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Sample records for antineutrino detectors current

  1. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 10 6 neutrino events and 1.60 x 10 5 antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section

  2. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 106 neutrino events and 1.60 x 105 antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section.

  3. Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Gas System

    OpenAIRE

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M-C.; Heeger, K. M.; Kwok, M. W.; Shih, K.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is designed to protect the liquid scintillator targets of the antineutrino detectors against degradation and contamination from exposure to ambient laboratory air. The gas system is also used to monitor the leak tightness of the antineutrino detector assembly. The cover gas system constantly flushes the gas volumes above the liquid scintillator with dry nitrogen to minimize oxidation of the scintillator over the five year lifetime of the experimen...

  4. A mobile antineutrino detector with plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Y.; Oguri, S.; Kato, Y.; Nakata, R.; Inoue, Y.; Ito, C.; Minowa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new type segmented antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for the nuclear safeguard application. A small prototype was built and tested to measure background events. A satisfactory unmanned field operation of the detector system was demonstrated. Besides, a detailed Monte Carlo simulation code was developed to estimate the antineutrino detection efficiency of the detector.

  5. Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M.-C.; Heeger, K. M.; Kwok, M. W.; Shih, K.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2012-11-01

    The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is designed to protect the liquid scintillator targets of the antineutrino detectors against degradation and contamination from exposure to ambient laboratory air. The gas system is also used to monitor the leak tightness of the antineutrino detector assembly. The cover gas system constantly flushes the gas volumes above the liquid scintillator with dry nitrogen to minimize oxidation of the scintillator over the five year lifetime of the experiment. This constant flush also prevents the infiltration of radon or other contaminants into these detecting liquids keeping the internal backgrounds low. Since the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors are immersed in the large water pools of the muon veto system, other gas volumes are needed to protect vital detector cables or gas lines. These volumes are also purged with dry gas. Return gas is monitored for oxygen content and humidity to provide early warning of potentially damaging leaks. The design and performance of the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is described.

  6. Towards Compact Antineutrino Detectors for Safeguarding Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, R.J. de; Smit, F.D.; Woertche, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the IAEA Division of Technical Support convened a Workshop on Antineutrino Detection for Safeguards Applications. Two of the recommendations expressed that IAEA should consider antineutrino detection and monitoring in its current R and D program for safeguarding bulk-process reactors, and consider antineutrino detection and monitoring in its Safeguards by Design approaches for power and fissile inventory monitoring of new and next generation reactors. The workshop came to these recommendations after having assessed the results obtained at the San Onofre Nuclear Generator Station (SONGS) in California. A 600 litre, 10% efficiency detector, placed at 25m from the core was shown to record 300 net antineutrino events per day. The 2*2.5*2.5 m 3 footprint of the detector and the required below background operation, prevents an easy deployment at reactors. Moreover it does not provide spatial information of the fissile inventory and, because of the shape of a PBMR reactor, would not be representative for such type of reactor. A solution to this drawback is to develop more efficient detectors that are less bulky and less sensitive to cosmic and natural radiation backgrounds. Antineutrino detection in the SONGS detector is based on the capture of antineutrinos by a proton resulting in a positron and neutron. In the SONGS detector the positron and neutron are detected by secondary gamma-rays. The efficiency of the SONGS detector is largely dominated by the low efficiency for gamma detection high background sensitivity We are investigating two methods to resolve this problem, both leading to more compact detectors, which in a modular set up also will provide spatial information. One is based on detecting the positrons on their slowdown signal and the neutrons by capturing in 10 B or 6 Li, resulting in alpha-emission. The drawback for standard liquid scintillators doped with e.g. B is the low flame point of the solvent and the strong quenching of the alpha signal. Our

  7. Reactor antineutrino detector iDREAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, M. B.; Lukyanchenko, G. A.; Novikova, G. J.; Obinyakov, B. A.; Oralbaev, A. Y.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Sukhotin, S. V.; Chepurnov, A. S.; Etenko, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Industrial Detector for Reactor Antineutrino Monitoring (iDREAM) is a compact (≈ 3.5m 2) industrial electron antineutrino spectrometer. It is dedicated for remote monitoring of PWR reactor operational modes by neutrino method in real-time. Measurements of antineutrino flux from PWR allow to estimate a fuel mixture in active zone and to check the status of the reactor campaign for non-proliferation purposes. LAB-based gadolinium doped scintillator is exploited as a target. Multizone architecture of the detector with gamma-catcher surrounding fiducial volume and plastic muon veto above and below ensure high efficiency of IBD detection and background suppression. DAQ is based on Flash ADC with PSD discrimination algorithms while digital trigger is programmable and flexible due to FPGA. The prototype detector was started up in 2014. Preliminary works on registration Cerenkov radiation produced by cosmic muons were established with distilled water inside the detector in order to test electronic and slow control systems. Also in parallel a long-term measurements with different scintillator samples were conducted.

  8. Assembly and Installation of the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, H R; Heeger, K M; Hinrichs, P; Brown, R L; Gill, R; Carr, R; Dwyer, D A; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Chen, X H; Heng, Y K; Cherwinka, J J; Greenler, L S; Draeger, E; Edwards, W R; Hoff, M; Goett, J; Gu, W Q; Ho, T H; He, W S

    2013-01-01

    The Daya Bay reactor antineutrino experiment is designed to make a precision measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ 13 , and recently made the definitive discovery of its non-zero value. It utilizes a set of eight, functionally identical antineutrino detectors to measure the reactor flux and spectrum at baselines of ∼ 300–2000 m from the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plants. The Daya Bay antineutrino detectors were built in an above-ground facility and deployed side-by-side at three underground experimental sites near and far from the nuclear reactors. This configuration allows the experiment to make a precision measurement of reactor antineutrino disappearance over km-long baselines and reduces relative systematic uncertainties between detectors and nuclear reactors. This paper describes the assembly and installation of the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

  9. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, T., E-mail: classen2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Kogler, L.; Reyna, D. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-01-21

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  10. Monitoring of spent nuclear fuel with antineutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran

    2017-09-01

    We put forward the possibility of employing antineutrino detectors in order to control the amounts of spent nuclear fuel in repositories or, alternatively, to precisely localize the underground sources of nuclear material. For instance, we discuss the applicability in determining a possible leakage of stored nuclear material which would aid in preventing environmental problems. The long-term storage facilities are also addressed.

  11. Detector of reactor antineutrinos with plastic scintillation bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgadze, A.Sh.; Pavlovich, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Project of a segmented antineutrino detector is developed with the use of plastic scintillator rectangular bars 10 x 10 x 100 cm, wrapped in Gd foils and assembled to an array of 1 m3 active volume. The scintillation array is sandwiched at both sides by the continuous light guides of 100 x 100 x 10 cm size, from which the scintillation light is spreading simultaneously through continuous light guides between all photomultipliers, forming the specific Light Response Function (LRF), which is character to a certain nuclear event in detector. Analysis of LRF allows one effectively reject background events, providing high efficiency detection of antineutrino capture in the detector. Monte Carlo simulations with the help of MCNP and ZEMAX software show that with the use of selection criteria the neutrino events are well separated from the background

  12. Leakage Tests of the Stainless Steel Vessels of the Antineutrino Detectors in the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaohui; Luo, Xiaolan; Heng, Yuekun; Wang, Lingshu; Tang, Xiao; Ma, Xiaoyan; Zhuang, Honglin; Band, Henry; Cherwinka, Jeff; Xiao, Qiang; Heeger, Karsten M.

    2012-01-01

    The antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment are liquid scintillator detectors designed to detect low energy particles from antineutrino interactions with high efficiency and low backgrounds. Since the antineutrino detector will be installed in a water Cherenkov cosmic ray veto detector and will run for 3 to 5 years, ensuring water tightness is critical to the successful operation of the antineutrino detectors. We choose a special method to seal the detector. Three l...

  13. Experimental results from a reactor monitoring experiment with a cubic meter scale antineutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, A.

    2007-01-01

    Cubic meter scale antineutrino detectors can stably and no intrusively monitor both plutonium content and reactor power at the few percent level, at a standoff of a few tens of meters. Our Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratories collaboration has deployed a detector to demonstrate this capability at a 3 GWt pressurized water reactor in Southern California, operating 25 meters from the core center, and acquiring data over an approximate one year period. Such monitoring may be useful for tracking power output and plutonium buildup in nuclear reactors, constraining the fissile content and providing the earliest possible measurement of the amount of plutonium in the reactor core. We present our antineutrino event sample, and show that the observed change in antineutrino rate recorded in our detector over the reactor cycle correlates with plutonium ingrowth according to predictions. We present our current precision and estimate the attainable precision of the method, and discuss the benefits this technology may have for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or other safeguards regimes

  14. The Daya Bay antineutrino detector filling system and liquid mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Draeger, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hinrichs, P.; Lewis, C. A.; Mattison, H.; McFarlane, M. C.; Webber, D. M.; Wenman, D.; Wang, W.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2013-09-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the neutrino mixing angle θ13 to world-leading precision. The experiment uses eight antineutrino detectors filled with 20-tons of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator to detect antineutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear power plant through the inverse beta decay reaction. The precision measurement of sin22θ13 relies on the relative antineutrino interaction rates between detectors at near (400 m) and far (roughly 1.8 km) distances from the nuclear reactors. The measured interaction rate in each detector is directly proportional to the number of protons in the liquid scintillator target. A precision detector filling system was developed to simultaneously fill the three liquid zones of the antineutrino detectors and measure the relative target mass between detectors to < 0.02%. This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of the system and the resulting precision measurement of the detectors' target liquid masses.

  15. Measurement of the neutrino component of an antineutrino beam observed by a nonmagnetized detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Spitz, J.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Marsh, W.; Moore, C. D.; Polly, C. C.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Nguyen, V.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods are employed to measure the neutrino flux of the antineutrino-mode beam observed by the MiniBooNE detector. The first method compares data to simulated event rates in a high-purity ν μ -induced charged-current single π + (CC1π + ) sample while the second exploits the difference between the angular distributions of muons created in ν μ and ν μ charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) interactions. The results from both analyses indicate the prediction of the neutrino flux component of the predominately antineutrino beam is overestimated--the CC1π + analysis indicates the predicted ν μ flux should be scaled by 0.76±0.11, while the CCQE angular fit yields 0.65±0.23. The energy spectrum of the flux prediction is checked by repeating the analyses in bins of reconstructed neutrino energy, and the results show that the spectral shape is well-modeled. These analyses are a demonstration of techniques for measuring the neutrino contamination of antineutrino beams observed by future nonmagnetized detectors.

  16. First Measurement of one Pion Production in Charged Current Neutrino and Antineutrino events on Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanavini, Scanavini,Giacomo [Yale U.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a work done in the context of the Fermilab Neutrino Intensity Frontier. In this analysis, the cross section of single charged pion production in charged-current neutrino and antineutrino interactions with the argon nucleus target are measured. These measurements are performed using the Argon Neutrino Test (ArgoNeuT) detector exposed to the Fermilab Neutrino From The Main Injector (NuMI) beam operating in the low energy antineutrino mode. The signal is a charged-current μ interaction in the detector, with exactly one charged pion exiting the target nucleus, with momentum above 100 MeV/c. There shouldn’t be any 0 or kaons in the final state. There is no restriction on other mesons or nucleons. Total and differential cross section measurements are presented. The results are reported in terms of outgoing muon angle and momentum, outgoing pion angle and angle between outgoing pion and muon. The total cross sections, averaged over the flux, are found to be 8.2 ± 0.9 (stat) +0.9 -1.1 (syst) × 10-38 cm2 per argon nuclei and 2.5 ± 0.4 (stat) ± 0.5 (syst) × 10-37 cm2 per argon nuclei for antineutrino and neutrino respectively at a mean neutrino energy of 3.6 GeV (antineutrinos) and 9.6 GeV (neutrinos). This is the first time the single pion production in charged-current interactions cross section is measured on argon nuclei.

  17. Antineutrino Neutral Current Interactions in MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation reports the antineutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering cross section on CH2 measured by the MiniBooNE experiment located in Batavia, IL. The data set consists of 60,605 events passing the selection cuts corresponding to 10.1×1020 POT, which represents the world’s largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering events. The final sample is more than one order of magnitude lager that the previous antineutrino NCE scattering cross section measurement reported by the BNL E734 experiment. The measurement presented in this dissertation also spans a wider range in Q2, including the low-Q2 regime where the cross section rollover is clearly visible. A X2-based minimization was performed to determine the best value of the axial mass, MA and the Pauli blocking scaling function, that matches the antineutrino NCE scattering data. However, the best fit values of MA=1.29 GeV and K=1.026 still give a relatively poor X2, which suggests that the underlying nuclear model (based largely on the relativistic Fermi gas model) may not be an accurate representation for this particular interaction. Additionally, we present a measurement of the antineutrino/neutrino-nucleus NCE scattering cross section ratio. The neutrino mode NCE sample used in this study, corresponding to 6.4 × 1020 POT, is also the world’s largest sample (also by an order of magnitude). We have demonstrated that the ratio measurement is robust, as most of the correlated errors cancel, as expected. Furthermore, this ratio also proves to be rather insensitive to variations in the axial mass and the Pauli blocking parameter. This is the first time that this ratio has been experimentally reported. We believe this measurement will aid the theoretical physics community to test various model predictions of neutrino-nucleon/nucleus interactions.

  18. Can one distinguish T-neutrinos from antineutrinos in neutral-current pion production processes?

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Gajate, Eliecer; Nieves Pamplona, Juan Miguel; Valverde Hermosilla, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    A potential way to distinguish tau-neutrinos from antineutrinos, below the tau-production threshold, but above the pion production one, is presented. It is based on the different behavior of the neutral-current pion production off the nucleon, depending on whether it is induced by neutrinos or antineutrinos. This procedure for distinguishing tau-neutrinos from antineutrinos neither relies on any nuclear model, nor it is affected by any nuclear effect (distortion of the outgoing nucleon waves,...

  19. Study of single pion production in antineutrino induced charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognese, Teresa.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented on the exclusive charged current antineutrino production of one pion using the data of the Gargamelle propane experiment at CERN PS. The isospin structure of the charged weak current is studied as well as the energy dependence of the total cross section for π - antineutrino production, which is compared with the prediction of Adler's model [fr

  20. Electron Neutrino and Antineutrino Appearance in the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckenberger, Adam Paul [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes a particle beam and two steel-scintillator calorimeters designed to determine the parameters associated with muon neutrino disappearance. Analysis methods developed by the MINOS νe group have facilitated the placement of limits upon the mixing angle associated with νμ → νe oscillations. Since the polarity of the focusing horns can be switched, we can perform a similar analysis with an antineutrino-enriched beam to select electron antineutrino appearance candidates. Using 3.34e20 POT (protons on target) in the antineutrino mode, we exclude θ13 = 0 at the 80% C.L. A joint fit of the 3.34e20 POT antineutrino and 10.6e20 POT neutrino samples excluded θ13 = 0 at the 96% C.L. In addition, the combined data were used to produce exclusions regarding the CP-violating phase.

  1. Monitoring nuclear reactors with anti-neutrino detectors: the ANGRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenti, Pietro; Leigui, Marcelo Augusto [UFABC - Universidade Federal do ABC. Rua Santa Adelia, 166. Bairro Bangu. Santo Andre - SP (Brazil); Anjos, Joao; Azzi, Gabriel; Rafael, Gama; Ademarlaudo, Barbosa; Lima, Herman; VAZ, Mario; Villar, Arthur [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 22290-180 (Brazil); Gonzales, Luis Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Kemp, Ernesto [Unicamp, State University of Campinas, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Barao Geraldo - Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Pontifical Catholic University - PUC, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22451-900 Gavea - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Guedes, Germano; Faria, Paulo Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Avenida Transnordestina, Novo Horizonte (Brazil); Pepe, Iuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the status of the ANGRA Project, aimed at developing an anti-neutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactors. Indeed the detection of anti-neutrinos provides a unique handle for non-invasive measurements of the nuclear fuel. This kind of measurements are of deep interest for developing new safeguards tools which may help in nuclear non-proliferation programs. The ANGRA experiment, placed at about 30 m from the core of the 4 GW Brazilian nuclear power reactor ANGRA II, is based on a water Cherenkov detector with about one ton target mass. A few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. The latest results from simulations and the status of the construction are presented. (authors)

  2. A Comparison Framework for Reactor Anti-Neutrino Detectors in Near-Field Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brodsky, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Electron anti-neutrino ( e) detectors can support nuclear safeguards, from reactor monitoring to spent fuel characterization. In recent years, the scientific community has developed multiple detector concepts, many of which have been prototyped or deployed for specific measurements by their respective collaborations. However, the diversity of technical approaches, deployment conditions, and analysis techniques complicates direct performance comparison between designs. We have begun development of a simulation framework to compare and evaluate existing and proposed detector designs for nonproliferation applications in a uniform manner. This report demonstrates the intent and capabilities of the framework by evaluating four detector design concepts, calculating generic reactor antineutrino counting sensitivity, and capabilities in a plutonium disposition application example.

  3. Recent results on neutrino, antineutrino charged current interactions at NAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Benvenuti, A.; Cline, D.; Ford, W.T.; Imlay, R.; Ling, T.Y.; Mann, A.K.; Messing, F.; Piccioni, R.L.; Pilcher, J.; Reeder, D.D.; Rubbia, C.; Stefanski, R.; Sulak, L.

    The dependence of the neutrino cross section on energy has been measured to 160GeV. The ratio sigma(antineutrino)/sigma(neutrino) is measured up to 70GeV. Preliminary results are presented for the distributions of the scaling variables x, y observed in neutrino induced events

  4. Data acquisition system for segmented reactor antineutrino detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hons, Zdeněk; Vlášek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2017), č. článku P01022. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Data acquisition concepts * Detector control systems (detector and experiment monitoring and slow-control system, architecture , hardware, algorithms, databases) * Neutrino detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  5. Computer-aided design and construction of an antineutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutz, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Bugey group is setting-up a new detector for another neutrino oscillation experiment. This thesis reports on the different steps concerning its realisation. Light yield, light transmission and pulse shape discrimination properties of NE 320 a new liquid scintillator loaded with 0.15% of Lithium 6 allow to realise a large volume detector (3 x 600 l) with an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity. The benefit of the neutron capture on Lithium 6 has been conserved owing to the segmentation of the whole detector volume in 98 cells and to energy resolution and pulse shape discrimination properties of the liquid. The efficiency is expected to be 0.5 and the essential component of the background is the natural activity of the scintillator. This makes this detector the most performant for neutrino oscillation experiment at reactor [fr

  6. Can one distinguish τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos in neutral-current pion production processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.; Nieves, J.; Valverde, M.

    2007-01-01

    A potential way to distinguish τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos, below the τ-production threshold, but above the pion production one, is presented. It is based on the different behavior of the neutral-current pion production off the nucleon, depending on whether it is induced by neutrinos or antineutrinos. This procedure for distinguishing τ-neutrinos from antineutrinos neither relies on any nuclear model, nor it is affected by any nuclear effect (distortion of the outgoing nucleon waves, etc.). We show that neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries occur both in the totally integrated cross sections and in the pion azimuthal differential distributions. To define the asymmetries for the latter distributions we just rely on Lorentz-invariance. All these asymmetries are independent of the lepton family and can be experimentally measured by using electron or muon neutrinos, due to the lepton family universality of the neutral-current neutrino interaction. Nevertheless and to estimate their size, we have also used the chiral model of [E. Hernandez, J. Nieves, M. Valverde, hep-ph/0701149] at intermediate energies. Results are really significant since the differences between neutrino and antineutrino induced reactions are always large in all physical channels

  7. Coherent single pion production by antineutrino charged current interactions and test of PCAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Bertrand, D.; Sacton, J.; Aderholz, M.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Wells, J.; Baton, J.P.; Gerbier, G.; Neveu, M.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.; Kasper, P.; Venus, W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The cross section for coherent production of a single π - meson in charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei has been measured in BEBC to be (175+-25) 10 -40 cm 2 /neon nucleus, averaged over the energy spectrum of the antineutrino wide band beam at the CERN SPS; this corresponds to (0.9+-0.1)% of the total charged current anti νsub(μ) cross section. The distributions of kinematical variables are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the PCAC hypothesis and the meson dominance model; in particular, the Q 2 dependence is well described by a propagator containing a mass m=(1.35+-0.18)GeV. The absolute value of the cross section is also in agreement with the model. This analysis thus provides a test of the PCAC hypothesis in the antineutrino energy range 5-150 GeV. (orig.)

