thought that neutrinos accelerate beta decay by reacting with neutron-rich nuclides to form a beta particle and a daughter product, with no antineutrino emitted. Conversely, it is proposed that antineutrinos can react with proton-rich nuclides to cause positron decay, with no neutrino emitted. It is also proposed that the nuclear fusion of the hydrogen bomb is triggered not only by the energy of the igniting fission bomb, but by the antineutrinos created by the rapid beta decay of the daughter products in the fission process. The contemplated mechanism for antineutrino initiated fusion is the following: 1. The antineutrinos from the fission daughter products cause positron decay of deuterium by the process outlined above. 2. In a later fusion step, these positrons subsequently react with neutrons in deuterium to create antineutrinos. Electrons are unavailable to annihilate positrons in the plasma of the hydrogen bomb. 3. These antineutrinos thereafter react with more deuterium to form positrons, thereby propagating a chain reaction. )

  4. Neutrino mass hierarchy determination at reactor antineutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    After the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ has been precisely measured by the reactor antineutrino experiments, one of the most important open questions left in neutrino physics is the neutrino mass hierarchy. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) without exploring the matter effect. The JUNO site location is optimized to have the best sensitivity for the mass hierarchy determination. JUNO will employ a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector located in a laboratory 700 meters underground. The excellent energy resolution and PMT coverage will give us an unprecedented opportunity to reach a 3-4 $\\sigma$ precision. In this paper, the JUNO detector design and simulation work will be presented. Also, RENO-50, another medium distance reactor antineutrino experiment, will do a similar measurement. With the efforts of these experiments, it is very likely that the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined in the next 10 years.

  5. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  6. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  7. Reactor and Antineutrino Spectrum Calculations for the Double Chooz First Phase Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Double Chooz reactor oscillation experiment is designed to search for a non-vanishing value of the mixing angle θ13. For the first phase of the experiment with only the far detector running, the reactor electron antineutrino flux is normalized via reactor simulation. For this first phase and from its last results, Double Chooz observed an evidence for a reactor electron antineutrino disappearance. In 227.93 days of far detector live time, we obtained sin22θ13=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). This result excludes the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL

  8. CeLAND: search for a 4th light neutrino state with a 3 PBq 144Ce-144Pr electron antineutrino generator in KamLAND

    CERN Document Server

    Gando, A; Hayashida, S; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishidoshiro, K; Ishikawa, H; Koga, M; Matsuda, R; Matsuda, S; Mitsui, T; Motoki, D; Nakamura, K; Oki, Y; Otani, M; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, B D; Yamada, S; Yamauchi, Y; Yoshida, H; Cribier, M; Durero, M; Fischer, V; Gaffiot, J; Jonqueres, N; Kouchner, A; Lasserre, T; Leterme, D; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Mention, G; Rampal, G; Scola, L; Veyssiere, Ch; Vivier, M; Yala, P; Berger, B E; Kozlov, A; Banks, T; Dwyer, D; Fujikawa, B K; Han, K; Kolomensky, Yu G; Mei, Y; O'Donnell, T; Decowski, P; Markoff, D M; Yoshida, S; Kornoukhov, V N; Gelis, T V M; Tikhomirov, G V; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Karwowski, H J; Efremenko, Y; Detwiler, A; Enomoto, S

    2013-01-01

    The reactor neutrino and gallium anomalies can be tested with a 3-4 PBq (75-100 kCi scale) 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino beta-source deployed at the center or next to a large low-background liquid scintillator detector. The antineutrino generator will be produced by the Russian reprocessing plant PA Mayak as early as 2014, transported to Japan, and deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) as early as 2015. KamLAND's 13 m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure the energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, sterile neutrino state. This will provide a comprehensive test of the electron dissaperance neutrino anomalies and could lead to the discovery of a 4th neutrino state for Delta_m^2 > 0.1 eV^2 and sin^2(2theta) > 0.05.

  9. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ∼ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC

  10. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  11. Cosmic Muon Flux Measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kalousis, L N; Link, J M; Mariani, C; Pelkey, R

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  12. Distributed Sensible Heat Flux Measurements for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwald, H.; Brauchli, T.; Lehning, M.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance is typically computed using eddy covariance or two point profile measurements while alternative approaches such as the flux variance method based on convective scaling has been much less explored and applied. Flux variance (FV) certainly has a few limitations and constraints but may be an interesting and competitive method in low-cost and power limited wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the advantage of providing spatio-temporal sensible heat flux over the domain of the network. In a first step, parameters such as sampling frequency, sensor response time, and averaging interval are investigated. Then we explore the applicability and the potential of the FV method for use in WSN in a field experiment. Low-cost sensor systems are tested and compared against reference instruments (3D sonic anemometers) to evaluate the performance and limitations of the sensors as well as the method with respect to the standard calculations. Comparison experiments were carried out at several sites to gauge the flux measurements over different surface types (gravel, grass, water) from the low-cost systems. This study should also serve as an example of spatially distributed sensible heat flux measurements.

  13. Antineutrino emission and gamma background characteristics from a thermal research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, V M; Fallot, M; Communeau, V; Cormon, S; Estienne, M; Lenoir, M; Peuvrel, N; Shiba, T; Cucoanes, A S; Elnimr, M; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Remoto, A; Thiolliere, N; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the antineutrino emission from research reactors is mandatory for any high sensitivity experiments either for fundamental or applied neutrino physics, as well as a good control of the gamma and neutron backgrounds induced by the reactor operation. In this article, the antineutrino emission associated to a thermal research reactor: the OSIRIS reactor located in Saclay, France, is computed in a first part. The calculation is performed with the summation method, which sums all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products, coupled for the first time with a complete core model of the OSIRIS reactor core. The MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution code was used, allowing to take into account the contributions of all beta decayers in-core. This calculation is representative of the isotopic contributions to the antineutrino flux which can be found at research reactors with a standard 19.75\\% enrichment in $^{235}$U. In addition, the required off-equilibrium correction...

  14. Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Gas System

    CERN Document Server

    Band, H R; Chu, M-C; Heeger, K M; Kwok, M W; Shih, K; Wise, T; Xiao, Q

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is designed to protect the liquid scintillator targets of the antineutrino detectors against degradation and contamination from exposure to ambient laboratory air. The gas system is also used to monitor the leak tightness of the antineutrino detector assembly. The cover gas system constantly flushes the gas volumes above the liquid scintillator with dry nitrogen to minimize oxidation of the scintillator over the five year lifetime of the experiment. This constant flush also prevents the infiltration of radon or other contaminants into these detecting liquids keeping the internal backgrounds low. Since the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors are immersed in the large water pools of the muon veto system, other gas volumes are needed to protect vital detector cables or gas lines. These volumes are also purged with dry gas. Return gas is monitored for oxygen content and humidity to provide early warning of potentially damaging leaks. The design and performance of the Daya...

  15. Thermal neutron flux measurements using neutron-electron converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of neutron-electron converters designed for measuring thermal neutron fluxes is examined. The principle is to produce short lived isotopes emitting beta particles, by activation, and to measure their activity not by extracting them from the reactor, but directly in the reactor using the emitted electrons to deflect the needle of a galvanometer placed outside the flux. After a theoretical study, the results of the measurements are presented; particular attention is paid to a new type of converter characterized by a layer structure. The converters are very useful for obtaining flux distributions with more than 107 neutrons cm-2*sec-1. They work satisfactorily in pressurized carbon dioxide at 400 Celsius degrees. Some points still have to be cleared up however concerning interfering currents in the detectors and the behaviour of the dielectrics under irradiation. (authors)

  16. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Bor...

  17. Antineutrino Neutral Current Interactions in MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation reports the antineutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering cross section on CH2 measured by the MiniBooNE experiment located in Batavia, IL. The data set consists of 60,605 events passing the selection cuts corresponding to 10.1×1020 POT, which represents the world’s largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering events. The final sample is more than one order of magnitude lager that the previous antineutrino NCE scattering cross section measurement reported by the BNL E734 experiment. The measurement presented in this dissertation also spans a wider range in Q2, including the low-Q2 regime where the cross section rollover is clearly visible. A X2-based minimization was performed to determine the best value of the axial mass, MA and the Pauli blocking scaling function, that matches the antineutrino NCE scattering data. However, the best fit values of MA=1.29 GeV and K=1.026 still give a relatively poor X2, which suggests that the underlying nuclear model (based largely on the relativistic Fermi gas model) may not be an accurate representation for this particular interaction. Additionally, we present a measurement of the antineutrino/neutrino-nucleus NCE scattering cross section ratio. The neutrino mode NCE sample used in this study, corresponding to 6.4 × 1020 POT, is also the world’s largest sample (also by an order of magnitude). We have demonstrated that the ratio measurement is robust, as most of the correlated errors cancel, as expected. Furthermore, this ratio also proves to be rather insensitive to variations in the axial mass and the Pauli blocking parameter. This is the first time that this ratio has been experimentally reported. We believe this measurement will aid the theoretical physics community to test various model predictions of neutrino-nucleon/nucleus interactions.

  18. Measurement of fission products β decay properties using a total absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Porta, A.; Fallot, M.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Agramunt, J.; Äystö, J.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eloma, V.; Estévez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttilä, H.; Regan, P. H.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2013-12-01

    In a nuclear reactor, the β decay of fission fragments is at the origin of decay heat and antineutrino flux. These quantities are not well known while they are very important for reactor safety and for our understanding of neutrino physics. One reason for the discrepancies observed in the estimation of the decay heat and antineutrinos flux coming from reactors could be linked with the Pandemonium effect. New measurements have been performed at the JYFL facility of Jyväskylä with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS) in order to circumvent this effect. An overview of the TAS technique and first results from the 2009 measurement campaign will be presented.

  19. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  20. Charged current neutrino and antineutrino interactions in hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this dissertation results are presented of two different (anti-)neutrino experiments with the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) filled with hydrogen and deuterium successively and exposed to the wide band (anti-)neutrino beam at the SPS at CERN. Chapter 1 contains the description of the experimental set-up and in chapter 2 results of the experiment with BEBC filled with deuterium and exposed to the antineutrino beam are presented. The multiplicity distributions of the charged hadron shower produced in (anti-)neutrino interactions with protons and neutrons are studied and compared with the results from hadron-hadron experiments. In chapter 3 a study of the exclusive reaction γp→μ-pπ+ is presented, data being obtained from an exposure of BEBC filled with hydrogen to the wide band neutrino beam. The absolute cross-section of the dominant subchannel γp→μ-Δ++(1232) averaged over an energy range of Esub(γ) = 20-200 GeV is measured to be sigma = (0.59 +- 0.06) . 10-38 cm2. This value is in good agreement with the results of other experiments. The differential cross-section dsigma/dQ2, the Δ++ decay angular distributions and the density matrix elements are determined. The value of the axial mass determined using the Schreiner-Von Hippel parametrization of the Adler model by fitting the total cross-section is Msub(A) = 0.85 +- 0.10 GeV/c2. (Auth.)

  1. The double chooz experiment: simulation of reactor antineutrino spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to study the oscillations of electron antineutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power station, located in France, in the Ardennes region. It will lead to an unprecedented accuracy on the value of the mixing angle θ13. Improving the current knowledge on this parameter, given by the Chooz experiment, requires a reduction of both statistical and systematic errors, that is to say not only observing a large data sample, but also controlling the experimental uncertainties involved in the production and detection of electron antineutrinos. The use of two identical detectors will cancel most of the experimental systematic uncertainties limiting the sensitivity to the value of the mixing angle. We present in this thesis, simulations of reactor antineutrino spectra that were carried out in order to control the sources of systematic uncertainty related to the production of these particles by the plant. We also discuss our work on controlling the normalization error of the experiment through the precise determination of the number of target protons by a weighing measurement and through the study of the fiducial volume of the detectors which requires an accurate modeling of neutron physics. After three years of data taking with two detectors, Double Chooz will be able to disentangle an oscillation signal for sin22θ13 ≥ 0.05 (at 3σ) or, if no oscillations are observed, to put a limit of sin22θ13 ≤ 0.03 at 90% C.L. (author)

  2. Comparison between elementary flux modes analysis and 13C-metabolic fluxes measured in bacterial and plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieuaide-Noubhani Martine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 13C metabolic flux analysis is one of the pertinent ways to compare two or more physiological states. From a more theoretical standpoint, the structural properties of metabolic networks can be analysed to explore feasible metabolic behaviours and to define the boundaries of steady state flux distributions. Elementary flux mode analysis is one of the most efficient methods for performing this analysis. In this context, recent approaches have tended to compare experimental flux measurements with topological network analysis. Results Metabolic networks describing the main pathways of central carbon metabolism were set up for a bacteria species (Corynebacterium glutamicum and a plant species (Brassica napus for which experimental flux maps were available. The structural properties of each network were then studied using the concept of elementary flux modes. To do this, coefficients of flux efficiency were calculated for each reaction within the networks by using selected sets of elementary flux modes. Then the relative differences - reflecting the change of substrate i.e. a sugar source for C. glutamicum and a nitrogen source for B. napus - of both flux efficiency and flux measured experimentally were compared. For both organisms, there is a clear relationship between these parameters, thus indicating that the network structure described by the elementary flux modes had captured a significant part of the metabolic activity in both biological systems. In B. napus, the extension of the elementary flux mode analysis to an enlarged metabolic network still resulted in a clear relationship between the change in the coefficients and that of the measured fluxes. Nevertheless, the limitations of the method to fit some particular fluxes are discussed. Conclusion This consistency between EFM analysis and experimental flux measurements, validated on two metabolic systems allows us to conclude that elementary flux mode analysis could be a

  3. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  4. Calibration corrections of solar tower flux density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PSA flux density measuring system PROHERMES measures the concentrated solar radiation in the entrance aperture of solar tower receivers with a white rotating bar as target and a CCD-camera taking images. The calibration is done with commercial flux gauges placed in the measurement plane. To improve the calibration of the system and to reveal systematic errors, measurements are performed with two different types of commercial flux gauges (Thermogage sensors with and without quartz window) and a large custom-made calorimeter used as reference. The comparison shows that the sensors without quartz window measure about 5-8% higher and the sensors with quartz window about 100% higher. This error is explained with the differences in the spectral composition of the radiation and different angles of incidence between the manufacturer calibration and the solar measurements and corrections are proposed. Spectral changes of the sunlight during the day and year can affect the measurements by more than 10%. By selecting a correction filter adapted to the camera sensitivity, this influence can be reduced to less than 2.5%. Due to the reflective properties of the target coating, changes in angle of incidence can affect the measurements. In standard solar field conditions, this error is less than 0.5%, but for special conditions a correction of the systematic error of up to 8% is proposed

  5. Soil heat flux measurements in an open forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMeulen, MJW; Klaassen, W; Kiely, G

    1996-01-01

    The soil surface heat flux in an open oak forest was determined at four locations to account for the heterogeneity of the forest. Soil temperatures and soil water content were measured at several depths and an integration method with three layers was used. The thickness of the bottom layer was deter

  6. Evapotranspiration: Mass balance measurements compared with flux estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be measured by mass balance methods and estimated by flux sensing methods. The mass balance methods are typically restricted in terms of the area that can be represented (e.g., surface area of weighing lysimeter (LYS) or equivalent representative area of neutron probe (NP...

  7. Horizontal muon flux measured with the LVD detector at LNGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Marco, E-mail: garbini@bo.infn.it [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' Roma and INFN Bologna (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    We report the measure of underground horizontal (cos({theta})<0.3) muon flux with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the I.N.F.N. Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The analysis is based on the whole muon data collected by LVD since start of data taking in 1992.

  8. Flux depression and the absolute measurement of the thermal neutron flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal neutron flux depression in a diffusing medium by an absorbing foil has been treated in numerous papers. The results are re-examined in an attempt to find a uniform and physically meaningful representation of the 'activation correction'. This quantity can be split up into a combination of probabilities. Thus, it is possible to determine the activation correction for any moderator and foil material. Measurements confirm the utility of the concepts introduced

  9. Flux depression and the absolute measurement of the thermal neutron flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal neutron flux depression in a diffusing medium by an absorbing foil has been treated in numerous papers. The results are re-examined in an attempt to find a uniform and physically meaningful representation of the 'activation correction'. This quantity can be split up into a combination of probabilities. Thus, it is possible to determine the activation correction for any moderator and foil material. Measurements confirm the utility of the concepts introduced. (orig.)

  10. Use of Antineutrino Detectors for Nuclear Reactor Safeguards Effectiveness Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Lambert, H E; Elayat, H A; O' Connell, W J; Rexroth, P; Baldwin, G; Bowden, N; Huelskamp, R

    2006-06-05

    As described in an earlier article [1], important information regarding reactor power and the amount and type of fissile material in reactor cores can be determined by measuring the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum, using a cubic meter scale antineutrino detector at tens of meters standoff from the core. Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards techniques do not provide such real-time quantitative information regarding core power levels and isotopic composition. The possible benefits of this approach are several and have been discussed in the earlier article. One key advantage is that the method gives the inspecting agency completely independent access to real-time information on the operational status and fissile content of the core. Furthermore, the unattended and non-intrusive nature of the technology may reduce the monitoring burden on the plant operator, even though more information is being provided than is available within the current IAEA safeguards regime. Here we present a detailed analytical framework for measuring the impact that such a detector might have on IAEA safeguards, if implemented. To perform the analysis, we will use initial data from our operating detector and a standard analysis technique for safeguards regimes, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Because characterization of the prototype detector is still underway, and because improvements in the prototype could have important impact on safeguards performance, the results presented here should be understood to be preliminary, and not reflective of the ultimate performance of the system. The structure of this paper is as follows. Reactor safeguards and the relevant properties of antineutrino detectors are briefly reviewed. A set of hypothetical diversion scenarios are then described, and one of these is analyzed using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Integrated Safeguards System Analysis Tool (LISSAT) The probability of successful

  11. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  12. Search for Perturbations of Nuclear Decay Rates Induced by Reactor Electron Antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, V E; Bryan, C D; Cinko, N; Deichert, G G; Gruenwald, J T; Heim, J M; Kaplan, H B; LaZur, R; Neff, D; Nistor, J M; Sahelijo, N; Fischbach, E

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment conducted near the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, designed to address the question of whether a flux of reactor-generated electron antineutrinos can alter the rates of weak nuclear interaction-induced decays for Mn-54, Na-22, and Co-60. This experiment, while quite sensitive, cannot exclude perturbations less than one or two parts in $10^4$ in $\\beta$ decay (or electron capture) processes, in the presence of an antineutrino flux of $3\\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The present experimental methods are applicable to a wide range of isotopes. Improved sensitivity in future experiments may be possible if we can understand and reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties.

  13. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  14. Measurement of thermal neutron flux for BNCT in JRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on brain tumor, a medical irradiation facility has been installed in the Japan Research Reactor No.2 (JRR-2) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The first BNCT using by this facility was performed in August 1990. Since then, irradiations for 15 BNCT were performed until March 1993 in JRR-2. Two kinds of devices has been equipped for the measurement of thermal neutron flux at the diseased part of patients. The one is for the measurement of activation of thin gold wire using β-γ coincidence equipment, and the other is for the simultaneous monitoring of neutron fluxes during BNCT using silicon semiconductor detectors. The measurements using these devices are reported in this paper. (author)

  15. Absolute measurement of neutron fluxes inside the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this work is the development and study of two methods of neutron measurements in nuclear reactors, the new method of high neutron flux measurements and the Li6-semiconductor neutron spectrometer. This work is presented in four sections: Section I. The introduction explains the need for neutron measurements in reactors. A critical survey is given of the existing methods of high neutron flux measurement and methods of fast neutron spectrum determination. Section II. Theoretical basis of the work of semiconductor counters and their most important characteristics are given. Section III. The main point of this section is in presenting the basis of the new method which the author developed, i.e., the long-tube method, and the results obtained by it, with particular emphasis on absolute measurement of high neutron fluxes. Advantages and limitations of this method are discussed in details at the end of this section. Section IV. A comparison of the existing semiconductor neutron spectrometers is made and their advantages and shortcomings underlined. A critical analysis of the obtained results with the Li6-semiconductor spectrometer with plane geometry is given. A new type of Li6-semiconductor spectrometer is described, its characteristics experimentally determined, and a comparison of it with a classical Li6-spectrometer made (author)

  16. Long-term testing and properties of acrylic for the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Heeger, K. M.

    2012-08-01

    The Daya Bay reactor antineutrino experiment has recently measured the neutrino mixing parameter sin22θ13 by observing electron antineutrino disappearance over kilometer-scale baselines using six antineutrino detectors at near and far distances from reactor cores at the Daya Bay nuclear power complex. Liquid scintillator contained in transparent target vessels is used to detect electron antineutrinos via the inverse beta-decay reaction. The Daya Bay experiment will operate for about five years yielding a precision measurement of sin22θ13. We report on long-term studies of poly(methyl methacrylate) known as acrylic, which is the primary material used in the fabrication of the target vessels for the experiment's antineutrino detectors. In these studies, acrylic samples are subjected to gaseous and liquid environmental conditions similar to those experienced during construction, transport, and operation of the Daya Bay acrylic target vessels and detectors. Mechanical and optical stability of the acrylic as well as its interaction with detector liquids is reported.

  17. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  18. Magnetoinduction converter for measuring the charged particle flux in beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arrangement of a contactless magnetoinduction converter (MIC) designed for measuring the charged particle flux in beams is described. The converter is made of a coil placed onto a toroidal ferromagnetic core, 120x60x12 mm in size. To eliminate the effect of the external magnetic field the MIC is placed into a compound permalloy- copper labyrinth-type screen, In the aperiodic operating mode the MIC measuring channel contains a preamplifier, an amplifier, a strobing circuit, an integrator with a converter, a delay circuit, a time relay, a pulsed-to-direct voltage converter, and a digital voltmeter. For experimental measuring of sensitivity of the MIC measuring system a calibration loop, consisting of an accurate- amplitude generator, a delay circuit and a time relay, is used. The given contactless magnetoinduction converter is a part of the electron flux standard for 5-50 MeV beams. The normal conditions of reproduction of the ''electron/s'' unit are the following: the 293+-1 K temperature, 101.3+40 kPa pressure, 60+-15% relative humidity, 220B+-10% supply voltage and 50+-0.5 Hz frequency. The dynamic range of MIC application is 1012-1015 electron/s. The total systematic error of reproduction of the electron flux unit for the MIC is 1.7%

  19. First flux surface measurements on W7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Otte, Matthias; Biedermann, Christoph; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Braeuer, Torsten; Lazerson, Samuel; W7-X Team

    2015-11-01

    Wendelstein 7-X is rapidly approaching first plasma operation. The full operational B-field of 2.5 T has been reached using the 70 superconducting coils. The first flux surface measurements have recently been successfully performed. This talk will describe the W7-X flux surface measurement system, and show and analyze the first results from this diagnostic, which, at the time of writing this abstract, can be summarized as follows: Confirmation of the existence of nested, closed flux surfaces, first measurements of iota, and detection of the expected internal 5/6 island chain of the OP1.1 configuration. The data obtained so far agree with expectations, and provide a first confirmation of the accuracy of the coil geometry and assembly, as well as diagnostic installation. They also confirm that, with respect to the magnetic topology, plasma operation can start. Plans for, and potentially first results of, measurements of any remnant field errors, will be reported separately at this meeting.

  20. Monitoring nuclear reactors with anti-neutrino detectors: the ANGRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenti, Pietro; Leigui, Marcelo Augusto [UFABC - Universidade Federal do ABC. Rua Santa Adelia, 166. Bairro Bangu. Santo Andre - SP (Brazil); Anjos, Joao; Azzi, Gabriel; Rafael, Gama; Ademarlaudo, Barbosa; Lima, Herman; VAZ, Mario; Villar, Arthur [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 22290-180 (Brazil); Gonzales, Luis Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Kemp, Ernesto [Unicamp, State University of Campinas, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Barao Geraldo - Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Pontifical Catholic University - PUC, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22451-900 Gavea - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Guedes, Germano; Faria, Paulo Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Avenida Transnordestina, Novo Horizonte (Brazil); Pepe, Iuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the status of the ANGRA Project, aimed at developing an anti-neutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactors. Indeed the detection of anti-neutrinos provides a unique handle for non-invasive measurements of the nuclear fuel. This kind of measurements are of deep interest for developing new safeguards tools which may help in nuclear non-proliferation programs. The ANGRA experiment, placed at about 30 m from the core of the 4 GW Brazilian nuclear power reactor ANGRA II, is based on a water Cherenkov detector with about one ton target mass. A few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. The latest results from simulations and the status of the construction are presented. (authors)

  1. Applied Anti-neutrino Physics 2013

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This year, the 9th annual Applied Antineutrino Physics Workshop will be hosted by Sejong University, at the COEX conference center in Seoul South Korea. The workshop will be held on November 1(Friday) - 2(Saturday), 2013. Conveniently for many travelers, it takes place directly after and at the same venue as the 2013 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium (http://www.nss-mic.org/2013/NSSMain.asp) Applied Antineutrino Physics describes an ensemble of experimental and theoretical efforts which aim to use the antineutrino signal from nuclear reactors, and from the Earth itself, in order to address practical problems in nonproliferation and geology respectively. Since the 2004 inception of these workshops, groups worldwide have made considerable advances in defining and expanding the field, garnering interest from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which administers the worlds most important nonproliferation regime, and from the geology/geophysics community. This meeting will focus on the current activi...

  2. Antineutrino induced antikaon production off the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M Rafi; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The charged current antikaon production off nucleons induced by antineutrinos is studied at low and intermediate energies. We extend here our previous calculation on kaon production induced by neutrinos. We have developed a microscopic model that starts from the SU(3) chiral Lagrangians and includes background terms and the resonant mechanisms associated to the lowest lying resonance in the channel, namely, the Sigma*(1385). Our results could be of interest for the background estimation of various neutrino oscillation experiments like MiniBooNE and SuperK. They can also be helpful for the planned antineutrino experiments like MINERvA, NOvA and T2K phase II and for beta-beam experiments with antineutrino energies around 1 GeV.

  3. Experimental determination of the antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of U238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate predictions of the antineutrino spectrum emitted by a nuclear reactor are of paramount importance for current and future reactor neutrino experiments. The antineutrinos are produced in the β - decays of the fission daughters of the four main fuel isotopes 235U, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Pu. One way to calculate the total anti νe - spectrum emitted by a fuel assembly is to experimentally determine the cumulative β-spectra emitted after fission of these four main fuel isotopes and to convert these into the corresponding anti νe-spectra. Three of the four spectra could already be determined in the 1980's, but only recently an experiment at the scientific neutron source FRM II in Garching could be performed to measure the anti νe-spectrum of 238U which contributes 10 % to the total antineutrino output of a standard PWR. With this spectrum, it is now possible to predict the antineutrino output of a reactor without the use of theoretical calculations for the contributing spectra. This talk describes the results of the experiment and discusses the impact on the current analysis of reactor neutrino experiments and the reactor antineutrino anomaly, which may give a hint on the possible existence of light sterile neutrinos.

  4. Antineutrino Background from Spent Fuel Storage in sensitive Searches for theta_13 at Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, V; Sinev, V

    2004-01-01

    Sensitive searches for antineutrino oscillations in atmospheric mass parameter region much discussed in recent years are based on accurate comparison of the inverse beta decay positron spectra measured in two (or more) detectors, far and near, stationed e.g. at ~1000 m and ~100 m from the reactor(s). We show that antineutrinos emitted from the stored irradiated fuel can differently distort the soft part of positron spectra measured in the far and near detector and thus mimic (or hide) the oscillation signal

  5. Antineutrino Background from Spent Fuel Storage in sensitive Searches for theta_13 at Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeikin, V.; Mikaelyan, L.; Sinev, V.

    2004-01-01

    Sensitive searches for antineutrino oscillations in atmospheric mass parameter region much discussed in recent years are based on accurate comparison of the inverse beta decay positron spectra measured in two (or more) detectors, far and near, stationed e.g. at ~1000 m and ~100 m from the reactor(s). We show that antineutrinos emitted from the stored irradiated fuel can differently distort the soft part of positron spectra measured in the far and near detector and thus mimic (or hide) the osc...

  6. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  7. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wohlfahrt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full

  8. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  9. Flux Loop Measurements of the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Magnet Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The first attempt is made to measure the magnetic flux density in the steel blocks of the CMS magnet yoke using the standard magnet discharge with the current ramp down speed of 1.5 A/...

  10. Analysis of neutron flux measurement systems using statistical functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work develops an integrated analysis for neutron flux measurement systems using the concepts of cumulants and spectra. Its major contribution is the generalization of Campbell's theorem in the form of spectra in the frequency domain, and its application to the analysis of neutron flux measurement systems. Campbell's theorem, in its generalized form, constitutes an important tool, not only to find the nth-order frequency spectra of the radiation detector, but also in the system analysis. The radiation detector, an ionization chamber for neutrons, is modeled for cylindrical, plane and spherical geometries. The detector current pulses are characterized by a vector of random parameters, and the associated charges, statistical moments and frequency spectra of the resulting current are calculated. A computer program is developed for application of the proposed methodology. In order for the analysis to integrate the associated electronics, the signal processor is studied, considering analog and digital configurations. The analysis is unified by developing the concept of equivalent systems that can be used to describe the cumulants and spectra in analog or digital systems. The noise in the signal processor input stage is analysed in terms of second order spectrum. Mathematical expressions are presented for cumulants and spectra up to fourth order, for important cases of filter positioning relative to detector spectra. Unbiased conventional estimators for cumulants are used, and, to evaluate systems precision and response time, expressions are developed for their variances. Finally, some possibilities for obtaining neutron radiation flux as a function of cumulants are discussed. In summary, this work proposes some analysis tools which make possible important decisions in the design of better neutron flux measurement systems. (author)

  11. Particle fluxes in the Bay of Bengal measurEd. by sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Parthiban, G.

    Particle fluxes were measured between October, 1987 and March, 1988 using six automated time series sediment traps at three locations in the northern, central and southern Bay of Bengal. Particle fluxes varied between 16.8 and 345 mg m/2 day/1...

  12. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates. PMID:27064564

  13. A Possible Detection of the Cosmic Antineutrino Background in the Presence of Flavor Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y F

    2011-01-01

    Lusignoli and Vignati have recently pointed out that it is in principle possible to directly detect the cosmic antineutrino background by using the rather stable isotope holmium-163 as a target, which can decay into dysprosium-163 via electron capture (EC) with a very small energy release. In this paper we calculate the rate of the relic antineutrino capture on holmium-163 nuclei against the corresponding EC decay rate by taking account of different neutrino mass hierarchies and reasonable values of theta_13. We show that such flavor effects are appreciable and even important in some cases, and stress that a calorimetric measurement of the cosmic antineutrino background might be feasible in the future.

  14. BVOC ecosystem flux measurements at a high latitude wetland site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holst

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present summertime concentrations and fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs measured at a sub-arctic wetland in northern Sweden using a disjunct eddy-covariance (DEC technique based on a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. The vegetation at the site was dominated by Sphagnum, Carex and Eriophorum spp. The performance of the DEC system was assessed by comparing H3O+-ion cluster formed with water molecules (H3O+(H2O at m37 with water vapour concentration measurements made using an adjacent humidity sensor, and from a comparison of sensible heat fluxes for high frequency and DEC data obtained from the sonic anemometer. These analyses showed no significant PTR-MS sensor drift over a period of several weeks and only a small flux-loss due to high-frequency spectrum omissions. This loss was within the range expected from other studies and the theoretical considerations.

    Standardised (20°C and 1000 μmol m−2 s−1 PAR summer isoprene emission rates of 323 μg C m−2 (ground area h−1 were comparable with findings from more southern boreal forests, and fen-like ecosystems. On a diel scale, measured fluxes indicated a stronger temperature dependence when compared with emissions from temperate or (subtropical ecosystems. For the first time, to our knowledge, we report ecosystem methanol fluxes from a sub-arctic ecosystem. Maximum daytime emission fluxes were around 270 μg m−2 h−1 (ca. 100 μg C m−2 h-1 and measurements indicated some nocturnal deposition.

    The measurements reported here covered a period of 50 days (1 August to 19 September 2006, approximately one half of the growing season at the site, and allowed to investigate the effect of vegetation senescence on daily BVOC fluxes and on their temperature and light

  15. Dilepton and trilepton production by antineutrinos and neutrinos in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbier, G.; Bertrand, D.; Guy, J.; Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Brisson, V.; Belusevic, R.; Brou, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Kochowski, C.; Lagraa, M.; Leighton-Davis, S.; Middleton, R.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Talebzadeh, M.; Varvell, K.; Vallee, C.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1985-03-01

    A sample of over 25,000 fully measured neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions in BEBC includes 192 dilepton candidates. The prompt signal after subtraction of background is 41 ±7µ+ e -, 35±7µ+µ- events frombar v interactions, and 32±7µ-µ+ events from ν interactions. There are 2 trileptons, µ-µ- e + and µ-µ-µ+. Results are compared with other experimental data and with the standard model. Limits to prompt like sign µ+ e +, µ+µ+ and µ-µ- signals are given and compared with other experiments and with theoretical calculations.