  8. Coherent single pion production by antineutrino charged current interactions and test of PCAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Allport, P.; Armenise, N.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Burkot, W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Natali, S.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.

    1986-06-01

    The cross section for coherent production of a single π- meson in charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei has been measured in BEBC to be (175±25) 10-40 cm2/neon nucleus, averaged over the energy spectrum of the antineutrino wide band beam at the CERN SPS; this corresponds to (0.9±0.1) % of the total charged currentbar v_μ cross section. The distributions of kinematical variables are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the PCAC hypothesis and the meson dominance model; in particular, the Q 2 dependence is well described by a propagator containing a mass m=(1.35±0.18) GeV. The absolute value of the cross section is also in agreement with the model. This analysis thus provides a test of the PCAC hypothesis in the antineutrino energy range 5 150 GeV.

  9. Study of charged current reactions induced by muon antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huss, D.

    1979-07-01

    We present in this work a study of antineutrino reactions on light targets. We have used the Gargamelle cloud chamber with a propane-freon mix. In the 2 first chapters we give a brief description of the experimental setting and we present the selection criteria of the events. In the third chapter we analyse the data for the reaction anti-ν + p → μ + + n that preserves strangeness. We have deduced the values of the axial (M A ) and vector (M V ) form factors: M A = (O.92 ± 0.08) GeV and M V = (0.86 ± 0.04) GeV. In the fourth chapter we study reactions in which strange particles appear (ΔS = 1) and we have determined their production cross-sections. The elastic reaction: anti-ν + p → μ + + Λ is studied in a more accurate manner thanks to a 3-constraint adjustment that enables the selection of events occurring on free protons. We have deduced from our data the longitudinal, orthogonal and transverse polarization of Λ, we have got respectively P l = -0.06 ± 0.44; P p = 0.29 ± 0.41; P t 1.05 ± 0.30. We have also deduced the values of the total cross-section as a function of the incident antineutrino energy E: σ (0.27 ± 0.02)*E*10 -38 cm -2 . E has been assessed from the energy deposited in the cloud chamber and we have adjusted the cross-section with a straight line as it is expected under the assumption of scale invariance. (A.C.)

  10. Determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and θ13 with a remote detector of reactor antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learned, John G.; Pakvasa, Sandip; Dye, Stephen T.; Svoboda, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the hierarchy of the neutrino mass spectrum and θ 13 through remote detection of electron antineutrinos from a nuclear reactor. This method utilizing a single, 10-kiloton scintillating liquid detector at a distance of 49-63 kilometers from the reactor complex measures mass-squared differences involving ν 3 with a one(ten)-year exposure provided sin 2 (2θ 13 )>0.05(0.02). Our technique applies the Fourier transform to the event rate as a function of neutrino flight distance over neutrino energy. Sweeping a relevant range of δm 2 resolves separate spectral peaks for δm 2 31 and δm 2 32 . For normal (inverted) hierarchy |δm 2 31 | is greater (lesser) than |δm 2 32 |. This robust determination requires a detector energy resolution of 3.5%/√(E).

  11. Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2007-06-27

    In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to 3.5% within 7 days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

  12. First Measurement of the Muon Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double-Differential Cross-Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grange, Joseph M. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of the muon antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic double-differential cross section. These data significantly extend the knowledge of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the GeV range, a region that has recently come under scrutiny due to a number of conflicting experimental results. To maximize the precision of this measurement, three novel techniques were employed to measure the neutrino background component of the data set. Representing the first measurements of the neutrino contribution to an accelerator-based antineutrino beam in the absence of a magnetic field, the successful execution of these techniques carry implications for current and future neutrino experiments.

  13. Observation of coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Azemoon, T.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Cooper, A. M.; Chwastowski, J.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Kochowski, C.; Leighton-Davies, S.; Middleton, R. P.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Talebzadeh, M.; Vallee, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wells, J.; Wernhard, K. L.; Wittek, W.; Zevgolatakos, E.; WA59 Collaboration

    1984-05-01

    First observation is reported of semi-inclusive coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei. A sharp peaking towards zero is observed in the | t| distribution of interactions for which the final state charge is 0 and from which only one negative hadron is emitted, unaccompanied by any evidence of nuclear fragmentation or reinteraction. This peak is correlated with high momentum of the outgoing charged hadron and with small values of Q2 and x.

  14. Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged current antineutrino-neon interactions in BEBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Allport, P.; Armenise, N.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Burkot, W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Guy, J.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Katz, U. F.; Klein, H.; Matsinos, E.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.

    1987-09-01

    Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the BEBC bubble chamber exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The cross section is measured to be (95±25)·10-40 cm2 per neon nucleus, averaged over the beam energy spectrum. The distributions of kinematical variables and the absolute value of the cross section are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the CVC hypothesis and the vector meson dominance model.

  15. Observation of coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrino on neon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Bertrand, D.; Aderholz, M.; Wernhard, K.L.; Wittek, W.; Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J.H.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Leighton-Davies, S.; Sansum, R.A.; Baton, J.P.; Gerbier, G.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Chwastowski, J.; Coghen, T.; Guy, J.; Kasper, P.; Venus, W.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Varvell, K.; Wells, J.

    1984-01-01

    First observation is reported of semi-inclusive coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei. A sharp peaking towards zero is observed in the vertical stroketvertical stroke distribution of interactions for which the final state charge is 0 and from which only one negative hadron is emitted, unaccompanied by any evidence of nuclear fragmentation or reinteraction. This peak is correlated with high momentum of the outgoing charged hadron and with small values of Q 2 and chi. (orig.)

  16. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Yamiel; SoLid Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  17. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK• CEN BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Yamiel, E-mail: yamiel.abreu@uantwerpen.be

    2017-02-11

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK• CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron–gamma discrimination using {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  18. Cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino neutral current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosetti, P.C.; Deden, H.; Deutschmann, M.; Fritze, P.; Graessler, H.; Hasert, F.J.; Morfin, J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Seyfert, H.; Banerjee, S.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Powell, K.J.; Davis, C.L.; Grossman, P.; McGow, R.; Mulvey, J.H.; Myatt, G.; Perkins, D.H.; Pons, R.; Radojicic, O.; Renton, P.; Saitta, B.; Stenger, V.

    1978-01-01

    The cross sections for γ and anti γ neutral current interactions for which the hadron energy is > 15 GeV have been measured. These results, and the ratios of neutral current to charged current sections, are in agreement with the Weinberg-Salam model. Values of sin 2 thetasub(w) have been obtained both with and without the use of a parametrisation for the hadronic part of the interaction; the values are in good agreement with each other and the preferred result, that obtained by the method independent of hadronic models, is sin 2 thetasub(w) = 0.22 +- 0.05. (Auth.)

  19. Spin alignment of ρ0 mesons produced in antineutrino and neutrino neon charged-current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, W.; Guy, J.; Adeholz, M.; Allport, P.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Burkot, W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallee, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.

    1987-03-01

    In a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC the spin alignment parameter η=1/2 (2ϱ00 - ϱ11 - ϱ-1-1) is measured for ϱ0 mesons produced in deep inelastic charged-current antineutrino and neutrono interactions on neon. In the current fragmentation region η is found to be ηv=0.48+/-0.27 (stat.)+/-0.15 (syst.) for vNe and ηv=0.12+/-0.20 (stat.)+/-0.10 (syst.) for vNe interactions Present address: University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

  20. Spin alignment of ρ0 mesons produced in antineutrino and neutrino neon charged-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittek, W.; Aderholz, M.; Schmitz, N.; Guy, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Venus, W.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M.T.; Jones, G.T.; Middleton, R.P.; O'Neale, S.W.; Varvell, K.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    In a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC the spin alignment parameter η=1/2(2ρ 00 -ρ 11 -ρ -1-1 ) is measured for ρ 0 mesons produced in deep inelastic charged-current antineutrino and neutrino interactions on neon. In the current fragmentation region η is found to be η ν =0.48±0.27(stat.)±0.15(syst.) for anti νNe and η ν =0.12±0.20(stat.)±0.10(syst.) for νNe interactions. (orig.)

  1. Neutral strange particle production in antineutrino-neon charged current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willocq, S.; Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Allport, P.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.

    1992-06-01

    Neutral strange particle production inbar v Ne charged current interactions is studied using the bubble chamber BEBC, exposed to the CERN SPS antineutrino wide band beam. From a sample of 1191 neutral strange particles, the inclusive production rates are determined to be (15.7±0.8)% for K 0 mesons, (8.2±0.5)% for Λ, (0.4±0.2)% forbar Λ and (0.6±0.3)% for Σ0 hyperons. The inclusive production properties of K 0 mesons and Λ hyperons are investigated. The Λ hyperons are found to be polarized in the production plane.

  2. Charged current antineutrino reactions from 12C at MiniBooNE energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmad, Shakeb; Singh, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    A study of charged current induced antineutrino interactions from nuclei has been done for the intermediate energy antineutrinos and applied to 12 C, relevant for ongoing experiment by MiniBooNE collaboration. The calculations have been done for the quasielastic and inelastic lepton production as well as for the incoherent and the coherent pion production processes. The calculations are done in local density approximation. In the case of the quasielastic reaction the effects of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion effects, renormalization of weak transition strengths in nuclear medium and the Coulomb distortion of the outgoing lepton have been taken into account. For the inelastic processes the calculations have been done in the Δ dominance model and take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion of the nucleon, and renormalization of Δ properties in a nuclear medium. The effect of final state interactions of pions is also taken into account. The numerical results for the total cross sections for the charged current quasielastic scattering and incoherent pion production processes are compared with earlier experimental results available in freon and freon-propane. It is found that nuclear medium effects give strong reduction in the cross sections leading to satisfactory agreement with the available data

  3. Compton current detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Campos, J.S. de.

    1984-01-01

    The project and construction of a Compton current detector, with cylindrical geometry using teflon as dielectric material; for electromagnetic radiation in range energy between 10 KeV and 2 MeV are described. The measurements of Compton current in teflon were obtained using an electrometer. The Compton current was promoted by photon flux proceeding from X ray sources (MG 150 Muller device) and gamma rays of 60 Co. The theory elaborated to explain the experimental results is shown. The calibration curves for accumulated charge and current in detector in function of exposition rates were obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Study of the antineutrino-induced elastic semi-leptonic neutral current reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racca, C.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the elastic neutral current reaction antiνsub(μ)p→antiνsub(μ)p has been done using Gargamelle filled with propane and the antineutrino beam of the CERN P.S. The space-time structure of the weak neutral current is discussed, the predictions of various V-A models for the ratio of neutral to charged current elastic cross-sections Rsup(antiν) are given. The experimental set-up, the scanning criteria and the program of reconstruction are described. The background due to the contamination by the reaction np→np principally is studied. Cuts are defined to resorbe these backgrounds and corrections are made for other backgrounds and losses. The results are compared with those of the reaction antiνsub(μ)p→μ + n and the ratio Rsup(antiν) is calculated. An upper limit of this ratio is given and the results are discussed [fr

  5. Integrated readout of organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/6LiF for segmented antineutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiff, Scott D.; Reyna, David; Monahan, James; Bowden, Nathaniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Antineutrino detection using inverse beta decay conversion has demonstrated the capability to measure nuclear reactor power and fissile material content for nuclear safeguards. Current efforts focus on aboveground deployment scenarios, for which highly efficient capture and identification of neutrons is needed to measure the anticipated antineutrino event rates in an elevated background environment. In this submission, we report on initial characterization of a new scintillation-based segmented design that uses layers of ZnS:Ag/ 6 LiF and an integrated readout technique to capture and identify neutrons created in the inverse beta decay reaction. Laboratory studies with multiple organic scintillator and ZnS:Ag/ 6 LiF configurations reliably identify 6 Li neutron captures in 60 cm-long segments using pulse shape discrimination.

  6. Automated calibration system for a high-precision measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 with the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Cai, B.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D.A.; Gu, W.Q.; Li, G.S.; Qian, X.; McKeown, R.D.; Tsang, R.H.M.; Wang, W.; Wu, F.F.; Zhang, C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the automated calibration system for the antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. This system consists of 24 identical units instrumented on 8 identical 20-ton liquid scintillator detectors. Each unit is a fully automated robotic system capable of deploying an LED and various radioactive sources into the detector along given vertical axes. Selected results from performance studies of the calibration system are reported

  7. Automated calibration system for a high-precision measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} with the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J., E-mail: jianglai.liu@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Cai, B.; Carr, R. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Dwyer, D.A. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gu, W.Q.; Li, G.S. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Qian, X. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); McKeown, R.D. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Tsang, R.H.M. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Wang, W. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Wu, F.F. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, C. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We describe the automated calibration system for the antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. This system consists of 24 identical units instrumented on 8 identical 20-ton liquid scintillator detectors. Each unit is a fully automated robotic system capable of deploying an LED and various radioactive sources into the detector along given vertical axes. Selected results from performance studies of the calibration system are reported.

  8. Measurement of the antineutrino to neutrino charged-current interaction cross section ratio in MINERvA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Han, J. Y.; Harris, D. A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sultana, M.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; MinerνA Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of the neutrino and antineutrino total charged-current cross sections on carbon and their ratio using the MINERvA scintillator-tracker. The measurements span the energy range 2-22 GeV and were performed using forward and reversed horn focusing modes of the Fermilab low-energy NuMI beam to obtain large neutrino and antineutrino samples. The flux is obtained using a subsample of charged-current events at low hadronic energy transfer along with precise higher energy external neutrino cross section data overlapping with our energy range between 12-22 GeV. We also report on the antineutrino-neutrino cross section ratio, RCC , which does not rely on external normalization information. Our ratio measurement, obtained within the same experiment using the same technique, benefits from the cancellation of common sample systematic uncertainties and reaches a precision of ˜5 % at low energy. Our results for the antineutrino-nucleus scattering cross section and for RCC are the most precise to date in the energy range Eν<6 GeV .

  9. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Total Charged-Current Cross Sections on Carbon with MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Lu [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of charged-current inclusive cross sections of muon neutrino and antineutrino interaction on carbon, and antineutrino to neutrino cross section ratio, r, in the energy range 2 - 22 GeV, with data collected in the MINERA experiment. The dataset corresponds to an exposure of 3.2 x 1020 protons on target (POT) for neutrinos and 1.01020 POT for antineutrinos. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino charged-current inclusive cross sections provides essential constraints for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at a few GeV energy range. Our measured antineutrino cross section has an uncertainty in the range 6.1% - 10.5% and is the most precise measurement below 6 GeV to date. The measured r has an uncertainty of 5.0% - 7.5%. This is the rst measurement below 6 GeV since Gargamelle in 1970s. The cross sections are measured as a function of neutrino energy by dividing the eciency corrected charged-current sample with extracted uxes. Fluxes are obtained using the low- method, which uses low hadronic energy subsamples of charged-current inclusive sample to extract ux. Measured cross sections show good agreement with the prediction of neutrino interaction models above 7 GeV, and are about 10% below the model below 7 GeV. The measured r agrees with the GENIE model [1] over the whole energy region. The measured cross sections and r are compared with world data.

  10. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Cheryl [Northwestern U.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  11. Antineutrino Charged-Current Reactions on Hydrocarbon with Low Momentum Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, R.; Betancourt, M.; Elkins, M.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Akbar, F.; Aliaga, L.; Andrade, D. A.; Bashyal, A.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Vera, G. F. R. Caceres; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Coplowe, D.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Haider, H.; Han, J. Y.; Harris, D. A.; Henry, S.; Jena, D.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Leistico, J. R.; Lovlein, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Nguyen, C.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman, Olivier, A.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Salinas, C. J. Solano; Su, H.; Sultana, M.; Falero, S. Sánchez; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; Minerva Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We report on multinucleon effects in low momentum transfer (<0.8 GeV /c ) antineutrino interactions on plastic (CH) scintillator. These data are from the 2010-2011 antineutrino phase of the MINERvA experiment at Fermilab. The hadronic energy spectrum of this inclusive sample is well described when a screening effect at a low energy transfer and a two-nucleon knockout process are added to a relativistic Fermi gas model of quasielastic, Δ resonance, and higher resonance processes. In this analysis, model elements introduced to describe previously published neutrino results have quantitatively similar benefits for this antineutrino sample. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to accelerate the investigation of alternate models for antineutrino scattering off nuclei.

  12. Anti-Neutrino Charged-Current Reactions on Scintillator with Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gran, R.; et al.

    2018-03-25

    We report on multi-nucleon effects in low momentum transfer ($< 0.8$ GeV/c) anti-neutrino interactions on scintillator. These data are from the 2010-11 anti-neutrino phase of the MINERvA experiment at Fermilab. The hadronic energy spectrum of this inclusive sample is well-described when a screening effect at low energy transfer and a two-nucleon knockout process are added to a relativistic Fermi gas model of quasi-elastic, $\\Delta$ resonance, and higher resonance processes. In this analysis, model elements introduced to describe previously published neutrino results have quantitatively similar benefits for this anti-neutrino sample. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to accelerate investigation of alternate models for anti-neutrino scattering off nuclei.

  13. Measurement of the ratios of neutral-current to charged current cross sections of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in Ne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, P. C.; Fritze, P.; Grässler, H.; Hasert, F. J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Nellen, B.; Pech, R.; Wünsch, B.; Grant, A.; Hulth, P. O.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Pape, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Vayaki, A.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Beuselinck, R.; Clayton, E. F.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Petrides, A.; Albajar, C.; Myatt, G.; Saitta, B.; Wells, J.; Bolognese, T.; Vignaud, D.; Aachen-Bonn-CERN-Democritos-Imperial College, London-Oxford-Saclay Collaboration

    1983-05-01

    The ratios of neutral current to charged current cross sections of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in heavy Ne/H 2 mixture have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 200 GeV/ c narrow band beam. The ratios were obtained using a cut in the transverse momentum of the hadronic system. In the standard Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model, our results correspond to the value of sin 2θw = 0.182 ± 0.020 ± 0.012. By combining this experiment with data from a hydrogen target the coupling constants uL2 and L2 are found to be 0.15 ± 0.04 and 0.19 ± 0.05, respectively.

  14. Measurement of the ratios of neutral-current to charged current cross sections of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosetti, P.C.; Fritze, P.; Graessler, H.; Hasert, F.J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Vayaki, A.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Beuselinck, R.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Petrides, A.; Albajar, C.; Myatt, G.; Saitta, B.; Wells, J.

    1983-01-01

    The ratios of neutral current to charged current cross sections of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in heavy Ne/H 2 mixture have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 200 GeV/c narrow band beam. The ratios were obtained using a cut in the transverse momentum of the hadronic system. In the standard Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model, our results correspond to the value of sin 2 THETAsub(w)=0.182+-0.020+-0.012. By combining this experiment with data from a hydrogen target the coupling constants usub(L) 2 and dsub(L) 2 are found to be 0.15+-0.04 and 0.19+-0.05, respectively. (orig.)

  15. Two particle–hole excitations in charged current quasielastic antineutrino-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, J.; Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the quasielastic and multinucleon contributions to the antineutrino-nucleus scattering cross section and compare our results with the recent MiniBooNE data. We use a local Fermi gas model that includes RPA correlations and gets the multinucleon part from a systematic many body expansion of the W boson selfenergy in the nuclear medium. The same model had been quite successful for the neutrino cross section and contains no new parameters. We have also analyzed the relevance of 2p2h events for the antineutrino energy reconstruction

  16. Experimental results on one-pion neutral current reaction in all channels induced by antineutrinos at CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Erriquez, O; Bullock, F W; Cavalli, D; Engel, J P; Fogli-Muciaccia, M T; Gamba, D; Guyonnet, J L; Halsteinslid, A; Henderson, R C W; Huss, D; Jones, T W; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Myklebost, K; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Paty, M; Pullia, A; Riccati, L; Riester, J L; Rognebakke, A; Rollier, M; Romero, A

    1980-01-01

    Single pion production, in antineutrino-nucleon interactions via the neutral current, has been studied in the bubble chamber Gargamelle, filled with propane. Complete analysis of the secondaries, including pi /sup 0/'s, has allowed a detailed study of all channels. After background and nuclear corrections, results are obtained which can be interpreted in terms of isospin structure of the neutral weak current and of the Salam-Weinberg angle. Agreement is found with the currently accepted value of sin/sup 2/ theta /sub w/ and the data suggest an important contribution of I=/sup 3///sub 2/ final states. (11 refs).

  17. Study of strange particle production by neutral currents induced by 1 and 12 GeV neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, T.L.B.

    1977-01-01

    Strange particles production by weak neutral currents was experimentally studied. The first result is a direct confirmation that neutral currents conserve strangeness (by an upper limit on ΔS=-1 production). The two other results, production rate of strange neutral particles and ratio of strange particles production for antineutrinos and neutrinos, prove that these particles are mainly produced in the final hadronic state rather than on strange sea-quarks and give an upper limit on the rate of this type of quark in the nucleon [fr

  18. Coherent production of ρ- mesons in charged current antineutrino-neon interactions in BEBC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Bertrand, D.; Sacton, J.; Aderholz, M.; Katz, U.F.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Varvell, K.; Wells, J.; Baton, J.P.; Kasper, P.; Neveu, M.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the BEBC bubbler chamber exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The cross section is measured to be (95±25).10 -40 cm 2 per neon nucleus, averaged over the beam energy spectrum. The distributions of kinematical variables and the absolute value of the cross section are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the CVC hypothesis and the vector meson dominance model. (orig.)

  19. Statistical properties of reactor antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Tarasov, V O; Shaaban, Y

    2002-01-01

    Based on the properties of the cascade statistics of reactor antineutrinos, the efficient method of searching for neutrino oscillations is offered. The determination of physical parameters of this statistics, i.e. the average number of fissions and the overage number of antineutrinos per fission, requires no a priori knowledge of the geometry and characteristics of the detector, the reactor power, and composition of nuclear fuel.

  20. Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering in MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvojka, Jesse John [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillation is becoming increasingly understood with results from accelerator-based and reactor-based experiments, but unanswered questions remain. The proper ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates that compose the neutrino avor eigenstates is not completely known. We have yet to detect CP violation in neutrino mixing, which if present could help explain the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter in the universe. We also have not resolved whether sterile neutrinos, which do not interact in any Standard Model interaction, exist. Accelerator-based experiments appear to be the most promising candidates for resolving these questions; however, the ability of present and future experiments to provide answers is likely to be limited by systematic errors. A significant source of this systematic error comes from limitations in our knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Errors on cross-sections for such interactions are large, existing data is sometimes contradictory, and knowledge of nuclear effects is incomplete. One type of neutrino interaction of particular interest is charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering, which yields a final state consisting of a charged lepton and nucleon. This process, which is the dominant interaction near energies of 1 GeV, is of great utility to neutrino oscillation experiments since the incoming neutrino energy and the square of the momentum transferred to the final state nucleon, Q2, can be reconstructed using the final state lepton kinematics. To address the uncertainty in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, many experiments have begun making dedicated measurements. In particular, the MINER A experiment is studying neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few GeV region. MINERvA is a fine-grained, high precision, high statistics neutrino scattering experiment that will greatly improve our understanding of neutrino cross-sections and nuclear effects that affect the final state particles

  1. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  2. Antineutrino detector for anti ν oscillation studies at fission weapon tests and at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, H.W.; Loncoski, R.; Mack, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two anti ν oscillation experiments are planned, incorporating large volume (4200 l) liquid scintillation detectors 1) at large distances (450 to 800 m) from fission weapon tests and 2) at 12 to 50 m from LAMPF beam dump where significant anti ν/sub e/ events are detected only if some oscillation operates, such as ν/sub μ/ → ν/sub e/. Design criteria, detector characteristics, and experimental considerations are given

  3. Measurements of the inclusive neutrino and antineutrino charged current cross sections in MINERvA using the low-ν flux method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, J.; Ren, L.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    The total cross sections are important ingredients for the current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. We present measurements of the total charged-current neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on scintillator (CH) in the NuMI low-energy beamline using an in situ prediction of the shape of the flux as a function of neutrino energy from 2-50 GeV. This flux prediction takes advantage of the fact that neutrino and antineutrino interactions with low nuclear recoil energy (ν ) have a nearly constant cross section as a function of incident neutrino energy. This measurement is the lowest energy application of the low-ν flux technique, the first time it has been used in the NuMI antineutrino beam configuration, and demonstrates that the technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies. The cross section measurements presented are the most precise measurements to date below 5 GeV.

  4. Current level detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for detecting the current level of a dc signal. It includes an even harmonic modulator to which a reference ac signal is applied. The unknown dc signal acts on the reference ac signal so that the output of the modulator includes an even harmonic whose amplitude is proportional to the unknown dc current. The device may be used to provide overcurrent protection for proportional wire chambers

  5. A study of single-meson production in neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P.; Grässler, H.; Schulte, R.; Jones, G. T.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Gebel, W.; Hofmann, E.; Klein, H.; Mittendorfer, J.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Clayton, E. F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Aachen-Birmingham-Bonn-CERN-London IC-Munich (MPI)-Oxford Collaboration

    1986-01-01

    We present results on exclusive single-charged pion and kaon production in neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons in the energy range from 5 to 120 GeV. The data were obtained from exposures of BEBC to wide band beams at the CERN SPS. For invariant masses of the (pπ) system below 2 GeV, the pions originate predominantly from decays of baryon resonances excited by the weak charged current. Similarly, we observe the production of Λ(1520) decaying into p and K -. For invariant masses above 2 GeV pion production becomes peripheral by interaction of the weak current with a virtual π0. We establish a contribution of longitudinally polarised intermediate vector bosons to this process.

  6. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobayyen, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ratios R νp and R a ntiν a ntip of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R νp = 0.384±0.024±0.015 and R a ntiν a nti p = 0.338±0.014±0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2 θ W (M W ) a nti M a nti S of 0.225±0.030. 20 refs

  7. A study of single-meson production in neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.; Graessler, H.; Schulte, R.; Gebel, W.; Hofmann, E.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    We present results on exclusive single-charged pion and kaon production in neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons in the energy range from 5 to 120 GeV. The data were obtained from exposures of BEBC to wide band beams at the CERN SPS. For invariant masses of the (pπ) system below 2 GeV, the pions originate predominantly from decays of baryon resonances excited by the weak charged current. Similarly, we observe the production of Λ(1520) decaying into p and K - . For invariant masses above 2 GeV pion production becomes peripheral by interaction of the weak current with a virtual π 0 . We establish a contribution of longitudinally polarised intermediate vector bosons to this process. (orig.)

  8. Comparing neutrino and antineutrino scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, B.C.

    1977-01-01

    The charged current interaction is considered. The present situation with respect to the indications of new physics at high energies, especially in the context of what can be learned by comparing neutrino with antineutrino production is reviewed

  9. Experimental test of the PCAC-hypothesis in charged current neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hoffmann, E.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1987-03-01

    Data obtained with the bubble chamber BEBC at CERN are used for the first significant test of Adler's prediction for the neutrino and antineutrino-proton scattering cross sections at vanishing four-momentum transfer squared Q 2. An Extended Vector Meson Dominance Model (EVDM) is applied to extrapolate Adler's prediction to experimentally accessible values of Q 2. The data show good agreement with Adler's prediction for Q 2→0 thus confirming the PCAC hypothesis in the kinematical region of high leptonic energy transfer ν>2 GeV. The good agreement of the data with the theoretical predictions also at higher Q 2, where the EVDM terms are dominant, also supports this model. However, an EVDM calculation without PCAC is clearly ruled out by the data.

  10. Experimental test of the PCAC-hypothesis in charged current neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Allport, P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1987-01-01

    Data obtained with the bubble chamber BEBC at CERN are used for the first significant test of Adler's prediction for the neutrino and antineutrino-proton scattering cross sections at vanishing four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 . An Extended Vector Meson Dominance Model (EVDM) is applied to extrapolate Adler's prediction to experimentally accessible values of Q 2 . The data show good agreement with Adler's prediction for Q 2 → 0 thus confirming the PCAC hypothesis in the kinematical region of high leptonic energy transfer ν > 2 GeV. The good agreement of the data with the theoretical predictions also at higher Q 2 , where the EVDM terms are dominant, also supports this model. However, an EVDM calculation without PCAC is clearly ruled out by the data. (orig.)

  11. Neutral current in the Weinberg-Salam gauge model and elastic scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    We study the elastic scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in the Weinberg-Salam model of the neutral current. In particular, we incorporate into our calculation the experimental cuts relevant to the two recent BNL experiments and also fold in the BNL ν and anti ν spectra. Sensitivity of the calculation to the changes in the axial-vector-meson mass and the Weinberg angle are explored. We conclude that the Weinberg-Salam model prediction for R/sub el/ = / and the differential-cross-section measurements are not inconsistent with the data provided the uncertainty in the mass of the axial-vector meson M/sub A/ is taken into account. Similar predictions are given for anti νN scattering

  12. Study of the neutral current properties in the semileptonic inclusive neutrino and antineutrino nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, B.

    1981-01-01

    In the dechromatic neutron beam of the CERN-SPS results obtained with the CHARM detector from the deep inelastic inclusive neutrino-nucleon scattering were analyzed according to following reactions: #betta#sub(μ)(anti #betta#sub(μ))+N->μ - (μ + ) + hadrons and #betta#sub(μ)(anti #betta#sub(μ))+N->#betta#sub(μ)(anti #betta#sub(μ)) + hadrons. The aim of these studies was the determination of the coupling of neutral currents in the weak interaction. All data can be well described by the standard model for the unification of the electrogmagnetic and weak interaction in connection with the quarkparton model, if a Weinberg angle of sin 2 deltasub(w)=0.222+-0.016 is assumed. (orig./HSI) [de

  13. AGM2015: Antineutrino Global Map 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, S M; Jocher, G R; Dye, S T; McDonough, W F; Learned, J G

    2015-09-01

    Every second greater than 10(25) antineutrinos radiate to space from Earth, shining like a faint antineutrino star. Underground antineutrino detectors have revealed the rapidly decaying fission products inside nuclear reactors, verified the long-lived radioactivity inside our planet, and informed sensitive experiments for probing fundamental physics. Mapping the anisotropic antineutrino flux and energy spectrum advance geoscience by defining the amount and distribution of radioactive power within Earth while critically evaluating competing compositional models of the planet. We present the Antineutrino Global Map 2015 (AGM2015), an experimentally informed model of Earth's surface antineutrino flux over the 0 to 11 MeV energy spectrum, along with an assessment of systematic errors. The open source AGM2015 provides fundamental predictions for experiments, assists in strategic detector placement to determine neutrino mass hierarchy, and aids in identifying undeclared nuclear reactors. We use cosmochemically and seismologically informed models of the radiogenic lithosphere/mantle combined with the estimated antineutrino flux, as measured by KamLAND and Borexino, to determine the Earth's total antineutrino luminosity at . We find a dominant flux of geo-neutrinos, predict sub-equal crust and mantle contributions, with ~1% of the total flux from man-made nuclear reactors.

  14. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and and antineutrino interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Hoffmann, E.; Haidt, D.; Klein, H.; Mittendorfer, J.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Retter, M. L.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.; Fitch, P. J.; Birmingham-Bonn-CERN-Imperial College-München(MPI)-Oxford-University College Collaboration

    1986-10-01

    The ratios Rvp and Rvp of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 400 GeV wideband beam. The bubble chamber, equipped with the standard External Muon Identifier, was surrounded with an additional plane of wire chambers (Internal Picket Fence), which was added to improve neutral current event identification. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/ c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R vp = 0.384 ± 0.015 and R vp = 0.338 ± 0.014 ± 0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2θ w(M woverlineMSof 0.225 ± 0.030 . Combining the results from hydrogen and an isoscalar target, the differences of the neutral current chiral coupling constants were found to be u2l- d2L = -0.080 ± 0.043 ± 0.012 and u2R- d2R = 0.021±0.055±0.028.

  15. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Hoffmann, E.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Retter, M.L.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.; Fitch, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ratios R vp and R vp of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 400 GeV wideband beam. The bubble chamber, equipped with the standard External Muon Identifier, was surrounded with an additional plane of wire chambers (Internal Picket Fence), which was added to improve neutral current event identification. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R vp =0.384±0.024±0.015 and R vp =0.338±0.014±0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2 θ w (M w ) MS of 0.225±0.030. Combining the results from hydrogen and an isoscalar target, the differences of the neutral current chiral coupling constants were found to be u L 2 -d L 2 =-0.080±0.043±0.012 and u R 2 -d R 2 =0.021±0.055±0.028. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear effects in (anti)neutrino charge-current quasielastic scattering at MINER νA kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Megias, G. D.; González-Jiménez, R.; Barbaro, M. B.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.; Udías, J. M.

    2018-05-01

    We compare the characteristics of the charged-current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering obtained in two different nuclear models, the phenomenological SuperScaling Approximation and the model using a realistic spectral function S(p, ɛ) that gives a scaling function in accordance with the (e, e‧ ) scattering data, with the recent data published by the MiniBooNE, MINER νA, and NOMAD collaborations. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations by using natural orbitals from the Jastrow correlation method and has a realistic energy dependence. Both models provide a good description of the MINER νA and NOMAD data without the need of an ad hoc increase of the value of the mass parameter in the axial-vector dipole form factor. The models considered in this work, based on the the impulse approximation (IA), underpredict the MiniBooNE data for the flux-averaged charged-current quasielastic {ν }μ ({\\bar{ν }}μ ){+}12\\text{C} differential cross section per nucleon and the total cross sections, although the shape of the cross sections is represented by the approaches. The discrepancy is most likely due to missing of the effects beyond the IA, e.g., those of the 2p–2h meson exchange currents that have contribution in the transverse responses.

  17. Measurement of total cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions in hydrogen and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Corrigan, G.; Hoffmann, E.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Schmid, P.; Schmitz, N.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Wittek, W.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Guy, J. G.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Lagraa, M.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachmuth, H.; Wells, J.

    1986-06-01

    BEBC filled in turn with hydrogen, and with a neon-hydrogen mixture, was exposed to the CERN SPS wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. The ratios of the charged-current cross sections per nucleon, σ(νH2)/σ(νNe) and σ(νH2)/σ(νNe), between 20 and 300 GeV were found to be 0.656 +/- 0.020 and 1.425 +/- 0.052, respectively. Multiplying these ratios by the revised cross sections in neon, σ(νNe)/E = (0.723 +/- 0.038) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon and σ(νNe)/E = (0.351 +/- 0.019) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon, and their ratio, σ(νNe)/σ(νNe) = 0.485 +/- 0.020,, yields values for the total charged-current cross sections on protons, σ(νp)/E and σ(νp)/E, of (0.474 +/- 0.029) × 10-38 cm2/GeV and (0.500 +/- 0.032) × 10-38 cm2/GeV. respectively, and a value for the ratio σ(νp)/σ(νp) of 1.053 +/- 0.066. Present address: University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.

  18. Measurement of total cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions in hydrogen and neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderholz, M.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Baton, J.P.; Lagraa, M.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Sansum, R.A.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.G.; Kasper, P.; Venus, W.; Middleton, R.P.; O'Neale, S.W.; Varvell, K.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Vallee, C.; Wells, J.

    1986-01-01

    BEBC filled in turn with hydrogen, and with a neon-hydrogen mixture, was exposed to the CERN SPS wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. The ratios of the charged-current cross sections per nucleon, sigma(νH 2 )/sigma(νNe) and sigma(anti νH 2 )/sigma(anti νNe), between 20 and 300 GeV were found to be 0.656+-0.020 and 1.425+-0.052, respectively. Multiplying these ratios by the revised cross sections in neon, sigma(νNe)/E=(0.723+-0.038)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV per nucleon and sigma(anti νNe)/E=(0.351+-0.019)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV per nucleon, and their ratio, sigma(anti νNe)/sigma(νNe)=0.485+-0.020, yields values for the total charged-current cross sections on protons, sigma(νp)/E and sigma(anti νp)/E, of (0.474+-0.029)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV and (0.500+-0.032)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV, respectively, and a value for the ratio sigma(anti νp)/sigma(νp) of 1.053+-0.066. (orig.)

  19. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for vμ → $\\bar{v}$μ transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |Δ$\\bar{m}$atm 2| = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat) ± 0.06(syst)) x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = 0.860-0.12+0.11(stat) ± 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  20. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmel, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for ν μ → (bar ν) μ transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |Δ(bar m) atm 2 | = (3.36 -0.40 +0.46 (stat) ± 0.06(syst)) x 10 -3 eV 2 and sin 2 (2(bar θ) 23 ) = 0.860 -0.12 +0.11 (stat) ± 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  1. Neutrino scattering and the reactor antineutrino anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Estela; Cañas, Blanca; Miranda, Omar; Parada, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Low energy threshold reactor experiments have the potential to give insight into the light sterile neutrino signal provided by the reactor antineutrino anomaly and the gallium anomaly. In this work we analyze short baseline reactor experiments that detect by elastic neutrino electron scattering in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We also analyze the sensitivity of experimental proposals of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering (CENNS) detectors in order to exclude or confirm the sterile neutrino signal with reactor antineutrinos.

  2. The double chooz experiment: simulation of reactor antineutrino spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to study the oscillations of electron antineutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power station, located in France, in the Ardennes region. It will lead to an unprecedented accuracy on the value of the mixing angle θ 13 . Improving the current knowledge on this parameter, given by the Chooz experiment, requires a reduction of both statistical and systematic errors, that is to say not only observing a large data sample, but also controlling the experimental uncertainties involved in the production and detection of electron antineutrinos. The use of two identical detectors will cancel most of the experimental systematic uncertainties limiting the sensitivity to the value of the mixing angle. We present in this thesis, simulations of reactor antineutrino spectra that were carried out in order to control the sources of systematic uncertainty related to the production of these particles by the plant. We also discuss our work on controlling the normalization error of the experiment through the precise determination of the number of target protons by a weighing measurement and through the study of the fiducial volume of the detectors which requires an accurate modeling of neutron physics. After three years of data taking with two detectors, Double Chooz will be able to disentangle an oscillation signal for sin 2 2θ 13 ≥ 0.05 (at 3σ) or, if no oscillations are observed, to put a limit of sin 2 2θ 13 ≤ 0.03 at 90% C.L. (author) [fr

  3. Measurement of the neutral-current interactions of high-energy neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.; Benvenuti, A.; Cline, D.; Imlay, R.; Reeder, D.D.; Stefanski, R.; Rubbia, C.; Sulak, L.; Messing, F.; Ford, W.T.; Ling, T.Y.; Mann, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the ν and nu-bar weak hadronic neutral-current total cross sections and hadron energy distributions are consistent with a V - A form for this current. They are three standard deviations from pure V, pure A, or a pure T form and unambiguously exclude V + A and any linear combination of S and P

  4. One meson π0 final state study in neutral current neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comtet, Alain.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral pion production by weak neutral currents was observed in the CERN-GARGAMELLE neutrino experiment. The aim of the analysis was the measurement of the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) of neutral-current to charged-current cross sections. The background due to neutron interactions was computed. A lower and an upper limit of the background was obtained. Bounds on the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) are given using these limits: 0.11 [fr

  5. A search for neutrino–antineutrino mass inequality by means of sterile neutrino oscillometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M.V., E-mail: gear8mike@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); St. Petersburg State University, 198504 Peterhof, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Loo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Novikov, Yu.N. [St. Petersburg State University, 198504 Peterhof, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W.H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Wurm, M. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The investigation of the oscillation pattern induced by the sterile neutrinos might determine the oscillation parameters, and at the same time, allow to probe CPT symmetry in the leptonic sector through neutrino–antineutrino mass inequality. We propose to use a large scintillation detector like JUNO or LENA to detect electron neutrinos and electron antineutrinos from MCi electron capture or beta decay sources. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the current research plans for JUNO and RENO. Requiring at least 5σ confidence level and assuming the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit, we would be able to detect neutrino–antineutrino mass inequality of the order of 0.5% or larger, which would imply a signal of CPT anomalies.