  16. Dilepton and trilepton production by antineutrinos and neutrinos in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sample of over 25,000 fully measured neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions in BEBC includes 192 dilepton candidates. The prompt signal after subtraction of background is 41+-7 μ+e-. 35+-7 μ+μ- events from anti ν interactions, and 32+-7μ- μ+ events from ν interactions. There are 2 trileptons, μ-μ- e+ and μ-μ-μ+. Results are compared with other experimental data and with the standard mode. Limits to prompt like sign μ+e+, μ+μ+ and μ-μ- signals are given and compared with other experiments and with theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  17. Experimental Determination of the Antineutrino Spectrum of the Fission Products of $^{238}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, N; Hofmann, M; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schreckenbach, K; Wagner, F M

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the scientific neutron source FRM II in Garching to determine the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of $^{238}$U. This was achieved by irradiating target foils of natural uranium with a thermal and a fast neutron beam and recording the emitted $\\beta$-spectra with a gamma-suppressing electron-telescope. The obtained $\\beta$-spectrum of the fission products of $^{235}$U was normalized to the data of the magnetic spectrometer BILL of $^{235}$U. This method strongly reduces systematic errors in the $^{238}$U measurement. The $\\beta$-spectrum of $^{238}$U was converted into the corresponding antineutrino spectrum. The final $\\bar\

  18. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  19. Greenhouse gases regional fluxes estimated from atmospheric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    build up a new system to measure continuously CO2 (or CO), CH4, N2O and SF6 mixing ratios. It is based on a commercial gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N) which have been modified to reach better precision. Reproducibility computed with a target gas on a 24 hours time step gives: 0.06 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CO, 0.7 ppb for CH4, 0.2 ppb for N2O and 0.05 ppt for SF6. The instrument's run is fully automated, an air sample analysis takes about 5 minutes. In July 2006, I install instrumentation on a telecommunication tall tower (200 m) situated near Orleans forest in Trainou, to monitor continuously greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6), atmospheric tracers (CO, Radon-222) and meteorological parameters. Intake lines were installed at 3 levels (50, 100 and 180 m) and allow us to sample air masses along the vertical. Continuous measurement started in January 2007. I used Mace Head (Ireland) and Gif-sur-Yvette continuous measurements to estimate major greenhouse gases emission fluxes at regional scale. To make the link between atmospheric measurements and surface fluxes, we need to quantify dilution due to atmospheric transport. I used Radon-222 as tracer (radon tracer method) and planetary boundary layer heights estimates from ECMWF model (boundary layer budget method) to parameterize atmospheric transport. In both cases I compared results to available emission inventories. (author)

  20. Neutron \\beta-decay as the origin of IceCube's PeV (anti)neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the indications of a possible deficit of muon tracks in the first three-year equivalent dataset of IceCube we investigate the possibility that the astrophysical (anti)neutrino flux (in the PeV energy range) could originate from \\beta-decay of relativistic neutrons. We show that to accommodate IceCube observations it is necessary that only \\sim 10% of the emitted cosmic rays in the energy decade 10^{8.5} \\alt E_{CR}/GeV \\alt 10^{9.5}$, yielding antineutrinos on Earth (10^{5.5} \\alt E_{\\bar \

  1. Quasielastic production of polarized hyperons in antineutrino--nucleon reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar, F; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the longitudinal and perpendicular polarizations of final hyperon($\\Lambda$,$\\Sigma$) produced in the antineutrino induced quasielastic charged current reactions on nucleon targets. The nucleon-hyperon transition form factors are determined from the experimental data on quasielastic $(\\Delta S =0)$ charged current (anti)neutrino--nucleon scattering and the semileptonic decay of neutron and hyperons assuming G--invariance, T--invariance and SU(3) symmetry. The vector transition form factors are obtained in terms of nucleon electromagnetic form factors for which various parameterizations available in literature have been used. A dipole parameterization for the axial vector form factor and the pseudoscalar transition form factor derived in terms of axial vector form factor assuming PCAC and GT relation extended to strangeness sector have been used in numerical evaluations. The flux averaged cross section and polarization observables corresponding to CERN Gargamelle experiment have been calculated...

  2. Performance measurements at the fast flux test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) management recognized the need to develop a measurement system that would quantify the operational performance of the FFTF and the human resources needed to operate it. Driven by declining budgets and the need to safely manage a manpower rampdown at FFTF, an early warning system was developed. Although the initiating event for the early warning system was the need to safely manage a manpower rampdown, many related uses have evolved. The initial desired objective for the FFTF performance measurements was to ensure safety and control of key performance trends. However, the early warning system has provided a more quantitative, supportable basis upon which to make decisions. From this initial narrow focus, efforts in the FFTF plant and supporting organizations are leading to measurement of and, subsequently, improvements in productivity. Pilot projects utilizing statistical process control have started with longer range productivity improvement

  3. Quantifying Representation and Using Representation Weights to Interpolate Flux Tower Measurements across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    We are using a new multivariate statistical technique to quantitatively divide the lower 48 United States into a series of flux-relevant ecoregions. On the basis of these flux-relevant ecoregions, we will quantify the representativeness of the existing network of AmeriFlux towers, showing how well each ecoregion is represented by the current stations in the AmeriFlux network. Quantifying AmeriFlux representation will indicate the best locations where additional AmeriFlux towers should be placed. Using a "paint-by-number" approach, we are attempting to use the flux ecoregions as the statistical basis for extrapolating measurements made at the 52 actively-reporting AmeriFlux towers into a continuous 1-km grid across the United States seasonally. We will use the similarity of the suite of flux-relevant ecosystem characteristics to modify existing flux measurements and estimate fluxes within unmeasured flux ecoregions. Weights calculated for each environmental gradient will allow us to mix new "paint-by-number" colors, extending the process beyond the palette of existing flux measurements. The map of 2000 to 5000 flux ecoregions will produce a highly-resolved national map of estimated fluxes, and will be equivalent to creating thousands of new "virtual" flux towers across the nation. Once flux ecoregions and representation weights have been determined, it may be possible to use them to obtain an interpolated grid of the estimated flux at any point in time across the United States.

  4. Experimental Study Of Terrestrial Electron Anti-neutrinos With Kamland

    CERN Document Server

    Tolich, N R

    2005-01-01

    The analysis presented here uses Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) to measure the rate of electron anti-neutrinos, ne&d1;' s , produced from terrestrial 238U and 212Th. 238U and 212Th are thought to be the main heat source driving mantle convection in the Earth, which in turn is responsible for plate tectonics. The total terrestrial 238U and 212Th content has been estimated from Earth models and rock samples from a very small fraction of the Earth. Until now there have been no direct measurements. Since ne&d1;' s have an exceedingly small cross section, they propagate undisturbed in the Earth interior, and their measurement near the Earth surface can be used to gain information on their sources. Based on a total of (2.63 ± 0.19) × 1031 target proton-years (0.506 kton- years), the 90% confidence interval for the total number of terrestrial 238U and 212Th ne&d1;' s detected is 4 to 40. This is consistent with the best models of terrestrial 23...

  5. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  6. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, R; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies. PMID:23824222

  7. Total Absorption Spectroscopy of Fission Fragments Relevant for Reactor Antineutrino Spectra and Decay Heat Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta decay of fission products is at the origin of decay heat and antineutrino emission in nuclear reactors. Decay heat represents about 7% of the reactor power during operation and strongly impacts reactor safety. Reactor antineutrino detection is used in several fundamental neutrino physics experiments and it can also be used for reactor monitoring and non-proliferation purposes. 92,93Rb are two fission products of importance in reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat, but their β-decay properties are not well known. New measurements of 92,93Rb β-decay properties have been performed at the IGISOL facility (Jyväskylä, Finland using Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS. TAS is complementary to techniques based on Germanium detectors. It implies the use of a calorimeter to measure the total gamma intensity de-exciting each level in the daughter nucleus providing a direct measurement of the beta feeding. In these proceedings we present preliminary results for 93Rb, our measured beta feedings for 92Rb and we show the impact of these results on reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat calculations.

  8. Total Absorption Spectroscopy of Fission Fragments Relevant for Reactor Antineutrino Spectra and Decay Heat Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Fallot, M.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Äystö, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucouanes, A.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Estévez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A. R.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez-Cerdán, A. B.; Podolyák, Zs.; Penttilä, H.; Regan, P. H.; Reponen, M.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Shiba, T.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Weber, C.

    2016-03-01

    Beta decay of fission products is at the origin of decay heat and antineutrino emission in nuclear reactors. Decay heat represents about 7% of the reactor power during operation and strongly impacts reactor safety. Reactor antineutrino detection is used in several fundamental neutrino physics experiments and it can also be used for reactor monitoring and non-proliferation purposes. 92,93Rb are two fission products of importance in reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat, but their β-decay properties are not well known. New measurements of 92,93Rb β-decay properties have been performed at the IGISOL facility (Jyväskylä, Finland) using Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS). TAS is complementary to techniques based on Germanium detectors. It implies the use of a calorimeter to measure the total gamma intensity de-exciting each level in the daughter nucleus providing a direct measurement of the beta feeding. In these proceedings we present preliminary results for 93Rb, our measured beta feedings for 92Rb and we show the impact of these results on reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat calculations.

  9. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations

  10. Flux-measuring approach of high temperature metal liquid based on BP neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡燕瑜; 桂卫华; 李勇刚

    2003-01-01

    A soft-measuring approach is presented to measure the flux of liquid zinc with high temperature andcausticity. By constructing mathematical model based on neural networks, weighing the mass of liquid zinc, the fluxof liquid zinc is acquired indirectly, the measuring on line and flux control are realized. Simulation results and indus-trial practice demonstrate that the relative error between the estimated flux value and practical measured flux value islower than 1.5%, meeting the need of industrial process.

  11. Improvements to measuring water flux in the vadose zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarik, Kevin C; Norman, John M; Brye, Kristofor R; Baker, John M

    2004-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of land use practices on ground water quality has been difficult because few techniques are capable of monitoring the quality and quantity of soil water flow below the root zone without disturbing the soil profile and affecting natural flow processes. A recently introduced method, known as equilibrium tension lysimetry, was a major improvement but it was not a true equilibrium since it still required manual intervention to maintain proper lysimeter suction. We addressed this issue by developing an automated equilibrium tension lysimeter (AETL) system that continuously matches lysimeter tension to soil-water matric potential of the surrounding soil. The soil-water matric potential of the bulk soil is measured with a heat-dissipation sensor, and a small DC pump is used to apply suction to a lysimeter. The improved automated approach reported here was tested in the field for a 12-mo period. Powered by a small 12-V rechargeable battery, the AETLs were able to continuously match lysimeter suction to soil-water matric potential for 2-wk periods with minimal human attention, along with the added benefit of collecting continuous soil-water matric potential data. We also demonstrated, in the laboratory, methods for continuous measurement of water depth in the AETL, a capability that quantifies drainage on a 10-min interval, making it a true water-flux meter. Equilibrium tension lysimeters have already been demonstrated to be a reliable method of measuring drainage flux, and the further improvements have created a more effective device for studying water drainage and chemical leaching through the soil matrix. PMID:15224955

  12. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  13. Supernova Relic Electron Neutrinos and anti-Neutrinos in future Large-scale Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, C

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the signal from supernova relic neutrinos in future large scale observatories, such as MEMPHYS (UNO, Hyper-K), LENA and GLACIER, at present under study. We discuss that complementary information might be gained from the observation of supernova relic electron anti-neutrinos and neutrinos using the scattering on protons on one hand, and on nuclei such as oxygen, carbon or argon on the other hand. When determining the relic neutrino fluxes we also include, for the first time, the coupling of the neutrino magnetic moment to magnetic fields within the core-collapse supernova. We present numerical results on both the relic electron neutrino and anti-neutrino fluxes and on the number of events for electron neutrinos on carbon, oxygen and argon, as well as electron anti-neutrinos on protons, for various oscillation scenarios. The observation of supernova relic neutrinos might provide us with unique information on core-collapse supernova explosions, on the star formation history and on neutrino propert...

  14. Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Adam; Wang, Yifang; Gratta, Giorgio; West, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino...

  15. Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

    2005-05-25

    The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

  16. Measurement of neutron fluxes in the underground laboratory LSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDELWEISS-2 is a direct Dark Matter search experiment installed in the underground laboratory, Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM, France), and looking for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP). The expected interaction rate of WIMPs is below 0.01 events/(kg day), thus rising the importance of having a detailed understanding of potential background. As the current analysis for Dark Matter search shows, ambient and muon-induced neutrons constitute a prominent background component. Detailed studies carried out by the EDELWEISS collaboration in this respect are presented. These activities include dedicated calibrations with neutron sources, monitoring the neutron flux with 3He detectors and measurements with a neutron counter based on Gd-loaded liquid scintillator as well as corresponding MC simulations with full event topology. Studies of muon-induced neutrons are of particular interest. The impact of the neutron background on current EDELWEISS-2 data-taking as well as for next generation experiments such as EURECA is discussed.

  17. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the ANTARES detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzotti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    ANTARES is a submarine neutrino telescope deployed in the Mediterranean Sea, at a depth of about 2500 m. It consists of a three-dimensional array of photomultiplier tubes that can detect the Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrinos with the surrounding medium. Down-going muons produced in atmospheric showers are a physical background to the neutrino detection, and are being studied. In this paper the measurement of the Depth Intensity Relation (DIR) of atmospheric muon flux is presented. The data collected in June and July 2007, when the ANTARES detector was in its 5-line configuration, are used in the analysis. The corresponding livetime is $724 h$. A deconvolution method based on a Bayesian approach was developed, which takes into account detector and reconstruction inefficiencies. Comparison with other experimental results and Monte Carlo expectations are presented and discussed.

  18. Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

    2011-01-01

    This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

  19. New Decay Data Sub-library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactors Antineutrino Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, Alejandro; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library contains up-to-date decay properties for all known nuclides and can be used in a wide variety of applications such as decay heat, delayed nu-bar and astrophysics. We have recently completed an upgrade to the ENDF/B-VII.1 decay data sub-library in order to better calculate antineutrino spectra from fission of actinide nuclides. This sub-library has been used to identify the main contributors to the antineutrino spectra as well as to derive a systematic behavior of the energy integrated spectra similar to that of the beta-delayed neutron multiplicities. The main improvements have been the use of the TAGS data from Algora et al and Greenwood et al, as well as some of the single beta spectrum data from Rudstam et al to obtain beta minus level feedings. Additionally, we have calculated the antineutrino spectra for neutron energies higher than thermal, needed for highly-enriched uranium cores, such as the HFIR in ORNL that will be used in the PROSPECT experiment. These calculations are relevant since the high precision beta spectra which are used in many antineutrino calculations were measured at thermal energies. The impact of the fission yield data on these calculations will be discussed. This work was sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  20. Neutron Flux Measurements of a D-T Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new D-T sealed-tube neutron generator model ING-07T (VNIIA, Russia) was installed at Soreq Nuclear Research Center. A deuterium (D) beam (a minimum 15 mm diameter) irradiates a target containing tritium (T) and via the D + T -> n+4He reaction generates neutrons at En ∼ 14.2 MeV. The neutron generator ion source is of a penning ion source type and allows continuous beam operation. The neutron production can be regulated by the acceleration voltage and ion source parameters. The specified neutron emission rate is 1*109 n/sec. Neutrons are emitted almost isotropically in space. The advantage of the sealed-tube is that it eliminates the use of a vacuum pump. The neutron generator is contained in a 44 cm long aluminum cylinder with a diameter of 19 cm. The generator is connected by a 50 m long cable to a control unit (laptop). A known method for calibration of a 14 MeV neutron flux is performed by copper activation, using the fast neutron reaction 63Cu(n,2n)62Cu, having a neutron energy threshold of En = 10.8 MeV. 62Cu decays by p+ emission (7% = 9.67 min; Pp+ = 97.43%), Photons are produced from positron-electron annihilation (511 keV) at 194.86% (2Ppt) of the disintegrations. In this paper we present a series of measurements performed in order to calibrate the neutron emission rate of the D-T generator and investigate the profile distribution of the flux

  1. Three-dimensional vortex flux flow in LSCO and YBCO through pseudo dc flux transformer measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pseudo dc flux transformer configuration shows that the flux flow in La2-xSrxCuO4 (x=0.075) and YBa2Cu3O7 single crystals is due to the movement of 3-D vortices across the sample. We show that the loss of c-axis long range vortex correlation is achieved either by thermal fluctuations or by an inhomogeneus Lorentz force acting on the vortices. (orig.)

  2. Heat flux measurement from vertical temperature profile and thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Finizola, Anthony; Beauducel, François; Brothelande, Elodie; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal systems are associated to most of the dormant volcanoes. Heat is transported by steam from the hot magma body in the connected porosity and the fissures of the rock to the surface. If the flux is low enough (management, since it reflects the state of the magma body in depth. In order to quantify this flux two methods are considered. First, a vertical profile of temperature is measured by a series of thermocouples, and the conducted flux is estimated thanks to the Fourier law. Secondly, a more recent method uses the thermal infrared imagery to monitor the surface temperature anomaly (STA) between the studied zone and an equivalent zone not affected by the geothermal flux. The heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere is computed as the sum of (1) the radiative flux, (2) the sensible flux and (3) the residual steam flux. These two methods are complementary and have an equivalent uncertainty of approximately 20%, which would allow to track the major changes in the hydrothermal system. However, the surface and sub-surface temperatures are strongly influenced by the climate. For instance, it has been widely demonstrated that the surface temperature dramatically decreases after a rainfall. In order to estimate the reliability of the measurements, a numerical model simulating the evolution of the subsurface temperature in low flux fumarolic zone has been built. In depth, the heat can be transported either by conduction, or by the rising steam, or by condensed water. In surface, both the radiative flux and the sensible flux (convection of the atmosphere) are taken into account. This model allows to estimate the changes of temperature due to a variation of solar illumination, wind, or rainfalls. It has been successfully tested during 5 months with a permanent station built on the Ty fault on La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles). Results show that the diurnal cycle has a significant influence on the temperature up to ca. 30 cm depth, hindering the

  3. Measurement of the axial distribution of thermal neutron flux beside NRU loop fuel test sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Chalk River Laboratories, fuel bundle tests for the CANDU power reactor fuel development program are performed in the fuel test sites of the NRU reactor loops. At present, calculated axial neutron flux profiles from neutronics modeling of the NRU reactor are used to distribute the total measured powers of the loop fuel test sites to determine the relative fuel bundle powers and burnups of the test bundles. In order to provide data for validating the calculated fluxes, measurements of the axial neutron flux distributions adjacent to the loop fuel test sites were also performed. This paper describes how the axial thermal neutron flux distributions were measured using in-core flux detectors and presents the results of comparisons between the measured fluxes and the calculated fluxes predicted by the neutronics simulation code. (author)

  4. Real-time soil flux measurements and calculations with CRDS + Soil Flux Processor: comparison among flux algorithms and derivation of whole system error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstad, K. P.; Venterea, R. T.; Tan, S. M.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding chamber-based soil flux model fitting and measurement error is key to scaling soils GHG emissions and resolving the primary uncertainties in climate and management feedbacks at regional scales. One key challenge is the selection of the correct empirical model applied to soil flux rate analysis in chamber-based experiments. Another challenge is the characterization of error in the chamber measurement. Traditionally, most chamber-based N2O and CH4 measurements and model derivations have used discrete sampling for GC analysis, and have been conducted using extended chamber deployment periods (DP) which are expected to result in substantial alteration of the pre-deployment flux. The development of high-precision, high-frequency CRDS analyzers has advanced the science of soil flux analysis by facilitating much shorter DP and, in theory, less chamber-induced suppression of the soil-atmosphere diffusion gradient. As well, a new software tool developed by Picarro (the "Soil Flux Processor" or "SFP") links the power of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technology with an easy-to-use interface that features flexible sample-ID and run-schemes, and provides real-time monitoring of chamber accumulations and environmental conditions. The SFP also includes a sophisticated flux analysis interface which offers a user-defined model selection, including three predominant fit algorithms as default, and an open-code interface for user-composed algorithms. The SFP is designed to couple with the Picarro G2508 system, an analyzer which simplifies soils flux studies by simultaneously measuring primary GHG species -- N2O, CH4, CO2 and H2O. In this study, Picarro partners with the ARS USDA Soil & Water Management Research Unit (R. Venterea, St. Paul), to examine the degree to which the high-precision, high-frequency Picarro analyzer allows for much shorter DPs periods in chamber-based flux analysis, and, in theory, less chamber-induced suppression of the soil

  5. Neutron flux measurements in the full power LEU core of PARR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of thermal and epithermal flux distributions were made in and around the first low enriched uranium (LEU) full power core of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1). Neutron Flux measurements were made with the help of activation foils and the self powered neutron detectors. The absolute activity of the irradiated foils was determined by gamma spectrometric methods and the neutron flux was obtained from the corresponding foil activity after applying necessary correction. Cadmium ratio technique was used to separate thermal and epithermal fluxes. For the measurement of the axial flux profiles in the core each standard fuel element was divided into six sections vertically. Radial flux distribution was determined by plotting axially averaged neutron flux in each fuel element versus the fuel element position. From the axial and radial flux distributions the flux peaking factors and the hot spots were identified. Specific power in each fuel element was also obtained by the flux measurement and absolute reactor power was determined by summing the specific power in individual fuel elements: Absolute reactor power thus obtained was used for the initial calibration of power monitoring channels of the reactor. The neutron fluxes in the experimental facilities in the new 9 MW core were measured and compared with the values in the 5 MW high enriched uranium (HEU) core wherever possible. (author) 10 figs

  6. Neutronic modeling and thermal neutron flux measurement of the MCR6 rod in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The six-barrel Multiple-Capsule Water Cooled Rods (MCR6) in the NRU reactor have been used to produce isotopes such as I-131 and Ir-192. This paper describes the modeling of the MCR6 rods and the simulation method used to predict the neutron fluxes. The sensitivity of various radioisotope loadings of MCR6 rods upon flux and power perturbations of neighbouring rods is investigated. This paper also presents the results of thermal neutron flux measurements in one of the MCR6 rods from gold wire detectors using the neutron activation technique. The measured fluxes match very well with the simulated fluxes, within ±2%. (author)

  7. Neutronic modeling and thermal neutron flux measurement of the MCR6 rod in the NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The six-barrel Multiple-Capsule Water Cooled Rods (MCR6) in the NRU reactor have been used to produce isotopes such as I-131 and Ir-192. This paper describes the modeling of the MCR6 rods and the simulation method used to predict the neutron fluxes. The sensitivity of various radioisotope loadings of MCR6 rods upon flux and power perturbations of neighbouring rods is investigated. This paper also presents the results of thermal neutron flux measurements in one of the MCR6 rods from gold wire detectors using the neutron activation technique. The measured fluxes match very well with the simulated fluxes, within {+-}2%. (author)

  8. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyna, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lund, J.; Kiff, S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Keefer, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino

  9. ACCENT-BIAFLUX workshop 2005, trace gas and aerosol flux measurement and techniques. Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, A.; Soerensen, L.L. (eds.)

    2005-04-01

    The woorkshop trace gas and aerosol flux measurement techniques in the second meeting within the Biosphere Atmosphere Exchange of Pollutions (BIAFLUX) group in the EU-network project Atmospheric Composition Change (ACCENT). The goal of the workshop is to obtain an overview of techniques for measurements of gas and aerosol fluxes and to gather the knowledge of uncertainties in flux measurements and calculations. The workshop is funded by ACCENT. The abstract book presents abstracts of 21 oral presentations and 26 poster presentations. (LN)

  10. Observation of Reactor Antineutrino Disappearance at RENO and Future Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) in South Korea observed electron anti-neutrino disappearance using data taken from August 2011 to March 2012 (about 222 live-days) at Yonggwang nuclear reactor site. The observed deficit resulted in measuring the last unknown neutrino mixing angle, sin22θ13, as 0.113 +/- 0.013 (stat) +/- 0.019 (sys.) which is 4.9 sigma level discovery over no oscillation hypothesis. We have taken about 440 live-days of data in total so far and those data are being analyzed. The ultimate goal of RENO analysis is that we would like to reduce statistical and systematic errors down to more than half of what are now by taking data for 3 years in total and by improving analysis method and reducing background. At the end, our future project, RENO-50, is discussed

  11. Ozone Flux Measurement and Modelling on Leaf/Shoot and Canopy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger Grünhage

    Full Text Available The quantitative study of the ozone effects on agricultural and forest vegetation requires the knowledge of the pollutant dose absorbed by plants via leaf stomata, i.e. the stomatal flux. Nevertheless, the toxicologically effective dose can differ from the stomatal flux because a pool of scavenging and detoxification processes reduce the amount of pollutant responsible of the expression of the harmful effects. The measurement of the stomatal flux is not immediate and the quantification of the effective dose is still troublesome. The paper examines the conceptual aspects of ozone flux measurement and modelling in agricultural and ecological research. The ozone flux paradigm is conceptualized into a toxicological frame and faced at two different scales: leaf/shoot and canopy scales. Leaf and shoot scale flux measurements require gas-exchange enclosure techniques, while canopy scale flux measurements need a micrometeorological approach including techniques such as eddy covariance and the aerodynamical gradient. At both scales, not all the measured ozone flux is stomatal flux. In fact, a not negligible amount of ozone is destroyed on external plant surfaces, like leaf cuticles, or by gas phase reaction with biogenic volatile compounds. The stomatal portion of flux can be calculated from concurrent measurements of water vapour fluxes at both scales. Canopy level flux measurements require very fast sensors and the fulfilment of many conditions to ensure that the measurements made above the canopy really reflect the canopy fluxes (constant flux hypothesis. Again, adjustments are necessary in order to correct for air density fluctuations and sensor-surface alignment break. As far as regards flux modelling, at leaf level the stomatal flux is simply obtained by multiplying the ozone concentration on the leaf with the stomatal conductance predicted by means of physiological models fed by meteorological parameter. At canopy level the stomatal flux is

  12. Apply of measure and control data management software in core neutron flux measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It describes the development of C2 project based on the OPC protocol core measurement system measurement and control data management software. The main achievement is a measure of the reactor core of the neutron flux distribution, monitoring core power distortion, and accumulated fuel consumption data and other functions, and place the abnormal response timely. The monitoring software running on the main cabinet computer achieves the integration of system monitoring, and the monitoring software running on the channel cabinet achieves system monitoring. The monitoring and control software plays an important role in ensuring the safety and economy of the nuclear power plants. (authors)

  13. Measurement of carbon dioxide fluxes in a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment experiment using the closed flux chamber technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsted, Merete Bang; Ambus, Per; Michelsen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, composing net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and soil respiration (SR) were measured in a temperate heathland exposed to elevated CO2 by the FACE (free-air carbon enrichment) technique, raising the atmospheric CO2 concentration from c. 380 μmol...

  14. Measurement of carbon dioxide fluxes in a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment experiment using the closed flux chamber technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsted, M.B.; Ambus, P.; Michelsen, A.;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes, composing net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and soil respiration (SR) were measured in a temperate heathland exposed to elevated CO2 by the FACE (free-air carbon enrichment) technique, raising the atmospheric CO(2) concentration from c. 380 mu...

  15. Comparison of eddy covariance and modified Bowen ratio methods for measuring gas fluxes and implications for measuring fluxes of persistent organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolinius, Damien Johann; Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cycle between the atmosphere and terrestrial surfaces; however measuring fluxes of POPs between the atmosphere and other media is challenging. Sampling times of hours to days are required to accurately measure trace concentrations of POPs in the atmosphere, which rules out the use of eddy covariance techniques that are used to measure gas fluxes of major air pollutants. An alternative, the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, has been used instead. In this study we used data from FLUXNET for CO2 and water vapor (H2O) to compare fluxes measured by eddy covariance to fluxes measured with the MBR method using vertical concentration gradients in air derived from averaged data that simulate the long sampling times typically required to measure POPs. When concentration gradients are strong and fluxes are unidirectional, the MBR method and the eddy covariance method agree within a factor of 3 for CO2, and within a factor of 10 for H2O. To remain within the range of applicability of the MBR method, field studies should be carried out under conditions such that the direction of net flux does not change during the sampling period. If that condition is met, then the performance of the MBR method is neither strongly affected by the length of sample duration nor the use of a fixed value for the transfer coefficient.

  16. Quasi-elastic interactions and one-pion production by neutrinos and anti-neutrinos on a deuterium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the weak charged current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nucleons are described, in which the neutrino scatters in a quasi-elastic way with the nucleon, leaving an excited nucleon state. The experiments have been performed in the bubble chamber BEBC, filled with deuterium and exposed to the CERN Wide Band (anti-)neutrino beams. This gave the opportunity to study both interactions on protons and on neutrons separately, whereas the measurement of the exclusive channels could be performed with a high precision. After a short introduction of the relevant theories (standard model; QCD; one-pion production models; FKR quark model), the experimental set-up at CERN is described as well as the bubble chamber picture facility in Amsterdam. Next, results of the neutrino and antineutrino experiments are given followed by a comparison with theory. (Auth.)

  17. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  18. Antineutrino reactor safeguards - a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrinos have been proposed as a means of reactor safeguards for more than 30 years and there has been impressive experimental progress in neutrino detection. In this paper we conduct, for the first time, a case study of the application of antineutrino safeguards to a real-world scenario - the North Korean nuclear crisis in 1994. We derive detection limits to a partial or full core discharge in 1989 based on actual IAEA safeguards access and find that two independent methods would have yielded positive evidence for a second core with very high confidence. To generalize our results, we provide detailed estimates for the sensitivity to the plutonium content of various types of reactors, including most types of plutonium production reactors, based on detailed reactor simulations. A key finding of this study is that a wide class of reactors with a thermal power of less than 0.1-1 GWth can be safeguarded achieving IAEA goals for quantitative sensitivity and timeliness with detectors right outside the reactor ...

  19. Detection of Breeding Blankets Using Antineutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Bernadette; Huber, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement between the United States and Russia makes arrangements for the disposal of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium. Under this agreement Russia plans to dispose of its excess stocks by processing the plutonium into fuel for fast breeder reactors. To meet the disposition requirements this fuel would be burned while the fast reactors are run as burners, i.e., without a natural uranium blanket that can be used to breed plutonium surrounding the core. This talk discusses the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the verification of the presence or absence of a breeding blanket. It is found that a 36 kg antineutrino detector, exploiting coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and made of silicon, could determine the presence of a breeding blanket at a liquid sodium cooled fast reactor at the 95% confidence level within 90 days. Such a detector would be a novel non-intrusive verification tool and could present a first application of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering to a real-world challenge.

  20. New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

  1. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  2. Relative measurement of the fluxes of thermal, resonant and rapid neutrons in reactor G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to determine the behavior of the thermal, resonant and rapid neutron fluxes in the multiplier-reflector transition region, in the two principal directions of the system. We have also measured the variation of these different fluxes in the body of the multiplier medium in a canal filled with graphite and in an empty canal. The results are given in the form of curves representing: - the variation of the ratio of the thermal flux to the rapid flux in axial and radial transitions - the behavior of the thermal and resonant fluxes and the variation of their ratio in the same regions. (author)

  3. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  4. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters

  5. Target Mass Monitoring and Instrumentation in the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Band, Henry R; Greenler, Lee S; Heeger, Karsten M; Hinrichs, Paul; Kang, Li; Lewis, Christine; Li, Shanfeng; Lin, Shengxin; McFarlane, Michael C; Wang, Wei; Webber, David M; Wei, Yadong; Wise, Thomas; Xiao, Qiang; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay experiment measures sin^2 2{\\theta}_13 using functionally identical antineutrino detectors located at distances of 300 to 2000 meters from the Daya Bay nuclear power complex. Each detector consists of three nested fluid volumes surrounded by photomultiplier tubes. These volumes are coupled to overflow tanks on top of the detector to allow for thermal expansion of the liquid. Antineutrinos are detected through the inverse beta decay reaction on the proton-rich scintillator target. A precise and continuous measurement of the detector's central target mass is achieved by monitoring the the fluid level in the overflow tanks with cameras and ultrasonic and capacitive sensors. In addition, the monitoring system records detector temperature and levelness at multiple positions. This monitoring information allows the precise determination of the detectors' effective number of target protons during data taking. We present the design, calibration, installation and in-situ tests of the Daya Bay real-time ant...

  6. Thermal flux measurements in hypersonic flows: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J. F.; Balageas, D.; Neumann, R. D.

    1993-04-01

    This contribution reviews the papers presented in the Session on 'Heat Flux' and 'Thermography' at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop entitled 'New Trends in Instrumentation for Hypersonic Research', 27 April-1 May, 1992, Le Fauga, France. The present status and problem areas associated with specific methods are discussed and recommendations for future research and development are presented.

  7. First flux measurement in a SINQ supermirror neutron guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Schlumpf, N.; Bauer, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    On Dec. 3, 1996, the Swiss spallation neutron source SINQ was taken into operation and produced its first neutrons successfully. The neutron spectrum within one of the supermirror guides was estimated by a chopper Time-of-Flight method. The result shows a 30% higher neutron intensity at the flux maximum than expected from previous Monte-Carlo simulations. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  8. Analysis of thermal neutron flux measurement in the Cobalt Irradiation Device at ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of geometrical distribution of thermal neutron flux in research reactors are often used in the field of reactor operation and reactor physics. Usually such measurements are carried out by using the gold wire activation method. This method has been used for measuring a thermal neutron flux at the location of a Cobalt Irradiation Device (CID) of ETRR-2. A special device was used for locating samples in an irradiation box and the measurements were preformed for seventy two positions. The Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code has been used for the modeling and simulation of ETRR-2 core with structural materials and surrounding beryllium reflectors. The device used in the flux measurement was also simulated in the MCNP-4B model. The thermal flux has been calculated and compared with the experimental one. The results show good agreement between the measured and calculated flux. (author)

  9. Eddy covariance flux measurements of gaseous elemental mercury using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Ashley M; Moore, Christopher W; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Kljun, Natascha; Obrist, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    A newly developed pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations at high temporal resolution (25 Hz) was used to successfully conduct the first eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of GEM. GEM is the main gaseous atmospheric form, and quantification of bidirectional exchange between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere is important because gas exchange is important on a global scale. For example, surface GEM emissions from natural sources, legacy emissions, and re-emission of previously deposited anthropogenic pollution may exceed direct primary anthropogenic emissions. Using the EC technique for flux measurements requires subsecond measurements, which so far has not been feasible because of the slow time response of available instrumentation. The CRDS system measured GEM fluxes, which were compared to fluxes measured with the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) and a dynamic flux chamber (DFC). Measurements took place near Reno, NV, in September and October 2012 encompassing natural, low-mercury (Hg) background soils and Hg-enriched soils. During nine days of measurements with deployment of Hg-enriched soil in boxes within 60 m upwind of the EC tower, the covariance of GEM concentration and vertical wind speed was measured, showing that EC fluxes over an Hg-enriched area were detectable. During three separate days of flux measurements over background soils (without Hg-enriched soils), no covariance was detected, indicating fluxes below the detection limit. When fluxes were measurable, they strongly correlated with wind direction; the highest fluxes occurred when winds originated from the Hg-enriched area. Comparisons among the three methods showed good agreement in direction (e.g., emission or deposition) and magnitude, especially when measured fluxes originated within the Hg-enriched soil area. EC fluxes averaged 849 ng m(-2) h(-1), compared to DFC fluxes of 1105 ng m(-2) h(-1) and MBR fluxes

  10. MARIE Dose and Flux Measurements in Mars Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Turner, R.; Atwell, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around Mars. MARIE operated successfully from March 2002 through October 2003. At the time of this writing, the instrument is off due to a loss of communications during an extremely intense Solar Particle Event. Efforts to revive MARIE are planned for Spring 2004, when Odyssey's role as a communications relay for the MER rovers is completed. During the period of successful operation, MARIE returned the first detailed energetic charged particle data from Mars. Due to limitations of the instrument, normalizing MARIE data to flux or dose is not straightforward - several large corrections are needed. Thus normalized results (like dose or flux) have large uncertainties and/or significant model-dependence. The problems in normalization are mainly due to inefficiency in detecting high-energy protons (signal-to-noise problems force the trigger threshold to be higher than optimal), to the excessively high gains employed in the signal processing electronics (many ions deposit energy sufficient to saturate the electronics, and dE/dx information is lost), and to artifacts associated with the two trigger detectors (incomplete registration of dE/dx). Despite these problems, MARIE is efficient for detecting helium ions with kinetic energies above about 30 MeV/nucleon, and for detecting high-energy ions (energies above about 400 MeV/nucleon) with charges from 5 to 10. Fluxes of these heavier ions can be compared to fluxes obtained from the ACE/CRIS instrument, providing at least one area of direct comparison between data obtained at Earth and at Mars; this analysis will be presented as a work in progress. We will also present dose-rate data, with a detailed explanation of the many sources of uncertainty in normalization. The results for both flux and dose will be compared to predictions of the HZETRN model of the GCR.

  11. Neutron flux measurements in the full power leu core of PARR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, L.; Ansari, S.A.; Shami, Q.D.; Iqbal, M.

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of thermal and epithermal flux distributions were made in and around the first low enriched uranium (LEU) full power core of Pakistan Research Reactor-1(PARR-1). Neutron Flux measurements were made with the help of activation foils and the self powered neutron detectors. The absolute activity of the irradiated foils was determined by gamma spectrometric method and the neutron correction. Cadmium ratio technique was used to separate thermal and epithermal fluxes. For the measurement of the axial flux profiles in the core each standard fuel element was divided into six sections vertically. Radial flux distribution was determined by plotting axially averaged neutron flux in each fuel element versus the fuel element position.

  12. The altitude variation of the ionospheric photoelectron flux A comparison of theory and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The 145 to 300-km altitude variation of the measured photoelectron flux in the 13 to 18 eV, 28 to 34 eV, and 50 to 55 eV energy regions are compared with the variations expected from theory. There is a strong linear relationship between the measured photoelectron flux and the attenuation of the solar EUV flux at these energies. Therefore, the photoelectron flux is sensitive to changes in the solar zenith angle, neutral density scale height, and total neutral density. However, contrary to previous assertions, the photoelectron flux at most energies is not sensitive to the relative densities of the neutral constituents. In addition, good agreement between theory and measurement is obtained. By using the concept of photoelectron production frequencies, the usually complex evaluation of the local equilibrium photoelectron flux is reduced to a trivial calculation so that the steps in the calculation can be readily verified.

  13. Comparison of calculated and measured foliar O3 flux in crop and forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We designed a new gas exchange system that concurrently measures foliar H2O, O3, and CO2 flux (HOC flux system) while delivering known O3 concentrations. Stomatal responses of three species were tested: snapbean, and seedlings of California black oak (deciduous broadleaf) and blue oak (evergreen broadleaf). Acute O3 exposure (120-250 ppb over an hour) was applied under moderate light and low vapor pressure deficits during near steady state conditions. The rate of stomatal closure was measured when the whole plant was placed in the dark. An adjacent leaf on each plant was also concurrently measured in an O3-free cuvette. Under some conditions, direct measurements and calculated foliar O3 flux were within the same order of magnitude; however, endogenously low gs or O3 exposure-induced depression of gs resulted in an overestimation of calculated O3 fluxes compared with measured O3 fluxes. Sluggish stomata in response to light extinction with concurrent O3 exposure, and incomplete stomatal closure likewise underestimated measured O3 flux. - Using a new system to concurrently measure H2O, O3, and CO2 flux, the conventional method of calculating O3 flux generally overestimated direct measures by 25-50%

  14. Comparison of calculated and measured foliar O{sub 3} flux in crop and forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grulke, N.E. [USDA Forest Service, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)]. E-mail: ngrulke@fs.fed.us; Paoletti, E. [IPP-CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Heath, R.L. [Botany and Plant Sciences Department, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    We designed a new gas exchange system that concurrently measures foliar H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, and CO{sub 2} flux (HOC flux system) while delivering known O{sub 3} concentrations. Stomatal responses of three species were tested: snapbean, and seedlings of California black oak (deciduous broadleaf) and blue oak (evergreen broadleaf). Acute O{sub 3} exposure (120-250 ppb over an hour) was applied under moderate light and low vapor pressure deficits during near steady state conditions. The rate of stomatal closure was measured when the whole plant was placed in the dark. An adjacent leaf on each plant was also concurrently measured in an O{sub 3}-free cuvette. Under some conditions, direct measurements and calculated foliar O{sub 3} flux were within the same order of magnitude; however, endogenously low gs or O{sub 3} exposure-induced depression of gs resulted in an overestimation of calculated O{sub 3} fluxes compared with measured O{sub 3} fluxes. Sluggish stomata in response to light extinction with concurrent O{sub 3} exposure, and incomplete stomatal closure likewise underestimated measured O{sub 3} flux. - Using a new system to concurrently measure H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, and CO{sub 2} flux, the conventional method of calculating O{sub 3} flux generally overestimated direct measures by 25-50%.

  15. A bottom-up perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of global eddy covariance flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Amelynck, Crist; Ammann, Christof; Arneth, Almut; Bamberger, Ines; Goldstein, Allen; Hansel, Armin; Heinesch, Bernhard; Holst, Thomas; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Karl, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; McKinney, Karena; Munger, William; Schade, Gunnar; Schoon, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is, after methane, the second most abundant VOC in the troposphere and globally represents nearly 20% of the total biospheric VOC emissions. With typical concentrations of 1-10 ppb in the continental boundary layer, methanol plays a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry, which needs to be evaluated in the light of ongoing changes in land use and climate. Previous global methanol budgets have approached the net land flux by summing up the various emission terms (namely primary biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, plant decay and biomass burning) and by subtracting dry and wet deposition, resulting in a net land flux in the range of 75-245 Tg y-1. The data underlying these budget calculations largely stem from small-scale leaf gas exchange measurements and while recently column-integrated remotely sensed methanol concentrations have become available for constraining budget calculations, there have been few attempts to contrast model calculations with direct net ecosystem-scale methanol flux measurements. Here we use eddy covariance methanol flux measurements from 8 sites in Europe and North America to study the magnitude of and controls on the diurnal and seasonal variability in the net ecosystem methanol flux. In correspondence with leaf-level literature, our data show that methanol emission and its strong environmental and biotic control (by temperature and stomatal conductance) prevailed at the more productive (agricultural) sites and at a perturbed forest site. In contrast, at more natural, less productive sites substantial deposition of methanol occurred, in particular during periods of surface wetness. These deposition processes are poorly represented by currently available temperature/light and/or production-driven modelling algorithms. A new framework for modelling the bi-directional land-atmosphere methanol exchange is proposed which accounts for the production of methanol in leaves, the regulation of leaf methanol emission by stomatal

  16. Flux measurements in a nuclear research reactor by using an aluminum nitride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small polycrystalline aluminium nitride detector with a thickness of 381 μm was used to measure a 200,000 Ci Co60 source and to measure the flux in a research reactor where the neutron flux is about 1014/cm2 s, which is nearly the same order as in the commercial power plant. If the applied voltage is greater than or equal to 2000 V and if the measurements are done in a short period of time so that the heat energy does not build up in the aluminium nitride, then the measured electric current is linearly proportional to the input flux. It is assumed of course that the energy spectrum of the input flux remains constant. This linearity relation is illustrated by the results of a measurement in which the reactor power has been controlled so that the flux becomes a step function

  17. SkyLine and SkyGas: Novel automated technologies for automatic GHG flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Philip; Stockdale, James

    2014-05-01

    1. Concerns for the future of the Earth's climate centre around the anthropogenically-driven continuing increases in atmospheric concentrations of the major 'greenhouse gases' (GHGs) which include CO2, CH4 and N2O. A major component of the global budgets for all three of these gases is the flux between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Currently, these fluxes are poorly quantified, largely due to technical limitations associated with making these flux measurements. Whilst eddy covariance systems have greatly improved such measurements at the ecosystem scale, flux measurements at the plot scale are commonly made using labour intensive traditional 'cover box' approaches; technical limitations have frequently been a bottle-neck in producing adequate and appropriate GHG flux data necessary for making land management decisions. For example, there are almost no night time flux data for N2O fluxes, and frequently such data are only measured over bare soil patches. 3. We have been addressing the design of novel field equipment for the automation of GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scale and will present here some of the technical solutions we have developed. These solutions include the development of the SkyLine and SkyGas approaches which resolve many of the common problems associated with making high frequency, sufficiently replicated GHG flux measurements under field conditions. 4. Unlike most other automated systems, these technologies 'fly' a single chamber to the measurement site, rather than have multiple replicated chambers and analysers. We will present data showing how such systems can deliver high time and spatial resolution flux data, with a minimum of operator intervention and, potentially, at relatively low per plot cost. We will also show how such measurements can be extended to monitoring fluxes from freshwater features in the landscape.

  18. Continuous SO2 flux measurements for Vulcano Island, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The La Fossa cone of Vulcano Island (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy is a closed conduit volcano. Today, Vulcano Island is characterized by sulfataric activity, with a large fumarolic field that is mainly located in the summit area. A scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument designed by the Optical Sensing Group of Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden, was installed in the framework of the European project "Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change", in March 2008. This study presents the first dataset of SO2 plume fluxes recorded for a closed volcanic system. Between 2008 and 2010, the SO2 fluxes recorded showed average values of 12 t.d–1 during the normal sulfataric activity of Vulcano Island, with one exceptional event of strong degassing that occurred between September and December, 2009, when the SO2 emissions reached up to 100 t.d–1.

  19. Comparison of ecosystem water flux measured with the Eddy covariance- and the direct xylem sap flux method in a mountainous forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanicki, G.; Geissbuehler, P.; Siegwolf, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The Eddy covariance technique allows to measure different components of turbulent air fluxes, including the flow of water vapour. Sap flux measurements determine directly the water flow in tree stems. We compared the water flux just above the crowns of trees in a forest by the technique of Eddy covariance and the water flux by the xylem sap flux method. These two completely different approaches showed a good qualitative correspondence. The correlation coefficient is 0.8. With an estimation of the crown diameter of the measured tree we also find a very good quantitative agreement. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs.

  20. Measuring light-emitting diodes with a scanner for radiant flux and colour characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the performance requirements of displays and lighting applications, there is a great need to measure the radiant flux and colour of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) simultaneously in a high throughput format. We evaluate the feasibility of obtaining reliable colour and radiant flux values of LEDs with a low-cost office flatbed document scanner under factory settings versus conventional measurements. Colour purity was evaluated against a spectrometer and a digital camera, while radiant flux was evaluated against photodiodes. Scanner colour rendition of red, green and yellow LEDs was of variable quality. The scanner showed better correlation to conventional radiant flux measurements, with linear least-squares agreement between 0.934 and 0.985. A scanner represents a low cost and high throughput means of evaluating LEDs with simultaneous measures of both electroluminescent flux and emission colour with operational time. (paper)

  1. Hypersharp Resonant Capture of Anti-Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, R S

    2008-01-01

    Recent ideas suggest that the 18.6 keV antineutrino (nuebar) line from 2-body decay of 3H in crystals is emitted with natural width, motionally narrowed by lattice vibrations as in recoilless emission. It can be resonantly captured in 3He with geometrical cross section sigma ~10 ^ -17 cm2. A key technique solves a basic obstacle for achieving resonance--the chemical difference of H and He in metals. The low nue energy, the high sigma and the hypersharp sensitivity DELTA E/E ~10^--29 make an extraordinary tool for bench scale tests of nue theta13 oscillations and predicted Planck length limits on nuclear level widths in models of quantum gravity.

  2. First Antineutrino Oscillation Results from T2K

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    As limits improve on the neutrino mixing angles and mass-squared differences, the focus of T2K has shifted towards studying antineutrino oscillation. This will give an insight into CP violation (if P($\\bar{\

  3. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  4. The Changjiang sediment flux into the seas: measurability and predictability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daowei YIN; Zhongyuan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the credibility and predictability of sediment flux of the Changjiang River that has discharged into the seas on the basis of historical database. The assumption of the study stands on the lack of sufficient observation data of suspended sediment con-centration (SSC) during peaking flood period, which most likely results in the application of an inappropriate method to the downstream-most Datong hydrological gauging station in the Changjiang basin. This insufficient method (only 30-50 times of SSC observation per year), that obviously did not cover the peaking SSC during peaking floods, would lead to an inaccuracy in estimating the Changjiang sediment load by 4.7×108t/a (multiyearly)into the seas. Also, sediment depletion that often takes place upstream of the Changjiang basin has, to some extent, lowered the credibility of traditional sediment rating curve that has been used for estimating sediment budget. A newly-established sediment rating curve of the present study is proposed to simulate the sediment flux/load into the seas by using those SSC only under discharge of 60000ma/s at the Datong station-the threshold to significantly correlate to SSC. Since discharge of 60000-80000 m3/s is often linked to extreme flood events and associated sediment depletion in the basin, un-incorporating SSC of 60000-80000 m3/s into the sediment rating curve will increase the credibility for sediment load estimation. Using this approach of the present study would indicate the sediment load of 3.3 × 108-6.6× 108 t/a to the seas in the past decades. Also, our analytical result shows a lower sediment flux pattern in the 1950s, but higher pattern in the 1960 s-1980 s, reflecting the changes in land-use in the upstream of Changjiang basin, including widely devastated deforestation during the middle 20th century.

  5. Discriminating among Earth composition models using geo-antineutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    H. Nunokawa(Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 38071, 22452-970, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Teves, W. J. C.; Funchal, R. Zukanovich

    2003-01-01

    It has been estimated that the entire Earth generates heat corresponding to about 40 TW (equivalent to 10,000 nuclear power plants) which is considered to originate mainly from the radioactive decay of elements like U, Th and K, deposited in the crust and mantle of the Earth. Radioactivity of these elements produce not only heat but also antineutrinos (called geo-antineutrinos) which can be observed by terrestrial detectors. We investigate the possibility of discriminating among Earth composi...

  6. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Antineutrino analysis for continuous monitoring of nuclear reactors: Sensitivity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Christopher; Erickson, Anna [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 770 State St. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This paper explores the various contributors to uncertainty on predictions of the antineutrino source term which is used for reactor antineutrino experiments and is proposed as a safeguard mechanism for future reactor installations. The errors introduced during simulation of the reactor burnup cycle from variation in nuclear reaction cross sections, operating power, and other factors are combined with those from experimental and predicted antineutrino yields, resulting from fissions, evaluated, and compared. The most significant contributor to uncertainty on the reactor antineutrino source term when the reactor was modeled in 3D fidelity with assembly-level heterogeneity was found to be the uncertainty on the antineutrino yields. Using the reactor simulation uncertainty data, the dedicated observation of a rigorously modeled small, fast reactor by a few-ton near-field detector was estimated to offer reduction of uncertainty on antineutrino yields in the 3.0–6.5 MeV range to a few percent for the primary power-producing fuel isotopes, even with zero prior knowledge of the yields.

  9. Measurements of muon flux in the Pyh\\"asalmi underground laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Enqvist, T; F"ohr, V; Jämsén, T; Lehtola, M; Narkilahti, J; Joutsenvaara, J; Nurmenniemi, S; Peltoniemi, J; Remes, H; Sarkamo, J; Shen, C; Usoskin, I

    2005-01-01

    The cosmic-ray induced muon flux was measured at several depths in the Pyh\\"asalmi mine (Finland) using a plastic scintillator telescope mounted on a trailer. The flux was determined at four different depths underground at 400 m (980 m.w.e), at 660 m (1900 m.w.e), at 990 m (2810 m.w.e) and at 1390 m (3960 m.w.e) with the trailer, and also at the ground surface. In addition, previously measured fluxes from depths of 90 m (210 m.w.e) and 210 m (420 m.w.e) are shown. A relation was obtained for the underground muon flux as a function of the depth. The measured flux follows well the general behaviour and is consistent with results determined in other underground laboratories.

  10. Techniques to Measure Solar Flux Density Distribution on Large-Scale Receivers

    OpenAIRE

    Röger, Marc; Herrmann, Patrik; Ulmer, Steffen; Ebert, Miriam; Prahl, Christoph; Göhring, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Flux density measurement applied to central receiver ystems delivers the spatial distribution of the concentrated solar radiation on the receiver aperture, measures receiver input power, and monitors and might control heliostat aimpoints. Commercial solar tower plants have much larger aperture surfaces than the receiver prototypes tested in earlier research and development (R&D) projects. Existing methods to measure the solar flux density in the receiver aperture face new challenges reg...

  11. Determination of Oxygen Transport Properties from Flux and Driving Force Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that an electrolyte probe can be used to measure the difference in oxygen chemical potential across the surface, when an oxygen flux is forced through an oxygen permeable membrane disk. The oxygen flux as well as the total oxygen chemical potential difference is carefully controlled...

  12. The submm wave Josephson flux flow oscillator; Linewidth measurements and simple theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Jesper; Koshelets, V. P.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm;

    2005-01-01

    The Flux Flow Oscillator (FFO) is a long Josephson junction in which a DC bias current and a DC magnetic field maintain a unidirectional viscous flow of magnetic flux quanta. The theoretical linewidth of the electromagnetic radiation generated at the end boundary is due to internal current fluctu...... is supported by linewidth measurements on FFO's subjected to different bias configurations....

  13. Enhancing the precision and accuracy within and among AmeriFlux site measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Bev

    2013-11-25

    This is the final report for AmeriFlux QA/QC at Oregon State University. The major objective of this project is to contribute to the AmeriFlux network by continuing to build consistency in AmeriFlux measurements by addressing objectives stated in the AmeriFlux strategic plan and self evaluation, the North American Carbon Program, and the US Carbon Cycle Science Program. The project directly contributes to NACP and CCSP goals to establish an integrated, near-real time network of observations to inform climate change science.

  14. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 (micro)s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  15. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remote-sensing γ-ray spectrometer (GRS) is capable of measuring planetary surface composition through the detection of characteristic gamma rays. In addition, the planetary neutron leakage flux may be detected by means of a thin neutron absorber surrounding the γ-ray detector which converts the neutron flux into a γ-ray flux having a unique energy signature. The γ rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic γ rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and a variety of gamma rays arising from cosmic-ray particle interactions with the γ-ray spectrometer and spacecraft (SC). In this paper the amplitudes of planetary and non-planetary neutron fluxes are assessed and their impact on the sensitivity of measurement is calculated for a lunar orbiter mission and a comet nucleus rendezvous mission. For a 100 h observation period from an altitude of 100 km, a GRS on a lunar orbiter can detect a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002 cm-2 s-1 and measure the expected flux of approx.=0.6 cm-2 s-1 with an uncertainty of 0.001 cm-2 s-1. A GRS rendezvousing with a comet at a distance equal to the radius of the comet's nucleus, again for a 100 h observation time, should detect a thermal neutron albedo flux at a level of 0.006 cm-2 s-1 and measure the expected flux of approx.=0.4 cm-2 s-1 with an uncertainty of 0.004 cm -2 s-1. Mapping the planetary neutron flux jointly with the direct detection of H will not only provide a more accurate model for translating observed γ-ray fluxes into concentrations but will also extend the effective sampling depth and should provide a capability for simple stratigraphic modeling of hydrogen. (orig.)

  16. Development and application of flexible substrate sensors in instantaneous heat flux measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Duo; GU JiaHua; WU Song

    2009-01-01

    A new type of sensor with the flexible substrate is introduced.It is applicable in measuring instanta-neous heat flux on the model surface in a hypersonic shock tunnel.The working principle,structure and manufacture process of the sensor are presented.The substrate thickness and the dynamic re-sponse parameter of the sensor are calculated.Because this sensor was successfully used in meas-uring the instantaneous heat flux on the surface of a flat plate in a detonation-driven shock tunnel,it may be effective in measuring instantaneous heat flux on the model surface.

  17. Inquiry into antineutrino angular distribution in the experiments on polarized neutron β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far as γ-radiation unescapably accompanies β-decay and thereby the final state of neutron β-decay involves photon beside proton, electron and antineutrino, i.e., not three but four particles, the antineutrino kinematics cannot be reconstructed unambiguously when the proton and electron momenta are given only, the γ-radiation momenta being unknown. Consequently, in the experiments on the polarized neutron β-decay where the electron and proton momentum distributions are observed only, without registering the γ-radiation, the asymmetry factor B of the antineutrino angular distribution cannot be acquired rigorously, but the B value is to be estimated only on the average by drawing into consideration the expectation (mean) value and the dispersion ΔB. The correspondent unavoidable ambiguities in B attainment amount to several percent which is significant for the now-a-days experimental attempts to obtain the B value with the very high precision ∼ (0.1 - 1) %. With allowance for the electromagnetic interaction, experimental measurement of the electron and proton momentum distributions is seen also to be instructive to verify with high accuracy the gA value obtained previously from the electron angular distribution

  18. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  19. A framework to utilize turbulent flux measurements for mesoscale models and remote sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Babel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Meteorologically measured fluxes of energy and matter between the surface and the atmosphere originate from a source area of certain extent, located in the upwind sector of the device. The spatial representativeness of such measurements is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the landscape. The footprint concept is capable of linking observed data with spatial heterogeneity. This study aims at upscaling eddy covariance derived fluxes to a grid size of 1 km edge length, which is typical for mesoscale models or low resolution remote sensing data.

    Here an upscaling strategy is presented, utilizing footprint modelling and SVAT modelling as well as observations from a target land-use area. The general idea of this scheme is to model fluxes from adjacent land-use types and combine them with the measured flux data to yield a grid representative flux according to the land-use distribution within the grid cell. The performance of the upscaling routine is evaluated with real datasets, which are considered to be land-use specific fluxes in a grid cell. The measurements above rye and maize fields stem from the LITFASS experiment 2003 in Lindenberg, Germany and the respective modelled timeseries were derived by the SVAT model SEWAB. Contributions from each land-use type to the observations are estimated using a forward lagrangian stochastic model. A representation error is defined as the error in flux estimates made when accepting the measurements unchanged as grid representative flux and ignoring flux contributions from other land-use types within the respective grid cell.

    Results show that this representation error can be reduced up to 56 % when applying the spatial integration. This shows the potential for further application of this strategy, although the absolute differences between flux observations from rye and maize were so small, that the spatial integration would be rejected in a real situation. Corresponding thresholds for

  20. Carbon dioxide flux measurements from a coastal Douglas-fir forest floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examined the process that affects the exchange of carbon between the soil and the atmosphere with particular attention to the large amounts of carbon stored in soils in the form of decaying organic matter. This forest floor measuring study was conducted in 2000 at a micro-meteorological tower flux site in a coastal temperature Douglas-fir forest. The measuring study involved half hourly measurements of both carbon dioxide and below-ground carbon dioxide storage. Measurements were taken at 6 locations between April and December to include a large portion of the growing season. Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of carbon dioxide flux above the forest floor over a two month period in the summer and the autumn were compared with forest floor measurements. Below-ground carbon dioxide mixing ratios of soil air were measured at 6 depths between 0.02 to 1 m using gas diffusion probes and a syringe sampling method. Maximum carbon dioxide fluxes measured by the soil chambers varied by a factor of 3 and a high spatial variability in soil carbon dioxide flux was noted. Forest floor carbon dioxide fluxes measured by each of the chambers indicated different sensitivities to soil temperature. Hysteresis in the flux temperature relationship over the year was evident. Reliable below-canopy EC measurements of the forest floor carbon dioxide flux were difficult to obtain because of the every low wind speeds below the forest canopy. The amount of carbon dioxde present in the soil increased rapidly with depth near the surface but less rapidly deeper in the soil. It was suggested that approximately half of the carbon dioxide produced below-ground comes from between the soil surface and the first 0.15 m of depth. Carbon dioxide fluxes from the floor of a Douglas-fir forest were found to be large compared to other, less productive ecosystems

  1. Effect of higher-harmonic flux in exponential experiment for subcriticality measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of higher-harmonic fluxes on a subcriticality measurement by the exponential experiment was investigated. An analysis method for obtaining higher-harmonic eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the neutron diffusion equation of which the eigenvalues are the decay constants in the exponential experiment was developed. We attempted to reproduce three-dimensional neutron flux distributions formed in the exponential experiment with superposition of higher-harmonic fluxes. Exponential experiments were performed for a subcritical rectangular fuel rod array of the TCA (Tank-type Critical Assembly) and the vertical neutron flux distributions at several horizontal locations were measured for various neutron source positions. Higher-harmonic eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in the exponential experiment were calculated to reproduce the vertical neutron fluxes. It was found that they were well reproduced within the fuel rod array or in the water-reflector region close to the array by taking account of the fewer-order harmonic fluxes. The method of higher-harmonic analysis presented in this paper enables us to evaluate the effect of higher-harmonic fluxes or to find measurement conditions such as the arrangement of a neutron source and neutron detectors for obtaining the decay constant of a fundamental mode flux. (author)

  2. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  3. Comparison between different methods of measurement of momentum and sensible heat fluxes over canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Aubinet

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Différent methods of measurement of momentum and sensible heat flux densifies are presented and compared above a gras covered fallow. The aerodynamic (AD and eddy covariance (EC methods are presented and compared for both momentum and sensible heat measurements. In addition, the temperature fluctuation (TF method is compared to the HEC method for the sensible heat flux measurement. The AD and EC methods are in good agreement for the momentum flux measurements. For the sensible heat flux, the AD method is very sensible to temperature errors. So it is unusable during night and gives biased estimations during the day. The TF method gives only estimations of the sensible heat flux. It is in good agreement with the EC method during the day but diverges completely during night, being unable to disceming positive from négative fluxes. From the three methods, the EC method is the sole that allows to measure continuously both momentum and sensible heat flux but it requires a loud data treatment. We présent in this paper the algorithm used for this treatment.

  4. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  5. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  6. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Pressley, S.; Grivicke, R.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.; Foster, W.; Jobson, B. T.; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Hernández, F.; Molina, L. T.; Lamb, B.

    2009-10-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric chemistry and the role that cities play in regional and global chemical cycles. As part of the MCMA-2003 study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City (Velasco et al., 2005a, b). During the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign, a second flux measurement study was conducted in a different district of Mexico City to corroborate the 2003 flux measurements, to expand the number of species measured, and to obtain additional data for evaluation of the local emissions inventory. Fluxes of CO2 and olefins were measured by the conventional EC technique using an open path CO2 sensor and a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard. In addition, fluxes of toluene, benzene, methanol and C2-benzenes were measured using a virtual disjunct EC method with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer. The flux measurements were analyzed in terms of diurnal patterns and vehicular activity and were compared with the most recent gridded local emissions inventory. In both studies, the results showed that the urban surface of Mexico City is a net source of CO2 and VOCs with significant contributions from vehicular traffic. Evaporative emissions from commercial and other anthropogenic activities were significant sources of toluene and methanol. The results show that the emissions inventory is in reasonable agreement with measured olefin and CO2 fluxes, while C2-benzenes and toluene emissions from evaporative sources are overestimated in the inventory. It appears that methanol emissions from mobile sources occur, but are not reported in the mobile emissions inventory.

  7. Scrape-off layer power flux measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, J.P., E-mail: Jamie.Gunn@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dejarnac, R. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Devynck, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, USCD, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Fuchs, V. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Gil, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kočan, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Komm, M. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kubič, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lunt, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Monier-Garbet, P.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Saint-Laurent, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    A new method to measure power flux in strongly magnetized plasmas is described, while the flaws inherent in standard Langmuir probe techniques are demonstrated. Instead of small cylindrical pins which overestimate the ion current density by several 100%, a concave probe has been developed which is immune to sheath expansion, and which inherently provides accurate measurements. A retarding field analyzer directly measures the ion component of the power flux by means of an integral method that eliminates the need to calculate the heat transmission factor. Evidence shows that strong secondary electron emission from surfaces with non-oblique magnetic field incidence angles is ubiquitous in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra tokamak. This results in sheath collapse, causing the power flux to be dominated by the electrons. The radially integrated power flux measured by the probes agrees well with the power convected to the limiter.

  8. Use of Motion Estimation Algorithms for Improved Flux Measurements Using SO 2 Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, N; Hoffmann, A.; Barnie, T.; M. Herzog; C. Oppenheimer

    2014-01-01

    This is the final published version of the article "Use of Motion Estimation Algorithms for Improved Flux Measurements Using SO 2 Cameras" which is also available from Elsevier at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377027314002807.

  9. Direct Heat-Flux Measurement System (MDF) for Solar central Receiver Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin, J.