  6. Neutral strange particle production in neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions on neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprospo, D.; Kalelkar, M.; Aderholz, M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P. P.; Ammosov, V. V.; Andryakov, A.; Asratyan, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Ballagh, H. C.; Baton, J.-P.; Barth, M.; Bingham, H. H.; Brucker, E. B.; Burnstein, R. A.; Cence, R. J.; Chatterjee, T. K.; Clayton, E. F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; Devanand; de Wolf, E.; Ermolov, P.; Erofeeva, I.; Faulkner, P. J.; Foeth, H.; Fretter, W. B.; Gapienko, G.; Gupta, V. K.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F. A.; Ivanilov, A.; Jabiol, M.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, M. D.; Kafka, T.; Kaftanov, V.; Kasper, P.; Kobrin, V.; Kohli, J. M.; Koller, E. L.; Korablev, V.; Kubantsev, M.; Lauko, M.; Lukina, O.; Lys, J. E.; Lyutov, S.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R. H.; Mittra, I. S.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D. R.; Moskalev, V.; Murzin, V.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Neveu, M.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M. W.; Peterson, V. Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N. K.; Rubin, H. A.; Ryasakov, S.; Sacton, J.; Sambyal, S. S.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, S.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smart, W.; Smirnova, L.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K. E.; Verluyten, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Willocq, S.; Yost, G. P.

    1994-12-01

    A study has been made of neutral strange particle production in νμNe and ν¯μNe charged-current interactions at a higher energy than any previous study. The experiment was done at the Fermilab Tevatron using the 15-ft. bubble chamber, and the data sample consists of 814(154) observed neutral strange particles from 6263(1115) ν(ν¯) charged-current events. For the ν beam (average event energy =150 GeV), the average multiplicities per charged-current event have been measured to be 0.408+/-0.048 for K0, 0.127+/-0.014 for Λ, and 0.015+/-0.005 for Λ¯, which are significantly greater than for lower-energy experiments. The dependence of rates on kinematical variables has been measured, and shows that both K0 and Λ production increase strongly with Eν, W2, Q2, and yB. Compared to lower-energy experiments, single-particle distributions indicate that there is much more K0 production for xF>-0.2, and the enhanced Λ production spans most of the kinematic region. Λ¯ production is mostly in the region ||xF||-0.2 there is a significant excess of Λ production over the model's prediction. The Λ hyperons are found to be polarized in the production plane.

  7. Neutral strange particle production in neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Villalobos-Baillie, O.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1993-06-01

    The production of the neutral strange particles K 0, Λ andbar Λ in vp andbar vp charged current interactions is studied in an experiment with the Big European Bubble Chamber. Mean multiplicities are measured as a function of the event variables E v, W 2 and Q 2 and of the hadron variables x F, z and p {T/2}. K *± (892) and ∑ *± (1385) signals are observed, whereas there is no evidence for ∑ *- (1385) production in vp scattering. Forward, backward and total mean multiplicities are found to compare well with the predictions of an empirical model for deep-inelastic reactions in the case of the strange mesons K 0 and K *± (892) but less so for the strange baryons Λ,bar Λ and ∑ *± (1385). The strange baryon multiplicities are used to obtain the decuplet to octet baryon production ratio and to assess the probabilities of a uu or ud system to break up.

  8. A measurement of the proton structure functions from neutrino-hydrogen and antineutrino-hydrogen charged-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of the quark-parton model, the quark and anti-quark structure functions of the proton have been measured by fitting them to the distributions of the events in the Bjorken y variable. The data used form the largest sample of neutrino and antineutrino interactions on a pure hydrogen target available, and come from exposures of BEBC to the CERN wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. It is found that the ratio d ν /u ν of valence quark distributions falls with increasing Bjorken x. In the context of the quark-parton model the results constrain the isospin composition of the accompanying diquark system. Models involving scattering from diquarks are in disagreement with the data. (orig.)

  9. Neutral strange particle production in neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Villalobos-Baillie, O.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U.F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1992-08-01

    The production of the neutral strange particles K 0 , Λ and anti Λ in νp and anti νp charged current interactions is studied in an experiment with the Big European Bubble Chamber. Mean multiplicities are measured as a function of the event variables. E ν , W 2 and Q 2 and of the hadron variables χ F , z and p T 2 . K* ± (892) and Σ* ± (1385) signals are observed, whereas there is no evidence for Σ* - (1385) production in νp scattering. Forward, backward and total mean multiplicities are found to compare well with the predictions of an empirical model for deep-inelastic reactions in the case of the strange mesons K 0 and K* ± (892) but less so for the strange baryons Λ, anti Λ and Σ* ± (1385). The strange baryon multiplicities are used to obtain the decuplet to octet baryon production ratio and to assess the probabilities of a uu or ud system to break up. (orig.)

  10. Neutral strange particle production in neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Villalobos-Baillie, O.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1993-01-01

    The production of the neutral strange particles K 0 , Λ and anti Λ in νp and anti νp charged current interactions is studied in an experiment with the Big European Bubble Chamber. Mean multiplicities are measured as a function of the event variables E ν , W 2 and Q 2 and of the hadron variables x F , z and p T 2 . K* ± (892) and Σ* ± (1385) signals are observed, whereas there is no evidence for Σ* - (1385) production in νp scattering. Forward, backward and total mean multiplicities are found to compare well with the predictions of an empirical model for deep-inelastic reactions in the case of the strange mesons K 0 and K* ± (892) but less so for the strange baryons Λ, anti Λ and Σ* ± (1385). The strange baryon multiplicites are used to obtain the decuplet to octet baryon production ratio and to assess the probabilities of a uu or ud system to break up. (orig.)

  11. Detection of neutrinos, antineutrinos, and neutrino-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischbach, Ephraim

    2018-04-24

    An apparatus for detecting the presence of a nuclear reactor by the detection of antineutrinos from the reactor can include a radioactive sample having a measurable nuclear activity level and a decay rate capable of changing in response to the presence of antineutrinos, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to at least one of a particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. A processor associated with the detector can correlate rate of decay of the radioactive sample to a flux of the antineutrinos to detect the reactor.

  12. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  13. Study on a prototype and by simulation of an antineutrino detector based on a lithium 6 scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Boubker, S.

    1989-01-01

    A detector based on Lithium-6 loaded liquid scintillator has been developed by the BUGEY collaboration in order to study neutrino's fundamental properties. This thesis reports on a study concerning a prototype cell of size 85x8.5x8.5 cm 3 , of the discrimination properties between neutrons and gammas and thermal neutron identification. Monte-Carlo simulation has allowed us to precise the light collection features in the cell. The last part of this memorandum deals with a cosmic detector presenting 2.5 m 2 active surface. We have obtained for this detector a very good homogenization of light response [fr

  14. Dissecting Reactor Antineutrino Flux Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Hayes, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Current predictions for the antineutrino yield and spectra from a nuclear reactor rely on the experimental electron spectra from 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and a numerical method to convert these aggregate electron spectra into their corresponding antineutrino ones. In the present work we investigate quantitatively some of the basic assumptions and approximations used in the conversion method, studying first the compatibility between two recent approaches for calculating electron and antineutrino spectra. We then explore different possibilities for the disagreement between the measured Daya Bay and the Huber-Mueller antineutrino spectra, including the 238U contribution as well as the effective charge and the allowed shape assumption used in the conversion method. We observe that including a shape correction of about +6 % MeV-1 in conversion calculations can better describe the Daya Bay spectrum. Because of a lack of experimental data, this correction cannot be ruled out, concluding that in order to confirm the existence of the reactor neutrino anomaly, or even quantify it, precisely measured electron spectra for about 50 relevant fission products are needed. With the advent of new rare ion facilities, the measurement of shape factors for these nuclides, for many of which precise beta intensity data from TAGS experiments already exist, would be highly desirable.

  15. Detector of the reactor AntiNeutrino based on Solid-state plastic Scintillator (DANSS). Status and first results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alekseev, I.; Belov, V.; Brudanin, V.; Danilov, M.; Egorov, V.; Filosofov, D. V.; Fomina, M.; Hons, Zdeněk; Kazartsev, S.; Kobyakin, A.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Medvedev, D.; Nesterov, V.; Olshevsky, A.; Ponomarev, D.; Rozova, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Rusinov, V.; Salamatin, A.; Shevchik, Y.; Shirchenko, M.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Skrobova, N.; Starostin, A.; Svirida, D.N.; Tarkovsky, E.; Tikhomirov, I.; Vlášek, J.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 798, UNSP (2017), č. článku 012152. ISSN 1742-6588. [2nd International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA). Moscow, 11.10.2016-14.10.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : detector * SiPMs * beta-decay Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics

  16. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios in neutrino and antineutrino nucleon interactions and determination of the Weinberg angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Groot, J.G.H. de; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Knobloch, J.; May, J.; Navarria, F.L.; Palazzi, P.; Para, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rothberg, J.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Taureg, H.; Rueden, W. von; Wahl, H.; Wotschak, J.; Duda, J.; Eisele, F.; Klasen, H.P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Lierl, H.; Pollmann, D.; Pszola, B.; Renk, B.; Willutzki, H.J.; Dydak, F.; Flottmann, T.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Krolikowski, J.; Tittel, K.; Bloch, P.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Guyot, C.; Loucatos, S.; Maillard, J.; Merlo, J.P.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Turlay, R.; He, J.T.; Ruan, T.Z.; Wu, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The cross section ratios of neutral and charged current interactions induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos in iron have been measured in the 200 GeV narrow-band beam at the CERN SPS. We find Rsub(ν)=0.301+-0.007 and Rsub(anti ν)=0.363+-0.015 for a hadron energy cut of 10 GeV. The results are in agreement with the standard model of electroweak interactions. In the MS renormalization scheme at the scale of the W boson mass sin 2 Osub(w)(msub(w))=0.226+-0.012 is obtained, where the error represents the experimental uncertainty. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be Δ sind 2 Osub(w)=+-0.006. (orig.)

  17. Experimental determination of the antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, Nils-Holger

    2013-01-01

    Fission of 238 U contributes about 10 % to the antineutrino emission of a pressurized water reactor. In the present thesis, the beta spectrum of the fission products of 238 U was determined in an experiment at the neutron source FRM II. This beta spectrum was subsequently converted into an antineutrino spectrum. This first measurement of the antineutrino spectrum supports all current and future reactor antineutrino experiments.

  18. Experimental determination of the antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of {sup 238}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Nils-Holger

    2013-10-09

    Fission of {sup 238}U contributes about 10 % to the antineutrino emission of a pressurized water reactor. In the present thesis, the beta spectrum of the fission products of {sup 238}U was determined in an experiment at the neutron source FRM II. This beta spectrum was subsequently converted into an antineutrino spectrum. This first measurement of the antineutrino spectrum supports all current and future reactor antineutrino experiments.

  19. Measuring Antineutrino Oscillations with the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Justin John [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A manmade beam of predominantly muon neutrinos is detected both 1 km and 735 km from the production point by two functionally identical detectors. A comparison of the energy spectra measured by the two detectors shows the energy-dependent disappearance of muon neutrinos characteristic of oscillations and allows a measurement of the parameters governing the oscillations. This thesis presents work leading to measurements of disappearance in the 6% $\\bar{v}$μ background in that beam. A calibration is developed to correct for time-dependent changes in the responses of both detectors, reducing the corresponding uncertainty on hadronic energy measurements from 1.8% to 0.4% in the near detector and from 0.8% to 0.4% in the far detector. A method of selecting charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events is developed, with purities (efficiencies) of 96.5% (74.4%) at the near detector, and 98.8% (70.9%) at the far detector in the region below 10 GeV reconstructed antineutrino energy. A method of using the measured near detector neutrino energy spectrum to predict that expected at the far detector is discussed, and developed for use in the $\\bar{v}$μ analysis. Sources of systematic uncertainty contributing to the oscillation measurements are discussed. In the far detector, 32 charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events are observed below a reconstructed energy of 30 GeV, compared to an expectation of 47.8 for Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2 = Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2, sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = sin2(2θ23). This deficit, in such a low-statistics sample, makes the result difficult to interpret in the context of an oscillation parameter measurement. Possible sources for the discrepancy are discussed, concluding that considerably more data are required for a definitive solution. Running MINOS with a dedicated $\\bar

  20. Coherent production of single pions and ρ mesons in charged-current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willocq, S.; Aderholz, M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P. P.; Badyal, S. K.; Ballagh, H. C.; Barth, M.; Bingham, H. H.; Brucker, E. B.; Burnstein, R. A.; Cence, R. J.; Chatterjee, T. K.; Clayton, E. F.; Corrigan, G.; de Prospo, D.; Devanand; de Wolf, E.; Faulkner, P. J.; Foeth, H.; Fretter, W. B.; Gupta, V. K.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F. A.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, M. D.; Kafka, T.; Kalelkar, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Koller, E. L.; Krawiec, R. J.; Lauko, M.; Lys, J. E.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R. H.; Mittra, I. S.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D. R.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M. W.; Peterson, V. Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N. K.; Rubin, H. A.; Sacton, J.; Sambyal, S. S.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, S.; Smart, W.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K. E.; Verluyten, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Yost, G. P.

    1993-04-01

    The coherent production of π and ρ mesons in νμ(ν¯μ)-neon charged-current interactions has been studied using the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber filled with a heavy Ne-H2 mix and exposed to the Teva- tron quadrupole triplet (anti)neutrino beam. The νμ (ν¯μ) beam had an average energy of 80 GeV (70 GeV). From a sample corresponding to approximately 28 000 charged-current interactions, net signals of (53+/-9) μ+/-π-/+ coherent events and (19+/-7) μ+/-π-/+π0 coherent events are extracted. For E>10 GeV, the coherent pion production cross section is determined to be (3.2+/-0.7)×10-38 cm2 per neon nucleus whereas the coherent ρ production cross section is (2.1+/-0.8)×10-38 cm2 per neon nucleus. These cross sections and the kinematical characteristics of the coherent events at ||t||<0.1 GeV2 are found to be in general agreement with the predictions of a model based on the hadron dominance and, in the pion case, on the partially conserved axial-vector current hypothesis. Also discussed is the coherent production of systems consisting of three pions.

  1. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections on iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanov, Martin Mihaylov [Pittsburgh U.

    2005-11-01

    This thesis will present a precise measurement of the differential cross section for charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. The NuTeV experiment took data during 1996-97 and collected 8.6 10 º and 2.4 10 º charged-current (CC) interactions. The experiment combines sign-selected neutrino and antineutrino beams and the upgraded CCFR iron-scintillator neutrino detector. A precision continuous calibration beam was used to determine the muon and hadron energy scales to a precision of about a factor of two better than previous experiments. The structure functions F (x,Q2) and xF3(x,Q2) are extracted and compared with theory and previous measurements.

  2. Applied Anti-neutrino Physics 2013

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This year, the 9th annual Applied Antineutrino Physics Workshop will be hosted by Sejong University, at the COEX conference center in Seoul South Korea. The workshop will be held on November 1(Friday) - 2(Saturday), 2013. Conveniently for many travelers, it takes place directly after and at the same venue as the 2013 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium (http://www.nss-mic.org/2013/NSSMain.asp) Applied Antineutrino Physics describes an ensemble of experimental and theoretical efforts which aim to use the antineutrino signal from nuclear reactors, and from the Earth itself, in order to address practical problems in nonproliferation and geology respectively. Since the 2004 inception of these workshops, groups worldwide have made considerable advances in defining and expanding the field, garnering interest from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which administers the worlds most important nonproliferation regime, and from the geology/geophysics community. This meeting will focus on the current activi...

  3. Anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Gari, M.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie

    1981-01-01

    The anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron (anti ν + D → anti ν + n + p and anti νsub(e) + D → + e + + n + n) is calculated using realistic two-body states. Meson-exchange currents are considered in the one-boson-exchange limit. The results are discussed as corrections to the cross sections obtained in effective range approximations. It is shown that the ratio of the cross sections (sigma - /sigma 0 ) for reactor antineutrinos is practically independent of the nuclear physics uncertainties. (orig.)

  4. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeger, Karsten M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  5. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta . Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  6. Anti-neutrino flux in a research reactor for non-proliferation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakshournia, Samad; Foroughi, Shokoufeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI)

    2017-11-15

    Owing to growing interest in the study of emitted antineutrinos from nuclear reactors to test the Atomic Energy Agency safeguards, antineutrino flux was studied in the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) using ORIGEN code. According to our prediction, antineutrino rate was obtained 2.6 x 10{sup 17} (v{sub e}/sec) in the core No. 57F of the TRR. Calculations indicated that evolution of antineutrino flux was very slow with time and the performed refueling had not an observable effect on antineutrino flux curve for a 5 MW reactor with the conventional refueling program. It is seen that for non-proliferation applications the measurement of the contribution of {sup 239}Pu to the fission using an antineutrino detector is not viable in the TRR.

  7. Reactor antineutrino monitoring with a plastic scintillator array as a new safeguards method

    OpenAIRE

    Oguri, S.; Kuroda, Y.; Kato, Y.; Nakata, R.; Inoue, Y.; Ito, C.; Minowa, M.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a segmented reactor-antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for application as a tool in nuclear safeguards inspection and performed mostly unmanned field operations at a commercial power plant reactor. At a position outside the reactor building, we measured the difference in reactor antineutrino flux above the ground when the reactor was active and inactive.

  8. The upper limit of the solar antineutrino flux according to the LSD array data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'etta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, D.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data obtained at the LSD liquid scintillation detector is carried out with the aim of searching the possible flux of electron antineutrinos from Sun. The most strong at present upper limit for the electron antineutrino flux of solar origin is determined: ≤ 1.0 x 10 5 cm -2 x s -1 (the reliability level of 90%)

  9. Antineutrino Oscillations and a Search for Non-standard Interactions with the MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvan, Zeynep [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    MINOS searches for neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab between two detectors. The Near Detector, located near the source, measures the beam composition before flavor change occurs. The energy spectrum is measured again at the Far Detector after neutrinos travel a distance. The mixing angle and mass splitting between the second and third mass states are extracted from the energy dependent difference between the spectra at the two detectors. NuMI is able to produce an antineutrino-enhanced beam as well as a neutrino-enhanced beam. Collecting data in antineutrino-mode allows the direct measurement of antineutrino oscillation parameters. From the analysis of the antineutrino mode data we measure $|\\Delta\\bar{m}^{2}_{\\text{atm}}| = 2.62^{+0.31}_{-0.28}\\times10^{-3}\\text{eV}^{2}$ and $\\sin^{2}(2\\bar{\\theta})_{23} = 0.95^{+0.10}_{-0.11}$, which is the most precise measurement of antineutrino oscillation parameters to date. A difference between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation parameters may indicate new physics involving interactions that are not part of the Standard Model, called non-standard interactions, that alter the apparent disappearance probability. Collecting data in neutrino and antineutrino mode independently allows a direct search for non-standard interactions. In this dissertation non-standard interactions are constrained by a combined analysis of neutrino and antineutrino datasets and no evidence of such interactions is found.

  10. Study of electron anti-neutrinos associated with gamma-ray bursts using KamLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asakura, A.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oki, Y.; Oura, T.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tachibana, H.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Berger, B.E.; Fujikawa, B.K.; O'Donnell, T.; Learned, J.G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L.A.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J.A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    We search for electron anti-neutrinos (-Ve) from long- and short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using data taken by the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) from 2002 August to 2013 June. No statistically significant excess over the background level is found. We place the

  11. Improved Measurement of Electron-antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    With 2.5× the previously reported exposure, the Daya Bay experiment has improved the measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter sin 2 2θ 13 =0.089±0.010(stat)±0.005(syst). Reactor anti-neutrinos were produced by six 2.9 GW th commercial power reactors, and measured by six 20-ton target-mass detectors of identical design. A total of 234,217 anti-neutrino candidates were detected in 127 days of exposure. An anti-neutrino rate of 0.944±0.007(stat)±0.003(syst) was measured by three detectors at a flux-weighted average distance of1648 m from the reactors, relative to two detectors at 470 m and one detector at 576 m. Detector design and depth underground limited the background to 5±0.3% (far detectors) and 2±0.2% (near detectors) of the candidate signals. The improved precision confirms the initial measurement of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance, and continues to be the most precise measurement of θ 13

  12. Improved Measurement of Electron-antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, D.A. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-15

    With 2.5× the previously reported exposure, the Daya Bay experiment has improved the measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter sin{sup 2}2θ{sub 13}=0.089±0.010(stat)±0.005(syst). Reactor anti-neutrinos were produced by six 2.9 GW{sub th} commercial power reactors, and measured by six 20-ton target-mass detectors of identical design. A total of 234,217 anti-neutrino candidates were detected in 127 days of exposure. An anti-neutrino rate of 0.944±0.007(stat)±0.003(syst) was measured by three detectors at a flux-weighted average distance of1648 m from the reactors, relative to two detectors at 470 m and one detector at 576 m. Detector design and depth underground limited the background to 5±0.3% (far detectors) and 2±0.2% (near detectors) of the candidate signals. The improved precision confirms the initial measurement of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance, and continues to be the most precise measurement of θ{sub 13}.

  13. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions

  14. Current technology of particle physics detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of the characteristics required of new accelerator facilities, leading into a discussion of the required detectors, including position sensitive detectors, particle identification, and calorimeters

  15. Reactor antineutrino spectra and their application to antineutrino-induced reactions II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, P.; Schenter, G.K.; Mann, F.M.; Schenter, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    The antineutrino and electron spectra associated with various nuclear fuels are calculated. There are substantial differences between the spectra of different uranium and plutonium isotopes. On the other hand, the dependence on the energy and flux of the fission inducing neutrons is very weak. The resulting spectra can be used for calculation of the antineutrino and electron spectra of an arbitrary nuclear reactor at various stages of its refueling cycle. The sources of uncertainties in the spectrum are identified and analyzed in detail. The exposure time dependence of the spectrum is also discussed. The resulting anti ν/sub e/ spectra are then used to calculate the averaged cross sections of the inverse neutron β decay, weak charged and neutral current induced deuteron disintegration, and the antineutrino-electron scattering

  16. The reactor antineutrino anomaly and low energy threshold neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, B. C.; Garcés, E. A.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.

    2018-01-01

    Short distance reactor antineutrino experiments measure an antineutrino spectrum a few percent lower than expected from theoretical predictions. In this work we study the potential of low energy threshold reactor experiments in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We discuss the perspectives of the recently detected coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering in future reactor antineutrino experiments. We find that the expectations to improve the current constraints on the mixing with sterile neutrinos are promising. We also analyze the measurements of antineutrino scattering off electrons from short distance reactor experiments. In this case, the statistics is not competitive with inverse beta decay experiments, although future experiments might play a role when compare it with the Gallium anomaly.

  17. Towards earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meijer, R. J.; Smit, F. D.; Brooks, F. D.; Fearick, R. W.; Wortche, H. J.; Mantovani, F.

    2006-01-01

    The programme Earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH) proposes to build ten underground facilities each hosting a telescope. Each telescope consists of many detector modules, to map the radiogenic heat sources deep in the interior of the Earth by utilising direction sensitive geoneutrino detection.

  18. The U238 antineutrino spectrum in the Double Chooz experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Nils; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Schreckenbach, Klaus [Technische Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Lachenmaier, Tobias [Eberhard Karls Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The DoubleChooz experiment aims at the determination of the unknown neutrino mixing parameter {Theta}{sub 13}. Two liquid scintillator detectors will measure an electron antineutrino disappearance at the Chooz site in the French ardennes. In order to improve the sensitivity, the antineutrino spectrum emitted by the Chooz reactor cores has to be determined with high accuracy. This talk focusses on the U238 spectrum, which is the only contributing spectrum, that was not measured until now. The final U238 beta spectrum is presented, and its implementation into the analysis framework is shown.

  19. Limits on the electron-antineutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    New measurements near the endpoint of the tritium beta-decay spectrum are producing limits on the electron-antineutrino mass which are below the central mass value of 30 eV reported by ITEP. The factors that influence the neutrino mass sensitivity of tritium beta decay measurements will be discussed followed by a review of the current experimental results. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Étude des antineutrinos de réacteurs : mesure de l'angle de mélange leptonique θ₁₃ et recherche d'éventuels neutrinos stériles

    OpenAIRE

    Collin, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to measure the θ₁₃ mixing angle through the disappearance—induced by the oscillation phenomenon—of anti-neutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties, the experiment relies on the relative comparison of detected signals in two identical liquid scintillator detectors. The near one, giving the normalization of the emitted flux, is currently being built and will be delivered in spring 2014. The far detector, sensiti...

  1. A search for electron antineutrinos associated with gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 using KamLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashi, A.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Karino, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oura, T.; Ozaki, H.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takai, T.; Tamae, K.; Teraoka, Y.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Berger, B.E.; Fujikawa, B.K.; O'Donnell, T.; Learned, J.G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L.A.; Krupczak, E.; Ouellet, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J.A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a search, using KamLAND, a kiloton-scale anti-neutrino detector, for low-energy anti-neutrino events that were coincident with the gravitational-wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW151226, and the candidate event LVT151012. We find no inverse beta-decay neutrino events within ±500 s of either

  2. Observation of shadowing of neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions and comparison with PCAC predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allport, P.P.; Radojicic, D.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Aderholz, M.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Berggren, M.; Jones, G.T.; O'Neale, S.; Varvell, K.; Marage, P.; Mobayyen, M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Neveu, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Apeldoorn, G. van

    1989-01-01

    Comparing the kinematical distributions of events obtained on neon and deuterium targets in similar experimental conditions reveals a reduction of the neutrino and antineutrino charged current cross section per nucleon in neon at low Q 2 . The effect, interpreted as due to geometric shadowing of the weak propagator in interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nuclei, agrees well with predictions derived from PCAC. (orig.)

  3. Observation of shadowing of neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions and comparison with PCAC predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allport, P. P.; Erriquez, O.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Aderholz, M.; Berggren, M.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Jones, G. T.; Marage, P.; Mobayyen, M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Parker, M. A.; Radojicic, D.; Sansum, R. A.; Saitta, B.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; O'neale, S.; Van Apeldoorn, G.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.; BEBC WA59 Collaboration

    1989-12-01

    Comparing the kinematical distributions of events obtained on neon and deuterium targets in similar experimental conditions reveals a reduction of the neutrino and antineutrino charged current cross section per nucleon in neon at low Q2. The effect, interpreted as due to geometric shadowing of the weak propagator in interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nuclei, agrees well with predictions derived from PCAC.

  4. Reactors as a Source of Antineutrinos: Effects of Fuel Loading and Burnup for Mixed-Oxide Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel S.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional light-water reactor loaded with a range of uranium and plutonium-based fuel mixtures, the variation in antineutrino production over the cycle reflects both the initial core fissile inventory and its evolution. Under an assumption of constant thermal power, we calculate the rate at which antineutrinos are emitted from variously fueled cores, and the evolution of that rate as measured by a representative ton-scale antineutrino detector. We find that antineutrino flux decreases with burnup for low-enriched uranium cores, increases for full mixed-oxide (MOX) cores, and does not appreciably change for cores with a MOX fraction of approximately 75%. Accounting for uncertainties in the fission yields in the emitted antineutrino spectra and the detector response function, we show that the difference in corewide MOX fractions at least as small as 8% can be distinguished using a hypothesis test. The test compares the evolution of the antineutrino rate relative to an initial value over part or all of the cycle. The use of relative rates reduces the sensitivity of the test to an independent thermal power measurement, making the result more robust against possible countermeasures. This rate-only approach also offers the potential advantage of reducing the cost and complexity of the antineutrino detectors used to verify the diversion, compared to methods that depend on the use of the antineutrino spectrum. A possible application is the verification of the disposition of surplus plutonium in nuclear reactors.

  5. Improved measurement of electron antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Fengpeng; Bai Jingzhi; An Qi

    2013-01-01

    We report an improved measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. We exclude a zero value for sin 2 2θ 13 with a significance of 7.7 standard deviations. Electron antineutrinos from six reactors of 2.9 GW th were detected in six antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (flux-weighted baselines of 470 m and 576 m) and one far (1648 m) underground experimental halls. Using 139 days of data, 28909 (205308) electron antineutrino candidates were detected at the far hall (near halls). The ratio of the observed to the expected number of antineutrinos assuming no oscillations at the far hall is 0.944±0.007(stat.)±0.003(syst.). An analysis of the relative rates in six detectors finds sin 2 2θ 13 =0.089±0.010(stat.)±0.005(syst.) in a three-neutrino framework. (authors)

  6. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ) has been developed for high-energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu 2 SiO 5 :Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr 3 :Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency

  7. Silicon radiation detector analysis using back electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guye, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for the observation and analysis of defects in silicon radiation detectors is described. This method uses an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinging on the rear side of the p + n junction of the silicon detector, which itself is active and detects the electron beam induced current (EBIC). It is shown that this current is a sensitive probe of localized trapping centers, either at the junction surface or somewhere in the volume of the silicon crystal. (orig.)

  8. 3He neutral current detectors at SNO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Browne, M.C.; Doe, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The flux of solar neutrinos measured via charged and neutral current interactions can provide a model independent test of neutrino oscillations. Since the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory uses heavy water as a target, it has a large sensitivity to both interactions. A technique for observing the neutral current breakup of the deuteron using 3 He proportional counters is described

  9. Workshop applied antineutrino physics 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiri, T.; Andrieu, B.; Anjos, J.; Argyriades, J.; Barouch, G.; Bernstein, A.; Bersillon, O.; Besida, O.; Bowden, N.; Cabrera, A.; Calmet, D.; Collar, J.; Cribier, M.; Kerret, H. de; Meijer, R. de; Dudziak, F.; Enomoto, S.; Fallot, M.; Fioni, G.; Fiorentini, G.; Gale, Ph.; Georgadze, A.; Giot, L.; Gonin, M.; Guillon, B.; Henson, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kanamaru, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Kornoukhov, V.; Lasserre, Th.; Learned, J.G.; Lefebvre, J.; Letourneau, A.; Lhillier, D.; Lindner, M.; Lund, J.; Mantovani, F.; Mcdonough, B.; Mention, G.; Monteith, A.; Motta, D.; Mueller, Th.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Odrzywolek, A.; Petcov, S.; Porta, A.; Queval, R.; Reinhold, B.; Reyna, D.; Ridikas, D.; Sadler, L.; Schoenert, St.; Sida, J.L.; Sinev, V.; Suekane, F.; Suvorov, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Tang, A.; Tolich, N.; Tolich, K.; Vanka, S.; Vignaud, D.; Volpe, Ch.; Wong, H

    2007-07-01

    The 'Applied Antineutrino Physics 2007' workshop is the fourth international meeting devoted to the opening of the neutrino physics to more applied fields, such as geophysics and geochemistry, nuclear industry, as well as the nonproliferation. This meeting highlights the world efforts already engaged to exploit the single characteristics of the neutrinos for the control of the production of plutonium in the civil nuclear power reactor. The potential industrial application of the measurement of the thermal power of the nuclear plants by the neutrinos is also approached. earth neutrinos were for the first time highlighted in 2002 by the KamLAND experiment. Several international efforts are currently underway to use earth neutrinos to reveal the interior of the Earth. This meeting is an opportunity to adapt the efforts of detection to the real needs of geophysicists and geochemists (sources of radiogenic heat, potassium in the court, feathers.) Finally more futuristic topics such as the detection of nuclear explosions, of low powers, are also discussed. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  10. Workshop applied antineutrino physics 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiri, T.; Andrieu, B.; Anjos, J.; Argyriades, J.; Barouch, G.; Bernstein, A.; Bersillon, O.; Besida, O.; Bowden, N.; Cabrera, A.; Calmet, D.; Collar, J.; Cribier, M.; Kerret, H. de; Meijer, R. de; Dudziak, F.; Enomoto, S.; Fallot, M.; Fioni, G.; Fiorentini, G.; Gale, Ph.; Georgadze, A.; Giot, L.; Gonin, M.; Guillon, B.; Henson, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kanamaru, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Kornoukhov, V.; Lasserre, Th.; Learned, J.G.; Lefebvre, J.; Letourneau, A.; Lhillier, D.; Lindner, M.; Lund, J.; Mantovani, F.; Mcdonough, B.; Mention, G.; Monteith, A.; Motta, D.; Mueller, Th.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Odrzywolek, A.; Petcov, S.; Porta, A.; Queval, R.; Reinhold, B.; Reyna, D.; Ridikas, D.; Sadler, L.; Schoenert, St.; Sida, J.L.; Sinev, V.; Suekane, F.; Suvorov, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Tang, A.; Tolich, N.; Tolich, K.; Vanka, S.; Vignaud, D.; Volpe, Ch.; Wong, H.

    2007-01-01

    The 'Applied Antineutrino Physics 2007' workshop is the fourth international meeting devoted to the opening of the neutrino physics to more applied fields, such as geophysics and geochemistry, nuclear industry, as well as the nonproliferation. This meeting highlights the world efforts already engaged to exploit the single characteristics of the neutrinos for the control of the production of plutonium in the civil nuclear power reactor. The potential industrial application of the measurement of the thermal power of the nuclear plants by the neutrinos is also approached. earth neutrinos were for the first time highlighted in 2002 by the KamLAND experiment. Several international efforts are currently underway to use earth neutrinos to reveal the interior of the Earth. This meeting is an opportunity to adapt the efforts of detection to the real needs of geophysicists and geochemists (sources of radiogenic heat, potassium in the court, feathers.) Finally more futuristic topics such as the detection of nuclear explosions, of low powers, are also discussed. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  11. Further results on muon-antineutrino-electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasert, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    In a further study of the neutral current interactions muon-antineutrino e - →muon-antineutrino e - , the Gargamelle collaboration analyzed 70% of the photographic film from the Freon neutrino (antineutrino) experiment. Three non-ambiguous events were found, that correspond within a 90% confidence to an upper limit for the cross section below 0.17x10 -41 cm 2 /e - . A 0.46 event background was calculated, and the probability for the three events to be background is lower than 1%. Signal loss corrections were effected in terms of the Salam-Ward-Weinberg model, and an upper limit (sin 2 theta(W) 2 theta(W) are concluded to be 0.1 2 thate(W) [fr

  12. Anti-neutrino imprint in solar neutrino flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, D.

    2006-10-01

    A future neutrino detector at megaton mass might enlarge the neutrino telescope thresholds revealing cosmic supernova background and largest solar flares (SFs) neutrinos. Indeed the solar energetic (Ep>100 MeV) flare particles (protons, α), while scattering among themselves on solar corona atmosphere must produce prompt charged pions, whose chain decays are source of a solar (electron muon) neutrino 'flare' (at tens or hundreds MeV energy). These brief (minutes) neutrino 'bursts' at largest flare peak may overcome by three to five orders of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, possibly leading to their detection above detection thresholds (in a full mixed three flavour state). Moreover the birth of anti-neutrinos at a few tens of MeV very clearly flares above a null thermal 'hep' anti-neutrino solar background and also above a tiny supernova relic and atmospheric noise. The largest prompt solar anti-neutrino 'burst' may be well detected in future Super Kamikande (gadolinium implemented) anti-neutrino \\bar\

  13. Is there a high-y anomaly in antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, M.; Knobloch, J.; May, J.; Paar, H.P.; Palazzi, P.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Suter, H.; Wahl, H.; Williams, E.G.H.; Eisele, F.; Geweniger, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Spahn, G.; Wilutzki, H.; Dorth, W.; Dydak, F.; Hepp, V.; Tittel, K.; Wotschack, J.; Bloch, P.; Devaux, B.; Grimm, M.; Maillard, J.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Turlay, R.; Navarria, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    We have analyzed data taken in the CERN narrow-band neutrino and antineutrino beams with regard to the ''high-y anomaly'' observed by previous experiments at Fermilab. At neutrino energies between 30 and 200 GeV, the anti ν and ν charged-current cross-section ratios and muon-inelasticity distributions disagree with the earlier results. In particular, there is no evidence for energy-dependent effects in the antineutrino data which constitute an important aspect of the alleged anomaly

  14. Neutron detection using a current biased kinetic inductance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishido, Hiroaki, E-mail: shishido@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Ishida, Takekazu [Department of Physics and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Narukami, Yoshito [Department of Physics and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Oikawa, Kenichi; Harada, Masahide; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi [Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, Mutsuo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Fujimaki, Akira [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate neutron detection using a solid state superconducting current biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which consists of a superconducting Nb meander line of 1 μm width and 40 nm thickness. {sup 10}B-enriched neutron absorber layer of 150 nm thickness is placed on top of the CB-KID. Our neutron detectors are able to operate in a wide superconducting region in the bias current–temperature diagram. This is in sharp contrast with our preceding current-biased transition edge detector, which can operate only in a narrow range just below the superconducting critical temperature. The full width at half maximum of the signals remains of the order of a few tens of ns, which confirms the high speed operation of our detectors.

  15. Neutron detection using a current biased kinetic inductance detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Hiroaki; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Ishida, Takekazu; Narukami, Yoshito; Oikawa, Kenichi; Harada, Masahide; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Fujimaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate neutron detection using a solid state superconducting current biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which consists of a superconducting Nb meander line of 1 μm width and 40 nm thickness. 10 B-enriched neutron absorber layer of 150 nm thickness is placed on top of the CB-KID. Our neutron detectors are able to operate in a wide superconducting region in the bias current–temperature diagram. This is in sharp contrast with our preceding current-biased transition edge detector, which can operate only in a narrow range just below the superconducting critical temperature. The full width at half maximum of the signals remains of the order of a few tens of ns, which confirms the high speed operation of our detectors

  16. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  17. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...... of the responsivity (2–3 A/W in the 1–3 THz-frequency band) range up to several percents of the quantum efficiency e/[h-bar] omega of an ideal superconductor tunnel junction detector. Properly designed semiconductor superlattice detectors may thus demonstrate better room temperature THz-photon responsivity than...

  18. Precision Search for Muon Antineutrino Disappearance Oscillations Using a Dual Baseline Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Gary Li [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A search for short baseline muon antineutrino disappearance with the SciBooNE and MiniBooNE experiments at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois is presented. Short baseline muon antineutrino disappearance measurements help constrain sterile neutrino models. The two detectors observe muon antineutrinos from the same beam, therefore the combined analysis of their data sets serves to partially constrain some of the flux and cross section uncertainties. A likelihood ratio method was used to set a 90% confidence level upper limit on muon antineutrino disappearance that dramatically improves upon prior sterile neutrino oscillation limits in the Δm2=0.1-100 eV2 region.