    2001-07-01

    A direct flux measurement system, MDF, has been designed, constructed and mounted on top of the SSPS-CRS tower at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in addition to an indirect flux measurement system based on a CCD camera. It's one of the main future objectives to compare systematically both measurements of the concentrated solar power, increasing in this way the confidence in the estimate of this quantity. Today everything is prepared to perform the direct flux measurement on the aperture of solar receivers: calorimeter array, data acquisition system and software. the geometry of the receiver determines the operation and analysis procedures to obtain the indecent power onto the defined area. The study of previous experiences with direct flux measurement systems ha been useful to define a new simpler and more accurate system. A description of each component of the MDF system is included, focusing on the heat-flux sensors or calorimeters, which enables these measurements to be done in a few seconds without water-cooling. The incident solar power and the spatial flux distribution on the aperture of the volumetric receiver Hitrec II are supplied by the above-mentioned MDF system. The first results obtained during the evaluation of this solar receiver are presented including a sunrise-sunset test. All these measurements have been concentrated in one coefficient that describes the global behavior of the Solar Power Plant. (Author) 18 refs.

  10. Direct Heat-Flux Measurement System (MDF) for Solar Central Receiver Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct flux measurement system, MDF, has been designed, constructed and mounted on top of the SSPSCRS tower at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in addition to an indirect flux measurement system based on a CCD camera. It's one of the main future objectives to compare systematically both measurements of the concentrated solar power, increasing in this way the confidence in the estimate of this quantity. Today everything is prepared to perform the direct flux measurement on the aperture of solar receivers: calorimeter array, data acquisition system and software. The geometry of the receiver determines the operation and analysis procedures to obtain the incident power onto the defined area. The study of previous experiences with direct flux measurement systems has been useful to define a new, simpler and more accurate system. A description of each component of the MDF system is included, focusing on the heat-flux sensors or calorimeters, which enables these measurements to be done in a few seconds without water-cooling. The incident solar power and the spatial flux distribution on the aperture of the volumetric receiver Hitrec II are supplied by the above-mentioned MDF system. The first results obtained during the evaluation of this solar receiver are presented including a sunrise-sunset test. AU these measurements have been concentrated in one coefficient that describes the global behavior of the Solar Power Plant. (Author) 18 refs

  11. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespillo, M L; Graham, J T; Zhang, Y; Weber, W J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of -170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au(3+) ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 10(12) cm(-2) s(-1). Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. A simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beam analysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect. PMID:26931879

  12. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Weber, W. J.

    2016-02-01

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of -170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm-2 s-1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. A simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beam analysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.

  13. Direct Measurement of CO2 Fluxes in Marine Whitings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa L. Robbins; Kimberly K. Yates

    2001-07-05

    Clean, affordable energy is a requisite for the United States in the 21st Century Scientists continue to debate over whether increases in CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources, including electricity generation, transportation and building systems may be altering the Earth's climate. While global climate change continues to be debated, it is likely that significant cuts in net CO{sub 2} emissions will be mandated over the next 50-100 years. To this end, a number of viable means of CO{sub 2} sequestration need to be identified and implemented. One potential mechanism for CO{sub 2} sequestration is the use of naturally-occurring biological processes. Biosequestration of CO{sub 2} remains one of the most poorly understood processes, yet environmentally safe means for trapping and storing CO{sub 2}. Our investigation focused on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in microbial precipitations of CaCO{sub 3}. Specifically, we investigated modern whitings (microbially-induced precipitates of the stable mineral calcium carbonate) as a potential, natural mechanism for CO{sub 2} abatement. This process is driven by photosynthetic metabolism of cyanobacteria and microalgae. We analyzed net air: sea CO{sub 2} fluxes, net calcification and photosynthetic rates in whitings. Both field and laboratory investigations have demonstrated that atmospheric CO{sub 2}decreases during the process of microbial calcification.

  14. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fraser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF, together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH4 fluxes for the period June 2009–December 2010 using proxy dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4 from GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite and/or NOAA ESRL (Earth System Research Laboratory and CSIRO GASLAB (Global Atmospheric Sampling Laboratory CH4 surface mole fraction measurements. Global posterior estimates using GOSAT and/or surface measurements are between 510–516 Tg yr−1, which is less than, though within the uncertainty of, the prior global flux of 529 ± 25 Tg yr−1. We find larger differences between regional prior and posterior fluxes, with the largest changes in monthly emissions (75 Tg yr−1 occurring in Temperate Eurasia. In non-boreal regions the error reductions for inversions using the GOSAT data are at least three times larger (up to 45% than if only surface data are assimilated, a reflection of the greater spatial coverage of GOSAT, with the two exceptions of latitudes >60° associated with a data filter and over Europe where the surface network adequately describes fluxes on our model spatial and temporal grid. We use CarbonTracker and GEOS-Chem XCO2 model output to investigate model error on quantifying proxy GOSAT XCH4 (involving model XCO2 and inferring methane flux estimates from surface mole fraction data and show similar resulting fluxes, with differences reflecting initial differences in the proxy value. Using a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs we characterize the posterior flux error introduced by non-uniform atmospheric sampling by GOSAT. We show that clear-sky measurements can theoretically reproduce fluxes within 10% of true values, with the exception of tropical regions where, due to a large seasonal cycle in the number of measurements because of clouds and aerosols, fluxes are within 15% of true fluxes. We evaluate our

  15. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs

  16. Uncertainty analysis of computational methods for deriving sensible heat flux values from scintillometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Solignac

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of scintillometers to determine sensible heat fluxes is now common in studies of land-atmosphere interactions. The main interest in these instruments is due to their ability to quantify energy distributions at the landscape scale, as they can calculate sensible heat flux values over long distances, in contrast to Eddy Correlation systems. However, scintillometer data do not provide a direct measure of sensible heat flux, but require additional data, such as the Bowen ratio (β, to provide flux values. The Bowen ratio can either be measured using Eddy Correlation systems or derived from the energy balance closure. In this work, specific requirements for estimating energy fluxes using a scintillometer were analyzed, as well as the accuracy of two flux calculation methods. We first focused on the classical method (used in standard software. We analysed the impact of the Bowen ratio according to both time averaging and ratio values; for instance, an averaged Bowen ratio (β of less than 1 proved to be a significant source of measurement uncertainty. An alternative method, called the "β-closure method", for which the Bowen ratio measurement is not necessary, was also tested. In this case, it was observed that even for low β values, flux uncertainties were reduced and scintillometer data were well correlated with the Eddy Correlation results.

  17. First measurement of the integral solar neutrino flux by the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical 71Ga - 71Ge experiment to determine the integral flux of neutrinos from the Sun was constructed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. Five measurements with 30 tons of gallium indicate that the total flux is less than 50 SNU (68% CL), 74 SNU (95% CL). The results of the analysis of the first five measurements are consistent with no solar neutrino induced events being observed. The initial data indicate that the flux may be less than expected from p-p neutrinos alone, indicating that the solar neutrino problem also applies to the low energy p-p neutrinos. (R.P.) 8 refs., 2 tabs

  18. Vessel's material surveillance program. Fast neutron (E>1MeV) flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vessel of the Garigliano nuclear power station is made of 4.75-in (125 mm) thick ASTM A 366 steel. It is made of forged ring courses. It is important to know the ratios between the maximum neutron flux and those at the upper and lower weld seams of the forged ring. An irradiation program was performed to measure the axial distribution of the fast neutron (E>1MeV) flux on the inner vessel wall. A comparison is made between the axial fast flux shape and the axial relative gamma intensity distribution measured with a small, air-filled ionization chamber

  19. Electron fluxes in the breakup region according to measurements at Kosmos-426

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of electron flux measurement conducted at KOSMOS-426 satellite within magnetosphere region, where breakup propagated, are analyzed. Maximum of electron fluxes with particle isotropic pinch-angular distribution measured with different pinch-angles is recorded in breakup region. Energy spectrum of 0.25-2 MeV electrons is harded near the boundary of radiation belt. Essential decrease of the intensity within latitude narrow range is marked during breakup in E≤1 keV energy electron fluxes behind the boundary of radiation belt

  20. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, E; S. Pressley; Grivicke, R.; E. Allwine; T. Coons; Foster, W; B. T. Jobson; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Hernández, F.; Molina, L. T.; Lamb, B.

    2009-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric chemistry and the role that cities play in regional and global chemical cycles. As part of the MCMA-2003 study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO2 fro...

  1. Pollutant Flux Estimation in an Estuary Comparison between Model and Field Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Yen-Chang Chen; Wu-Seng Lung; Han-Chung Yang; Bo-Jhih Chen; Chien-Hung Chen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for estimating pollutant flux in an estuary. An efficient method is applied to estimate the flux of pollutants in an estuary. A gauging station network in the Danshui River estuary is established to measure the data of water quality and discharge based on the efficient method. A boat mounted with an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) traverses the river along a preselected path that is normal to the streamflow to measure the velocities, water depths and water qua...

  2. Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of volatile organic compound fluxes using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Taipale, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, vegetation being the dominant source on a global scale. Some of these reactive compounds are deemed major contributors or inhibitors to aerosol particle formation and growth, thus making VOC measurements essential for current climate change research. This thesis discusses ecosystem scale VOC fluxes measured above a boreal Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland. The flux measureme...

  3. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Adam Robert; James, Lee; Misztal, Pawel; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin David; Lewis, Alastair C.; Purvis, Ruth; Carslaw, David; Goldstein, Allen; C. N. Hewitt; Davison, Brian Matthew; Beevers, Sean; Karl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over Lo...

  4. Measurements of energy and water vapor fluxes over different surfaces in the Heihe River Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S.; Xu, Z.; Wang, W.; J. Bai; Jia, Z; Zhu, M.; Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the seasonal variations of energy and water vapor fluxes over three different surfaces: irrigated cropland (Yingke, YK), alpine meadow (A'rou, AR), and spruce forest (Guantan, GT). The energy and water vapor fluxes were measured using eddy covariance systems (EC) and a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) in the Heihe River Basin, China, in 2008 and 2009. We also determined the source areas of the EC and LAS measurements with a footprint model for each site, and discussed th...

  5. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5changing redox conditions some processes in the bottom water and/or on the sediment surface (oxidation, adsorption, particles dissolution, etc.) are faster than diffusion and play an important role in the benthic flux formation for these elements. For the third group measured fluxes could be often overestimated, especially for coastal shallow stations, up to 50%, because of intensive decomposition of OM and/or organisms respiration in the isolated bottom

  6. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using a Copper-Constantan Circular Foil, Heat-Flux Transducer

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of radiative heat flux using a transducer whose sensing element (1,2 ) is a thin circular metal foil. These sensors are often called Gardon Gauges. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values stated in parentheses are provided for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Measurements of turbulence, heat fluxes and greenhouse gas fluxes above tropical rain forest and oil palm in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

    OpenAIRE

    Helfter, Carole; Coyle, Mhairi; Phillips, Gavin; Siong, Jambery; Skiba, Ute; Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-01-01

    Three intensive field campaigns were held in Malaysian Borneo during the first half of 2008 by a NERC-funded consortium of 8 UK institutions aiming at investigating Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3). Fluxes of heat and CO2 were measured during two periods (April and June/July 2008) at the Bukit Atur Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) tower located in the Danum Valley conservation area, Sabah; this tower stands 100 m tall and is situated on a hill leading to an effective measureme...

  8. Mathematical Modeling and In-Situ Measurements of Soil CO2/O2 Flux Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, V. E.; Or, D.

    2002-12-01

    Gaseous exchange between soil and atmosphere consist primarily of CO2 and O2 fluxes induced by concentration gradients resulting from respiration within the soil profile. Despite their crucial role in the biosphere, dynamics of CO2/O2 concentrations in soil and surface fluxes are rarely measured continuously. A new gradient-based method for continuous monitoring of soil CO2/O2 concentrations was tested in the laboratory and in the field and compared to closed-chamber measurements. In situ measurements were made in different plant communities within a semi-arid ecosystem. A one-dimensional vertical model for soil CO2/O2 fluxes that considers bio-geo-chemical and environmental factors within the basic governing equations for gaseous transport in porous media was developed. Comparisons between model simulations and continuous in-situ measurements of CO2 and O2 concentrations (and fluxes) were in reasonable agreement. Simultaneous measurements of soil CO2 and O2 concentrations provide insights on soil respiration characteristics such as the respiratory quotient (CO2/O2) that ranged from 0.7 to 1.2 and tended to remain remarkably stable under particular experimental conditions. Conversion of measured concentration gradients into surface fluxes was critically dependent on proper estimation of water content profile that affects soil diffusion coefficients. Continuous monitoring in the soil is particularly important following rainfall events where spatial (vertical) and temporal patterns of gaseous fluxes are complex and are unobservable by common surface chamber methods.

  9. Using "snapshot" measurements of CH4 fluxes from peatlands to estimate annual budgets: interpolation vs. modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sophie M.; Baird, Andy J.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in estimating annual budgets of peatland-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) exchanges. Such budgeting is required for calculating peatland carbon balance and the radiative forcing impact of peatlands on climate. There have been multiple approaches used to estimate CO2 budgets; however, there is a limited literature regarding the modelling of annual CH4 budgets. Using data collected from flux chamber tests in an area of blanket peatland in North Wales, we compared annual estimates of peatland-atmosphere CH4 emissions using an interpolation approach and an additive and multiplicative modelling approach. Flux-chamber measurements represent a snapshot of the conditions on a particular site. In contrast to CO2, most studies that have estimated the time-integrated flux of CH4 have not used models. Typically, linear interpolation is used to estimate CH4 fluxes during the time periods between flux-chamber measurements. It is unclear how much error is involved with such a simple integration method. CH4 fluxes generally show a rise followed by a fall through the growing season that may be captured reasonably well by interpolation, provided there are sufficiently frequent measurements. However, day-to-day and week-to-week variability is also often evident in CH4 flux data, and will not necessarily be properly represented by interpolation. Our fits of the CH4 flux models yielded r2 > 0.5 in 38 of the 48 models constructed, with 55% of these having a weighted rw2 > 0.4. Comparison of annualised CH4 fluxes estimated by interpolation and modelling reveals no correlation between the two data sets; indeed, in some cases even the sign of the flux differs. The difference between the methods seems also to be related to the size of the flux - for modest annual fluxes there is a fairly even scatter of points around the 1:1 line, whereas when the modelled fluxes are high, the corresponding interpolated fluxes tend to be low. We consider the

  10. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5stations, up to 50%, because of intensive decomposition of OM and/or organisms respiration in the isolated bottom water. Values of benthic fluxes obtained by the BROM model are within the range of magnitudes measured by chamber experiments and calculated from porewater distributions (Jpw < Jmd < Jch). Using the model it is possible estimate the influence of bioturbation on elements exchange at water-sediment interface. Model has a high resolution in the

  11. SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL ANTINEUTRINO SOURCES WITH THE KamLAND DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a search for extraterrestrial electron antineutrinos (ν-bare's) in the energy range 8.3 MeV ν-bare 8B solar νe's converting into ν-bare's at 5.3 × 10–5 (90% CL), if we assume an undistorted ν-bare shape. This limit corresponds to a solar ν-bare flux of 93 cm–2 s–1 or an event rate of 1.6 events (kton – year)–1 above the energy threshold (Eν-bare>=8.3 MeV). The present data also allows us to set more stringent limits on the diffuse supernova neutrino flux and on the annihilation rates for light dark matter particles.

  12. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  13. Measurement of neutron spectra and fluxes at the IPNS Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the neutron spectra, fluxes, and flux distributions produced by nuclear spallation resulting from 478-MeV proton bombardment of tantalum and depleted uranium targets surrounded by a thick lead neutron reflector. The configuration was chosen to simulate a radiation effects facility at a spallation-neutron source. The method of multiple foil activation with spectrum unfolding by the STAYSL computer code was used to measure the neutron spectra. The experimental results are compared in detail with the results of computer calculations on the same configuration of targets and reflector. The neutron production and transport codes HETC and VIM were employed in these calculations. Based on these measurements, the Radiation Effects Facility (REF) was designed and constructed at the IPNS. Using similar activation techniques the neutron spectra, fluxes and flux distributions have been determined for the REF

  14. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the 222Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric 222Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric 222Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated 222Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean 222Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m-2 s-1. The use of the estimated 222Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island. (authors)

  15. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes. PMID:25377990

  16. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens of hours; sizes at which

  17. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  18. Field intercomparison of two optical analyzers for CH4 eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Emmenegger

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Fast response optical analyzers based on laser absorption spectroscopy are the preferred tools to measure field-scale mixing ratios and fluxes of a range of trace gases. Several state-of-the-art instruments have become commercially available and are gaining in popularity. This paper aims for a critical field evaluation and intercomparison of two compact, cryogen-free and fast response instruments: a quantum cascade laser based absorption spectrometer from Aerodyne Research, Inc., and an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer from Los Gatos Research, Inc. In this paper, both analyzers are characterized with respect to precision, accuracy, response time and also their sensitivity to water vapour. The instruments were tested in a field campaign to assess their behaviour under various meteorological conditions. The instrument's suitability for eddy covariance flux measurements was evaluated by applying an artificial flux of CH4 generated above a managed grassland with otherwise very low methane flux. This allowed an independent verification of the flux measurements accuracy, including the overall eddy covariance setup and data treatment. The retrieved fluxes were in good agreement with the known artificial emission flux, which is more than satisfactory, given that the analyzers were attached to separate sonic anemometers placed on individual eddy towers with different data acquisition systems but similar data treatment that are specific to the best practice used by the involved research teams.

  19. Pollutant Flux Estimation in an Estuary Comparison between Model and Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for estimating pollutant flux in an estuary. An efficient method is applied to estimate the flux of pollutants in an estuary. A gauging station network in the Danshui River estuary is established to measure the data of water quality and discharge based on the efficient method. A boat mounted with an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP traverses the river along a preselected path that is normal to the streamflow to measure the velocities, water depths and water quality for calculating pollutant flux. To know the characteristics of the estuary and to provide the basis for the pollutant flux estimation model, data of complete tidal cycles is collected. The discharge estimation model applies the maximum velocity and water level to estimate mean velocity and cross-sectional area, respectively. Thus, the pollutant flux of the estuary can be easily computed as the product of the mean velocity, cross-sectional area and pollutant concentration. The good agreement between the observed and estimated pollutant flux of the Danshui River estuary shows that the pollutant measured by the conventional and the efficient methods are not fundamentally different. The proposed method is cost-effective and reliable. It can be used to estimate pollutant flux in an estuary accurately and efficiently.

  20. Reference detectors for low flux optical radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parametric down conversion of photons generated in a non-linear crystal gives rise to two correlated photons. Associated to a System of counting of coincidences, this phenomenon makes possible the quantum efficiency measurements of detectors working on photon counting levels, without using neither sources nor detectors of references. This new method was developed at BNMINM with the aim to realize new standards detectors in the field of weak flows. It allows the determination of quantum efficiency with a relative uncertainty of 1,1%. A comparison with the IENGF (Italy) bearing on the quantum determination of efficiency of one of BNM-FNM detectors made possible to confront the exactitude of the measuring equipment. This detector was also made the object of a comparison with the French reference of radiometry, the cryogenic radiometer, the results were in agreement with uncertainties of measurements. (author)

  1. A new method for simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in car underhood applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, M.; Garnier, B.; Harambat, F.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2010-02-01

    A new experimental technique is presented that allows simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in the underhood. The goal is to devise an easily implemented and accurate experimental method for application in the vehicle underhood compartment. The new method is based on a technique for heat-flux measurement developed by the authors (Heat flow (flux) sensors for measurement of convection, conduction and radiation heat flow 27036-2, © Rhopoint Components Ltd, Hurst Green, Oxted, RH8 9AX, UK) that uses several thermocouples in the thickness of a thermal resistive layer (foil heat-flux sensor). The method proposed here uses a pair of these thermocouples with different radiative properties. Measurements validating this novel technique are carried out on a flat plate with a prescribed constant temperature in both natural- and forced-convection flow regimes. The test flat plate is instrumented by this new technique, and also with a different technique that is intrusive but very accurate, used as reference here (Bardon J P and Jarny Y 1994 Procédé et dispositif de mesure transitoire de température et flux surfacique Brevet n°94.011996, 22 February). Discrepancies between the measurements by the two techniques are less than 10% for both convective and radiative heat flux. Error identification and sensitivity analysis of the new method are also presented.

  2. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, R. V.; Zellweger, C.; Knohl, A.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  3. Direct Measurement of Turbulent Particle and Gas Fluxes by Eddy Covariance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, F.; Griessbaum, F.; Tsukamoto, O.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Direct Measurement of Turbulent Particle and Gas Fluxes by Eddy Covariance Technique Fumiyoshi KONDO (The University of Tokyo) Frank GRIESSBAUM (Universität Münster) Osamu TSUKAMOTO (Okayama University) Mitsuo UEMATSU (The University of Tokyo) The oceans play major key roles in global energy transport, element cycles, and atmospheric radiation balance. The study of the processes at the interface of ocean and atmosphere is essential to develop profound understanding of the mechanisms driving ocean-atmosphere interaction and climate. Eddy covariance technique is the only direct measurement of air-sea particle and gas fluxes. This technique has little assumption (constant flux layer and steady state), and may evaluate small spatial and temporal particle and gas fluxes. For these reasons, we hope that the eddy covariance technique investigates uncertain processes that control the air-sea particle (aerosol) and gas (CO2) fluxes. The understanding of processes controlling both the CO2 uptake to the ocean and the oceans as major source of aerosols is vital for quantifying the role of the global oceans in the climate system. We developed the simultaneous measurement system of turbulent particle and gas fluxes by eddy covariance technique and installed with ship motion correction system on the top of the foremast of R/V Hakuho-Maru and Mirai. The turbulent flux system on the top of the foremast consisted of a sonic anemometer-thermometer (Gill, HS-50), an infrared CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-COR, LI-7500), a water-based condensation particle counter (TSI, WCPC3785), and Fog Monitor (Droplet Measurement, FM-100). The ship motion correction system consisted of a three-axis accelerometer and a three-axis rate gyro (Systron Donner, MotionPak II). The sonic anemometer measures three-dimensional wind components relative to the ship including apparent wind velocity due to the ship motion. Then, the ship motion correction system measures the ship motions by time integral of

  4. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m2-min to 9.69 x 106 pCi/m2-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m2-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were 2-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report

  5. Flux Measurements in Trees: Methodological Approach and Application to Vineyards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Lorenzi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a review of two sap flow methods for measuring the transpiration in vineyards is presented. The objective of this work is to examine the potential of detecting transpiration in trees in response to environmental stresses, particularly the high concentration of ozone (O3 in troposphere. The methods described are the stem heat balance and the thermal dissipation probe; advantages and disadvantages of each method are detailed. Applications of both techniques are shown, in two large commercial vineyards in Southern Italy (Apulia and Sicily, submitted to semi-arid climate. Sap flow techniques allow to measure transpiration at plant scale and an upscaling procedure is necessary to calculate the transpiration at the whole stand level. Here a general technique to link the value of transpiration at plant level to the canopy value is presented, based on experimental relationships between transpiration and biometric characteristics of the trees. In both vineyards transpiration measured by sap flow methods compares well with evapotranspiration measured by micrometeorological techniques at canopy scale. Moreover soil evaporation component has been quantified. In conclusion, comments about the suitability of the sap flow methods for studying the interactions between trees and ozone are given.

  6. Lidar Based Particulate Flux Measurements of Agricultural Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-wavelength portable scanning lidar system was developed to derive information on particulate spatial aerosol distribution over remote distances. The lidar system and retrieval approach has been tested during several field campaigns measuring agricultural emissions from a swine feeding operat...

  7. Measurement of fission products β decay properties using a total absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakari-Issoufou A.-A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a nuclear reactor, the β decay of fission fragments is at the origin of decay heat and antineutrino flux. These quantities are not well known while they are very important for reactor safety and for our understanding of neutrino physics. One reason for the discrepancies observed in the estimation of the decay heat and antineutrinos flux coming from reactors could be linked with the Pandemonium effect. New measurements have been performed at the JYFL facility of Jyväskylä with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS in order to circumvent this effect. An overview of the TAS technique and first results from the 2009 measurement campaign will be presented.

  8. Discriminating among Earth composition models using geo-antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Nunokawa, H; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2003-01-01

    It has been estimated that the entire Earth generates heat corresponding to about 40 TW (equivalent to 10,000 nuclear power plants) which is considered to originate mainly from the radioactive decay of elements like U, Th and K, deposited in the crust and mantle of the Earth. Radioactivity of these elements produce not only heat but also antineutrinos (called geo-antineutrinos) which can be observed by terrestrial detectors. We investigate the possibility of discriminating among Earth composition models predicting different total radiogenic heat generation, by observing such geo-antineutrinos at Kamioka and Gran Sasso, assuming KamLAND and Borexino (type) detectors, respectively, at these places. By simulating the future geo-antineutrino data as well as reactor antineutrino background contributions, we try to establish to which extent we can discriminate among Earth composition models for given exposures (in units of kt$\\cdot$ yr) at these two sites on our planet. We use also information on neutrino mixing pa...

  9. CO2, CH4 and particles flux measurements in Florence, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Zaldei, Alessandro; Fratini, Gerardo; Miglietta, Franco

    2013-04-01

    We report a synthesis of seven years of eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements in the city of Florence, Italy. The measurement site is located in a densely urbanized area in the central city area, where fluxes are governed by anthropogenic emissions, considering the lack of green-space in the flux footprint. EC flux measurements of CO2 are made long-term since seven years, while short-term campaigns have been aimed at measuring CH4 and particles fluxes. CO2 and CH4 densities are measured with fast open-path sensors, while particles in the range 0.32 - 7.00 µm optical diameter are measured with a custom-built optical counter. CO2 long-term fluxes are always a net source, with a small inter-annual variability associated with a high seasonality, ranging from 39 to 172% of the mean annual value in summer and winter respectively. CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere are relevant, representing about 8% of CO2-equivalent emissions, and do not exhibit any significant seasonality. Relative contributions of road traffic and domestic heating to observed emissions has been estimated through multi-variate analysis combined with inventorial data and emission proxies such as traffic counters and gas network flow rates, revealing that domestic heating accounts for more than 80% of observed CO2 fluxes. Heating and road traffic are instead responsible for only 14% of observed CH4 fluxes, while the major residual part is likely dominated by gas network leakages. Particles flux data show a smaller seasonal trend and a pronounced weekend decrease, highlighting that the contribution of heating to particle emissions is relatively small compared to road traffic. Dynamics at hourly time scales during week and week-end days allows the analysis of the coupled role of emission strength and atmospheric processes such as advection and entrainment in regulating atmospheric concentrations. This set of observations highlights the potential of urban EC flux measurements as a validation tool for

  10. Eddy Covariance flux measurements with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility and quality of Eddy-Covariance flux measurements from a weight-shift microlight aircraft (WSMA. Firstly we investigate the precision of the wind measurementu,v≤ 0.09 m s−1, σw = 0.04 m s−1, the lynchpin of flux calculations from aircraft. From here the smallest resolvable changes in friction velocity (0.02 m s−1, and sensible- (5 W m−2 and latent (3 W m−2 heat flux are estimated. Secondly a seven-day flight campaign was performed near Lindenberg (Germany. Here we compare measurements of wind, temperature, humidity and respective fluxes between a tall tower and the WSMA. The maximum likelihood functional relationship (MLFR between tower and WSMA measurements considers the random error in the data, and shows very good agreement of the scalar averages. The MLFRs for standard deviations (SDs, 2–34% and fluxes (17–21% indicate higher estimates of the airborne measurements compared to the tower. Considering the 99.5% confidence intervals the observed differences are not significant, with exception of the temperature SD. The comparison with a large-aperture scintillometer reveals lower sensible heat flux estimates at both, tower (−40–−25% and WSMA (−25–0%. We relate the observed differences to (i inconsistencies in the temperature and wind measurement at the tower and (ii the measurement platforms differing abilities to capture contributions from non-propagating eddies. These findings encourage the use of WSMA as a low price and highly versatile flux measurement platform.

  11. Performance of ERNE in particle flux anisotropy measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Riihonen

    Full Text Available The HED particle detector of the ERNE experiment to be flown on the SOHO spacecraft is unique compared to the earlier space-born detectors in its high directional resolution (better than 2°, depending on the track inclination. Despite the fixed view cone due to the three-axis stabilization of the spacecraft, the good angular and temporal resolution of the detector provides a new kind of opportunity for monitoring in detail the development of the anisotropies pertaining, for example, to the onset of SEP events, or passage of shock fronts related to gradual events. In order to optimize the measurement parameters, we have made a preflight simulation study of the HED anisotropy measurement capabilities. The purpose was to prove the feasibility of the selected measurement method and find the physical limits for the HED anisotropy detection. The results show HED to be capable of detecting both strong anisotropies related to impulsive events, and smoother anisotropies associated with gradual events.

  12. Carbon dioxide and latent heat flux measurements in a windbreak-sheltered orchard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An eddy correlation system for carbon dioxide and latent heat flux measurement comprising a twin-channel, closed-path infra-red gas analyzer and sonic anemometer is described. Its performance was examined by comparing latent heat fluxes measured concurrently with an open-path sensor over windbreak-sheltered kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosia var. deliciosia). Measurements were carried out at the height of surrounding windbreaks (6 m). Excellent average agreement was found between latent heat fluxes measured by either system with no evidence of bandwidth limiting by the closed-path components. This agreement gives confidence that carbon dioxide fluxes were also correctly measured. It also provides validation of the density corrections for eddy fluxes which differ significantly for closed- and open-path sensors.Carbon dioxide fluxes were closely related to solar radiation, reaching 800 μg m−2 s−1 towards the canopy early in the afternoon. Water-use efficiency was approximately 7 mg of CO2 per g of water evaporated and showed little dependence on either radiation or water use. Night-time fluxes were erratic in low wind conditions showing infrequent large excursions which are attributed to the action of occasional gusts sweeping out high levels of carbon dioxide accumulated from canopy and under-storey respiration. During windier conditions, night-time fluxes were typically 200 μg m−2 s−1 away from the canopy. The role of windbreaks in isolating the canopy from the free airstream was evident in the large diurnal variation in ambient carbon dioxide concentrations (640–800 mg m−3) observed 3–4 m above the height of the crop

  13. A disjunct eddy accumulation system for the measurement of BVOC fluxes: instrument characterizations and field deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Edwards

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biological volatile organic compounds (BVOCs, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, are emitted in large amounts from forests. Quantification of the flux of BVOCs is critical in the evaluation of the impact of these compounds on the concentrations of atmospheric oxidants and on the production of secondary organic aerosol. A disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA sampler system was constructed for the measurement of speciated BVOC fluxes. Unlike traditional eddy covariance (EC, the relatively new technique of disjunct sampling differs by taking short, discrete samples that allows for slower sampling frequencies. Disjunct sample airflow is directed into cartridges containing sorbent materials at sampling rates proportional to the magnitude of the vertical wind. Compounds accumulated on the cartridges are then quantified by thermal desorption and gas chromatography. Herein, we describe our initial tests to evaluate the disjunct sampler including the application of using vertical wind measurements to create optimized sampling thresholds. Measurements of BVOC fluxes obtained from DEA during its deployment above a mixed hardwood forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (Pellston, MI during the 2009 CABINEX field campaign are reported. Daytime (09:00 a.m. to 05:00 p.m. isoprene fluxes, when averaged over the footprint of the tower were 1.31 mg m−2 h−1 which is comparable to previous flux measurements at this location. Speciated monoterpene fluxes are some of the first to be reported from this site. Daytime averages were 26.7 μg m−2 h−1 for α-pinene and 10.6 μg m−2 h−1 for β-pinene. These measured concentrations and fluxes were compared to the output of an atmospheric chemistry model, and were found to be consistent with our knowledge of the variables that control BVOCs fluxes at this site.

  14. A disjunct eddy accumulation system for the measurement of BVOC fluxes: instrument characterizations and field deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Edwards

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological volatile organic compounds (BVOCs, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, are emitted in large amounts from forests. Quantification of the flux of BVOCs is critical in the evaluation of the impact of these compounds on the concentrations of atmospheric oxidants and on the production of secondary organic aerosol. A disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA sampler system was constructed for the measurement of speciated BVOC fluxes. Unlike traditional eddy covariance (EC, the relatively new technique of disjunct sampling differs by taking short, discrete samples that allow for slower sampling frequencies. Disjunct sample airflow is directed into cartridges containing sorbent materials at sampling rates proportional to the magnitude of the vertical wind. Compounds accumulated on the cartridges are then quantified by thermal desorption and gas chromatography. Herein, we describe our initial tests to evaluate the disjunct sampler including the application of vertical wind measurements to create optimized sampling thresholds. Measurements of BVOC fluxes obtained from DEA during its deployment above a mixed hardwood forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (Pellston, MI during the 2009 CABINEX field campaign are reported. Daytime (09:00 a.m. to 05:00 p.m. LT isoprene fluxes, when averaged over the footprint of the tower, were 1.31 mg m−2 h−1 which are comparable to previous flux measurements at this location. Speciated monoterpene fluxes are some of the first to be reported from this site. Daytime averages were 26.7 μg m−2 h−1 for α-pinene and 10.6 μg m−2 h−1 for β-pinene. These measured concentrations and fluxes were compared to the output of an atmospheric chemistry model, and were found to be consistent with our knowledge of the variables that control BVOCs fluxes at this site.

  15. Calculated ionospheric variations due to changes in the solar EUV flux measured by the AEROS spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar EUV radiation from the whole solar disk for wavelengths between 15.5 and 103.76 nm was measured by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer during the period December 1972 through August 1973. These measurements show a long-term decrease in solar EUV output with decreasing solar activity, a 27-day variation, and day-to-day and other short-term fluctuations. These solar EUV flux data are used with a model of the ionospheric E- and F- regions to calculate the variation of ionospheric properties that are associated with the changes in the measured solar EUV flux. The model calculates the variations in electron and ion density, electron and ion temperature, photoelectron spectra, various airglow emission rates, and the minor neutral constituents N(2D), N(4S) and NO. The results show that in general the magnitude of all ionospheric and atmospheric properties increases with increasing solar EUV flux. However, percentage changes of the calculated properties are different from each other and also from the percentage change of the measured total solar EUV energy flux. This occurs because a nonuniform variation of the solar flux with wavelength is observed over the EUV spectrum by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer and altitude-dependent aeronomic processes are sensitive to the detailed flux values within the solar EUV spectrum. (author)

  16. Uncertainties in eddy covariance flux measurements assessed from CH4 and N2O observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uncertainty in eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements is assessed for CH4 and N2O using data measured at a dairy farm site in the Netherlands in 2006 and 2007. An overview is given of the contributing uncertainties and their magnitude. The relative and absolute uncertainty of a 30 min EC flux are estimated for CH4 and N2O using N = 2185 EC fluxes. The average absolute uncertainty and its standard deviation are 500 ± 400 ng C m-2 s-1 for CH4 and 100 ± 100 ng N m-2 s-1 for N2O. The corresponding relative uncertainties have 95% confidence interval ranging from 20% to 300% for CH4 and from 30% to 1800% for N2O. The large relative uncertainties correspond to relatively small EC fluxes. The uncertainties are mainly caused by the uncertainty due to one-point sampling which contributes on average more than 90% to the total uncertainty. The other 10% includes the uncertainty in the correction algorithm for the systematic errors. The uncertainty in a daily and monthly averaged EC flux are estimated for several flux magnitude ranges. The daily and monthly average uncertainty are smaller than 25% and 10% for CH4 and smaller than 50% and 10% for N2O, respectively, based on fluxes larger than 100 ng C m-2 s-1 and 15 ng N m-2 s-1.

  17. CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

  18. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-01-01

    A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had a geometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as a correction factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials was measured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesin the range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current is gener...

  19. A Method to improve line flux and redshift measurements with narrowband filters

    CERN Document Server

    Zabl, J; Møller, P; Milvang-Jensen, B; Nilsson, K K; Fynbo, J P U; Fèvre, O Le; Tasca, L A M

    2016-01-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies are discovered routinely through a flux excess in narrowband filters (NB) caused by an emission line. In most cases, the width of such filters is broad compared to typical line widths, and the throughput of the filters varies substantially within the bandpass. This leads to substantial uncertainties in redshifts and fluxes that are derived from the observations with one specific NB. In this work we demonstrate that the uncertainty in measured line parameters can be sharply reduced by using repeated observations of the same target field with filters that have slightly different transmittance curves. Such data are routinely collected with some large field imaging cameras that use multiple detectors and a separate filter for each of the detectors. An example is the NB118 data from ESO's VISTA InfraRed CAMera (VIRCAM). We carefully developed and characterized this method to determine more accurate redshift and line flux estimates from the ratio of apparent fluxes measured from ...

  20. Notes on neutron flux measurement; Notas sobre medida de flujos neutronicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs.

  1. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term flux measurements of greenhouse gases and their applicability for 13CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Thorsten; Caldow, Chris; Griffith, David

    2010-05-01

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry has been deployed for continuous long term flux measurements on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock in New South Wales, Australia. The rationale for using FTIR spectrometry is its capability to measure many species simultaneously. The flux measurement techniques combined with FTIR - spectrometry in this study were Disjunct Eddy Accumulation (DEA) and Flux-Gradient (FG). The fluxes of CO2 derived from the FTIR-DEA and FTIR-FG measurements agree well and have been validated by Eddy Covariance Licor measurements. Variations in the observed fluxes could be attributed to temperature increase and water availability over the 5 months measurement period. In addition to CO2, CH4, CO and N2O FTIR-spectrometry is also capable to measure 13CO2. The isotopic fluxes of CO2 allow to separate net ecosystem exchange of CO2 into its gross one-way component fluxes, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. It has been shown that it is possible to measure the isoflux of CO2.

  2. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance at a temperate upland forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Murphy, J. G.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Geddes, J. A.; Thomas, S.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate upland forest in Central Ontario, Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve (45.28° N, 78.55° W) using the eddy covariance (EC) method. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS) Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA from Los Gatos Research, Inc.) operated at a sampling rate of 10 Hz allowed for simultaneous measurement of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water (H2O) over five months from June to October in 2011. Air was pulled from the top of a 32 m tower, 8 m above the forest canopy, to the bottom of the tower through 40 m of tubing to the instrument. A sonic anemometer and a LI-7500 open-path sensor were also used at the top of the tower to provide high frequency wind data and comparative open-path measurements of CO2 and H2O. A nearby soil station measured soil water content and soil temperature at 0, 3, and 10 cm below the surface. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux value (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7±0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. In early June when measurements commenced, the soil moisture was relatively high and CH4 flux values showed net emission. As the season advanced the soil became progressively drier, and there was an increasing trend in CH4 uptake, peaking in mid-September. There was also a diurnal trend in the CH4 flux, with increased uptake during the day, and decreased uptake between 0:00 and 08:00. The CH4 flux values correlated well with the horizontal wind speed measured within the forest canopy. We hypothesize that this may be due to a ventilation effect in which higher wind speed facilitates the introduction of CH4-rich air and removes CH4-depleted air near the methanotrophs in the soil. The measurements were made in an uneven-aged managed forest stand last harvested 15 years ago containing sandy and acidic soils (pH 4.0 - 5.0). Chamber flux measurements of CH4 were also performed at seven

  3. Measurement of $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; /Mexico U., CEN; Anderson, C.E.; /Yale U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Brown, B.C.; /Fermilab; Bugel, L.; /Columbia U.; Cao, J.; /Michigan U.; Coney, L.; /Columbia U.; Conrad, J.M.; /MIT; Cox, D.C.; /Indiana U.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-10-01

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC {pi}{sup 0} events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of {pi}{sup 0} momentum and {pi}{sup 0} angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.76{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of E{sub {nu}} = 808 MeV and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.23{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of E{sub {nu}} = 664 MeV for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} induced production, respectively. In addition, we have included measurements of the neutrino and antineutrino total cross sections for incoherent exclusive NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production corrected for the effects of final state interactions to compare to prior results.

  4. Noise and its application to neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission Counter's (FC) fundamental principles were studied, operating this neutron detector as pulses generator (AC modes) and fluctuant current (DC modes). Power spectral series were obtained in DC modes, corresponding to: alpha activity of the FC neutron converter, gamma exposition in Co60 radiation field, and only neutronic field. These noise spectra were correlated with those obtained from the FC in RA-3 critical facility, at different reactor power levels. These experiments allow to verify that, in DC mode, the power noise is very weakly dependent of the reactor gamma field, over a wide range of reactor working power, and that this range is strongly dependent of the detector's position with respect to the core's position. The frequency band of measurement is not critical. The results suggest that it is possible to develop a simple and compact measurement chain for nuclear reactors control. This would be obtained with an adequate combination of the FC operation ranges in AC and DC modes. Approximately ten decades in working power would be thus controlled with this unique type of detector (Campbellian method). A locally devised commercial detector (CFPT9) was used in these tests, and several of the most useful positions of the FC were determined. Frequency band from 150 Hz to 150 KHz was investigated. (M.E.L.)

  5. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in nonstationary metabolic flux analysis: The case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHeise

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014. Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labelling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from nonstationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  6. Spatially explicit regionalization of airborne flux measurements using environmental response functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to characterize the sensible (H and latent (LE heat exchange for different land covers in the heterogeneous steppe landscape of the Xilin River catchment, Inner Mongolia, China. Eddy-covariance flux measurements at 50–100 m above ground were conducted in July 2009 using a weight-shift microlight aircraft. Wavelet decomposition of the turbulence data enables a spatial discretization of 90 m of the flux measurements. For a total of 8446 flux observations during 12 flights, MODIS land surface temperature (LST and enhanced vegetation index (EVI in each flux footprint are determined. Boosted regression trees are then used to infer an environmental response function (ERF between all flux observations (H, LE and biophysical (LST, EVI and meteorological drivers. Numerical tests show that ERF predictions covering the entire Xilin River catchment (≈3670 km2 are accurate to ≤18% (1 σ. The predictions are then summarized for each land cover type, providing individual estimates of source strength (36 W m−2 H −2, 46 W m−2 −2 and spatial variability (11 W m−2 H −2, 14 W m−2 LE −2 to a precision of ≤5%. Lastly, ERF predictions of land cover specific Bowen ratios are compared between subsequent flights at different locations in the Xilin River catchment. Agreement of the land cover specific Bowen ratios to within 12 ± 9% emphasizes the robustness of the presented approach. This study indicates the potential of ERFs for (i extending airborne flux measurements to the catchment scale, (ii assessing the spatial representativeness of long-term tower flux measurements, and (iii designing, constraining and evaluating flux algorithms for remote sensing and numerical modelling applications.

  7. Measuring Flux Distributions for Diffusion in the Small-Numbers Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Phillips, Rob; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Dill, Ken

    2007-01-01

    For the classical diffusion of independent particles, Fick's law gives a well-known relationship between the average flux and the average concentration gradient. What has not yet been explored experimentally, however, is the dynamical distribution of diffusion rates in the limit of small particle numbers. Here, we measure the distribution of diffusional fluxes using a microfluidics device filled with a colloidal suspension of a small number of microspheres. Our experiments show that (1) the f...

  8. Uncertainty analysis of computational methods for deriving sensible heat flux values from scintillometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Solignac

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of scintillometers to determine sensible heat fluxes is now common in studies of land-atmosphere interactions. The main interest in these instruments is due to their ability to quantify energy distributions at the landscape scale, as they can calculate sensible heat flux values over long distances, in contrast to Eddy Covariance systems. However, scintillometer data do not provide a direct measure of sensible heat flux, but require additional data, such as the Bowen ratio (β, to provide flux values. The Bowen ratio can either be measured using Eddy Covariance systems or derived from the energy balance closure. In this work, specific requirements for estimating energy fluxes using a scintillometer were analyzed, as well as the accuracy of two flux calculation methods. We first focused on the classical method (used in standard softwares and we analysed the impact of the Bowen ratio on flux value and uncertainty. For instance, an averaged Bowen ratio (β of less than 1 proved to be a significant source of measurement uncertainty. An alternative method, called the "β-closure method", for which the Bowen ratio measurement is not necessary, was also tested. In this case, it was observed that even for low β values, flux uncertainties were reduced and scintillometer data were well correlated with the Eddy Covariance results. Besides, both methods should tend to the same results, but the second one slightly underestimates H while β decreases (<5%.

  9. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-04-12

    A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collections from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had ageometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as acorrection factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials wasmeasured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by thearc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesinthe range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current isgenerally greater for light elements than for heavy elements. The ionerosion rates were determined fromvalues of ion currentand ion chargestates, which were previously measured in the same experimental system.The ion erosion rates range from 12-94 mu g/C.

  10. Measurements of nuclear heating in the Petten High Flux Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the magnitude and distribution of the nuclear heating in all positions of the reactor core is an essential basis for the design of irradiation facilities. The principle for determining the nuclear heating is based on the caloric method. The nuclear heating is generated in a small sample suspended in the centre of a He-filled container. Since in steady state condition, the heat generation in the sample equals the heat removal over the gas annulus, the temperature difference is related to the nuclear heating in the sample. This relation is determined by means of an appropriate calibration. Two sets of three calorimeters with different sample materials, stainless steel, aluminium and graphite, are fitted in a measuring probe, which is placed in a thimble. The probe is vertically displacable in the thimble. (Auth.)

  11. CO2 Flux Measurement Uncertainty Estimates for NACP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A.; Hollinger, D.; Richardson, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the uncertainties in eddy-covariance net ecosystem exchange NEE, total ecosystem respiration RE and gross primary production GPP associated with (a) random measurement error and (b) uncertainties in the u* (friction velocity) threshold u*Th for all site-years in the NACP site-level synthesis. The analyses required automated evaluation of the u*Th filter used to identify and reject bad NEE measurements during low-turbulence periods at night. The u*Th detection algorithm was adapted from Papale et al. (2006), modified to use a standard change-point detection algorithm. Uncertainty in the u*Th was estimated by bootstrapping, conducted annually with 1,000 draws per site-year, then pooling all years and calculating the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals from the median and 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles of the pooled u*Th values. Random uncertainties in NEE, RE and GPP were estimated following Richardson et al. (2007). The NEE random uncertainty characteristic curve, which characterizes random uncertainty in NEE as a function of NEE, was estimated for each site-year based on the differences between the measured data and the output of a simple and robust gap-filling model. The estimation procedure began with synthetic NEE data generated by the gap-filling model, introduced gaps (as in the measured data after u*Th filtering), added synthetic noise (defined by the NEE random uncertainty characteristic curve using a Monte-Carlo approach), then filled the gaps in the noisy, gappy synthetic data. The process was repeated 1,000 times for each site-year, and the random uncertainty was estimated from median and the 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles of the gap-filled data. The uncertainties in NEE, RE and GPP associated with uncertainties in the u*Th were evaluated by running the gap-filling routine at 1,000 u*Th values, drawn randomly from the pooled annual bootstrapping estimates. This produced 1,000 realizations of the gap-filled NEE, RE and GPP time series. The

  12. A reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Baldoncini, Marica; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillate...

  13. Measurements of energy and water vapor fluxes over different surfaces in the Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the seasonal variations of energy and water vapor fluxes over three different surfaces: irrigated cropland (Yingke, YK, alpine meadow (A'rou, AR, and spruce forest (Guantan, GT. The energy and water vapor fluxes were measured using eddy covariance systems (EC and a large aperture scintillometer (LAS in the Heihe River Basin, China, in 2008 and 2009. We also determined the source areas of the EC and LAS measurements with a footprint model for each site, and discussed the differences between the sensible heat fluxes measured by EC and LAS. The results show that the main EC source areas were within a radius of 250 m at all sites. The main source area for the LAS (with a path length of 2390 m stretched along a path line approximately 2000 m long and 700 m wide. The surface characteristics in the source areas changed according to season and site, and there were characteristic seasonal variations in the energy and water vapor fluxes at all sites. The sensible heat flux was the main term of the energy budget during the dormant season. During the growing season, however, the latent heat flux dominated the energy budget, and an obvious "oasis effect" was observed at YK. The evapotranspiration (ET at YK was larger than those at the other two sites. The monthly ET reached its peak in July at YK and in June at GT in both 2008 and 2009, while it reached its peak in August at AR in 2008 and in June in 2009. The sensible heat fluxes measured by LAS at AR were larger than those measured by EC at the same site. This difference seems to be caused by the energy imbalance of EC, the heterogeneity of the underlying surfaces, and the difference between the source areas of the LAS and EC measurements.

  14. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analysers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Peltola

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA, RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA, G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA.

    The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analysers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and long-term performance were not assessed. Prototype-7700 is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, however if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyser is needed.

  15. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory. PMID:27098421

  16. Probe measurements of hydrogen fluxes during discharge cleaning in JFT-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) has been applied during discharge cleaning in the JFT-2M tokamak to measure hydrogen fluxes. The TDS carbon sample, thickness 0.13 mm, was heated to 10000C by direct current and the temperature distribution of the sample surface measured by infrared thermography. The probe was exposed to three types of plasma: Taylor-type discharge cleaning (TDC), ECR discharge cleaning (ECR-DC), and glow discharge cleaning (GDC). The TDS spectra show peak desorption at around 8000C. The hydrogen flux, obtained by integration of the TDS spectrum, decreases exponentially in the radial direction with decay length 7.4 cm and 5.8 cm in TDC and ECR-DC, respectively. The relation between hydrogen fluxes and water vapour production was investigated. In TDC, the amount of water vapour depends more strongly on the electron temperature of the plasma than on the hydrogen flux. In ECR-DC, the production of water vapour increases approximately linearly with the hydrogen-flux. In GDC, hydrogen fluxes were measured by TDS but no water vapour could be detected in the residual gases during the discharge. (orig.)

  17. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ate Poortinga

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the measurement compartments and the analysis approach used. In this study, we analyse the uncertainty of these measurements by investigating the vertical cumulative distribution and relative sediment flux derived from both wind tunnel and field studies. Vertical flux data was examined using existing data in combination with a newly acquired dataset; comprising meteorological data and sediment fluxes from six different events, using three customized catchers at Ameland beaches in northern Netherlands. Fast-temporal data collected in a wind tunnel shows that the median transport height has a scattered pattern between impact and fluid threshold, that increases linearly with shear velocities above the fluid threshold. For finer sediment, a larger proportion was transported closer to the surface compared to coarser sediment fractions. It was also shown that errors originating from the distribution of sampling compartments, specifically the location of the lowest sediment trap relative to the surface, can be identified using the relative sediment flux. In the field, surface conditions such as surface moisture, surface crusts or frozen surfaces have a more pronounced but localized effect than shear velocity. Uncertainty in aeolian mass flux estimates can be reduced by placing multiple compartments in closer proximity to the surface.

  18. Field intercomparison of two optical analyzers for CH4 eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Emmenegger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast response optical analyzers based on laser absorption spectroscopy are the preferred tools to measure field-scale mixing ratios and fluxes of a range of trace gases. Several state-of-the-art instruments have become commercially available and are gaining in popularity. This paper aims for a critical field evaluation and intercomparison of two compact, cryogen-free and fast response instruments: a quantum cascade laser based absorption spectrometer from Aerodyne Research, Inc., and an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer from Los Gatos Research, Inc. In this paper, both analyzers are characterized with respect to precision, accuracy, response time and also their sensitivity to water vapour. The instruments were tested in a field campaign to assess their behaviour under various meteorological conditions. The instrument's suitability for eddy covariance flux measurements was evaluated by applying an artificial flux of CH4 generated above a managed grassland with otherwise very low methane exchange. This allowed an independent verification of the flux measurements accuracy, including the overall eddy covariance setup and data treatment. The retrieved fluxes were in good agreement with the known artificial emission flux, which is more than satisfactory, given that the analyzers were attached to separate sonic anemometers placed on individual eddy towers with different data acquisition systems but similar data treatment that are specific to the best practice used by the involved research teams.

  19. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region. PMID:26601210

  20. First measurements of the flux integral with the NIST-4 watt balance

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, D; Chao, L S; Cao, A; Sineriz, G; Pratt, J R; Newell, D B; Schlamminger, S

    2015-01-01

    In early 2014, construction of a new watt balance, named NIST-4, has started at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In a watt balance, the gravitational force of an unknown mass is compensated by an electromagnetic force produced by a coil in a magnet system. The electromagnetic force depends on the current in the coil and the magnetic flux integral. Most watt balances feature an additional calibration mode, referred to as velocity mode, which allows one to measure the magnetic flux integral to high precision. In this article we describe first measurements of the flux integral in the new watt balance. We introduce measurement and data analysis techniques to assess the quality of the measurements and the adverse effects of vibrations on the instrument.

  1. Measurement of the east-west asymmetry of the cosmic muon flux in Hanoi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The east-west asymmetry of the cosmic muon flux has been measured in Hanoi where the geomagnetic rigidity cut-off reaches its maximal value of 17 GV. The measurement was made using an orientable scintillator telescope that had been previously used to measure the zenith angle distribution of the cosmic muon flux in the direction of the geographic north. The data exhibit a clear east-west asymmetry in good agreement with the predictions of a model widely used in the analysis of atmospheric neutrino oscillation studies

  2. Measurement of the thermal flux distribution in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the neutron flux distribution in research reactors is important because it gives the power distribution over the core, and it provides better conditions to perform experiments and sample irradiations. The measured neutron flux distribution can also be of interest as a means of comparison for the calculational methods of reactor analysis currently in use at this institute. The thermal neutron flux distribution of the IEA-R1 reactor has been measured with the miniature chamber WL-23292. For carrying out the measurements, it was buit a guide system that permit the insertion of the mini-chamber i between the fuel of the fuel elements. It can be introduced in two diferent positions a fuel element and in each it spans 26 axial positions. With this guide system the thermal neutron flux distribution of the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor can be obtained in a fast and efficient manner. The element measured flux distribution shows clearly the effects of control rods and reflectors in the IEA-R1 reactor. The difficulties encountered during the measurements are mentioned with detail as well as the procedures adopteed to overcome them. (Author)

  3. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux in underground sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrica, Bogdan, E-mail: mitrica@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Margineanu, Romul; Stoica, Sabin; Petcu, Mirel; Brancus, Iliana [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Jipa, Alexandru; Lazanu, Ionel; Sima, Octavian [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O.B. MG-11 (Romania); Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd [Institut fur Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Petre, Marian; Toma, Gabriel; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Stanca, Denis; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2011-10-21

    Muons comprise an important contribution of the natural radiation dose in air (approx. 30 nSv/h of a total dose rate of 65-130 nSv/h), as well as in underground sites even when the flux and relative contribution are significantly reduced. The flux of muons observed underground can be used as an estimator for the depth in mwe (meter water equivalent) of the underground site. The water equivalent depth is important information to devise physics experiments feasible for a specific site. A mobile detector for performing measurements of the muon flux was developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of two scintillator plates (approx. 0.9 m{sup 2}) which measure in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements at different locations at the surface or underground. The detector was used to determine muon fluxes at different sites in Romania. In particular, data were taken and the values of meter water equivalents were assessed for several locations at the salt mine in Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The measurements have been performed in two different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at the surface at different elevations were performed. The results were compared with predictions of Monte-Carlo simulations using the CORSIKA and MUSIC codes.

  4. Measurements and modelling of turbulent fluxes at two glaciers in British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, V.; Fitzpatrick, N.; Tessema, M.; Menounos, B.; Shea, J. M.; Dery, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The most physically-based method to simulate surface glacier melting is by surface energy balance models since they account for radiative and turbulent heat exchanges occurring at the snow or ice surface. Direct measurements of turbulent fluxes, however, are uncommon given the complexity of making reliable measurements of turbulent energy exchange on alpine glaciers. Most studies thus rely on the bulk aerodynamic method used to parametrize turbulent fluxes; an approach that may be inaccurate due to poorly specified empirical coefficients, such as the transfer coefficient and roughness lengths. Here we present direct measurements of turbulent energy fluxes for two alpine glaciers in British Columbia: Castle Glacier in the Interior Mountains for ablation seasons 2010 and 2012, and Nordic Glacier in Canadian Rockies for ablation season 2014. On both glaciers the turbulent heat fluxes may account for up to 35% of energy available for daily melt. Using eddy-covariance method we derive the roughness lengths for momentum, temperature and humidity, and evaluate the performance of bulk method with different parametrizations for transfer coefficient in simulating the turbulent fluxes. Finally, we estimate the transfer coefficient directly from our measurements, and investigate its dependence on meteorological variables measured at the glaciers.

  5. Ammonia fluxes for beech forest in the leaf fall transition period - measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of atmospheric reactive nitrogen represents uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere. This is because the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate and ecosystems models. Improving the understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system and quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere-atmosphere system is therefore essential. In particular, more knowledge of the bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed. We investigated the NH3 exchange for deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall by studying the atmospheric NH3 fluxes throughout a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October - 14 November) for the Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). The atmospheric NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained using the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). We found that 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087±0.19 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1. Measurements indicate a clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96±0.40 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period. In the leaf fall period (23 October - 8 November) the measured atmospheric NH3 concentration was increasing in relation to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The mean NH3 concentration was well simulated in DAMOS before leaf fall, but was underestimated following leaf fall. The results indicate that there is a missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall of a relatively large magnitude in the model. This points to the need for representing forest leaf fall

  6. Measurement of turbulent water vapor fluxes using a lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first application of a lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV system designed to measure turbulent properties and vertical latent heat fluxesE. Such measurements are crucial to improve our understanding of linkages between surface moisture supply and boundary layer clouds and phenomena such as atmospheric rivers. The application of UAVs allows for measurements on spatial scales complimentary to satellite, aircraft, and tower derived fluxes. Key system components are: a turbulent gust probe; a fast response water vapor sensor; an inertial navigation system (INS coupled to global positioning system (GPS; and a 100 Hz data logging system. We present measurements made in the continental boundary layer at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Dryden Research Flight Facility located in the Mojave Desert. Two flights consisting of several horizontal straight flux run legs up to ten kilometers in length and between 330 and 930 m above ground level (m a.g.l. are compared to measurement from a surface tower. Surface measured λE ranged from −53 W m−2 to 41 W m−2, and the application of a Butterworth High Pass Filter (HPF to the datasets improved agreement to within +/−12 W m−2 for 86% of flux runs, by removing improperly sampled low frequency flux contributions. This result, along with power and co-spectral comparisons and consideration of the differing spatial scales indicates the system is able to resolve vertical fluxes for the measurement conditions encountered. Challenges remain, and the outcome of these measurements will be used to inform future sampling strategies and further system development.

  7. Is there a high-y anomaly in antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed data taken in the CERN narrow-band neutrino and antineutrino beams with regard to the ''high-y anomaly'' observed by previous experiments at Fermilab. At neutrino energies between 30 and 200 GeV, the anti ν and ν charged-current cross-section ratios and muon-inelasticity distributions disagree with the earlier results. In particular, there is no evidence for energy-dependent effects in the antineutrino data which constitute an important aspect of the alleged anomaly

  8. Investigation of Large LGB Detectors for Antineutrino Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, P

    2011-01-01

    A detector material or configuration that can provide an unambiguous indication of neutron capture can substantially reduce random coincidence backgrounds in antineutrino detection and capture-gated neutron spectrometry applications. Here we investigate the performance of such a material, a composite of plastic scintillator and $^6$Li$_6^{nat}$Gd$(^{10}$BO$_{3})_{3}$:Ce (LGB) crystal shards of ~1 mm dimension and comprising 1% of the detector by mass. While it is found that the optical propagation properties of this material as currently fabricated are only marginally acceptable for antineutrino detection, its neutron capture identification ability is encouraging.

  9. Investigation of large LGB detectors for antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P. [Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943 (United States); Bowden, N.S., E-mail: nbowden@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-12-21

    A detector material or configuration that can provide an unambiguous indication of neutron capture can substantially reduce random coincidence backgrounds in antineutrino detection and capture-gated neutron spectrometry applications. Here we investigate the performance of such a material, a composite of plastic scintillator and {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd({sup 10}BO{sub 3}){sub 3}:Ce (LGB) crystal shards of Almost-Equal-To 1 mm dimension and comprising 1% of the detector by mass. While it is found that the optical propagation properties of this material as currently fabricated are only marginally acceptable for antineutrino detection, its neutron capture identification ability is encouraging.

  10. Non-invasive continuous core temperature measurement by zero heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Klewer, J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable continuous core temperature measurement is of major importance for monitoring patients. The zero heat flux method (ZHF) can potentially fulfil the requirements of non-invasiveness, reliability and short delay time that current measurement methods lack. The purpose of this study was to deter

  11. Contribution of Soil Surface CO2 Efflux to Boreal Forest Net Ecosystem Flux: Measurements and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinisto, S. M.; Kellomaki, S.

    2001-05-01

    The aims of the study are to assess the contribution of measured soil surface CO2 efflux to boreal forest net ecosystem flux and to test whether modeled component fluxes such as leaf and surface soil fluxes are consistent with the net flux measured from a tower over a forest stand. Net ecosystem flux was measured continuously in a boreal Scots pine forest in eastern Finland (62° 52'N, 30° 49'E) during the growing period in 2000. Height and diameter of trees in this 50-year-old stand ranged from 10 to 13 m and from 9 to 12 cm, respectively, for 80 % of trees. Eddy-flux measurements were made at the top of a 32-m tower, about 20 m above the canopy. Wind velocity and virtual temperature were measured with a three-axis sonic anemometer. CO2 fluctuations at 32 m were continuously monitored with a CO2 analyzer. Raw data were sampled at 10 Hz and 1/2 hr fluxes calculated. Soil surface CO2 efflux was measured on the top of a feather moss or lichen cover with an IRGA and four automated open dynamic chambers, each equipped with a PAR sensor and air temperature probe. Chambers of 19 cm diameter were made of transparent PMMA. Measurements were made twice per hr, lasting 1 min each. Periods considered in this study included both early and late season conditions, since data from the automated soil surface efflux measurements were available from May to June as well as from August to September. In this study, we aim to compare the measured soil surface CO2 efflux with simultaneously measured net ecosystem flux. The performance of the automated chambers will be tested by comparing with simultaneous measurements from a dark closed static chamber at the same site. A simple regression model, using soil surface temperature as an independent variable, will be built using the static dark chamber data from the previous years. A rough correction for the carbon uptake of moss will be made. This model could be validated later with automated measurements. To investigate further the

  12. Interpretation of surface flux measurements in heterogeneous terrain during the Monsoon '90 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network of 9-m-tall surface flux measurement stations were deployed at eight sparsely vegetated sites during the Monsoon '90 experiment to measure net radiation, Q, soil heat flux, G, sensible heat flux, H (using eddy correlation), and latent heat flux, E (using the energy balance equation). At four of these sites, 2-m-tall eddy correlation systems were used to measure all four fluxes directly. Also a 2-m-tall Bowen ratio system was deployed at one site. Magnitudes of the energy balance closure (Q + G + H + E) increased as the complexity of terrain increased. The daytime Bowen ratio decreased from about 10 before the monsoon season to about 0.3 during the monsoons. Source areas of the measurements are developed and compared to scales of heterogeneity arising from the sparse vegetation and the topography. There was very good agreement among simultaneous measurements of Q with the same model sensor at different heights (representing different source areas), but poor agreement among different brands of sensors. Comparisons of simultaneous measurements of G suggest that because of the extremely small source area, extreme care in sensor deployment is necessary for accurate measurement in sparse canopies. A recently published model to estimate fetch is used to interpret measurements of H at the 2 m and 9 m heights. Three sites were characterized by undulating topography, with ridgetops separated by about 200-600 m. At these sites, sensors were located on ridgetops, and the 9-m fetch included the adjacent valley, whereas the 2-m fetch was limited to the immediate ridgetop and hillside. Before the monsoons began, vegetation was mostly dormant, the watershed was uniformly hot and dry, and the two measurements of H were in close agreement. After the monsoons began and vegetation fully matured, the 2-m measurements of H were significantly greater than the 9-m measurements, presumably because the vegetation in the valleys was denser and cooler than on the ridgetops

  13. Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing

  14. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  15. Method for improving line flux and redshift measurements with narrowband filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabl, J.; Freudling, W.; Møller, P.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Nilsson, K. K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High redshift star-forming galaxies are discovered routinely because of a flux excess in narrowband filters caused by an emission line. In most cases, the width of such filters is broader than typical line widths, and the throughput of the filters varies substantially within the bandpass. This leads to substantial uncertainties in redshifts and fluxes that are derived from the observations with one specific narrowband filter. Aims: The uncertainty in measured line parameters can be sharply reduced by using repeated observations of the same target field with filters that have overlapping passbands but differ slightly in central wavelength or wavelength dependence of the effective filter curve. Such data are routinely collected with some large field imaging cameras that use multiple detectors and a separate filter for each of the detectors. An example is the European Southern Observatory's VISTA InfraRed CAMera (VIRCAM). Methods: We developed a method of determining more accurate redshift and line flux estimates from the ratio of apparent fluxes measured from observations in different narrowband filters and several matching broadband filters. A parameterized model of the line and continuum flux is used to predict the flux ratios as a function of redshift based on the known filter curves. These model predictions are then used to determine the most likely redshift and line flux. Results: We tested the obtainable quality of parameter estimation for the example of Hα in the VIRCAM NB118 filters both on simulated and actual observations where the latter were based on the UltraVISTA DR2 data set. We combined the narrowband data with deep broadband data in Y, J, and H. We find that with this method, the errors in the measured lines fluxes can be reduced up to almost an order of magnitude. Conclusions: We conclude that existing narrowband data can be used to derive accurate line fluxes if the observations include images taken with sufficiently different filter

  16. Estimating effects from trapped magnetic fluxes in superconducting magnetic levitation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masakazu Nakanishi

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic levitation measurement is one of the most promising approaches to define mass standard based on the fundamental physical constants. However, the present system has unknown factors causing error larger than 50 ppm. We examined the effects of magnetic fluxes trapped in the superconducting coil and the superconducting floating body. When fluxes were trapped in either coil or floating body, their effects were able to be cancelled by reversing polarities of current and magnetic field, as had been believed. However, fluxes trapped in both coil and body induced an attractive force between them and caused error. In order to reduce the fluxes, the coil and the floating body should be cooled in low magnetic field in magnetic and electromagnetic shields.