  19. Lithium converter of reactor neutrinos in antineutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Lyashuk, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    The questions of developing lithium converter of the reactor neutrons in antineutrino operating at dynamic regime in the scheme with the cycle circulation of the high-purified lithium (by 7 Li isotope) through the converter are considered. The scheme allows to localize the 8 Li β-decay (T 1/2 =0.84 s) in the reservoir near the detector and so to design the hard-spectrum lithium ν-tilde e -source (E max ≅13 MeV) at the distance from the active zone being the soft-spectrum ν-tilde e -source. The expressions for the lithium ν-tilde e flux from the converter, reservoir and conveyance channel are obtained. 9 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Optical fiber Cherenkov detector for beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishchulin, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.G.; Romashkin, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained in calculation of an optical fiber Cherenkov detector for accelerated beam current monitoring are presented. The technique of beam parameters monitoring is based on Cherenkov radiation excitation by accelerated electrons in the optical fiber. The formulas for calculations of optical power and time dependence of Cherenkov radiation pulse are given. The detector sensitivity and time resolution dependence on the fiber material characteristics are investigated. Parameters of a 10μm one-mode quartz optical fiber detector for the free electron laser photoinjector are calculated. The structure of a monitoring system with the optical fiber Cherenkov detector is considered. Possible applications of this technique are discussed and some recommendations are given

  1. Investigating the spectral anomaly with different reactor antineutrino experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Buck

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spectral shape of reactor antineutrinos measured in recent experiments shows anomalies in comparison to neutrino reference spectra. New precision measurements of the reactor neutrino spectra as well as more complete input in nuclear data bases are needed to resolve the observed discrepancies between models and experimental results. This article proposes the combination of experiments at reactors which are highly enriched in U235 with commercial reactors with typically lower enrichment to gain new insights into the origin of the anomalous neutrino spectrum. The presented method clarifies, if the spectral anomaly is either solely or not at all related to the predicted U235 spectrum. Considering the current improvements of the energy scale uncertainty of present-day experiments, a significance of three sigma and above can be reached. As an example, we discuss the option of a direct comparison of the measured shape in the currently running Double Chooz near detector and the upcoming Stereo experiment. A quantitative feasibility study emphasizes that a precise understanding of the energy scale systematics is a crucial prerequisite in recent and next generation experiments investigating the spectral anomaly.

  2. Simulation and conceptual design of a detector for sterile neutrino search and remote reactor monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, V.K.S.; Thomas, R.G.; Mitra, A.; Pant, L.M.; Mohanty, A.K.; Datar, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of measured/expected ratio of antineutrinos coming from reactors at detector distances <100 m, shows a value less than unity at a C.L of 98.2%. This has been termed the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly

  3. Correlated background and impact on the measurement of θ13 with the Double Chooz detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoto, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment uses antineutrinos emitted from the Chooz nuclear power plant (France) to measure the oscillation mixing parameter θ 13 . By using two detectors at different baselines, a precise measurement of antineutrinos disappearance is anticipated. The Far detector has been taking physics data since April 2011, while the Near detector is under construction. Data from April 13, 2011 to March 30, 2012 taken with the Far detector only have been analyzed and an indication for antineutrino disappearance, consistent with the current neutrino oscillation hypothesis, has been found. The best fit value for the neutrino mixing parameter sin 2 (2θ 13 ) is 0.109 ± 0.030(stat.) ± 0.025(syst.). This thesis present an accurate description of the Double Chooz experiment, with particular emphasis on the Far detector and its acquisition system. The main focus of the thesis is the accurate study of the correlated background affecting the Double Chooz antineutrinos sample and its impact on the measurement of the mixing parameter θ 13 . A general overview of the current experimental scenario which aim to the characterization of the neutrino oscillation is also provided, focusing on the recent results obtained in this field. (author) [fr

  4. A Search for Electron Antineutrinos Associated with Gravitational-wave Events GW150914 and GW151226 Using KamLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashi, A.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Karino, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oura, T.; Ozaki, H.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takai, T.; Tamae, K.; Teraoka, Y.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Berger, B. E.; Fujikawa, B. K.; O'Donnell, T.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L. A.; Krupczak, E.; Ouellet, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.; KamLAND Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We present a search, using KamLAND, a kiloton-scale anti-neutrino detector, for low-energy anti-neutrino events that were coincident with the gravitational-wave (GW) events GW150914 and GW151226, and the candidate event LVT151012. We find no inverse beta-decay neutrino events within ±500 s of either GW signal. This non-detection is used to constrain the electron anti-neutrino fluence and the total integrated luminosity of the astrophysical sources.

  5. Leakage current measurements on pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirks, B.P.F.; Blondel, C.; Daly, F.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of the R and D of a new generation hard X-ray cameras for space applications we focus on the use of pixelated CdTe or CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. They are covered with 64 (0.9x0.9 mm 2 ) or 256 (0.5x0.5 mm 2 ) pixels, surrounded by a guard ring and operate in the energy ranging from several keV to 1 MeV, at temperatures between -20 and +20 o C. A critical parameter in the characterisation of these detectors is the leakage current per pixel under polarisation (∼50-500 V/mm). In operation mode each pixel will be read-out by an integrated spectroscopy channel of the multi-channel IDeF-X ASIC currently developed in our lab. The design and functionality of the ASIC depends directly on the direction and value of the current. A dedicated and highly insulating electronics circuit is designed to automatically measure the current in each individual pixel, which is in the order of tens of pico-amperes. Leakage current maps of different CdZnTe detectors of 2 and 6 mm thick and at various temperatures are presented and discussed. Defect density diagnostics have been performed by calculation of the activation energy of the material

  6. Analysis of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Flux Changes with Fuel Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Garvey, G. T.; Wang, X. B.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the recent Daya Bay results on the changes in the antineutrino flux and spectrum with the burnup of the reactor fuel. We find that the discrepancy between current model predictions and the Daya Bay results can be traced to the original measured U 235 /Pu 239 ratio of the fission β spectra that were used as a base for the expected antineutrino fluxes. An analysis of the antineutrino spectra that is based on a summation over all fission fragment β decays, using nuclear database input, explains all of the features seen in the Daya Bay evolution data. However, this summation method still allows for an anomaly. We conclude that there is currently not enough information to use the antineutrino flux changes to rule out the possible existence of sterile neutrinos.

  7. Reactor Antineutrinos Signal all over the world

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, B.; Mantovani, F.; Baldoncini, M.; Esposito, J.; Ludhova, L.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated estimate of reactor antineutrino signal all over the world, with particular attention to the sites proposed for existing and future geo-neutrino experiment. In our calculation we take into account the most updated data on Thermal Power for each nuclear plant, on reactor antineutrino spectra and on three neutrino oscillation mechanism.

  8. Study of Electron Anti-neutrinos Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using KamLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oki, Y.; Oura, T.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tachibana, H.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Berger, B. E.; Fujikawa, B. K.; O'Donnell, T.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Winslow, L. A.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.; KamLAND Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We search for electron anti-neutrinos ({{\\bar{ν }}e}) from long- and short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using data taken by the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) from 2002 August to 2013 June. No statistically significant excess over the background level is found. We place the tightest upper limits on {{\\bar{ν }}e} fluence from GRBs below 7 MeV and place first constraints on the relation between {{\\bar{ν }}e} luminosity and effective temperature.

  9. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asratyan, A. E.; Aderholz, M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Burkot, W.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Gapienko, G. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Guy, J.; Hantke, D.; Jones, G. T.; Kaftanov, V. S.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Korotkov, V. A.; Krutchinin, S. P.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Marage, P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Sacton, J.; Schmitz, N.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wittek, W.; Zaetz, V. G.

    1993-03-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D {s/*} and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV)-2. The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D{s/+}→φτ+ branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)×10-4.

  10. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asratyan, A.E.; Kaftanov, V.S.; Krutchinin, S.P.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U.F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Ammosov, V.V.; Gapienko, G.S.; Gapienko, V.A.; Korotkov, V.A.; Zaetz, V.G.; Burkot, W.; Coghen, T.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Erriquez, O.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Jones, G.T.; Varvell, K.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Neveu, M.

    1993-01-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D s * and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV) -2 . The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D s + →φπ + branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)x10 -4 . (orig.)

  11. Hybrid method to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy by supernova (anti)neutrino induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vale, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenička c. 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Rauscher, T. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Paar, N., E-mail: dvale@phy.hr, E-mail: Thomas.Rauscher@unibas.ch, E-mail: npaar@phy.hr [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a hybrid method to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by simultaneous measurements of responses of at least two detectors to antineutrino and neutrino fluxes from accretion and cooling phases of core-collapse supernovae. The (anti)neutrino-nucleus cross sections for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 208}Pb are calculated in the framework of the relativistic nuclear energy density functional and weak interaction Hamiltonian, while the cross sections for inelastic scattering on free protons p(ν-bar {sub e},e{sup +})n are obtained using heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The modelling of (anti)neutrino fluxes emitted from a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova include collective and Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects inside the exploding star. The particle emission rates from the elementary decay modes of the daughter nuclei are calculated for normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. It is shown that simultaneous use of (anti)neutrino detectors with different target material allows to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the ratios of ν{sub e}- and ν-bar {sub e}-induced particle emissions. This hybrid method favors neutrinos from the supernova cooling phase and the implementation of detectors with heavier target nuclei ({sup 208}Pb) for the neutrino sector, while for antineutrinos the use of free protons in mineral oil or water is the appropriate choice.

  12. Hybrid method to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy by supernova (anti)neutrino induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, D.; Rauscher, T.; Paar, N.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a hybrid method to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by simultaneous measurements of responses of at least two detectors to antineutrino and neutrino fluxes from accretion and cooling phases of core-collapse supernovae. The (anti)neutrino-nucleus cross sections for 56Fe and 208Pb are calculated in the framework of the relativistic nuclear energy density functional and weak interaction Hamiltonian, while the cross sections for inelastic scattering on free protons p(bar nue,e+)n are obtained using heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The modelling of (anti)neutrino fluxes emitted from a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova include collective and Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects inside the exploding star. The particle emission rates from the elementary decay modes of the daughter nuclei are calculated for normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. It is shown that simultaneous use of (anti)neutrino detectors with different target material allows to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the ratios of νe- and bar nue-induced particle emissions. This hybrid method favors neutrinos from the supernova cooling phase and the implementation of detectors with heavier target nuclei (208Pb) for the neutrino sector, while for antineutrinos the use of free protons in mineral oil or water is the appropriate choice.

  13. Coherent production of π+ and π- mesons by charged-current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P. P.; Baba, P. V.; Badyal, S. K.; Barth, M.; Baton, J. P.; Bingham, H. H.; Brucker, E. B.; Burnstein, R. A.; Campbell, R. C.; Cence, R.; Chatterjee, T. K.; Clayton, E. F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; de Prospo, D.; Devanand; de Wolf, E.; Faulkner, P. J.; Fretter, W. B.; Gupta, V. K.; Guy, J.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F.; Jabiol, M. A.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, M. D.; Jones, R. W.; Kafka, T.; Kalelkar, M.; Kasper, P.; Kasper, P.; Kaul, G. L.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Koller, E. L.; Krawiec, R. J.; Lauko, M.; Lys, J.; Mann, W. A.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, D. B.; Mittra, I. S.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D. R.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Neveu, M.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M. W.; Peterson, V. Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N. K.; Rubin, H. A.; Sacton, J.; Saitta, B.; Schmid, P.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Sekulin, R.; Sewell, S.; Singh, J. B.; Sood, P. M.; Smart, W.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K. E.; Venus, W.; Verluyten, L.; Voyvodic, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Willocq, S.; Wittek, W.; Yost (E632 Collaboration), G. P.

    1989-11-01

    Coherent single-pion production on neon nuclei is studied using the Fermilab 15-ft bubble chamber filled with a heavy Ne-H2 mixture and exposed to the Tevatron neutrino beam. In the neutrino energy range 40-300 GeV, the net signal is 20+/-6 events, giving a corrected rate per charged-current event of (0.26+/-0.10)%. The cross section and kinematic distributions agree with the predictions of a model based on partial conservation of axial-vector current and meson dominance.

  14. Development of the reactor antineutrino detection technology within the iDream project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, M.; Kuznetsov, D.; Murchenko, A.; Novikova, G.; Obinyakov, B.; Oralbaev, A.; Plakitina, K.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sukhotin, S.; Chepurnov, A.; Etenko, A.

    2017-12-01

    The iDREAM (industrial Detector for reactor antineutrino monitoring) project is aimed at remote monitoring of the operating modes of the atomic reactor on nuclear power plant to ensure a technical support of IAEA non-proliferation safeguards. The detector is a scintillator spectrometer. The sensitive volume (target) is filled with a liquid organic scintillator based on linear alkylbenzene where reactor antineutrinos will be detected via inverse beta-decay reaction. We present first results of laboratory tests after physical launch. The detector was deployed at sea level without background shielding. The number of calibrations with radioactive sources was conducted. All data were obtained by means of a slow control system which was put into operation.

  15. Modelling of the anti-neutrino production and spectra from a Magnox reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert W.; Mountford, David J.; Coleman, Jonathon P.; Metelko, Carl; Murdoch, Matthew; Schnellbach, Yan-Jie

    2018-01-01

    The anti-neutrino source properties of a fission reactor are governed by the production and beta decay of the radionuclides present and the summation of their individual anti-neutrino spectra. The fission product radionuclide production changes during reactor operation and different fissioning species give rise to different product distributions. It is thus possible to determine some details of reactor operation, such as power, from the anti-neutrino emission to confirm safeguards records. Also according to some published calculations, it may be feasible to observe different anti-neutrino spectra depending on the fissile contents of the reactor fuel and thus determine the reactor's fissile material inventory during operation which could considerable improve safeguards. In mid-2014 the University of Liverpool deployed a prototype anti-neutrino detector at the Wylfa R1 station in Anglesey, United Kingdom based upon plastic scintillator technology developed for the T2K project. The deployment was used to develop the detector electronics and software until the reactor was finally shutdown in December 2015. To support the development of this detector technology for reactor monitoring and to understand its capabilities, the National Nuclear Laboratory modelled this graphite moderated and natural uranium fuelled reactor with existing codes used to support Magnox reactor operations and waste management. The 3D multi-physics code PANTHER was used to determine the individual powers of each fuel element (8×6152) during the year and a half period of monitoring based upon reactor records. The WIMS/TRAIL/FISPIN code route was then used to determine the radionuclide inventory of each nuclide on a daily basis in each element. These nuclide inventories were then used with the BTSPEC code to determine the anti-neutrino spectra and source strength using JEFF-3.1.1 data. Finally the anti-neutrino source from the reactor for each day during the year and a half of monitored reactor

  16. Modelling of the anti-neutrino production and spectra from a Magnox reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Robert W

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-neutrino source properties of a fission reactor are governed by the production and beta decay of the radionuclides present and the summation of their individual anti-neutrino spectra. The fission product radionuclide production changes during reactor operation and different fissioning species give rise to different product distributions. It is thus possible to determine some details of reactor operation, such as power, from the anti-neutrino emission to confirm safeguards records. Also according to some published calculations, it may be feasible to observe different anti-neutrino spectra depending on the fissile contents of the reactor fuel and thus determine the reactor's fissile material inventory during operation which could considerable improve safeguards. In mid-2014 the University of Liverpool deployed a prototype anti-neutrino detector at the Wylfa R1 station in Anglesey, United Kingdom based upon plastic scintillator technology developed for the T2K project. The deployment was used to develop the detector electronics and software until the reactor was finally shutdown in December 2015. To support the development of this detector technology for reactor monitoring and to understand its capabilities, the National Nuclear Laboratory modelled this graphite moderated and natural uranium fuelled reactor with existing codes used to support Magnox reactor operations and waste management. The 3D multi-physics code PANTHER was used to determine the individual powers of each fuel element (8×6152 during the year and a half period of monitoring based upon reactor records. The WIMS/TRAIL/FISPIN code route was then used to determine the radionuclide inventory of each nuclide on a daily basis in each element. These nuclide inventories were then used with the BTSPEC code to determine the anti-neutrino spectra and source strength using JEFF-3.1.1 data. Finally the anti-neutrino source from the reactor for each day during the year and a half of

  17. Current oscillations in avalanche particle detectors with PNIPN-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukin, K.A.

    1995-08-01

    The model of an avalanche high energy particle detector consisting of two pn-junctions, connected through an intrinsic semiconductor with a reverse biased voltage applied. This detector is able to generate the oscillatory response on the single particle passage through the structure. The possibility of oscillations leading to chaotic behaviour is pointed out

  18. Prospects for Antineutrino Running at MiniBooNE

    OpenAIRE

    Wascko, M. O.

    2006-01-01

    MiniBooNE began running in antineutrino mode on 19 January, 2006. We describe the sensitivity of MiniBooNE to LSND-like nuebar oscillations and outline a program of antineutrino cross-section measurements necessary for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. We describe three independent methods of constraining wrong-sign (neutrino) backgrounds in an antineutrino beam, and their application to the MiniBooNE antineutrino analyses.

  19. Neutrino versus antineutrino oscillation parameters at DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouvêa, André; Kelly, Kevin J.

    2017-11-01

    Testing, in a nontrivial, model-independent way, the hypothesis that the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm properly describes nature is among the main goals of the current and the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. In the coming decade, the DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande experiments will be able to study the oscillation of both neutrinos and antineutrinos with unprecedented precision. We explore the ability of these experiments, and combinations of them, to determine whether the parameters that govern these oscillations are the same for neutrinos and antineutrinos, as prescribed by the C P T -theorem. We find that both DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande will be sensitive to unexplored levels of leptonic C P T -violation. Assuming the parameters for neutrino and antineutrino oscillations are unrelated, we discuss the ability of these experiments to determine the neutrino and antineutrino mass-hierarchies, atmospheric-mixing octants, and C P -odd phases, three key milestones of the experimental neutrino physics program. Additionally, if the C P T -symmetry is violated in nature in a way that is consistent with all present neutrino and antineutrino oscillation data, we find that DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande have the potential to ultimately establish leptonic C P T -invariance violation.

  20. Total Absorption Spectroscopy of Fission Fragments Relevant for Reactor Antineutrino Spectra and Decay Heat Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta decay of fission products is at the origin of decay heat and antineutrino emission in nuclear reactors. Decay heat represents about 7% of the reactor power during operation and strongly impacts reactor safety. Reactor antineutrino detection is used in several fundamental neutrino physics experiments and it can also be used for reactor monitoring and non-proliferation purposes. 92,93Rb are two fission products of importance in reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat, but their β-decay properties are not well known. New measurements of 92,93Rb β-decay properties have been performed at the IGISOL facility (Jyväskylä, Finland using Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS. TAS is complementary to techniques based on Germanium detectors. It implies the use of a calorimeter to measure the total gamma intensity de-exciting each level in the daughter nucleus providing a direct measurement of the beta feeding. In these proceedings we present preliminary results for 93Rb, our measured beta feedings for 92Rb and we show the impact of these results on reactor antineutrino spectra and decay heat calculations.

  1. Nuclear effect study on nucleon structure functions, in comparison with antineutrino interactions on neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, C.

    1984-03-01

    We have studied the nuclear effects on high energy antineutrino charged current interactions by comparing the data which were taken in the Bubble Chamber BEBC filled with Neon and Deuterium. On the one hand, the study of nuclear reinteractions gave us the possibility to estimate the formation time of hadrons. On the other hand, the comparison of structure functions does not show any significant difference between Neon and Deuterium. Though this result does not contradict the effects observed with charged leptons by the EMC and SLAC experiments, it is strongly incompatible with certain theoretical interpretations which implied a stronger effect in antineutrino interactions [fr

  2. Dilepton and trilepton production by antineutrinos and neutrinos in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbier, G.; Bertrand, D.; Guy, J.; Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Brisson, V.; Belusevic, R.; Brou, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Kochowski, C.; Lagraa, M.; Leighton-Davis, S.; Middleton, R.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Talebzadeh, M.; Varvell, K.; Vallee, C.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1985-03-01

    A sample of over 25,000 fully measured neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions in BEBC includes 192 dilepton candidates. The prompt signal after subtraction of background is 41 ±7µ+ e -, 35±7µ+µ- events frombar v interactions, and 32±7µ-µ+ events from ν interactions. There are 2 trileptons, µ-µ- e + and µ-µ-µ+. Results are compared with other experimental data and with the standard model. Limits to prompt like sign µ+ e +, µ+µ+ and µ-µ- signals are given and compared with other experiments and with theoretical calculations.