  17. Neutron detection and identification using ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF in segmented antineutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiff, Scott D., E-mail: skiff@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bowden, Nathaniel [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lund, Jim; Reyna, David [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Antineutrino detection using inverse beta-decay conversion has demonstrated capability to measure nuclear reactor power and fissile material content for nuclear safeguards. Current efforts focus on aboveground deployment scenarios, for which a successful background rejection strategy will be needed to measure the anticipated antineutrino event rates. In this paper, we report on initial studies to quantify the intrinsic capture efficiency and particle identification capabilities of a new scintillation-based segmented design that uses layers of ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF to capture and identify neutrons created in the inverse beta-decay reaction. Laboratory efficiency measurements are consistent with MCNP5 calculations, estimating {sup 6}Li neutron conversion efficiency above 50% for practical full-scale detector configurations.

  18. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  19. Experimental assessment for instantaneous temperature and heat flux measurements under Diesel motored engine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higlights: ► We measured in-cylinder wall heat fluxes. ► We examine the effects of different engine parameters. ► Increasing air mass flow increase heat fluxes. ► The effect of engine speed can be masked by the effect of volumetric efficiency. ► Differences among the different walls have been found. - Abstract: The main goal of this work is to validate an innovative experimental facility and to establish a methodology to evaluate the influence of some of the engine parameters on local engine heat transfer behaviour under motored steady-state conditions. Instantaneous temperature measurements have been performed in order to estimate heat fluxes on a modified Diesel single cylinder combustion chamber. This study was divided into two main parts. The first one was the design and setting on of an experimental bench to reproduce Diesel conditions and perform local-instantaneous temperature measurements along the walls of the combustion chamber by means of fast response thermocouples. The second one was the development of a procedure for temperature signal treatment and local heat flux calculation based on one-dimensional Fourier analysis. A thermodynamic diagnosis model has been employed to characterise the modified engine with the new designed chamber. As a result of the measured data coherent findings have been obtained in order to understand local behaviour of heat transfer in an internal combustion engine, and the influence of engine parameters on local instantaneous temperature and heat flux, have been analysed.

  20. On the measurement of energy fluxes in plasmas using a calorimetric probe and a thermopile sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different diagnostics for the determination of the energy influx in plasma processes were used to characterize an ion beam source and an asymmetric RF discharge. The related energy fluxes were measured in dependence on the ion energy and on the RF power, respectively. The first sensor, called HFM (Heat Flux Microsensor) is a thermopile which allows for direct energy flux measurements. With the second sensor, a calorimetric probe, the energy influx has been calculated from the temporal temperature evolution preliminarily registered. Although the working principle of both sensors is different, the obtained results are in good agreement. In the ion beam (-2), whereas the values measured in the asymmetric RF discharge were lower than 50 mW cm-2 for discharge powers in the range 10-100 W. The performances and limitations of both sensors are compared and discussed.

  1. Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Velasco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Eddy covariance (EC flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric chemistry and the role that cities play in regional and global chemical cycles. As part of the MCMA-2003 study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs and CO2 from a residential district of Mexico City (Velasco et al., 2005a, b. During the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign, a second flux measurement study was conducted in a different district of Mexico City to corroborate the 2003 flux measurements, to expand the number of species measured, and to obtain additional data for evaluation of the local emissions inventory. Fluxes of CO2 and olefins were measured by the conventional EC technique using an open path CO2 sensor and a Fast Isoprene Sensor calibrated with a propylene standard. In addition, fluxes of toluene, benzene, methanol and C2-benzenes were measured using a virtual disjunct EC method with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer. The flux measurements were analyzed in terms of diurnal patterns and vehicular activity and were compared with the most recent gridded emissions inventory. In both studies, the results showed that the urban surface of Mexico City is a net source of CO2 and VOCs with significant contributions from vehicular traffic. Evaporative emissions from commercial and other anthropogenic activities were significant sources of toluene and methanol. The data show that the emissions inventory is in reasonable agreement with measured olefin and CO2 fluxes, while C2-benzenes and toluene emissions from evaporative sources are overestimated in the inventory. It appears that methanol emissions from mobile sources occur, but are not present in

  2. Ozone flux of an urban orange grove: multiple scaled measurements and model comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstad, K. P.; Grulke, N. E.; Jenerette, D. G.; Schilling, S.; Marrett, K.

    2009-12-01

    There is significant uncertainty about the ozone sink properties of the phytosphere due to a complexity of interactions and feedbacks with biotic and abiotic factors. Improved understanding of the controls on ozone fluxes is critical to estimating and regulating the total ozone budget. Ozone exchanges of an orange orchard within the city of Riverside, CA were examined using a multiple-scaled approach. We access the carbon, water, and energy budgets at the stand- to leaf- level to elucidate the mechanisms controlling the variability in ozone fluxes of this agro-ecosystem. The two initial goals of the study were 1. To consider variations and controls on the ozone fluxes within the canopy; and, 2. To examine different modeling and scaling approaches for totaling the ozone fluxes of this orchard. Current understanding of the total ozone flux between the atmosphere near ground and the phytosphere (F-total) include consideration of a fraction which is absorbed by vegetation through stomatal uptake (F-absorb), and fractional components of deposition on external, non-stomatal, surfaces of the vegetation (F-external) and soil (F-soil). Multiplicative stomatal-conductance models have been commonly used to estimate F-absorb, since this flux cannot be measured directly. We approach F-absorb estimates for this orange orchard using chamber measurement of leaf stomatal-conductance, as well as non-chamber sap-conductance collected on branches of varied aspect and sun/shade conditions within the canopy. We use two approaches to measure the F-total of this stand. Gradient flux profiles were measured using slow-response ozone sensors collecting within and above the canopy (4.6 m), and at the top of the tower (8.5 m). In addition, an eddy-covariance system fitted with a high-frequency chemiluminescence ozone system will be deployed (8.5 m). Preliminary ozone gradient flux profiles demonstrate a substantial ozone sink strength of this orchard, with diurnal concentration differentials

  3. Flux measurements of volatile organic compounds at SMEAR II using surface layer gradient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, P.; Taipale, R.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Aalto, J.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Schallhart, S.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are mostly emitted into atmosphere from natural sources. Some of the compounds, such as monoterpenes, are highly reactive and seem to have major contributions to aerosol particle formation and growth, thus these compounds are also connected to the global climate change. Approximately 50 % of the biogenic emissions is coming from the tropical rain forests, 15-20 % from the boreal forests and the rest from the other sources like fields and oceans. In order to understand seasonal and interannual changes in VOC emissions long term emission measurements would be of great importance. However, long-term VOC emission measurements are extremely sparse. Our aim is to develop reliable and feasible method to measure ecosystem scale VOC emissions by micrometeorological methods. In the past decade the disjunct eddy covariance method with proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (DEC/PTR-QMS) has been the method of choise for VOC flux measurements. However, automatically data post-processing, crucial for long term measurement, remains a challenge, especially in low flux conditions. To by-pass these problems we can apply a surface layer gradient technique with PTR-QMS (SLG/PTR-QMS) for long term VOC flux measurements. In this technique fluxes are obtained using measured vertical profiles on VOC concentrations with Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Albeit more indirect method than DEC, this classical method holds promise for long term measurement. The measurements wer conducted in Hyytiälä at SMEAR II station (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E, 180 m a.m.s.l.) since summer 2010. Hyytiälä represents a typical boreal region with clear snow covered winters and annual average temperature has been approximately 3.3°C. Clear cumulative positive flux of methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol/formic acid, acetone, MBO-fragment/isoprene, and monoterpenes were observed.

  4. Terrestrial matter effects on reactor antineutrino oscillations at JUNO or RENO-50: how small is small?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu-Feng; Wang, Yifang; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2016-01-01

    We have carefully examined, in both analytical and numerical ways, how small the terrestrial matter effects can be in a given medium-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillation experiment like JUNO or RENO-50. Taking the ongoing JUNO experiment for example, we show that the inclusion of terrestrial matter effects may reduce the sensitivity of the neutrino mass ordering measurement by \\Delta \\chi^2_{\\rm MO} \\simeq 0.6, and a neglect of such effects may shift the best-fit values of the flavor mix...

  5. Neutron flux measurements for the PBMR DPP - HTR2008-58093

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) Demonstration Power Plant (DPP) several neutron flux measurements are made, both within the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and outside the RPV. The measurements within the RPV are performed by the Core Structures Instrumentation (CSI) system. While those outside the RPV are performed by the Nuclear Instrumentation System (NIS). The PBMR has a long annular core with a relative low power density, requiring flux monitoring over the full 11 M of the active core region. The core structures instrumentation measures the neutron flux in the graphite reflector. Two measurement techniques are used; Fission Chamber based channels with high sensitivity for initial fuel load and low power testing and SPND channels for measurements at full and near full power operation. The CSI flux monitoring supports data acquisition for design Verification and Validation (V and V), and the data will also be used for the characterization of the NIS for normal reactor start-ups and low power operation. The CSI flux measurement channels are only required for the first few years of operation; the sensors are not replaceable. The Nuclear Instrumentation System is an ex core system that includes the Post Event Instrumentation. Due to the long length of the PBMR core, the flux is measured at several axial positions. This is a fission chamber based system; full advantage is taken of all the operating modes for fission chambers (pulse counting, mean square voltage (MSV), and linear current). The CSI flux monitoring channels have many technical and integration challenges. The environment where the sensors and their associated signal cables are required to operate is extremely harsh; temperature and radiation levels are very high. The selection and protection of the fission chambers warranted special attention. The selection criteria for sensors and cables takes cognizance of the fact that the assemblies are built in during the assembly of the reactor internal

  6. Development of a laser remote sensing instrument to measure sub-aerial volcanic CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike

    2016-04-01

    A thorough quantification of volcanic CO2 fluxes would lead to an enhanced understanding of the role of volcanoes in the geological carbon cycle. This would enable a more subtle understanding of human impact on that cycle. Furthermore, variations in volcanic CO2 emissions are a key to understanding volcanic processes such as eruption phenomenology. However, measuring fluxes of volcanic CO2 is challenging as volcanic CO2 concentrations are modest compared with the ambient CO2 concentration (~400 ppm) . Volcanic CO2 quickly dilutes with the background air. For Mt. Etna (Italy), for instance, 1000 m downwind from the crater, dispersion modelling yields a signal of ~4 ppm only. It is for this reason that many magmatic CO2 concentration measurements focus on in situ techniques, such as direct sampling Giggenbach bottles, chemical sensors, IR absorption spectrometers or mass spectrometers. However, emission rates are highly variable in time and space. Point measurements fail to account for this variability. Inferring 1-D or 2-D gas concentration profiles, necessary to estimate gas fluxes, from point measurements may thus lead to erroneous flux estimations. Moreover, in situ probing is time consuming and, since many volcanoes emit toxic gases and are dangerous as mountains, may raise safety concerns. In addition, degassing is often diffuse and spatially extended, which makes a measurement approach with spatial coverage desirable. There are techniques that allow to indirectly retrieve CO2 fluxes from correlated SO2 concentrations and fluxes. However, they still rely on point measurements of CO2 and are prone to errors of SO2 fluxes due to light dilution and depend on blue sky conditions. Here, we present a new remote sensing instrument, developed with the ERC project CO2Volc, which measures 1-D column amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere with sufficient sensitivity to reveal the contribution of magmatic CO2. Based on differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) the instrument measures

  7. Detection and Flux Density Measurements of the Millisecond Pulsar J2145-0750 below 100 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, J; Taylor, G B; Blythe, J N; Clarke, T; Craig, J; Ellingson, S W; Helmboldt, J F; Henning, P A; Lazio, T J W; Schinzel, F; Stovall, K; Wolfe, C N

    2013-01-01

    We present flux density measurements and pulse profiles for the millisecond pulsar PSR J2145-0750 spanning 37 to 81 MHz using data obtained from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array. These measurements represent the lowest frequency detection of pulsed emission from a millisecond pulsar to date. We find that the pulse profile is similar to that observed at 102 MHz. We also find that the flux density spectrum between ~40 MHz to 5 GHz is suggestive of a break and may be better fit by a model that includes spectral curvature with a rollover around 730 MHz rather than a single power law.

  8. ICI detector for measuring gamma-ray fluxes in mixed gamma-neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new gamma-ray detecting device called ICI (Insulator-conductor-insulator) detector has been developed and tested. Like vacuum Compton diode (VCD) and dielectric Compton diode (DCD) generally used in pulsed gamma-ray measurements, ICI detector operates by utilization of the Compton effect and has low sensitivity to gamma-ray fluxes, very fast time response, large linearity and wide dynamic range, it is desired for using the device to measure intense and rapidly changing gamma-ray fluxes. Compared to the existing VCDs and DCDs, the detector requires no vacuum in operation and the active volume is only 2 mm thick. (authors)

  9. Neutron flux measurement in the central channel (XC1) of TRIGA 14 MW LEU core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA Research Reactor was completed in May 2006 and each step of the conversion was achieved by removal of HEU fuel and replaced by LEU fuel. The operation was accompanied by a large set of theoretical evaluations and physical measurements intended to confirm the performances of gradual conversion. After the core full conversion, a program of measurements and comparisons with previous results of core physics and measurements is underway, allowing data acquisition for normal operation, demonstration of safety and economics of the converted core. Neutron flux spectrum measurements in the XC-1 water-filled channel were performed using multi-foil activation techniques. The neutron spectra and flux are obtained by unfolding from measured reaction rates using SAND II computer code. The integral flux measured value for LEU core and 14 MW reactor power is 4.66x1014 n/cm2s. For standard core the integral neutron flux for 14 MW reactor power was 4.27x1014 n/cm2s. (authors)

  10. On-line fast flux measurements in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2001, CEA-Cadarache and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are collaborating on the development and in-pile qualification of subminiature fission chambers (diameter of 1.5 mm). Initially, efforts concentrated on fission chambers for the in-pile measurement of thermal fluxes (with 235U as fissile material). Meanwhile successful long-term tests of the prototypes have been performed in various environments: in low temperature (40-100 degress Celsius) BR2 pool water (up to a thermal neutron fluence of 3 1021 n/cm2) and in the CALLISTO PWR loop (300 degrees Celsius, 155 bars). The long-term qualification of derived industrial detectors (Photonis CFUZ53) in CALLISTO is still ongoing. However, for various types of irradiations in research reactors, the knowledge of the evolution of the fast neutron flux is even of more interest than the thermal flux data. Therefore the collaboration program was extended to the development and the in-pile qualification of subminiature or miniature fission chambers (with 3 mm diameter) for fast neutron detection, for which 242Pu was selected as the optimal fissile material. In order to achieve the on-line in-pile measurement of fast neutron flux, the fission chambers will be operated in the Campbelling mode (based on the mean square fluctuation of the detector current). In this mode the gamma induced contribution to the signal can be efficiently suppressed. Moreover, a data processing software will take into account the evolution of the fissile deposit in order to assess on-line the fast flux sensitivity and to correct for the low energy neutron contributions. The final objective is to qualify a Fast Neutron Detector System (FNDS) able to provide on-line data for local fast neutron fluxes in Material Testing Reactors. The on-line measurement of the fast neutron flux would contribute significantly to the characterization of the irradiation conditions during test experiments with materials and innovative fuel elements

  11. A relaxed eddy accumulation system for measuring vertical fluxes of nitrous acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system combined with a nitrous acid (HONO analyzer was developed to measure atmospheric HONO vertical fluxes. The system consists of three major components: (1 a fast-response sonic anemometer measuring both vertical wind velocity and air temperature, (2 a fast-response controlling unit separating air motions into updraft and downdraft samplers by the sign of vertical wind velocity, and (3 a highly sensitive HONO analyzer based on aqueous long path absorption photometry that measures HONO concentrations in the updrafts and downdrafts. A dynamic velocity threshold (±0.5σw, where σw is a standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity was used for valve switching determined by the running means and standard deviations of the vertical wind velocity. Using measured temperature as a tracer and the average values from two field deployments, the flux proportionality coefficient, β, was determined to be 0.42 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the theoretical estimation. The REA system was deployed in two ground-based field studies. In the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study in Bakersfield, California in summer 2010, measured HONO fluxes appeared to be upward during the day and were close to zero at night. The upward HONO flux was highly correlated to the product of NO2 and solar radiation. During the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX 2009 at Blodgett Forest, California in July 2009, the overall HONO fluxes were small in magnitude and were close to zero. Causes for the different HONO fluxes in the two different environments are briefly discussed.

  12. Modeling Method for Increased Precision and Scope of Directly Measurable Fluxes at a Genome-Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D; Xu, Sibei; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is considered to be the gold standard for determining the intracellular flux distribution of biological systems. The majority of work using MFA has been limited to core models of metabolism due to challenges in implementing genome-scale MFA and the undesirable trade-off between increased scope and decreased precision in flux estimations. This work presents a tunable workflow for expanding the scope of MFA to the genome-scale without trade-offs in flux precision. The genome-scale MFA model presented here, iDM2014, accounts for 537 net reactions, which includes the core pathways of traditional MFA models and also covers the additional pathways of purine, pyrimidine, isoprenoid, methionine, riboflavin, coenzyme A, and folate, as well as other biosynthetic pathways. When evaluating the iDM2014 using a set of measured intracellular intermediate and cofactor mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs),1 it was found that a total of 232 net fluxes of central and peripheral metabolism could be resolved in the E. coli network. The increase in scope was shown to cover the full biosynthetic route to an expanded set of bioproduction pathways, which should facilitate applications such as the design of more complex bioprocessing strains and aid in identifying new antimicrobials. Importantly, it was found that there was no loss in precision of core fluxes when compared to a traditional core model, and additionally there was an overall increase in precision when considering all observable reactions. PMID:26981784

  13. Integrated readout of organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/6LiF for segmented antineutrino detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiff, Scott D.; Reyna, David; Monahan, James; Bowden, Nathaniel S.

    2010-11-01

    Antineutrino detection using inverse beta decay conversion has demonstrated the capability to measure nuclear reactor power and fissile material content for nuclear safeguards. Current efforts focus on aboveground deployment scenarios, for which highly efficient capture and identification of neutrons is needed to measure the anticipated antineutrino event rates in an elevated background environment. In this submission, we report on initial characterization of a new scintillation-based segmented design that uses layers of ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF and an integrated readout technique to capture and identify neutrons created in the inverse beta decay reaction. Laboratory studies with multiple organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF configurations reliably identify {sup 6}Li neutron captures in 60 cm-long segments using pulse shape discrimination.

  14. Integrated readout of organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/6LiF for segmented antineutrino detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiff, Scott D.; Reyna, David; Monahan, James (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA); Bowden, Nathaniel S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

    2010-10-01

    Antineutrino detection using inverse beta decay conversion has demonstrated the capability to measure nuclear reactor power and fissile material content for nuclear safeguards. Current efforts focus on aboveground deployment scenarios, for which highly efficient capture and identification of neutrons is needed to measure the anticipated antineutrino event rates in an elevated background environment. In this submission, we report on initial characterization of a new scintillation-based segmented design that uses layers of ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF and an integrated readout technique to capture and identify neutrons created in the inverse beta decay reaction. Laboratory studies with multiple organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/{sup 6}LiF configurations reliably identify {sup 6}Li neutron captures in 60 cm-long segments using pulse shape discrimination.

  15. Electron Neutrino and Antineutrino Appearance in the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckenberger, Adam Paul [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes a particle beam and two steel-scintillator calorimeters designed to determine the parameters associated with muon neutrino disappearance. Analysis methods developed by the MINOS νe group have facilitated the placement of limits upon the mixing angle associated with νμ → νe oscillations. Since the polarity of the focusing horns can be switched, we can perform a similar analysis with an antineutrino-enriched beam to select electron antineutrino appearance candidates. Using 3.34e20 POT (protons on target) in the antineutrino mode, we exclude θ13 = 0 at the 80% C.L. A joint fit of the 3.34e20 POT antineutrino and 10.6e20 POT neutrino samples excluded θ13 = 0 at the 96% C.L. In addition, the combined data were used to produce exclusions regarding the CP-violating phase.

  16. Measurement of the 36Cl deposition flux in central Japan: natural background levels and seasonal variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essential parameters for the applications of 36Cl as a tracer in groundwater studies include the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio, at the time of recharge, and/or the natural background deposition flux of 36Cl in the recharge area. To facilitate the hydrological use of 36Cl in central Japan, this study aimed to obtain a precise estimate of the long-term average local 36Cl flux and to characterize its seasonal variability. The 36Cl in precipitation was continuously monitored in Tsukuba, central Japan over a period of >5 years. The 36Cl flux showed a clear seasonal variation with an annual peak during the spring, which was attributed to the seasonal variability of tropopause height. The long-term average 36Cl flux (32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1), estimated from the measured data, was consistent with the prediction from the 36Cl latitudinal fallout model scaled using the global mean production rate of 20 atoms m−2 s−1. The initial 36Cl/Cl ratio was estimated to be (41 ± 6) × 10−15, which is similar to that of pre-bomb groundwater in the Tsukuba Upland. An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum. - Highlights: ► We monitored 36Cl in precipitation in central Japan over a period of >5 years. ► The 36Cl flux varied seasonally, with a peak in spring. ► The long-term average 36Cl flux and the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio were 32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1 and (41 ± 6) × 10−15, respectively. ► An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum.

  17. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.;

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux...... measurements from three sites of different land surface type (agriculture, forest and meadow) and river discharge data from the 2500 km2 Skjern River catchment in Denmark. The approach includes initial calibrations of three one-dimensional models representing the three land surface types using the flux...... measurements for calibration. This step provides initial values for the subsequent modelling and calibration at catchment scale. To test the validity of the approach, two additional catchment scale distributed simulations were performed with no calibration and only calibration of the one-dimensional models...

  18. Measurement of cosmic ray flux in the China Jinping underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) is the deepest underground laboratory running in the world at present. In such a deep underground laboratory, the cosmic ray flux is a very important and necessary parameter for rare-event experiments. A plastic scintillator telescope system has been set up to measure the cosmic ray flux. The performance of the telescope system has been studied using the cosmic rays on the ground laboratory near the CJPL. Based on the underground experimental data taken from November 2010 to December 2011 in the CJPL, which has an effective live time of 171 days, the cosmic ray muon flux in the CJPL is measured to be (2.0±0.4)×10-10/(cm2·s). The ultra-low cosmic ray background guarantees an ideal environment for dark matter experiments at the CJPL. (authors)

  19. MARIE measurements and model predictions of GCR particle flux at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations, and compared with the first twelve months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculations. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with particle flux distributions. Model calculation particle fluxes also includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current mapping period are presented

  20. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration fluxes are influenced by natural factors such as climate and soil type, but also by anthropogenic activities in managed ecosystems. As a result, soil CO2 fluxes show a large intra- and interannual as well as intra- and intersite variability. Most of the available soil CO2 flux data giving insights into this variability have been measured with manually closed static chambers, but technological advances in the past 15 years have also led to an increased use of automated closed chamber systems. The great advantage of automated chambers in comparison to manually operated chambers is the higher temporal resolution of the flux data. This is especially important if we want to better understand the effects of short-term events, e.g. fertilization or heavy rainfall, on soil CO2 flux variability. However, the chamber method is an invasive measurement method which can potentially alter soil CO2 fluxes and lead to biased measurement results. In the peer-reviewed literature, many papers compare the field performance and results of different closed static chamber designs, or compare manual chambers with automated chamber systems, to identify potential biases in CO2 flux measurements, and thus help to reduce uncertainties in the flux data. However, inter-comparisons of different automated closed dynamic chamber systems are still lacking. Here we are going to present a field comparison of the most-cited automated chamber system, the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, with the also commercially available Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. Both measurement systems were installed side by side at a recently harvested poplar bioenergy plantation (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/) from April 2014 until August 2014. The plantation provided optimal comparison conditions with a bare field situation after the harvest and a regrowing canopy resulting in a broad variety of microclimates. Furthermore, the plantation was planted in a double-row system with

  1. Simple, stable, and affordable: Towards long-term ecosystem scale flux measurements of VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, J.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are key players in atmospheric chemistry and climate, yet our understanding of their emission dynamics is very limited. They dominate global emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) with estimated rates that are an order of magnitude higher than the anthropogenic VOC emissions. Since the publication of the first global BVOC emission inventories there have been efforts to develop more realistic and process-based models of BVOC emissions. However, there are only a few ecosystem-scale BVOC flux data for evaluation and improvement of these models. Thus a reliable network of observations is urgently needed. Surface layer flux measurements by micrometeorological methods provide the most suitable data for this purpose but there are some hindrances preventing the implementation of a long-term flux measurement network.

  2. High CO2 emissions through porous media: Transport mechanisms and implications for flux measurement and fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William C.; Sorey, M.L.; Kennedy, B.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Rogie, J.D.; Shuster, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was constructed in the laboratory where known fluxes could be maintained through dry sand. Steady-state gas concentration profiles and fractionation effects observed in the 30-cm sand column nearly match those predicted by the Stefan-Maxwell equations, indicating that the test system was functioning successfully as a uniform porous medium. Eight groups of investigators tested their accumulation chamber equipment, all configured with continuous infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), in this system. Over a flux range of ~ 200-12,000 g m-2 day-1, 90% of their 203 flux measurements were 0-25% lower than the imposed flux with a mean difference of - 12.5%. Although this difference would seem to be within the range of acceptability for many geologic investigations, some potential sources for larger errors were discovered. A steady-state pressure gradient of -20 Pa/m was measured in the sand column at a flux of 11,200 g m-2 day-1. The derived permeability (50 darcies) was used in the dusty-gas model (DGM) of transport to quantify various diffusive and viscous flux components. These calculations were used to demonstrate that accumulation chambers, in addition to reducing the underlying diffusive gradient, severely disrupt the steady-state pressure gradient. The resultant diversion of the net gas flow is probably responsible for the systematically low flux measurements. It was also shown that the fractionating effects of a viscous CO2 efflux against a diffusive influx of air will have a major impact on some important geochemical indicators, such as N2/Ar, ??15N-N2, and 4He/22

  3. Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds measured and modelled above a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juráň, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Savi, Flavia; Alivernini, Alessandro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Večeřová, Kristýna; Křůmal, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were investigated at Norway spruce forest at Bílý Kříž in Beskydy Mountains of the Czech Republic during the summer 2014. A proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, Ionicon Analytik, Austria) has been coupled with eddy-covariance system. Additionally, Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model has been used to derive fluxes from concentration gradient of various monoterpenes previously absorbed into n-heptane by wet effluent diffusion denuder with consequent quantification by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. Modelled data cover each one day of three years with different climatic conditions and previous precipitation patterns. Model MEGAN was run to cover all dataset with monoterpene fluxes and measured basal emission factor. Highest fluxes measured by eddy-covariance were recorded during the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes and isoprene. Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model suggests most abundant monoterpene fluxes being α- and β-pinene. Principal component analysis revealed dependencies of individual monoterpene fluxes on air temperature and particularly global radiation; however, these dependencies were monoterpene specific. Relationships of monoterpene fluxes with CO2 flux and relative air humidity were found to be negative. MEGAN model correlated to eddy-covariance PTR-TOF-MS measurement evince particular differences, which will be shown and discussed. Bi-directional fluxes of oxygenated short-chain volatiles (methanol, formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and methyl ethyl ketone) were recorded by PTR-TOF-MS. Volatiles of anthropogenic origin as benzene and toluene were likely transported from the most benzene polluted region in Europe - Ostrava city and adjacent part of Poland around Katowice, where metallurgical and coal mining industries are located. Those were accumulated during

  4. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Hiller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc. that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  5. Comparison of CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance and soil chambers measurements in a vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the processes involved in the carbon balance of a vineyard, we set up a long-term monitoring station of CO2, water vapour and energyfluxes. The experimental site is located in an extensive flat vineyard in the north-east of Italy. We measure the net ecosystem exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) technique using a Campbell Scientific closed-path IRGA and sonic anemometer, and the soil CO2 flux using a Li-Cor multiplexed system connected with six automatic dynamic chambers. Ancillary meteorological and soil variables are also measured. The vineyard is planted with north-south oriented rows spaced 2.2 m apart. Floor is grass covered, and a strip 0.6 m wide on the rows is chemically treated. To represent the different soil conditions existing in the EC footprint and to study the components of the CO2 soil flux, we placed dark soil chambers both on the vineyard rows and in the inter-row space. A well-known limit of the EC technique is the underestimation of fluxes during calm wind periods, mainly occurring at night. In the autumn/winter vine dormancy period, the EC and soil chambers CO2 fluxes should be similar. We compared the CO2 fluxes measured using the two methods to evaluate the reliability of EC measurements at different atmospheric turbulent mixing conditions and stability. The EC technique underestimates the ecosystem respiration during night time periods with friction velocity lower than 0.1 m/s. The present comparison could enable the assessment of a friction velocity threshold, representing the limit above which the EC fluxes can be considered representative of the vegetation-atmosphere exchanges at our specific site.

  6. Regional inversion of CO2 ecosystem fluxes from atmospheric measurements. Reliability of the uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broquet, G.; Chevallier, F.; Breon, F.M.; Yver, C.; Ciais, P.; Ramonet, M.; Schmidt, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, UMR8212, IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alemanno, M. [Servizio Meteorologico dell' Aeronautica Militare Italiana, Centro Aeronautica Militare di Montagna, Monte Cimone/Sestola (Italy); Apadula, F. [Research on Energy Systems, RSE, Environment and Sustainable Development Department, Milano (Italy); Hammer, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest (Hungary); Meinhardt, F. [Federal Environmental Agency, Kirchzarten (Germany); Necki, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Piacentino, S. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Palermo (Italy); Thompson, R.L. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Vermeulen, A.T. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, EEE-EA, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The Bayesian framework of CO2 flux inversions permits estimates of the retrieved flux uncertainties. Here, the reliability of these theoretical estimates is studied through a comparison against the misfits between the inverted fluxes and independent measurements of the CO2 Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) made by the eddy covariance technique at local (few hectares) scale. Regional inversions at 0.5{sup 0} resolution are applied for the western European domain where {approx}50 eddy covariance sites are operated. These inversions are conducted for the period 2002-2007. They use a mesoscale atmospheric transport model, a prior estimate of the NEE from a terrestrial ecosystem model and rely on the variational assimilation of in situ continuous measurements of CO2 atmospheric mole fractions. Averaged over monthly periods and over the whole domain, the misfits are in good agreement with the theoretical uncertainties for prior and inverted NEE, and pass the chi-square test for the variance at the 30% and 5% significance levels respectively, despite the scale mismatch and the independence between the prior (respectively inverted) NEE and the flux measurements. The theoretical uncertainty reduction for the monthly NEE at the measurement sites is 53% while the inversion decreases the standard deviation of the misfits by 38 %. These results build confidence in the NEE estimates at the European/monthly scales and in their theoretical uncertainty from the regional inverse modelling system. However, the uncertainties at the monthly (respectively annual) scale remain larger than the amplitude of the inter-annual variability of monthly (respectively annual) fluxes, so that this study does not engender confidence in the inter-annual variations. The uncertainties at the monthly scale are significantly smaller than the seasonal variations. The seasonal cycle of the inverted fluxes is thus reliable. In particular, the CO2 sink period over the European continent likely ends later than

  7. Field inter-comparison of three systems for NH3 concentration and flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voglmeier, Karl; Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht; Häni, Christoph; Richter, Undine; Brümmer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Ambient air ammonia analyzer systems that are not only used for concentration but also for flux measurements have to meet special requirements. They either have to provide a fast response detection (c. 1 sec) for the application of the eddy covariance technique (EC) or they have to resolve relatively small horizontal or vertical concentration gradients. The Posieux intercomparison experiment in fall 2015 was designed to compare three advanced and different approaches to determine concentration and fluxes of NH3 of a grazed pasture during several weeks. The methods involved: [1] a two channel reactive N converter measuring in parallel the sum of oxidized N species with the exception of N2O and the sum of the total reactive N species. The difference of the two channels corresponds to the sum of reduced reactive N species; [2] a QC laser analyzer with a special designed inlet system that minimize wall effects and separates particles from the gas sampling stream; [3] two MiniDOAS instruments for line integrated concentration without any inlet system. The experimental setup and the environmental conditions resulted in a high temporal and spatial dynamic of NH3 concentrations and fluxes. Systems [1] and [2] are designed to perform flux measurements by the Eddy Covariance technique, whereas the DOAS technique has a temporal resolution of 1 min. Fluxes are calculated from the horizontal concentration increase across an emitting surface with back lagrangian stochastic trajectory dispersion model. We present a comparison of the measured concentrations and fluxes and discuss the advantages and limitations of the three chosen systems.

  8. MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdos, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-10

    The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

  9. Measurements of Radon Exhalation Flux and Atmospheric Radon in Uranium Mining and Processing Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) performs an environmental monitoring of areas around the different nuclear facilities. This environmental monitoring involves a periodical sampling and analysis in the areas surrounding the operating and decommissioned facilities for the mining and milling of uranium ores. This monitoring implies the sampling and measurements of natural uranium and 226Ra levels in surface waters, sediments and ground waters in each surrounding area. Moreover, radon exhalation flux measurements from uranium mill tailings and radon concentration in air are performed. Radon exhalation rate measurement is performed by activated charcoal adsorption followed by gamma spectrometry. In the case of radon gas measurements in air, they are carried out by several methods, mainly by nuclear track detectors (Makrofol and CR-39). In this work, the results related with radon exhalation flux measurements and radon concentration in air are presented and discussed. In addition, a full description of the methods used is presented. (author)

  10. Film data processing system of the antineutrino experiment in the HYDRA system on the BESM-6 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the system for mathematical processing of the film data of an antineutrino experiment. The system is based on the HYDRA system with the use of a modular principle. Functionally the mathematical processing system is divided into three parts: primary data processing, geometrical reconstruction of events, and kinematic balance. Use of the said system makes it possible to quickly and efficiently process the film data from measuring devices

  11. Neutron spatial flux profile measurement in compact subcritical system using miniature neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zero power multiplying assembly in subcritical regime serves as a benchmark for validating subcritical reactor physics. The utilization of a subcritical assembly for the determination of nuclear parameters in a multiplying medium requires a well-defined neutron flux to carry out the experiments. For this it is necessary to know the neutron flux profile inside a subcritical system. A compact subcritical assembly BRAHMMA has been developed in India. The experimental channels in this assembly are typically less than 8 mm diameter. This requires use of miniature detectors that can be mounted in these experimental channels. In this article we present the thermal neutron flux profile measurement in a compact subcritical system using indigenously developed miniature gas filled neutron detectors. These detectors were specially designed and fabricated considering the restrictive dimensional requirements of the subcritical core. Detectors of non-standard size with various sensitivities, from 0.4 to 0.001 cps/nv were used for neutron flux of interest ranging from 103 to 107 n-cm−2 s−1. A comparison of measured neutron flux using these detectors and simulated Monte Carlo calculations are also presented in this article

  12. Non-linearity measurements of solar cells with an LED-based combinatorial flux addition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Behrang H.; Shore, Andrew; Roller, John; Yoon, Howard W.; Campanelli, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We present a light emitting diode (LED)-based system utilizing a combinatorial flux addition method to investigate the non-linear relationship in solar cells between the output current of the cell and the incident irradiance level. The magnitude of the light flux is controlled by the supplied currents to two LEDs (or two sets of them) in a combinatorial fashion. The signals measured from the cell are arranged within a related overdetermined linear system of equations derived from an appropriately chosen Nth degree polynomial representing the relationship between the measured signals and the incident fluxes. The flux values and the polynomial coefficients are then solved for by linear least squares to obtain the best fit. The technique can be applied to any solar cell, under either monochromatic or broadband spectrum. For the unscaled solution, no reference detectors or prior calibrations of the light flux are required. However, if at least one calibrated irradiance value is known, then the entire curve can be scaled to an appropriate spectral responsivity value. Using this technique, a large number of data points can be obtained in a relatively short time scale over a large signal range.

  13. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Felber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 from ruminants contributes one third to global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analysers the instrumentation at many flux sites have been amended for these gases. However the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatial and temporal uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d−1 managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to two orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head−1 d−1 (best guess of this study correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows to determine CH4 emissions of grazing cows if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  14. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-06-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one-third of global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analyzers, the instrumentation at many flux sites has been amended for these gases. However, the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatially and temporally uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best estimate from this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However, a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found, which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows one to determine CH4 emissions of cows on a pasture if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  15. Design and tests of a data acquisition system for the Angra anti-neutrinos detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We describe the design of a Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for the Angra antineutrino project, aimed at developing an antineutrino detector to monitor nuclear reactors through the detection of antineutrino counting rates and spectral measurements. The experiment, presently under construction, will take place at the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra II and will detect antineutrinos generated in the fusion process of the nuclear reactor fuel. The DAQ system is designed to be able to digitize and to store all the analog signals coming from the photomultiplier tubes (PMT), after going through the front-end electronics. It is composed of VME standard electronic modules. We focus here on the design of a new VME data acquisition card (NDAQ), which will be part of the Angra DAQ. This card is composed of eight analog-to-digital channels (ADC), each one featuring 10 bits of vertical resolution and 125 MHz of sampling rate. In order to measure time between events, or between PMT pulses, an 82 ps resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) is also included in the card. Other NDAQ features are: one 512K x 8 bits Static RAM for on-board data storage, reprogrammable data processing circuit (through the use of a Field Programmable Gate Array - FPGA), standalone operation (connecting to any computer via USB port) and a 512K x 32 bits output buffer, used to reduce dead time in the data flow. The card allows VME block read cycles, reaching the usual bandwidth of more than 20 MB/s. Considering the worst-case estimated event rate of 1kHz, comprising neutrino and muons events, the Angra project must be able to deal with 10 MB/s event rate, which is safely below the card bandwidth. The design uses off-the-shelf devices from worldwide semiconductor companies. A software framework for the DAQ is developed for Linux platforms by using standard scientific tools and languages like ROOT and C++. The NDAQ design is currently under tests. The design and preliminary results, using

  16. Influence of temporally variable groundwater flow conditions on point measurements and contaminant mass flux estimations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Bauer, S; Dietrich, P; Beyer, C

    information representing observation wells installed along control planes using different well frequencies and configurations. Results of the scenario simulations show that temporally variable flow conditions can lead to significant temporal fluctuations of the concentration and thus are a substantial source...... measurements can improve mass flux estimates under dynamic flow conditions. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Productivity and carbon dioxide exchange of the leguminous crops: Estimates from flux tower measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net CO2 exchange data on legume crops at 17 flux tower sites in North America and 3 sites in Europe representing 29 site-years of measurements were partitioned into gross photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration using a light-response function method, resulting in new estimates of ecosystem-scale ec...

  18. Lithogenic fluxes in the Bay of Bengal measured by sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; VijayKumar, B.; Parthiban, G.; Ittekkot, V.; Nair, R.R.

    after removal of carbonates with phosphoric acid. Duplicate anlayses were carried out on all samples, and the variation was less than 1% of the mean. On another aliquot, carbonate Lithogenic fluxes in the Bay of Bengal measured by sediment traps 797...

  19. Apparatus for the measurement of the distribution of neutron flux (band and wire continuous recorders)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus of which we describe the principles and the operation, makes it possible to know the thermal neutron flux distribution in a pile channel or along a fuel element by the measurement of the β activity of continuous detectors. It is also possible thereby to show the presence of a very localised sudden discontinuity in the distribution curve. (authors)

  20. Measurements of Mass, Momentum and Energy fluxes over an ice/snow covered lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Rui; Potes, Miguel; Mammarella, Ivan; Provenzale, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of the interactions between ice and snow and the atmosphere requires improved measurements of energy, mass and momentum fluxes, which continue to have a high degree of uncertainty. In this communication, observed near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) over a boreal lake during a freezing period (winter 2015/2016) will be analysed and compared with observations over ice free lakes. Continuously measurements of near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) are obtained with a new eddy covariance (EC) system, the Campbell Scientific's IRGASON Integrated Open-Path CO2/H2O Gas Analyzer and 3D Sonic Anemometer, over lake Vanajavesi in Finland. The measurement site is located in a tip of narrow peninsula on the lake (61.133935° N ; 24.259119° E), offering very good conditions for eddy covariance flux measurements. The EC system was installed at 2.5m height above the lake surface and was oriented against the prevailing wind direction in the site.

  1. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, D. R.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-median midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 14.1±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h, respectively. For comparison the adjusted CAM2004 emission inventory estimates toluene fluxes of 10 mg/m2/h along the footprint of the flight-track. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10-15 g/g) including the International airport (e.g. 3-5 g/g) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 g/g (3.9±0.3 g/g) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (BTEX- Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m, p, o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >87% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds in the MCMA (2-13%).

  2. Comparative soil CO2 flux measurements and geostatistical estimation methods on masaya volcano, nicaragua

    OpenAIRE

    Lewicki, J. L.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Earth Sciences Division; Bergfeld, D.; U.S. Geological Survey; Cardellini, C.; Università di Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia,; Chiodini, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Granieri, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Pisa, Pisa, Italia; Varley, N.; Universidad de Colima, Colima, México; Werner, C.; Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, New Zealand

    2004-01-01

    We present a comparative study of soil CO2 flux ( ) measured by five groups (Groups 1–5) at the IAVCEI-CCVG Eighth Workshop on Volcanic Gases on Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. Groups 1–5 measured using the accumulation chamber method at 5-m spacing within a 900 m2 grid during a morning (AM) period. These measurements were repeated by Groups 1–3 during an afternoon (PM) period. Measured ranged from 218 to 14,719 g m–2 day–1. The variability of the five measurements made at each grid point range...

  3. Neutrino and antineutrino charge-exchange reactions on 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the formalism of weak interaction processes, obtaining new expressions for the transition rates, which greatly facilitate numerical calculations, for both neutrino-nucleus reactions and muon capture. Explicit violation of the conserved vector current hypothesis by the Coulomb field, as well as development of a sum-rule approach for inclusive cross sections, has been worked out. We have done a thorough study of exclusive (ground-state) properties of 12B and 12N within the projected quasiparticle random phase approximation (PQRPA). Good agreement with experimental data achieved in this way put into evidence the limitations of the standard RPA and QRPA models, which come from the inability of the RPA to open the p3/2 shell and from the nonconservation of the number of particles in the QRPA. The inclusive neutrino/antineutrino (ν/ν-tilde) reactions 12C(ν,e-)12N and 12C(ν-tilde,e+)12B are calculated within both the PQRPA and the relativistic QRPA. It is found that (i) the magnitudes of the resulting cross sections are close to the sum-rule limit at low energy, but significantly smaller than this limit at high energies, for both ν and ν-tilde; (ii) they increase steadily when the size of the configuration space is augmented, particularly for ν/ν-tilde energies >200 MeV; and (iii) they converge for sufficiently large configuration space and final-state spin. The quasi-elastic 12C(ν,μ-)12N cross section recently measured in the MiniBooNE experiment is briefly discussed. We study the decomposition of the inclusive cross section based on the degree of forbiddenness of different multipoles. A few words are dedicated to the ν/ν-tilde-12C charge-exchange reactions related to astrophysical applications.

  4. Measurement of \

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Bazarko, A O; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Cao, J; Coney, L; Conrad, J M; Cox, D C; Curioni, A; Djurcic, Z; Finley, D A; Fleming, B T; Ford, R; Garcia, F G; Garvey, G T; Gonzales, J; Grange, J; Green, C; Green, J A; Hart, T L; Hawker, E; Imlay, R; Johnson, R A; Karagiorgi, G; Kasper, P; Katori, T; Kobilarcik, T; Kourbanis, I; Koutsoliotas, S; Laird, E M; Linden, S K; Link, J M; Liu, Y; Louis, W C; Mahn, K B M; Marsh, W; Mauger, C; McGary, V T; McGregor, G; Metcalf, W; Meyers, P D; Mills, F; Mills, G B; Monroe, J; Moore, C D; Mousseau, J; Nelson, R H; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J A; Osmanov, B; Ouedraogo, S; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Perevalov, D; Polly, C C; Prebys, E; Raaf, J L; Ray, H; Roe, B P; Russell, A D; Sandberg, V; Schirato, R; Schmitz, D; Shaevitz, M H; Shoemaker, F C; Smith, D; Soderberg, M; Sorel, M; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; Stancu, I; Stefanski, R J; Sung, M; Tanaka, H A; Tayloe, R; Tzanov, M; Van de Water, R G; Wascko, M O; White, D H; Wilking, M J; Yang, H J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2009-01-01

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single \\pi^0 production on CH_2 induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC \\pi^0 events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of \\pi^0 momentum and \\pi^0 angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.40_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =808 MeV and (1.48+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.14_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =664 MeV for \

  5. Glucose transport carrier of human erythrocytes. Radiation target size measurement based on flux inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact human erythrocytes frozen in the presence of cryoprotective reagents and irradiated with an electron beam retained their diffusion barrier to L-glucose. The carrier-mediated flux of D-glucose, on the other hand, was inactivated as a simple exponential function of the radiation dose. Classical target size analysis of this data yielded a molecular size of 185,000 daltons for the carrier. This represents the first measurement of the functional size of a transport protein based directly on flux inactivation

  6. Evapotranspiration and heat fluxes over a patchy forest - studied using modelling and measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Dellwik, Ebba; Boegh, Eva

    using these parameters without a proper interpretation in mesoscale or global circulation models can results in serious bias of estimates of modelled evapotranspiration or heat fluxes from given area. Since representative measurements focused on heterogeneous effects are scarce numerical modelling can......, Ecological. Appl. 18, 1454-1459). In the present work, we apply the SCADIS with enhanced turbulence closure including buoyancy for investigation of the spatial distribution of latent and sensible heat vertical fluxes over patchy forested terrain in Denmark during selected days in the summer period. A closer...

  7. Trapped proton fluxes at low Earth orbits measured by the PAMELA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Danilchenko, I A; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01

    We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above > 70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350-610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.

  8. Fast flux measurements by means of threshold detectors on the reactor 'Melusine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using existing data on the (n,p) and (n,α) threshold reactions we have carried out fast flux measurements on the swimming pool type reactor 'Melusine'. Four common elements: P, S, Mg, Al were chosen because from the point of view of fast spectrum analysis they represent a fairly good energy range from 2.4 MeV to 8 MeV. The fission flux value found in the central element at a power of 1 MW is 1.4 x 1013 n/cm2/s ± 0.14. (author)

  9. Critical heat flux measurements in small-diameter tubes using R12 as model fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of critical heat flux measurements are reported for vertical upflow of Refrigerant 12 at high mass fluxes and high pressures in small diameter tubes. The data are transformed into water data using a scaling law, which is verified by means of a new analysis. An error estimation includes the error of the scaling law. Special phenomena ('limiting quality', 'upstream boiling crisis') are explained by theoretical models. The applicability of existing correlations is checked and a new CHF-table for small diameter tubes is presented. With 41 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Estimation of heat and chemical fluxes from a seafloor hydrothermal vent field using radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N.D.; Lupton, J.E.; Kadko, D.; Collier, R.; Lilley, M.D.; Pak, H.

    1988-08-18

    The circulation of seawater through newly formed ocean crust at mid-ocean ridge spreading centres is important in the oceanic heat and chemical budgets. Here we introduce a geochemical approach to estimating the flux from a hydrothermal vent field based on radon (/sup 222/Rn) measurements in the overlying effluent plume. This method was applied successfully in 1986 during a 23-day expedition to an active vent field on the 170-km Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We estimate the heat flux from this site to be 1-5 x 10/sup 9/ W.

  11. Review of neutron flux measurements in the RA reactor from 1959 - 1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core of the experimental RA reactor in Vinca consists of 2% enriched uranium and heavy water. Reactor started operation with 56 fuel elements. At the beginning of 1962 number of fuel elements was increased to 68 and it reached 84 at the end of the cycle. Physical parameters were measured for each 'new' core for cold unpoisoned core as well as for simulated hot poisoned core conditions. For the core with 84 fuel elements measurements were done only for cold poisoned core conditions. This paper summarizes the results of measuring thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes in the experimental channels during the past period. Measurement of fast neutron flux in the fuel element cavity along the vertical axis is presented separately

  12. First air-sea flux mooring measurements in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, E. W.; Josey, S. A.; Verein, R.

    2012-08-01

    The Southern Ocean is a key component of the global climate system: insulating the Antarctic polar region from the subtropics, transferring climate signals throughout the world's oceans and forming the southern component of the global overturning circulation. However, the air-sea fluxes that drive these processes are severely under-observed due to the harsh and remote location. This paucity of reference observations has resulted in large uncertainties in ship-based, numerical weather prediction, satellite and derived flux products. Here, we report observations from the Southern Ocean Flux Station (SOFS); the first successful air-sea flux mooring deployment in this ocean. The mooring was deployed at 47°S, 142°E for March 2010 to March 2011 and returned measurements of near surface meteorological variables and radiative components of the heat exchange. These observations enable the first accurate quantification of the annual cycle of net air-sea heat exchange and wind stress from a Southern Ocean location. They reveal a high degree of variability in the net heat flux with extreme turbulent heat loss events, reaching -470 Wm-2 in the daily mean, associated with cold air flowing from higher southern latitudes. The observed annual mean net air-sea heat flux is a small net ocean heat loss of -10 Wm-2, with seasonal extrema of 139 Wm-2 in January and -79 Wm-2 in July. The novel observations made with the SOFS mooring provide a key point of reference for addressing the high level of uncertainty that currently exists in Southern Ocean air-sea flux datasets.

  13. A Re-examination of Density Effects in Eddy Covariance Measurements of CO2 Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping LIU

    2009-01-01

    Corrections of density effects resulting from air-parcel expansion/compression are important in interpreting eddy covariance fluxes of water vapor and CO2 when open-path systems are used. To account for these effects, mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air are two critical parameters in treating those physical processes responsible for density variations. Based on various underlying assumptions, different studies have obtained different formulas for the mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air, leading to a number of approaches to correct density effects. In this study, we re-examine physical processes related to different assumptions that are made to formulate the density effects. Specifically, we re-examine the assumptions of a zero dry air flux and a zero moist air flux in the surface layer, used for treating density variations, and their implications for correcting density effects. It is found that physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero dry air flux account for the influence of dry air expansion/compression on density variations. Meanwhile, physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero moist air flux account for the influence of moist air expansion/compression on density variations. In this study, we also re-examine mixing ratio issues. Our results indicate that the assumption of a zero dry air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to dry air, while the assumption of a zero moist air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to the total moist air. Additionally, we compare different formula for the mean vertical velocity, generated by air-parcel expansion/compression, and for density effect corrections using eddy covariance data measured over three boreal ecosystems.

  14. Study on the 6He β-decay with account for second-class currents and antineutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the rest mass of electron antineutrino are studied taking into account the induced tensor form factor Ft of second kind current according to the Weinberg classification in the course of 6He nucleus β-decay. The contribution of mν and Ft into the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient Aeν and degree of longitudinal polarization of decay electrons. It is shown that in the case of mν difference from zero independently of second kind current account Aeν coefficient both at the begining and end of the β spectrum asymptotically tends to zero. It is noted that qualitatively new experiments on measurement of the e-ν correlation for pure Gamov-Teller transitions with the 1% accuracy being planned for the nearest future will permit to considerably improve the available estimations by the Ft form factor value

  15. Comment on Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 191802 (2012): "Observation of Reactor Electron Antineutrino Disappearance in the RENO Experiment"

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, Thierry; Cribier, Michel; Collin, Antoine; Durand, Vincent; Fischer, Vincent; Gaffiot, Jonathan; Lhuillier, David; Letourneau, Alain; Vivier, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    The RENO experiment recently reported the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos consistent with neutrino oscillations, with a significance of 4.9 standard deviations. The published ratio of observed to expected number of antineutrinos in the far detector is R=0.920 +-0.009(stat.) +-0.014(syst.) and corresponds to sin^2 2theta13 = 0.113 +-0.013(stat.) +-0.019(syst), using a rate-only analysis. In this letter we reanalyze the data and we find a ratio R=0.903 +-0.01(stat.), leading to sin^2 2theta13 = 0.135. Moreover we show that the sin^2 2theta13 measurement still depend of the prompt high energy bound beyond 4 MeV, contrarily to the expectation based on neutrino oscillation.

  16. Measurement of NOx fluxes from a tall tower in central London, UK and comparison with emissions inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, James D.; Helfter, Carole; Purvis, Ruth M.; Beevers, Sean D.; Carslaw, David C.; Alastair C. Lewis; Moller, Sarah J.; Tremper, Anja; Vaughan, Adam; Nemitz, Eiko G.

    2015-01-01

    Direct measurements of NOx concentration and flux were made from a tall tower in central London, UK as part of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Fast time resolution (10 Hz) NO and NO2 concentrations were measured and combined with fast vertical wind measurements to provide top-down flux estimates using the eddy covariance technique. Measured NOx fluxes were usually positive and ranged from close to zero at night to 2000–8000 ng m–2 s–1 during the day. Peak fluxes were usually obse...

  17. Measurement improvements of heat flux probes for internal combustion engine; Nainen kikan ni okeru netsuryusokukei no kaihatsu to kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, H.; Tasaka, H. [Miyazaki University, Miyazaki (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In heat flux measurement in engines, material properties of a heat flux probe and numerical prediction of those influence have been discussed rather than practical measurement accuracy. This study featured the process for the quantitative examination of heat flux probes. Although the process required direct comparison among all the probes and additional measurements in a constant volume bomb, precision of heat flux measurement was greatly improved so that the essential characteristics of heat transfer in engines can be detected. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  19. An assessment of antineutrino detection as a tool for monitoring nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam Bernstein; Todd West; Vipin Gupta

    1999-06-01

    The antineutrino is the only real-time nuclear signature from a fission explosion that propagates great distances through air, water, and ground. The size and sensitivity of antineutrino detectors has increased dramatically in the last decade, and will continue to do so in the next, thanks in part to the renewed interest in neutrino physics brought on by the recent discovery that neutrinos may have mass. The evolution of antineutrino detectors, and the evident interest of the signature as a means for monitoring nuclear tests motivates this review of the capabilities of existing and possible future detectors as test ban verification tools. The authors find that existing liquid scintillator ionization detectors, operating a few tens of meters below the Earth's surface and containing a few thousand tons of active material, could be used to monitor an area of a few square kilometers for nuclear explosions at the 1 kt level. Purified water Cerenkov detectors of sizes comparable to existing detectors (50,000 m{sup 3}) could be used to detect 1 kt explosions at distances of a few tens of kilometers. If neutron-absorbing dopants such as sodium chloride or gadolinium could be added to purified water, the resulting background reduction would allow extension of the range for sensitivity to a pulse of 10 antineutrino events from a 1 kt explosion out to approximately 1000 km. Beyond 1000 km, backgrounds from the world's nuclear reactors would become prohibitively large. The engineering hurdles for such detectors would be formidable. The size of a doped detector operating at the 100 km range, suitable for cooperative monitoring of existing nuclear test sites, is about 60 times that of the largest existing water detector, and would require a factor of several dozen more photomultiplier tubes than what is now used in large scale physics experiments. At a price per phototube of $1000, capital costs would amount to several billions of dollars, even for a detector at this

  20. New ground-based lidar enables volcanic CO2 flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Nuvoli, Marcello; Chiodini, Giovanni; Minopoli, Carmine; Tamburello, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    There have been substantial advances in the ability to monitor the activity of hazardous volcanoes in recent decades. However, obtaining early warning of eruptions remains challenging, because the patterns and consequences of volcanic unrests are both complex and nonlinear. Measuring volcanic gases has long been a key aspect of volcano monitoring since these mobile fluids should reach the surface long before the magma. There has been considerable progress in methods for remote and in-situ gas sensing, but measuring the flux of volcanic CO2—the most reliable gas precursor to an eruption—has remained a challenge. Here we report on the first direct quantitative measurements of the volcanic CO2 flux using a newly designed differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which were performed at the restless Campi Flegrei volcano. We show that DIAL makes it possible to remotely obtain volcanic CO2 flux time series with a high temporal resolution (tens of minutes) and accuracy (volcanic CO2 represents a major step forward in volcano monitoring, and will contribute improved volcanic CO2 flux inventories. Our results also demonstrate the unusually strong degassing behavior of Campi Flegrei fumaroles in the current ongoing state of unrest. PMID:26324399

  1. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux in underground sites

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrica, Bogdan; Stoica, Sabin; Petcu, Mirel; Brancus, Iliana; Jipa, Alexandru; Lazanu, Ionel; Sima, Octavian; Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd; Petre, Marian; Toma, Gabriel; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Stanca, Denis; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Muons comprise an important contribution of the natural radiation dose in air (approx. 30 nSv/h of a total dose rate of 65-130 nSv/h), as well as in underground sites even when the flux and relative contribution are significantly reduced. The flux of the muons observed in underground can be used as an estimator for the depth in mwe (meter water equivalent) of the underground site. The water equivalent depth is an important information to devise physics experiments feasible for a specific site. A mobile detector for performing measurements of the muon's flux was developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of 2 scintillator plates (approx. 0.9 m2) which measure in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements at different locations at surface or underground. The detector was used to determine muon fluxes at different sites in Romania. In particular, data were taken and the values of meter water equivalents were assessed for several locations from the salt mine from Slanic Prahov...

  2. Technical Note: Semi-rigid chambers for methane gas flux measurements on tree-stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, A.; Welch, B.; Pangala, S. R.; Peacock, M.; Gauci, V.

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the measurement of methane (CH4) emissions from tree stems in a wide range of ecosystems so as to determine how they contribute to the total ecosystem flux. To date, tree CH4 fluxes are commonly measured using rigid closed chambers (static or dynamic), which often pose challenges as these are bulky and limit measurement of CH4 fluxes to only a very narrow range of tree stem sizes and shapes. To overcome these challenges we aimed to design, describe and test new semi-rigid stem-flux chambers (or sleeves). We compared semi-rigid chamber's gas permeability to CH4 against the traditional rigid chamber approach, in the laboratory and in the field, with continuous flow or syringe injections. We found that the semi-rigid chambers performed well, and had numerous benefits including reduced gas permeability and optimal stem gas exchange surface to total chamber volume ratio (Sc/Vtot) allowing better headspace mixing, especially when connected in a dynamic mode to a continuous flow gas analyser. Semi-rigid sleeves can easily be constructed and transported in multiple sizes, are extremely light, cheap to build and fast to deploy. This makes them ideal for use in remote ecosystems where access logistics are complicated.

  3. Technical Note: Semi-rigid chambers for methane gas flux measurements on tree stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Andy; Welch, Bertie; Pangala, Sunitha R.; Peacock, Michael; Gauci, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing interest in the measurement of methane (CH4) emissions from tree stems in a wide range of ecosystems so as to determine how they contribute to the total ecosystem flux. To date, tree CH4 fluxes are commonly measured using rigid closed chambers (static or dynamic), which often pose challenges as these are bulky and limit measurement of CH4 fluxes to only a very narrow range of tree stem sizes and shapes. To overcome these challenges we aimed to design and test new semi-rigid stem-flux chambers (or sleeves). We compared the CH4 permeability of the new semi-rigid chambers with that of the traditional rigid chamber approach, in the laboratory and in the field, with continuous flow or syringe injections. We found that the semi-rigid chambers had reduced gas permeability and optimal stem gas exchange surface to total chamber volume ratio (Sc / Vtot) better headspace mixing, especially when connected in a dynamic mode to a continuous flow gas analyser. Semi-rigid sleeves can easily be constructed and transported in multiple sizes, are extremely light, cheap to build and fast to deploy. This makes them ideal for use in remote ecosystems where access logistics is complicated.

  4. Investigation of SOL parameters and divertor particle flux from electric probe measurements in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, J.G., E-mail: jgbak@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, M.K. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Juhn, J.W.; Seo, D.C.; Bang, E.N. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, S.B. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.S. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.J. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The upstream scrape-off layer (SOL) profiles and downstream particle fluxes are measured with a fast reciprocating Langmuir probe assembly (FRLPA) at the outboard mid-plane and a fixed edge Langmuir probe array (ELPA) at divertor region, respectively in the KSTAR. It is found that the SOL has a two-layer structure in the outboard wall-limited (OWL) ohmic and L-mode: a near SOL (∼5 mm zone) with a narrow feature and a far SOL with a broader profile. The near SOL width evaluated from the SOL profiles in the OWL plasmas is comparable to the scaling for the L-mode divertor plasmas in the JET and AUG. In the SOL profiles and the divertor particle flux profile during the ELMy H-modes, the characteristic e-folding lengths of electron temperature, plasma density and particle flux during an ELM phase are about two times larger than ones at the inter ELM.

  5. The measurements of thermal neutron flux distribution in a paraffin phantom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parisa Akhlaghi; Laleh Rafat-Motavalli; Seyed Hashem Miri-Hakimabad

    2013-05-01

    The term `thermal flux' implies a Maxwellian distribution of velocity and energy corresponding to the most probable velocity of 2200 ms-1 at 293.4 K. In order to measure the thermal neutron flux density, the foil activation method was used. Thermal neutron flux determination in paraffin phantom by counting the emitted rays of indium foils with two different detectors (Geiger–Muller counter and NaI(Tl)) was the aim of this project. The relative differences of the outcome of the experiments were between 2.5% and 5%. The final results were compared with MCNP4C outputs and the best agreement was generated using NaI(Tl) by a minimum discrepancy of about 0.6% for the foil placed 8.5 cm from the neutron source.

  6. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work mainly describes the 'Neutrino Flux Monitoring' system (NFM), which has been built for the 400-GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) neutrino beams. A treatment is given of some general subjects related to the utilization of silicon detectors and the properties of high-energy muons. Energy loss of minimal-ionizing particles, which has to be distinguished from energy deposition in the detector, is considered. Secondary radiation, also called 'spray', consisting of 'delta rays' and other cascade products, is shown to play an important role in the muon flux measurement inside a shield, especially for muons of high energy (> 100 GeV). Radiation induced damage in the detectors, which determines the long term performance, is discussed. The relation between the detector response and the real muon flux is determined. The use of NFM system for on-line beam monitoring is described. (Auth.)

  7. Muon Flux Measurements at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} Veto System

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Dunagan, C; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Lopez, A M; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schmitt, C; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2016-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the total MUON flux underground at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the 4850 ft level. Measurements were done with the Majorana Demonstrator veto system arranged in two different configurations. The measured total flux is (5.04+/-0.16) x 10^-9 muons/s/cm^2.

  8. Comparison of calculated energy flux of internal tides with microstructure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Falahat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical mixing caused by breaking of internal tides plays a major role in maintaining the deep-ocean stratification. This study compares observations of dissipation from microstructure measurements to calculations of the vertical energy flux from barotropic to internal tides, taking into account the temporal variation due to the spring-neap tidal cycle. The dissipation data originate from two surveys in the Brazil Basin Tracer Release Experiment (BBTRE, and one over the LArval Dispersal along the Deep East Pacific Rise (LADDER3, supplemented with a few stations above the North-Atlantic Ridge (GRAVILUCK and in the western Pacific (IZU. A good correlation is found between logarithmic values of energy flux and local dissipation in BBTRE, suggesting that the theory is able to predict energy fluxes. For the LADDER3, the local dissipation is much smaller than the calculated energy flux, which is very likely due to the different topographic features of BBTRE and LADDER3. The East Pacific Rise consists of a few isolated seamounts, so that most of the internal wave energy can radiate away from the generation site, whereas the Brazil Basin is characterised by extended rough bathymetry, leading to a more local dissipation. The results from all four field surveys support the general conclusion that the fraction of the internal-tide energy flux that is dissipated locally is very different in different regions.

  9. Measurements of microparticle fluxes on orbital stations in 1978-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Lev; Baranov, Dmitrii; Dergachev, Valentin; Gagarin, Yurii; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bednyakov, Sergey A.

    The important task of ISO WG4/SC14 activity is the development of standards for the micrometeoroids/space debris environment. To develop such standards it is necessary to have a large amount of experimental data. This paper presents results of flight experiments for measuring fluxes of hard particles with sizes of 1-500 mum, that were carried out on “Salut-6” (1978-1979), “Salut-7” (1984-1985) and “Mir” (1988-1997) orbital space stations, and on ISS (1998-2011). Particle fluxes were determined by analyzing holes in thermal protective shields of plastic track detectors for heavy nuclei of cosmic rays, that were used in PLATAN experiment on “Salut” and “Mir” stations, and on ISS (2002-2004), and by studying craters in polished metal samples and at the surface of a specimen cartridge of KOMPLAST experiment on ISS (1998-2011). Differential and integral dependences of particle fluxes on their diameter were obtained for various assumptions about the correlation between diameters of craters/holes and of incident particles. The elemental composition analysis of remainders in craters, carried out with an electron microprobe, enabled to distinguish craters created by micrometeoroids from the ones made by space debris particles. The data obtained on particle fluxes are compared with existing models of natural and artificial particle fluxes. KOMPLAST results for particles with size of 5-50 mum exceed corresponding values of ORDEM2000 model for the ISS orbit.