  3. Dilepton and trilepton production by antineutrinos and neutrinos in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbier, G.; Baton, J.P.; Brou, D.; Kasper, P.; Kochowski, C.; Lagraa, M.; Neveu, M.; Guy, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Venus, W.; Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Nuzzo, S.; Bartley, J.H.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Leighton-Davis, S.; Sansum, R.A.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Talebzadeh, M.; Coghen, T.; Hulth, P.O.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1985-01-01

    A sample of over 25,000 fully measured neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions in BEBC includes 192 dilepton candidates. The prompt signal after subtraction of background is 41+-7 μ + e - . 35+-7 μ + μ - events from anti ν interactions, and 32+-7μ - μ + events from ν interactions. There are 2 trileptons, μ - μ - e + and μ - μ - μ + . Results are compared with other experimental data and with the standard mode. Limits to prompt like sign μ + e + , μ + μ + and μ - μ - signals are given and compared with other experiments and with theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  4. Status of Works on A-40-MCI-Activity Tritium Source for the Measurement of the Antineutrino Magnetic Moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Golubkov, A.N.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Il'kaev, R.I.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Lebedev, B.L.; Lobanov, V.N.; Mikhailov, V.N.; Tumkin, D.P.; Bogdanova, L.N.

    2005-01-01

    For the experiment on the measurement of the electron antineutrino magnetic moment we suggest a new approach to the tritium source design, namely, a configuration of annular cells filled with TiT 2 that are stacked into a hollow cylinder. Detectors are mounted in the hole inside.We present results of the optimization of geometrical and physical parameters of the source with respect to its experimental effectiveness and safety guaranty at all stages of its lifecycle. We discuss the choice of the construction materials and specify technological issues relevant to radiation purity of the source, being of the special concern in the experiment on the electron antineutrino magnetic moment measurement

  5. Analysis of output currents of self-powered detectors polarized by an external potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, K; Glowacki, S

    1980-01-01

    During measurement of self-powered detector current the electrical potential is induced between the emitter and collector caused by the input resistivity of measuring device. The detector current dependence on the emitter potential has been analyzed. The experimental results confirm the theoretical model of electronic processes within the insulator and also give the requirements that measuring device should fulfil.

  6. Leakage current measurements on pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, B.; Blondel, C.; Daly, F.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of the R&D of a new generation hard X-ray cameras for space applications we focus on the use of pixelated CdTe or CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. They are covered with 64 (0.9×0.9 mm2) or 256 (0.5×0.5 mm2) pixels, surrounded by a guard ring and operate in the energy ranging from several

  7. Measurement of the electroweak coupling of neutrinos and antineutrinos on electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonker, M.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the events induced by elastic scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on electrons and interprets the results in terms of the coupling strength of (anti)neutrino on electrons. The data for this analysis were obtained with the electronic calorimeter of the CHARM (Amsterdam, Cern, Hamburg, Moscow, Rome) collaboration during the wide band neutrino beam exposures of 1979, 1980 and 1981 in the neutrino facility of the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire, Geneva, Switzerland). In chapter 1 a historical overview of the early neutrino physics and a description of the phenomenological Lagrangian is given, followed by an introduction to the electroweak unification model. The neutrino detector of the CHARM collaboration is described in chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with the on-line monitoring system of this detector which has been under the responsibility of the author. The wide band neutrino facility of the CERN SPS is described in chapter 4, followed by a discussion of the experimental method to measure the neutrino energy spectra of the neutrino beams. The electromagnetic shower development process is reviewed in chapter 5 and is followed by a description of the technique that was used to separate showers of electromagnetic and hadronic origin. Chapter 6 discusses the observed signal of the (anti)neutrinos scattering on electrons and interprets these events in terms of the parameters related to the strength of the coupling of neutrinos to electrons. (Auth.)

  8. SoLid Detector Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labare, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    SoLid is a reactor anti-neutrino experiment where a novel detector is deployed at a minimum distance of 5.5 m from a nuclear reactor core. The purpose of the experiment is three-fold: to search for neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline; to measure the pure 235U neutrino energy spectrum; and to demonstrate the feasibility of neutrino detectors for reactor monitoring. This report presents the unique features of the SoLid detector technology. The technology has been optimised for a high background environment resulting from low overburden and the vicinity of a nuclear reactor. The versatility of the detector technology is demonstrated with a 288 kg detector prototype which was deployed at the BR2 nuclear reactor in 2015. The data presented includes both reactor on, reactor off and calibration measurements. The measurement results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The 1.6t SoLid detector is currently under construction, with an optimised design and upgraded material technology to enhance the detector capabilities. Its deployement on site is planned for the begin of 2017 and offers the prospect to resolve the reactor anomaly within about two years.

  9. Radiation detectors for personnel monitoring - current developments and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, S.

    2003-01-01

    The radiation detectors for personnel monitoring range from the conventional passive dosimeters like the film badge and the TLD, to sophisticated active dosimeters for integrated gamma, beta and neutron dose measurement. With the availability of high accuracy active dosimeters, the process of personnel monitoring, acceptability among radiation workers, record keeping and dose control have become more simplified. However the high level of sophistication in the active dosimeter has its own inevitable price tag and the new breed of active dosimeters are prohibitively costly. The silver lining, in the otherwise dark cost scenario of these dosimeters is the potential for cost reduction at least in some of the dosimeters in the near future

  10. Development of large area silicon semiconductor detectors for use in the current mode

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang Xia Opin; Li Zhen Fu; Zhang Guo Guang; Zhang Qi; Zhang Xia; Song Xian Cai; Jia Huan Yi; Lei Jian Hua; Sun Yuan Cheng

    2002-01-01

    Large area silicon semiconductor detectors for use in the current mode, with their dimensions of phi 40, phi 50 and phi 60 mm, their depletion thickness of 200-300 mu m, have been developed. Their performance measurements have been made, which indicate that the developed detectors can satisfactorily meet the needs in expectation. Compared with the detectors commercially available on the market, authors' large PIN detectors can serve both as reliable and efficient high-resolution devices for nuclear counting experiments, as well as monitors of high-intensity radiation fields in the current mode under a bias of 100-1000 V, while the detectors commercially available are only for the counting use

  11. Fast current amplifier for background-limited operation of photovoltaic InSb detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmann, J; Koehler, S; Lahmann, W

    1981-01-01

    A fast current amplifier for use with photovoltaic indium antimonide detectors is described which was designed for detection of lidar return signals. Near background-limited operation was possible for bandwidths up to 0.8 MHz.

  12. Study of Anti-Neutrino Beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed.

  13. Study of anti-neutrino beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed. (author)

  14. Search for “anomalies” from neutrino and anti-neutrino oscillations at $\\Delta_m^{2} ≈ 1eV^{2}$ with muon spectrometers and large LAr–TPC imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M; Baibussinov, B; Bilokon, H; Boffelli, F; Bonesini, M; Calligarich, E; Canci, N; Centro, S; Cesana, A; Cieslik, K; Cline, D B; Cocco, A G; Dequal, D; Dermenev, A; Dolfini, R; De Gerone, M; Dussoni, S; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Ferrari, A; Fiorillo, G; Garvey, G T; Gatti, F; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Guber, F; Guglielmi, A; Haranczyk, M; Holeczek, J; Ivashkin, A; Kirsanov, M; Kisiel, J; Kochanek, I; Kurepin, A; Łagoda, J; Lucchini, G; Louis, W C; Mania, S; Mannocchi, G; Marchini, S; Matveev, V; Menegolli, A; Meng, G; Mills, G B; Montanari, C; Nicoletto, M; Otwinowski, S; Palczewski, T J; Passardi, G; Perfetto, F; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Płonski, P; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rossella, M; Rubbia, C; Sala, P; Scaramelli, A; Segreto, E; Stefan, D; Stepaniak, J; Sulej, R; Suvorova, O; Terrani, M; Tlisov, D; Van de Water, R G; Trinchero, G; Turcato, M; Varanini, F; Ventura, S; Vignoli, C; Wang, H G; Yang, X; Zani, A; Zaremba, K; Benettoni, M; Bernardini, P; Bertolin, A; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Cecchetti, A; Cecchini, S; Collazuol, G; Creti, P; Dal Corso, F; De Mitri, I; De Robertis, G; De Serio, M; Degli Esposti, L; Di Ferdinando, D; Dore, U; Dusini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Fanin, C; Fini, R A; Fiore, G; Garfagnini, A; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, R; Grella, G; Guandalini, C; Guerzoni, M; Kose, U; Laurenti, G; Laveder, M; Lippi, I; Loddo, F; Longhin, A; Loverre, P; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta, A; Marsella, G; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Mengucci, A; Mezzetto, M; Michinelli, R; Muciaccia, M T; Orecchini, D; Paoloni, A; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Rescigno, R; Rosa, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Stanco, L; Stellacci, S; Surdo, A; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Ventura, M; Zago, M

    2012-01-01

    This proposal describes an experimental search for sterile neutrinos beyond the Standard Model with a new CERN-SPS neutrino beam. The experiment is based on two identical LAr-TPC's followed by magnetized spectrometers, observing the electron and muon neutrino events at 1600 and 300 m from the proton target. This project will exploit the ICARUS T600, moved from LNGS to the CERN "Far" position. An additional 1/4 of the T600 detector will be constructed and located in the "Near" position. Two spectrometers will be placed downstream of the two LAr-TPC detectors to greatly complement the physics capabilities. Spectrometers will exploit a classical dipole magnetic field with iron slabs, and a new concept air-magnet, to perform charge identification and muon momentum measurements in a wide energy range over a large transverse area. In the two positions, the radial and energy spectra of the nu_e beam are practically identical. Comparing the two detectors, in absence of oscillations, all cross sections and experimenta...

  15. A fast high-voltage current-peak detection system for the ALICE transition radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verclas, Robert [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During LHC operation in run 1, the gaseous detectors of ALICE occasionally experienced simultaneous trips in their high voltage which affected the majority of the high voltage channels. These trips are caused by large anode currents in the detector and are potentially related to LHC machine operations. We developed and installed a fast current-peak detection system for the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector. This system is based on FPGA technology and monitors 144 out 522 high voltage channels minimally invasively at a maximum readout rate of 2 MHz. It is an integral part of the LHC beam monitoring system. We report on the latest status.

  16. An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors based on LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Cunfeng; Lu Taiguo; Yan Zhen; Wang Suojie; Zhu Chengguang; Sun Yansheng; He Mao

    2005-01-01

    An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors with high voltage was set up by using the graphic LabVIEW platform and NI 4351 data acquisition card. The leak current was automatically monitored and recorded with this system, the time and the value of the leak current were showed instantly. Good efficiency and precision of monitoring were obtained. (authors)

  17. Reactor anti-neutrinos: measurement of the θ13 leptonic mixing angle and search for potential sterile neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to measure the θ 13 mixing angle through the disappearance -induced by the oscillation phenomenon - of anti-neutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties, the experiment relies on the relative comparison of detected signals in two identical liquid scintillator detectors. The near one, giving the normalization of the emitted flux, is currently being built and will be delivered in spring 2014. The far detector, sensitive to θ 13 , is located at about one kilometer and is taking data since 2011. In this first phase of the experiment, the far detector data are compared to a prediction of the emitted neutrino flux to estimate θ 13 . In this thesis, the Double Chooz experiment and its analysis are presented, especially the background studies and the rejection of parasitic signals due to light emitted by photo-multipliers. Neutron fluxes between the different detector volumes impact the definition of the fiducial volume of neutrino interactions and the efficiency of detection. Detailed studies of these effects are presented. As part of the Double Chooz experiment, studies were performed to improve the prediction of neutrino flux emitted by reactors. This work revealed a deficit of observed neutrino rates in the short baseline experiments of last decades. This deficit could be explained by an oscillation to a sterile state. The Stereo project aims to observe a typical signature of oscillations: the distortion of neutrino spectra both in energy and baseline. This thesis presents the detector concept and simulations as well as sensitivity studies. Background sources and the foreseen shielding are also discussed. (author) [fr

  18. Study of neutrino- and antineutrino interactions in a neon-hydrogen mixture using the CERN narrow band beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, K.

    1977-01-01

    The charged-current cross sections for neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in the energy range 20-200 GeV are given. Taken in conjunction with the previous Gargamelle results, they show that sigma/E is almost constant with energy for antineutrinos, and falls with energy for neutrinos. Above 50 GeV, sigma/E is compatible with being constant for neutrinos and antineutrinos. Rates for the production of neutral current events, di-lepton events and strange particles are given. The rate of di-lepton production shows no evidence for the production of 'bottom' states. Finally there is no indication for a charged heavy lepton coupled to the muon neutrino. (orig./WL) [de

  19. Measurement of the muon antineutrino double-differential cross section for quasielastic-like scattering on hydrocarbon at Eν˜3.5 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, C. E.; Aliaga, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Caceres v., G. F. R.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chavarria, E.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Han, J. Y.; Harris, D. A.; Henry, S.; Hurtado, K.; Jena, D.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Lu, X.-G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nowak, G. M.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Perdue, G. N.; Peters, E.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sultana, M.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Teklu, A. M.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present double-differential measurements of antineutrino charged-current quasielastic scattering in the MINERvA detector. This study improves on a previous single-differential measurement by using updated reconstruction algorithms and interaction models and provides a complete description of observed muon kinematics in the form of a double-differential cross section with respect to muon transverse and longitudinal momentum. We include in our signal definition zero-meson final states arising from multinucleon interactions and from resonant pion production followed by pion absorption in the primary nucleus. We find that model agreement is considerably improved by a model tuned to MINERvA inclusive neutrino scattering data that incorporates nuclear effects such as weak nuclear screening and two-particle, two-hole enhancements.

  20. Gadolinium-loaded gel scintillators for neutron and antineutrino detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Akers, Douglas William; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Paviet, Patricia Denise; Drigert, Mark William

    2016-11-29

    A gadolinium (Gd) loaded scintillation gel (Gd-ScintGel) compound allows for neutron and gamma-ray detection. The unique gel scintillator encompasses some of the best features of both liquid and solid scintillators, yet without many of the disadvantages associated therewith. Preferably, the gel scintillator is a water soluble Gd-DTPA compound and water soluble fluorophores such as: CdSe/ZnS (or ZnS) quantum dot (Q-dot) nanoparticles, coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and Alexa Fluor 350 as well as a carbostyril compound, carbostyril 124 in a stable water-based gel, such as methylcellulose or polyacrylamide polymers. The Gd-loaded ScintGel allows for a homogenious distribution of the Gd-DTPA and the fluorophores, and yields clean fluorescent emission peaks. A moderator, such as deuterium or a water-based clear polymer, can be incorporated in the Gd-ScintGel. The gel scintillators can be used in compact detectors, including neutron and antineutrino detectors.

  1. Prototypes of Self-Powered Radiation Detectors Employing Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    neutron sensi- tivities of a Pt self - powered detector ,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 25, 292–295 (1978). 6T. A. Dellin, R. E. Huddleston, and C. J...Gamma-sensitive self - powered detectors and their use for in-core flux -mapping,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 28, 752–757 (1981). 9E. A. Burke and J. Wall...AFCEC-CX-TY-TP-2016-0006 PROTOTYPES OF SELF - POWERED RADIATION DETECTORS EMPLOYING INTRINSIC HIGH-ENERGY CURRENT (HEC) (POSTPRINT) Piotr

  2. Dedicated supernova detection by a network of neutral current spherical TPC detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J. D.; Giomataris, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Supernova neutrinos can easily be detected by a spherical gaseous TPC detector measuring very low energy nuclear recoils. The expected rates are quite large for a neutron-rich target since the neutrino-nucleus neutral current interaction yields a coherent contribution of all neutrons. As a matter of fact, for a typical supernova at 10 kpc, about 1000 events are expected using a spherical detector of radius 4 m with Xe gas at a pressure of 10 atm. A worldwide network of several such simple, stable, and low-cost supernova detectors with a running time of a few centuries is quite feasible

  3. Status of the KATRIN focal-plane detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seher, Agnes [Karlsruher Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment aims to determine the mass of the electron anti-neutrino with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} by measuring the kinematics of tritium β-electrons close to the enpoint of the energy spectrum. The energy analysis of the experiment is performed with a high-resolution electrostatic spectrometer of MAC-E filter type which acts as an integranting high pass filter. Transmitted electrons are counted with a segmented silicon detector system located at the downstream end of the experiment. The detector system consists of two super-conducting solenoids (B{sub max}=6 T), a post-acceleration electrode, a detector wafer with silicon pixel-diodes, readout electronics as well as a calibration and monitoring devices. This talk gives an overview of the detector system and its current status as well as key performance parameters.

  4. Averaged currents induced by alpha particles in an InSb compound semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Hishiki, Shigeomi; Kogetsu, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Very fast pulses due to alpha particle incidence were observed by an undoped-type InSb Schottky detector. This InSb detector was operated without applying bias voltage and its depletion layer thickness was less than the range of alpha particles. The averaged current induced by alpha particles was analyzed as a function of operating temperature and was shown to be proportional to the Hall mobility of InSb. (author)

  5. Current-mode detector for neutron time-of-flight studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.D.; Szymanski, J.J.; Yuan, V.W.; Bowman, C.D.; Silverman, A.; Zhu, X.

    1990-01-01

    A system for the detection of high-intensity neutron bursts with instantaneous rates as high as 10 11 Hz is presented. This system uses a transient digitizer to sample the output voltage of a high-current photomultiplier tube as a function of time. The coutput voltage is proportional to the number of neutrons striking the detector. This detector is used at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center to study fundamental symmetries. Design considerations, construction details and performance benchmarks are presented. (orig.)

  6. Spin correlation and entanglement detection in Cooper pair splitters by current measurements using magnetic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busz, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Damian; Martinek, Jan

    2017-08-01

    We analyze a model of a double quantum dot Cooper pair splitter coupled to two ferromagnetic detectors and demonstrate the possibility of determination of spin correlation by current measurements. We use perturbation theory, taking account of the exchange interaction with the detectors, which leads to complex spin dynamics in the dots. This affects the measured spin and restricts the use of ferromagnetic detectors to the nonlinear current-voltage characteristic regime at the current plateau, where the relevant spin projection is conserved, in contrast to the linear current-voltage characteristic regime, in which the spin information is distorted. Moreover, we show that for separable states the spin correlation can only be determined in a limited parameter regime, much more restricted than in the case of entangled states. We propose an entanglement test based on the Bell inequality.

  7. Low dark current InGaAs detector arrays for night vision and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Liao, Shirong; Getty, Jonathan; Holmes, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Aerius Photonics has developed large InGaAs arrays (1K x 1K and greater) with low dark currents for use in night vision applications in the SWIR regime. Aerius will present results of experiments to reduce the dark current density of their InGaAs detector arrays. By varying device designs and passivations, Aerius has achieved a dark current density below 1.0 nA/cm2 at 280K on small-pixel, detector arrays. Data is shown for both test structures and focal plane arrays. In addition, data from cryogenically cooled InGaAs arrays will be shown for astronomy applications.

  8. Quasi-elastic interactions and one-pion production by neutrinos and anti-neutrinos on a deuterium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlag, S.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, the weak charged current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nucleons are described, in which the neutrino scatters in a quasi-elastic way with the nucleon, leaving an excited nucleon state. The experiments have been performed in the bubble chamber BEBC, filled with deuterium and exposed to the CERN Wide Band (anti-)neutrino beams. This gave the opportunity to study both interactions on protons and on neutrons separately, whereas the measurement of the exclusive channels could be performed with a high precision. After a short introduction of the relevant theories (standard model; QCD; one-pion production models; FKR quark model), the experimental set-up at CERN is described as well as the bubble chamber picture facility in Amsterdam. Next, results of the neutrino and antineutrino experiments are given followed by a comparison with theory. (Auth.)