  10. Inertial-Dissipation flux measurements over south Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX— Pilot experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Venkataramana; K SenGupta; G S Bhat; S Ameenulla; J V S Raju

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes measurement of air-sea parameters and estimation of sensible and latent heat fluxes by the ``Inertial-Dissipation'' technique over south Bay of Bengal. The data were collected on ORV Sagar Kanya during BOBMEX-Pilot cruise during the period 23rd October 1998 to 12th November 1998 over south Bay of Bengal. The fluxes are estimated using the data collected through fast response sensors namely Gill anemometer, Sonic anemometer and IR Hygrometer. In this paper the analyses carried out for two days, one relatively cloud free day on November 3rd and the other cloudy with rain on November 1st, are presented. Sea surface and air temperatures are higher on November 3rd than on November 1st. Sensible heat flux for both the days does not show any significant variation over the period of estimation, whereas latent heat flux is more for November 3rd than November 1st. An attempt is made to explain the variation of latent heat flux with a parameter called thermal stability on the vapor transfer from the water surface, which depends on wind speed and air to sea surface temperature difference.

  11. Suspended sediment fluxes in a tidal wetland: Measurement, controlling factors, and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Suspended sediment fluxes to and from tidal wetlands are of increasing concern because of habitat restoration efforts, wetland sustainability as sea level rises, and potential contaminant accumulation. We measured water and sediment fluxes through two channels on Browns Island, at the landward end of San Francisco Bay, United States, to determine the factors that control sediment fluxes on and off the island. In situ instrumentation was deployed between October 10 and November 13, 2003. Acoustic Doppler current profilers and the index velocity method were employed to calculate water fluxes. Suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) were determined with optical sensors and cross-sectional water sampling. All procedures were analyzed for their contribution to total error in the flux measurement. The inability to close the water balance and determination of constituent concentration were identified as the main sources of error; total error was 27% for net sediment flux. The water budget for the island was computed with an unaccounted input of 0.20 m 3 s-1 (22% of mean inflow), after considering channel flow, change in water storage, evapotranspiration, and precipitation. The net imbalance may be a combination of groundwater seepage, overland flow, and flow through minor channels. Change of island water storage, caused by local variations in water surface elevation, dominated the tidalty averaged water flux. These variations were mainly caused by wind and barometric pressure change, which alter regional water levels throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Peak instantaneous ebb flow was 35% greater than peak flood flow, indicating an ebb-dominant system, though dominance varied with the spring-neap cycle. SSC were controlled by wind-wave resuspension adjacent to the island and local tidal currents that mobilized sediment from the channel bed. During neap tides sediment was imported onto the island but during spring tides sediment was exported because the main

  12. Combining two complementary micrometeorological methods to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes over pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Johannes; Barthel, Matti; Fraser, Anitra; Hunt, John E.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2016-03-01

    New Zealand's largest industrial sector is pastoral agriculture, giving rise to a large fraction of the country's emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). We designed a system to continuously measure CH4 and N2O fluxes at the field scale on two adjacent pastures that differed with respect to management. At the core of this system was a closed-cell Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, which measured the mole fractions of CH4, N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) at two heights at each site. In parallel, CO2 fluxes were measured using eddy-covariance instrumentation. We applied two different micrometeorological ratio methods to infer the CH4 and N2O fluxes from their respective mole fractions and the CO2 fluxes. The first is a variant of the flux-gradient method, where it is assumed that the turbulent diffusivities of CH4 and N2O equal that of CO2. This method was reliable when the CO2 mole-fraction difference between heights was at least 4 times greater than the FTIR's resolution of differences. For the second method, the temporal increases of mole fractions in the stable nocturnal boundary layer, which are correlated for concurrently emitted gases, are used to infer the unknown fluxes of CH4 and N2O from the known flux of CO2. This method was sensitive to "contamination" from trace gas sources other than the pasture of interest and therefore required careful filtering. With both methods combined, estimates of mean daily CH4 and N2O fluxes were obtained for 56 % of days at one site and 73 % at the other. Both methods indicated both sites as net sources of CH4 and N2O. Mean emission rates for 1 year at the unfertilised, winter-grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.38 (±0.018) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. During the same year, mean emission rates at the irrigated, fertilised and rotationally grazed site were 8.9 (±0.79) nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 0.58 (±0.020) nmol N2O m-2 s-1. At this site, the N2O emissions amounted to 1.21 (±0.15) % of the nitrogen

  13. Measurement and modelling ozone fluxes over a cut and fertilized grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mészáros

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment between 20 May and 15 June 2000, the ozone flux was measured by the eddy covariance method above intensively managed grassland in Braunschweig, northern Germany. Three different phases of vegetation were covered during the measuring campaign: tall grass canopy before cut (29 May 2000, short grass after cut, and re-growing vegetation after fertilization (5 June 2000. Results show that beside weather conditions, the agricultural activities significantly influenced the O3 fluxes. After the cut the daytime average of the deposition velocity (vd decreased from 0.44 cm s−1 to 0.26 cm s−1 and increased again to 0.32 cm s−1 during the third period. Detailed model calculations were carried out to estimate deposition velocity and ozone flux. The model captures the general diurnal patter of deposition, with vd daytime values of 0.52, 0.24, and 0.35 cm s−1 in the first, second and third period, respectively. Thus the model predicts a stronger response to the cut than the measurements, which is nevertheless smaller than expected on the basis of change in leaf area. The results show that both cut and fertilization have complex impacts on fluxes. Reduction of vegetation by cutting decreased the stomatal flux initially greatly, but the stomatal flux recovered to 80% of its original value within a week. At the same time, the non-stomatal flux appears to have increased directly after the cut, which the model partially explains by an increase in the deposition to the soil. A missing sink after the cut may be the chemical interaction with biogenic volatile organic compounds released after the cut and exposed senescent plant parts, or the increase in soil NO emissions after fertilization. Increased canopy temperatures may also have promoted ozone destruction on leaf surfaces. These results demonstrate the importance of canopy

  14. New antineutrino energy spectra predictions from the summation of beta decay branches of the fission products

    CERN Document Server

    Fallot, M; Estienne, M; Algora, A; Bui, V M; Cucoanes, A; Elnimr, M; Giot, L; Jordan, D; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Taín, J L; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured beta decay properties of the $^{102;104;105;106;107}$Tc, $^{105}$Mo, and $^{101}$Nb nuclei in an updated calculation of the antineutrino energy spectra of the four fissible isotopes $^{235, 238}$U, and $^{239,241}$Pu. These actinides are the main contributors to the fission processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. The beta feeding probabilities of the above-mentioned Tc, Mo and Nb isotopes have been found to play a major role in the $\\gamma$ component of the decay heat of $^{239}$Pu, solving a large part of the $\\gamma$ discrepancy in the 4 to 3000\\,s range. They have been measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS), avoiding the Pandemonium effect. The calculations are performed using the information available nowadays in the nuclear databases, summing all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products. Our results provide a new prediction of the antineutrino energy spectra of $^{235}$U, $^{239,241}$Pu ...

  15. Integral emission factors for methane determined using urban flux measurements and local-scale inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Andreas; Johnson, Mark; Molodovskaya, Marina; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran; Crawford, Ben; Giometto, Marco; van der Laan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The most important long-lived greenhouse gas (LLGHG) emitted during combustion of fuels is carbon dioxide (CO2), however also traces of the LLGHGs methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are released, the quantities of which depend largely on the conditions of the combustion process. Emission factors determine the mass of LLGHGs emitted per energy used (or kilometre driven for cars) and are key inputs for bottom-up emission modelling. Emission factors for CH4 are typically determined in the laboratory or on a test stand for a given combustion system using a small number of samples (vehicles, furnaces), yet associated with larger uncertainties when scaled to entire fleets. We propose an alternative, different approach - Can integrated emission factors be independently determined using direct micrometeorological flux measurements over an urban surface? If so, do emission factors determined from flux measurements (top-down) agree with up-scaled emission factors of relevant combustion systems (heating, vehicles) in the source area of the flux measurement? Direct flux measurements of CH4 were carried out between February and May, 2012 over a relatively densely populated, urban surface in Vancouver, Canada by means of eddy covariance (EC). The EC-system consisted of an ultrasonic anemometer (CSAT-3, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and two open-path infrared gas analyzers (Li7500 and Li7700, Licor Inc.) on a tower at 30m above the surface. The source area of the EC system is characterised by a relative homogeneous morphometry (5.3m average building height), but spatially and temporally varying emission sources, including two major intersecting arterial roads (70.000 cars drive through the 50% source area per day) and seasonal heating in predominantly single-family houses (natural gas). An inverse dispersion model (turbulent source area model), validated against large eddy simulations (LES) of the urban roughness sublayer, allows the determination of the spatial area that

  16. Characterisation of radiation and flux measurements on a neutraliser plate of the Tore Supra ergodic divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, Y. E-mail: corre@drfc.cad.cea.fr; Giannella, R.; De Michelis, C.; Guirlet, R.; Azeroual, A.; Chareyre, E.; Costanzo, L.; Escarguel, A.; Gauthier, E.; Ghendrih, P.; Gunn, J.; Hogan, J.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Tsitrone, E

    2001-03-01

    A recent extensive experimental study of impurity production and penetration for various density regimes is described. Deuterium and carbon emissions near a neutraliser plate (NP) of the Tore Supra Ergodic Divertor (ED) has been measured with an absolutely calibrated visible endoscope, for high- and low-density plasma regimes. From these radiation measurements, we have deduced an effective carbon flux, and at an order-of-magnitude estimate of the NP erosion: 50 m for the fall 1999 experimental ED campaign ({approx}500 shots). Combining the measured carbon and deuterium fluxes, we deduce a global experimental carbon sputtering yield for the NP in the range 2x10{sup -2}-3x10{sup -1} for ohmic pulses, showing evidence of the importance of carbon self-sputtering.

  17. Experimental neutron flux measurements with a diamond detector at the QUINTA setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlev, A. I.; Rodionov, N. B.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Amosov, V. N.; Meshchaninov, S. A.; Yudin, I. P.

    2016-05-01

    The operational capability of a diamond detector used to measure the neutron spectrum by the response function on the QUINTA setup [1] installed at the proton beam of the phasotron [2] (Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) was demonstrated in the energy interval of 2.1-20 MeV. The neutron-flux count rate was measured. The energy of neutrons was estimated at 7.4-25.7 MeV based on the diamond-detector response spectrum. The dependence of the diamond-detector response spectra on the angle between the proton beam and the line going through the detector and the center of the QUINTA setup was investigated. The angular anisotropy of the neutron flux was demonstrated. Measurements at different distances from the detector to the QUINTA setup were performed.

  18. Measurement of KL0 flux at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the KL0 flux measurements performed at the J-PARC neutral-kaon beam line. This beam line was constructed for an experiment aiming to observe the CP-violating rare decay KL0→π0νν¯. The primary proton energy was 30 GeV and the KL0 production angle was 16°. Prior to the physics run, the KL0 flux and spectrum were measured by counting KL0→π+π-π0 decays with a simple setup, which was composed of an electromagnetic calorimeter and a hodoscope system. Results from these measurements are presented and compared with various hadron-interaction simulations.

  19. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, S; Gando, A; Gando, Y; Ichimura, K; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Kibe, Y; Kimura, W; Kishimoto, Y; Koga, M; Minekawa, Y; Mitsui, T; Morikawa, T; Nagai, N; Nakajima, K; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Narita, K; Shimizu, I; Shimizu, Y; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, N; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, B D; Yabumoto, H; Yonezawa, E; Yoshida, H; Yoshida, S; Enomoto, S; Kozlov, A; Murayama, H; Grant, C; Keefer, G; McKee, D; Piepke, A; Banks, T I; Bloxham, T; Detwiler, J A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Han, K; Kadel, R; O'Donnell, T; Steiner, H M; Winslow, L A; Dwyer, D A; Mauger, C; McKeown, R D; Zhang, C; Berger, B E; Lane, C E; Maricic, J; Miletic, T; Batygov, M; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Sakai, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Tang, A; Downum, K E; Gratta, G; Tolich, K; Efremenko, Y; Kamyshkov, Y; Perevozchikov, O; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Tornow, W; Heeger, K M; Piquemal, F; Ricol, J -S; Decowski, M P

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from 8B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5 MeV analysis threshold is 1.49+/-0.14(stat)+/-0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a 8B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77+/-0.26(stat)+/-0.32(syst) x 10^6 cm^-2s^-1. The analysis threshold is driven by 208Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic 11Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with Standard Solar Model predictions which include matter enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  20. A New Sensitivity Analysis and Solution Method for Scintillometer Measurements of Area-Averaged Turbulent Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Scintillometer measurements of the turbulence inner-scale length $l_o$ and refractive index structure function $C_n^2$ allow for the retrieval of large-scale area-averaged turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. This retrieval involves the solution of the non-linear set of equations defined by the Monin-Obukhov similarity hypothesis. A new method that uses an analytic solution to the set of equations is presented, which leads to a stable and efficient numerical method of computation that has the potential of eliminating computational error. Mathematical expressions are derived that map out the sensitivity of the turbulent flux measurements to uncertainties in source measurements such as $l_o$. These sensitivity functions differ from results in the previous literature; the reasons for the differences are explored.

  1. Experimental demonstration of radiation flux measurement accuracy surpassing the Nyquist limit

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, Richard; Kibble, T W B; Johann,; Shi, C -H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an extensive and detailed experimental assessment of the performance of homodyne detection vs direct detection for determining the flux of an incoherent light source. The intensity of a laser reference signal is measured, before and after contamination by photon bunching noise (transimpedance gain of 20k), simultaneously. Moreover, the measurement containing photon bunching noise was done using two schemes: direct and homodyne detection, also with no appreciable time delay. The sampling rate of all measurements is the same, and is always higher than the frequency limit of the bunching noise. By carefully comparing the resulting three time series, it is found, surprisingly, that the homodyne detection of the incoherent signal resembles more closely the variance and variability pattern of the original coherent signal, and the effect is most prominent at the highest sampling frequency. It therefore appears flux estimates made using the shot noise of the field were able to overcome the Ny...

  2. Reconstruction of vacuum flux surfaces from diagnostic measurements in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shape of a tokamak plasma is determined from measurements of the magnetic flux and one component of the poloidal magnetic field at the vacuum chamber wall. The problem is solved by an application of the Vector Green's theorem for the poloidal flux function, allowing a formulation which overcomes the inherent ill-posedness of the problem while maintaining the computational speed necessary for between shot analysis. The expansion functions are one-dimensional Fourier Transforms in a poloidal-angle-like variable along the direction of the wall. An error analysis is presented that shows the existence of an optimal number of terms in the Fourier sum to maximize the accuracy of the solution. It is also shown that even with random measurement errors, the solution has the same accuracy as the input data from the diagnostic measurements, at least if the maximum error is less than 5%. 11 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Surprisingly low frequency attenuation effects in long tubes when measuring turbulent fluxes at tall towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Brændholt, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    The eddy covariance technique relies on the fast and accurate measurement of gas concentration fluctuations. While for some gasses robust and compact sensors are available, measurement of, e.g., non CO2 greenhouse gas fluxes is often performed with sensitive equipment that cannot be run on a tower without massively disturbing the wind field. To measure CO and N2O fluxes, we installed an eddy covariance system at a 125 m mast, where the gas analyser was kept in a laboratory close to the tower and the sampling was performed using a 150 m long tube with a gas intake at 96 m height. We investigated the frequency attenuation and the time lag of the N2O and CO concentration measurements with a concentration step experiment. The results showed surprisingly high cut-off frequencies (close to 2 Hz) and small low-pass filter induced time lags (effect by reducing both the water vapour dilution correction and the cross sensitivity effects on the N2O and CO flux measurements. Here we present the set-up of the concentration step change experiment and its results and compare them with recently developed theories for the behaviour of gases in turbulent tube flows.

  4. Neutron flux measurement in the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA mark II reactor with MCNP verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA Mark II reactor, forming part of a feasibility study for BNCT was proposed in 2001. In the current study, pure metals were used to measure the neutron flux at selected points in the thermal column and the neutron flux determined using SAND-II. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column was also carried out. The reactor core was homogenized and calculations of the neutron flux through the graphite stringers performed using MCNP5. The results show good agreement between the measured flux and the MCNP calculated flux. An obvious extension from this is that the MCNP neutron flux output can be utilized as an input spectrum for SAND-II for the flux iteration. (author)

  5. Eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and energy fluxes in the city of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vesala

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term measurement of carbon dioxide flux (Fc was performed using the eddy covariance (EC method in the Beijing megacity over a 4-yr period in 2006–2009. The EC setup was installed at a height of 47 m on the Beijing 325-m meteorological tower in the northwest part of the city. Latent heat flux dominated the energy exchange between the urban surface and the atmosphere in summer, while sensible heat flux was the main component in the spring. The source area of the measurements of CO2 is highly heterogeneous, which consists of buildings, parks, and highways. It is valuable for global carbon budget research to study the temporal and spatial variability of Fc in this urban environment of a developing country. Both on a diurnal and monthly scale, the urban surface acted as a net source for CO2 and downward fluxes were only occasionally observed. The diurnal pattern of Fc showed dependence on automobile traffic and the typical two peak traffic pattern appeared in Fc diurnal cycle. Also, the Fc was higher on weekdays than on weekends due to the higher traffic volumes on weekdays. On seasonal scale, Fc was generally higher in winter than during other seasons, likely due to domestic heating during colder months. Total annual average CO2 emissions were estimated to be 4.90 kg C m−2 y−1 over the 4-yr period.

  6. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lorke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1 drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2 anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3 the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4 there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  7. Use of higher order signal moments and high speed digital sampling technique for neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second (conventional variance or Campbell signal) , , , the third , and the modified fourth order - 3*2 etc. central signal moments associated with the amplified (K) and filtered currents [i1, i2, x = K * (i2-2>),] from two electrodes of an ex-core neutron sensitive fission detector have been measured versus the reactor power of the 1 MW TRIGA reactor in Mexico City. Two channels of a high speed (400 kHz) multiplexing data sampler and A/D converter with 12 bit resolution and one megawords buffer memory were used. The data were further retrieved into a PC and estimates for auto- and cross-correlation moments up to the fifth order, coherence (/√), skewness (/(√/)3), excess (/2 - 3) etc. quantities were calculated off-line. A five mode operation of the detector was achieved including the conventional counting rates and currents in agreement with the theory and the authors previous results with analogue techniques. The signals were proportional to the neutron flux and reactor power in some flux ranges. The suppression of background noise is improved and the lower limit of the measurement range is extended as the order of moment is increased, in agreement with the theory. On the other hand the statistical uncertainty is increased. At increasing flux levels it was statistically more difficult to obtain flux estimates based on the higher order (≥3) moments

  8. Fast rabbit measurements: determination of the neutron flux inside the TRIGA core at critical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of measurements carried out during weeks 28 and 29 of year 2004. They concern the determination of the neutron flux inside the TRIGA core at a critical configuration with a reactor power of 10 Watt. For that purpose, the well-known activation technique was used. A pneumatic fast rabbit device was settled down inside the reactor hall in order to send gold and indium samples into the reactor. Those samples were irradiated with and without cadmium covers. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes were extracted from the yields of γ-rays emitted by irradiated samples. Fast neutron flux components were roughly estimated from the activation of the Al shuttle material. An overall quantitative agreement is observed between Au and In results. Due to its higher neutron capture cross-section and to its shorter half-life, In allows performing measurements more rapidly and with higher statistics than Au does. Since neutron fluxes are expected to be lower for subcritical configurations, the use of In samples will be recommended for experiments in subcritical configurations. (A.C.)

  9. EXPRESSO flux measurements at upland and lowland Congo tropical forest site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the EXPRESSO program (EXPeriment for the REgional Sources and Sinks of Oxidants), biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of trace gases were investigated in a ground-based forest site of the Republic of Congo. Experiments were carried out in March and November-December 1996. A 60-meter walkup tower was erected in an undisturbed mixed tropical forest typical of upland vegetation in the Nouabale-Ndoki National Park. Eight belt transects radiating from the tower were used to characterize the species composition and structure of the upland mixed forest. As a comparison, and to investigate horizontal heterogeneity of the trace gases exchanges, additional measurements were made in a nearby monospecific forest stand characteristic of lowland Gilbertodendron dewevrei (Gilbert. dew.) forest. Micrometeorological data, trace gas concentrations and flux measurements were made from the tower. We report daily above-canopy variation in temperature and radiation, energy partitioning into latent and sensible heat flux, volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios, isoprene and CO2 fluxes. Fluxes of isoprene and CO2 were measured above the canopy using relaxed eddy accumulation and eddy covariance methods, respectively. These fluxes show a seasonal variation between the two experiments, as does energy partitioning. However, difference in isoprene emission between the two seasons are difficult to reconcile with meteorological (T, PAR) data only, and more data such as plant water potential are needed to model the seasonal isoprene emission cycle. Isoprene emission at the leaf level was also determined for plant species at both upland and lowland sites using environmentally controlled leaf enclosures. Together with the ecological survey, the leaf level work suggests that lowland Gilbert. dew. forests act as hot spots in terms of isoprene emissions. Future climate and land use changes could greatly affect the isoprene regional emission estimate through changes in the respective

  10. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karl

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-average midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 15.5±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h respectively. These values argue for an underestimation of toluene and benzene emissions in current inventories used for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10–15 including the International airport (e.g. 3–5 and a mean flux (concentration ratio of 3.2±0.5 (3.9±0.3 across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m,p,o-Xylenes compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN, we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >90% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds (0–10% in the MCMA.

  11. Heat flux measurements in stagnation point methane/air flames with thermographic phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed; Staude, Susanne; Bergmann, Ulf; Atakan, Burak

    2010-10-01

    Light-induced phosphorescence from thermographic phosphors was used to study the wall temperatures and heat fluxes from nearly one-dimensional flat premixed flames. The investigated flames were stoichiometric, lean and rich laminar methane/air flames with equivalence ratios of φ = 1, φ = 0.75 and φ = 1.25 at ambient pressure. The flames were burning in a stagnation point arrangement against a water-cooled plate. The central part of this plate was an alumina ceramic plate coated from both sides with chromium-doped alumina (ruby) and excited with a Nd:YAG laser or a green light-emitting diode (LED) array to measure the wall temperature from both sides and thus the heat flux rate from the flame. The outlet velocity of the gases was varied from 0.1 to 1.2 m/s. The burner to plate distance (H) ranged from 0.5 to 2 times the burner exit diameter ( d = 30 mm). The measured heat flux rates indicate the change of the flame stabilization mechanism from a burner stabilized to a stagnation plate stabilized flame. The results were compared to modeling results of a one-dimensional stagnation point flow, with a detailed reaction mechanism. In order to prove the model, gas phase temperatures were measured by OH-LIF for a stoichiometric stagnation point flame. It turns out that the flame stabilization mechanism and with it the heat fluxes change from low to high mass fluxes. This geometry may be well suited for further studies of the elementary flame wall interaction.

  12. Locally manufactured films for neutron flux measurement in the MNSR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Metal films deposited on Teflon are prepared to use as neutron monitors in the MNSR. • Ti, Al, V, and Ag films have been locally prepared by two different methods. • The thermal neutron flux was measured using Ti, Al, V, and Ag films. • V and Ag films were used as neutron monitors for the first time in MNSR type reactor. • With compared to published results in literature our neutron monitors are validated. - Abstract: Metal films deposited on Teflon are used in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) for the first time to study their usability as neutron activation detectors for the thermal neutron flux measurements in the reactor. For this purpose Titanium, Aluminum, Vanadium, and Silver films deposited on Teflon have been locally prepared at room temperature using two methods: the vacuum arc deposition and DC Magnetron sputtering techniques. The thermal neutron flux in the MNSR inner irradiation site was measured using the prepared metal films. The results at the 95% level of confidence of the neutron flux using the metal films deposited on Teflon by the vacuum arc deposition for Titanium, Aluminum, and Vanadium were: (9.9 ± 0.3) × 1011, (1.4 ± 0.3) × 1012, (1.2 ± 0.2) × cm−2 s−1, respectively. The result at the same level of confidence of the neutron flux using the metal films deposited on Teflon by the DC Magnetron sputtering for Silver was: (1.5 ± 0.2) × 1011 cm−2 s−1. Good agreements are noticed between our obtained mean value (9.3 ± 0.9) × 1011 cm−2 s−1 and the previous published results

  13. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 μN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  14. Measurement of thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor by the foil activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical details of the foil activation method applied to neutrons flux measurements at the IEA-R1 reactor are presented. The thermal - and epithermal - neutron flux were determined form activation measurements of gold, cobalt and manganese foils; and for the fast neutron flux determination, aluminum, iron and nickel foils were used. The measurements of the activity induced in the metal foils were performed using a Ge-Li gamma spectrometry system. In each energy range of the reactor neutron spectrum, the agreement among the experimental flux values obtained using the three kind of materials, indicates the consistency of the theoretical approach and of the nuclear parameters selected. (Author)

  15. Captures of Hot and Warm Sterile Antineutrino Dark Matter on EC-decaying Ho-163 Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y F

    2011-01-01

    Capturing low-energy electron antineutrinos on radioactive Ho-163 nuclei, which decay into Dy-163 via electron capture (EC), is a noteworthy opportunity to detect relic sterile antineutrinos. Such hypothetical particles are more or less implied by current experimental and cosmological data, and they might be a part of hot dark matter or a candidate for warm dark matter in the Universe. Using the isotope Ho-163 as a target and assuming reasonable active-sterile antineutrino mixing angles, we calculate the capture rate of relic electron antineutrinos against the corresponding EC-decay background in the presence of sterile antineutrinos at the sub-eV or keV mass scale. We show that the signature of hot or warm sterile antineutrino dark matter should in principle be observable, provided the target is big enough and the energy resolution is good enough.

  16. A site-level comparison of lysimeter and eddy-covariance flux measurements of evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Martin; Michel, Dominik; Lehner, Irene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate measurements of evapotranspiration are required for many meteorological, climatological, ecological and hydrological research applications and developments. Here we examine and compare two widely used methods to measure evapotranspiration at the site level: lysimeter-based measurements (EL) and eddy-covariance (EC) flux measurements (EEC). The analyses are based on parallel measurements at the research catchment Rietholzbach in northeastern Switzerland and focuses on the period June 2009 to December 2013. The measurements are compared on the yearly, monthly, daily, and hourly time scales, and with respect to an over 35-year lysimeter evapotranspiration time series. Overall, the two measurement techniques agree well, especially on the annual time scale. They also agree well with an independent catchment water-balance estimate of evapotranspiration. The good agreement of these independent methods emphasizes the representativeness of the lysimeter and EC measurements for the entire catchment despite their comparatively small source areas. The study also discusses different possibilities to close the energy balance of the EC flux measurements. From the comparison of EL and EEC, the closure of the energy balance according to the Bowen ratio is found to be reasonable.

  17. Two-dimensional electric field measurements in the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. McWilliams

    Full Text Available Line-of-sight Doppler velocities from the SuperDARN CUTLASS HF radar pair have been combined to produce the first two-dimensional vector measurements of the convection pattern throughout the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event (a pulsed ionospheric flow, or PIF. Very stable and moderate interplanetary magnetic field conditions, along with a preceding prolonged period of northward interplanetary magnetic field, allow a detailed study of the spatial and the temporal evolution of the ionospheric response to magnetic reconnection. The flux tube footprint is tracked for half an hour across six hours of local time in the auroral zone, from magnetic local noon to dusk. The motion of the footprint of the newly reconnected flux tube is compared with the ionospheric convection velocity. Two primary intervals in the PIF's evolution have been determined. For the first half of its lifetime in the radar field of view the phase speed of the PIF is highly variable and the mean speed is nearly twice the ionospheric convection speed. For the final half of its lifetime the phase velocity becomes much less variable and slows down to the ionospheric convection velocity. The evolution of the flux tube in the magnetosphere has been studied using magnetic field, magnetopause and magnetosheath models. The data are consistent with an interval of azimuthally propagating magnetopause reconnection, in a manner consonant with a peeling of magnetic flux from the magnetopause, followed by an interval of anti-sunward convection of reconnected flux tubes.

    Key words: Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere · ionosphere interactions; plasma convection; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  18. Neutron flux measurement in the central channel (XC-1) of TRIGA 14 MW LEU core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA 14 MW reactor, operated by Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Romania, is a pool type reactor, and has a rectangular shape which holds fuel bundles and is surrounded with beryllium reflectors. Each fuel bundle is composed of 25 nuclear fuel rods. The TRIGA 14 MW reactor was commissioned 28 years ago with HEU fuel rods. The conversion was gradually achieved, starting in February 1992 and completed in March 2006. The full conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA Research Reactor was completed in May 2006 and each step of the conversion was achieved by removal of HEU fuel, replaced by LEU fuel, accompanied by a large set of theoretical evaluation and physical measurements intended to confirm the performances of gradual conversion. After the core full conversion, a program of measurements and comparisons with previous results of core physics and measurements is underway, allowing data acquisition for normal operation, demonstration of safety and economics of the converted core. Neutron flux spectrum measurements in the XC in the XC-1 water 1 water-filled channel were performed using multi multi-foil activation techniques. The neutron spectra and flux are obtained by unfolding from measured reaction rates using SAND II computer code. The integral neutron flux value for LEU core is greater of 13% than for the standard HEU core. Also thermal neutron flux value for converted LEU core is smaller by 0.38% than for the standard HEU core. These differences appear because the foil activation detectors have been irradiated using a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 32 mm, whereas foil irradiations in standard HEU core has been performed with a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 14 mm, and therefore the neutron spectra in LEU core is less thermalized and the weight of fast neutron is greater

  19. Neutron flux measurement in the central channel (XC-1) of TRIGA 14 MW LEU core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARBOS, D.; BUSUIOC, P.; ROTH, Cs.; PAUNOIU, C. [Institute for Nuclear Research - ICN Pitesti (Romania)

    2008-10-29

    The TRIGA 14 MW reactor, operated by Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Romania, is a pool type reactor, and has a rectangular shape which holds fuel bundles and is surrounded with beryllium reflectors. Each fuel bundle is composed of 25 nuclear fuel rods. The TRIGA 14 MW reactor was commissioned 28 years ago with HEU fuel rods. The conversion was gradually achieved, starting in February 1992 and completed in March 2006. The full conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA Research Reactor was completed in May 2006 and each step of the conversion was achieved by removal of HEU fuel, replaced by LEU fuel, accompanied by a large set of theoretical evaluation and physical measurements intended to confirm the performances of gradual conversion. After the core full conversion, a program of measurements and comparisons with previous results of core physics and measurements is underway, allowing data acquisition for normal operation, demonstration of safety and economics of the converted core. Neutron flux spectrum measurements in the XC in the XC-1 water 1 water-filled channel were performed using multi multi-foil activation techniques. The neutron spectra and flux are obtained by unfolding from measured reaction rates using SAND II computer code. The integral neutron flux value for LEU core is greater of 13% than for the standard HEU core. Also thermal neutron flux value for converted LEU core is smaller by 0.38% than for the standard HEU core. These differences appear because the foil activation detectors have been irradiated using a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 32 mm, whereas foil irradiations in standard HEU core has been performed with a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 14 mm, and therefore the neutron spectra in LEU core is less thermalized and the weight of fast neutron is greater.

  20. Possibility of measuring gravity-wave momentum flux by single beam observation of MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Vincent and Reid (1983) proposed a technique to measure gravity-wave momentum fluxes in the atmosphere by mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars using two or more radar beams. Since the vertical momentum fluxes are assumed to be due to gravity waves, it appears possible to make use of the dispersion and polarization relations for gravity waves in extracting useful information from the radar data. In particular, for an oblique radar beam, information about both the vertical and the horizontal velocities associated with the waves are contained in the measured Doppler data. Therefore, it should be possible to extract both V sub Z and V sub h from a single beam observational configuration. A procedure is proposed to perform such an analysis. The basic assumptions are: the measured velocity fluctuations are due to gravity waves and a separable model gravity-wave spectrum of the Garrett-Munk type that is statistically homogeneous in the horizontal plane. Analytical expressions can be derived that relate the observed velocity fluctuations to the wave momentum flux at each range gate. In practice, the uncertainties related to the model parameters and measurement accuracy will affect the results. A MST radar configuration is considered.