  9. Evolution of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Cummings, J P; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guo, L; Guo, X H; Guo, Y H; Guo, Z; Hackenburg, R W; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huang, Y B; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jen, K L; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Jones, D; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Khan, A; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y-C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Mitchell, I; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pan, H-R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Qiu, R M; Raper, N; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Steiner, H; Stoler, P; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C-H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J L; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Yang, Y Z; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, R; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, L; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2017-06-23

    The Daya Bay experiment has observed correlations between reactor core fuel evolution and changes in the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum. Four antineutrino detectors in two experimental halls were used to identify 2.2 million inverse beta decays (IBDs) over 1230 days spanning multiple fuel cycles for each of six 2.9 GW_{th} reactor cores at the Daya Bay and Ling Ao nuclear power plants. Using detector data spanning effective ^{239}Pu fission fractions F_{239} from 0.25 to 0.35, Daya Bay measures an average IBD yield σ[over ¯]_{f} of (5.90±0.13)×10^{-43}  cm^{2}/fission and a fuel-dependent variation in the IBD yield, dσ_{f}/dF_{239}, of (-1.86±0.18)×10^{-43}  cm^{2}/fission. This observation rejects the hypothesis of a constant antineutrino flux as a function of the ^{239}Pu fission fraction at 10 standard deviations. The variation in IBD yield is found to be energy dependent, rejecting the hypothesis of a constant antineutrino energy spectrum at 5.1 standard deviations. While measurements of the evolution in the IBD spectrum show general agreement with predictions from recent reactor models, the measured evolution in total IBD yield disagrees with recent predictions at 3.1σ. This discrepancy indicates that an overall deficit in the measured flux with respect to predictions does not result from equal fractional deficits from the primary fission isotopes ^{235}U, ^{239}Pu, ^{238}U, and ^{241}Pu. Based on measured IBD yield variations, yields of (6.17±0.17) and (4.27±0.26)×10^{-43}  cm^{2}/fission have been determined for the two dominant fission parent isotopes ^{235}U and ^{239}Pu. A 7.8% discrepancy between the observed and predicted ^{235}U yields suggests that this isotope may be the primary contributor to the reactor antineutrino anomaly.

  10. New (anti)neutrino results from the T2K experiment on CP violation in the lepton sector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    T2K is a long-baseline neutrino experiment in which a muon neutrino beam produced by J-PARC in Tokai is sent 295 km across Japan to the Super-Kamiokande detector, to study neutrino oscillations via the disappearance of muon neutrinos and the appearance of electron neutrinos. Since the start of operations in 2010, T2K has conclusively observed muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations, opening the door to the observation of CP violation in neutrino mixing, and performed the most precise measurement of the muon neutrino disappearance parameters. In a joint analysis between these two modes, T2K placed its first constraints on the CP-violating phase delta. Starting in 2014, T2K has been running primarily with an antineutrino beam in order to study the corresponding antineutrino oscillations, resulting in leading measurements of the muon antineutrino disappearance parameters. The joint analysis of neutrino and antineutrino data indicates that CP-conserving parameters lie outside the 90% confidence interval....

  11. Simultaneous measurements of ion and electron currents using a novel compact electrostatic end-loss-current detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M.; Miyake, Y.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Numakura, T.; Shimizu, K.; Ito, M.; Kiminami, S.; Morimoto, N.; Hirai, K.; Yamagishi, T.; Miyata, Y.; Nakashima, Y.; Miyoshi, S.; Ogura, K.; Kondoh, T.; Kariya, T.

    2006-10-01

    For the purpose of end-loss-ion and -electron analyses in open-field plasmas, a compact-sized electrostatic end-loss-current detector is proposed on the basis of a self-collection principle for suppressing the effects of secondary-electron emission from a metal collector. For employing this specific method, it is worth noting that no further additional magnetic systems except the ambient open-ended magnetic fields are required in the detector operation. This characteristic property provides a compactness of the total detection system and availability for its use in plasma confinement devices without disturbing plasma-confining magnetic fields. The detector consists of a set of parallel metal plates with respect to lines of ambient magnetic forces of a plasma device for analyzing incident ion currents along with a grid for shielding the collector against strays due to the metal-plate biasing. The characterization experiments are carried out by the use of a test-ion-beam line along with an additional use of a Helmholtz coil system for the formation of open magnetic fields similar to those in the GAMMA 10 end region. The applications of the developed end-loss-current detector in the GAMMA 10 plasma experiments are demonstrated under the conditions with simultaneous incidence of energetic electrons produced by electron-cyclotron heatings for end-loss-plugging potential formation.

  12. A feasibility study of boron-loaded liquid scintillator for the detection of electron anti-neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, S C; Leung, R W S; Wang, S L; Chang, C Y; Chen Chi Ping; Cheng, K C; Ho, T I; Lai, W P; Liu, H M; Mao, Z P; Shih, I C; Wong, H T; Yu, Z Q

    1999-01-01

    Boron-loaded liquid scintillator offers some potential advantages as a detector for electron anti-neutrinos. A research program was carried out with the objective of developing such scintillators. The crucial feature is the pulse shape discrimination properties following the neutron capture by sup 1 sup 0 B. Results of the R and D efforts are presented. The feasibility and the technical difficulties of carrying out a full-scale neutrino experiment based on this approach are discussed. (author)

  13. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in free neutron decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, B; Bateman, F; Bauder, W K; Byrne, J; Byron, W A; Chen, W; Darius, G; DeAngelis, C; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Hassan, M T; Jones, G L; Komives, A; Laptev, A; Mendenhall, M P; Nico, J S; Noid, G; Park, H; Stephenson, E J; Stern, I; Stockton, K J S; Trull, C; Wietfeldt, F E; Yerozolimsky, B G

    2017-08-01

    We describe an apparatus used to measure the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient in free neutron decay. The apparatus employs a novel measurement technique in which the angular correlation is converted into a proton time-of-flight asymmetry that is counted directly, avoiding the need for proton spectroscopy. Details of the method, apparatus, detectors, data acquisition, and data reduction scheme are presented, along with a discussion of the important systematic effects.

  14. Nb/Al STJ detectors with sub-nA subgap current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, S.; De Leo, N.; Lacquaniti, V.; Agostino, A.; Gonnelli, R.; Verhoeve, P.

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) are promising high-resolution radiation detectors because of their larger energy resolution with respect to conventional Si-based detectors. We have developed a fabrication process for Nb/Al-AlO x /Nb STJ devices which produces junctions with subgap currents below 50 pA at 300 mK, a factor of 10 -6 less than the subgap current at 4.2 K. We report the details of the fabrication process and preliminary results on X-ray measurements at 300 mK with a 5 mC 55 Fe source

  15. Coherent production of a1- mesons and (ρπ)- systems by antineutrinos on neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Willocq, S.; Aderholz, M.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.P.; Baton, J.P.; Neveu, M.; Burtovoy, V.; Clayton, E.F.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Jones, G.T.; O'Neale, S.; Varvell, K.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Sansum, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The coherent production of 3π systems by charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the bubble chamber BEBC exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The coherent signal is attributed mainly to (ρπ) production, where the (ρπ) system is either non-resonant or comes from the decay of a 1 mesons. The kinematical variables and the total cross section are compared with the predictions of the meson dominance model. (orig.)

  16. Commissioning the SNO+ Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caden, E.; Coulter, I.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SNO+ is a multipurpose liquid scintillator neutrino experiment based at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The experiment’s main physics goal is a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Tellurium-130, but SNO+ will also study low energy solar neutrinos, geo- and reactor-antineutrinos, among other topics. We are reusing much of the hardware from the original SNO experiment, but significant work has taken place to transform the heavy water detector into a liquid scintillator detector. We present upgrades and improvements to the read-out electronics and trigger system to handle the higher data rates expected by a scintillator experiment. We show the successful installation and testing of a hold-down rope net for the acrylic vessel to counter-act the buoyancy of organic liquid scintillator. We also describe the new scintillator process plant and cover gas systems that have been constructed to achieve the purification necessary to meet our physics goals. We are currently commissioning the experiment with ultra-pure water in preparation for filling with scintillator in early 2017 and present the current status of this work.

  17. Current status of multi-detector row helical CT in imaging of adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current status of multi-detector row helical CT in imaging of adult acquired pancreatic diseases and assessing surgical neoplastic resectability. ... The presence of inflammation, masses, and vascular invasion was evaluated and interpreted images were obtained during each phase. Results were compared with surgery, ...

  18. Scanning transient current study of the I-V stabilization phenomena in silicon detectors irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Sidorov, A.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstrom, G.

    1996-03-01

    Investigation of the I-V stabilization phenomena in neutron irradiated silicon detectors has been carried out using scanning transient current technique (STCT) on non-irradiated PP + -p-n + detectors. The PP + -p-n + detectors were used to simulate the PP + -n-n + detectors irradiated beyond the space charge sign inversion (SCSI). Two mechanisms partially responsible for the I- V stabilization have been identified

  19. Research on Mechanical Shim Application with Compensated Prompt γ Current of Vanadium Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Xu

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical shim is an advanced technology for reactor power and axial offset control with control rod assemblies. To address the adverse accuracy impact on the ex-core power range neutron flux measurements-based axial offset control resulting from the variable positions of control rod assemblies, the lead-lag-compensated in-core self-powered vanadium detector signals are utilized. The prompt γ current of self-powered detector is ignored normally due to its weakness compared with the delayed β...

  20. Current problems in semiconductor detectors for high energy physics after particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Ionel

    2002-01-01

    The use of semiconductor materials as detectors in high radiation environments, as expected in future high energy accelerators or in space missions, poses severe problems in long-time operations, due to changes in the properties of the material, and consequently in the performances of detectors. This talk presents the major theoretical areas of current problems, reviews the works in this field and the stage of their understanding, including author's contributions The mechanisms of interaction of the projectile with the semiconductor, the production of primary defects, the physical quantities and the equations able to characterise and describe the radiation effects, and the equations of kinetics of defects are considered. Correlation between microscopic damage and detector performances and the possible ways to optimise the radiation hardness of materials are discussed. (author)

  1. Detectors for X-ray diffraction and scattering: current technology and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, D.; Brugemann, L.; Gerndt, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Detectors are crucial devices determining the quality, the reliability and the throughput of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scattering investigations. This is of utmost importance in an industrial environment where in many cases untrained personnel or even without human intervention the experiments and data evaluations are running. The currently used technology of 0-dimensional to 2-dim XRD detectors is presented using selected examples. The application specific requirements on e.g. energy range and resolution, count rate limit, background and dynamic range, and size versus price are discussed. Due to the fact that x-ray diffraction investigations are becoming increasingly attractive in science, research and industry the advance in detector technology is pushed beyond existing limits. The discussion of the resultant market opportunities versus the cost of ownership and market entrance barrier is the final section of the presentation

  2. Research on Mechanical Shim Application with Compensated Prompt γ Current of Vanadium Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical shim is an advanced technology for reactor power and axial offset control with control rod assemblies. To address the adverse accuracy impact on the ex-core power range neutron flux measurements-based axial offset control resulting from the variable positions of control rod assemblies, the lead-lag-compensated in-core self-powered vanadium detector signals are utilized. The prompt γ current of self-powered detector is ignored normally due to its weakness compared with the delayed β current, although it promptly reflects the flux change of the core. Based on the features of the prompt γ current, a method for configuration of the lead-lag dynamic compensator is proposed. The simulations indicate that the method can improve dynamic response significantly with negligible adverse effects on the steady response. The robustness of the design implies that the method is of great value for engineering applications.

  3. Research on mechanical shim application with compensated prompt γ current of vanadium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    Mechanical shim is an advanced technology for reactor power and axial offset control with control rod assemblies. To address the adverse accuracy impact on the ex-core power range neutron flux measurements-based axial offset control resulting from the variable positions of control rod assemblies, the lead-lag-compensated in-core self-powered vanadium detector signals are utilized. The prompt γ current of self-powered detector is ignored normally due to its weakness compared with the delayed β current, although it promptly reflects the flux change of the core. Based on the features of the prompt γ current, a method for configuration of the lead-lag dynamic compensator is proposed. The simulations indicate that the method can improve dynamic response significantly with negligible adverse effects on the steady response. The robustness of the design implies that the method is of great value for engineering applications.

  4. Heavy quark production by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.; Tanaka, K.

    1979-01-01

    The rate for producing t- and b-quarks in, respectively, neutrino and antineutrino interactions with nucleons are estimated. Experimental quark parton distribution functions, SU(2) x SU(2) x U(1) gauge group mixing angles, and threshold suppression through rescaling are used in the calculation. The ratios to total cross sections of b-quark production by anti nu, R/sub b//sup anti nu/, and t-quark production by ν, R/sub t//sup nu/, are, respectively, R/sub b//sup anti nu/ approximately equal to 10 -4 and R/sub t//sup nu/ approximately equal to 10 -5 for an incident energy of 200 GeV. 13 references

  5. A study of quasi-elastic muon (anti)neutrino scattering in he NOMAD experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubushkin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the muon neutrino and antineutrino quasi-elastic (QEL) scattering reactions (v μ n→μ - p and v-bar μ p→μ + n using a set of experimental data collected by the NOMAD collaboration. We have performed measurements of the cross-section of these processes on a nuclear target (mainly Carbon) normalizing it to the total v μ (v-bar μ ) charged current cross-section. The results for the flux averaged QEL cross-sections in the (anti)neutrino energy interval 3-100 GeV are qel >v μ = (0.92±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst))x10 -38 cm 2 and qel >v-bar μ = (0.81±0.05(stat)±0.09(syst))x10 -38 cm 2 for neutrino and antineutrino, respectively. The axial mass parameter MA was extracted from the measured quasi-elastic neutrino cross-section. The corresponding result is M A = 1.05±0.02(stat)±0.06(syst) GeV. It is consistent with the axial mass values recalculated from the antineutrino cross-section and extracted from the pure Q 2 shape analysis of the high purity sample of v μ quasi-elastic 2-track events, but has smaller systematic error and should be quoted as the main result of this work. Our measured MA is found to be in good agreement with the world average value obtained in previous deuterium filled bubble chamber experiments. The NOMAD measurement of M A is lower than those recently published by K2K and MiniBooNE collaborations. However, within the large errors quoted by these experiments on M A , these results are compatible with the more precise NOMAD value.

  6. Performance of a high-precision calorimeter for the measurement of the antineutrino-source strength in the SOX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenmueller, Konrad [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: BOREXINO-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A calorimeter was developed to measure the thermal power and thus the antineutrino-generation rate of a {sup 144}Ce - {sup 144}Pr antineutrino-source with < 1% overall accuracy for the SOX experiment. SOX is searching for neutrino oscillations at short baselines with the Borexino detector to investigate the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. The calorimeter design is based on a copper heat exchanger with integrated water lines for the heat extraction, mounted around the source. A high precision measurement is possible thanks to an elaborate thermal insulation. In this talk, the design of the calorimeter is reviewed and results of calibration measurements are presented. The thermal insulation of the system was examined and heat losses were quantified. The methods to reconstruct the source power and the decay rate from measurements are described.

  7. Current status and requirements for position-sensitive detectors in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Speller, R

    2002-01-01

    This review considers the current status of detector developments for medical imaging using ionising radiation. This field is divided into two major areas; the use of X-rays for transmission imaging and the use of radioactive tracers in emission imaging (nuclear medicine). Until recently, most detector developments were for applications in nuclear medicine. However, in the past 5 years new developments in large area, X-ray-sensitive detectors have meant that both application domains are equally served. In X-ray imaging, work in CT and mammography are chosen as examples of sensor developments. Photodiode arrays in multi-slice spiral CT acquisitions are described and for mammography the use of amorphous silicon flat panel arrays is considered. The latter is an excellent example where new detector developments have required a re-think of traditional imaging methods. In gamma-ray imaging the recent developments in small area, task-specific cameras are described. Their limitations and current proposals to overcome...

  8. Analysis of Current-mode Detectors For Resonance Detection In Neutron Optics Time Reversal Symmetry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Grant; Noptrex Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    One of the most promising explanations for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe is the search for new sources of time-reversal (T) symmetry violation. The current amount of violation seen in the kaon and B-meson systems is not sufficient to describe this asymmetry. The Neutron Optics Time Reversal Experiment Collaboration (NOPTREX) is a null test for T violation in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized 139La target. Due to the high neutron flux needed for this experiment, as well as the ability to effectively subtract background noise, a current-mode neutron detector that can resolve resonances at epithermal energies has been proposed. In order to ascertain if this detector design would meet the requirements for the eventual NOPTREX experiment, prototypical detectors were tested at the NOBORU beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (JPARC) facility. Resonances in In and Ta were measured and the collected data was analyzed. This presentation will describe the analysis process and the efficacy of the detectors will be discussed. Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107, UGRAS Scholarship.

  9. A self-powered thin-film radiation detector using intrinsic high-energy current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygmanski, Piotr, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sajo, Erno, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The authors introduce a radiation detection method that relies on high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary charged particles in the detector material, which induces conduction current in an external readout circuit. Direct energy conversion of the incident radiation powers the signal formation without the need for external bias voltage or amplification. The detector the authors consider is a thin-film multilayer device, composed of alternating disparate electrically conductive and insulating layers. The optimal design of HEC detectors consists of microscopic or nanoscopic structures. Methods: Theoretical and computational developments are presented to illustrate the salient properties of the HEC detector and to demonstrate its feasibility. In this work, the authors examine single-sandwiched and periodic layers of Cu and Al, and Au and Al, ranging in thickness from 100 nm to 300 μm and separated by similarly sized dielectric gaps, exposed to 120 kVp x-ray beam (half-value thickness of 4.1 mm of Al). The energy deposition characteristics and the high-energy current were determined using radiation transport computations. Results: The authors found that in a dual-layer configuration, the signal is in the measurable range. For a defined total detector thickness in a multilayer structure, the signal sharply increases with decreasing thickness of the high-Z conductive layers. This paper focuses on the computational results while a companion paper reports the experimental findings. Conclusions: Significant advantages of the device are that it does not require external power supply and amplification to create a measurable signal; it can be made in any size and geometry, including very thin (sub-millimeter to submicron) flexible curvilinear forms, and it is inexpensive. Potential applications include medical dosimetry (both in vivo and external), radiation protection, and other settings where one or more of the above qualities are desired.

  10. Analysis and solution of current spike occurred in dynamic compensation of self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Xingjie; Li, Qing; Wang, Kan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The current spike problem is observed in the dynamic compensation process of SPNDs. • The current spike is caused by unphysical current change due to range switching. • Modification on the compensation algorithm is introduced to deal with current spike. - Abstract: Dynamic compensation methods are required to improve the response speed of the Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) and make it possible to apply the SPNDs for core monitoring and surveillance. During the experimental test of the compensation method based on linear matrix inequality (LMI), spikes are observed in the compensated SPND current. After analyzing the measurement data, the cause is fixed on the unphysical change of the uncompensated SPND current due to range switching. Then some modifications on the dynamic compensation algorithms are proposed to solve the current spike problem.

  11. Calculation of current-voltage characteristics of electron-capture detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinneburg, D.; Grosse, H.J.; Leonhardt, J.; Popp, P.

    1983-01-01

    Starting from the law of conservation of charge a stationary one-dimensional non-linear differential equation system is derived, which is applied to the direct-current mode of an electron-capture detector with parallel electrode plates. The theory takes into account space-charge, recombination, and inhomogeneous ionization and it deals with three kinds of charge carriers with different mobilities (positive and negative ions, electrons). Terms due to diffusion and gas-flow losses are excluded. The equations so constructed were programmed to get a means of calculating the charge and field distributions and the current-voltage characteristics as functions of various parameters of the detectors, the attaching gas and the ionization. For two cases the results are given. (author)

  12. ICON, a current model preamplifier in CMOS technology for use with high rate particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Jarron, P.; Meddeler, G.; Santiard, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The ICON current mode preamplifier is intended for use in experiments at high rate hadron colliders. The transient response and noise performance have been analyzed. One chip has been made using an ICON circuit with resistive feedback to produce a preamplifier with a peaking time of below 10 ns. This fast preamplifier has a gain of 870 mV/pC and a power dissipation of around 1 mW. Another chip was made which uses the ICON circuit as the front-end to a dual port analog memory. The noise measured is between 2,400 e - and 3,000 e - . An important characteristic of ICON is that it can tolerate a detector leakage current of 10 μA at the DC coupled input. Therefore, it is very suitable for silicon detector systems under severe radiation conditions

  13. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  14. Dynamical model of computation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, O.; Slovacek, M.; Zerola, L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current in dependence on the neutron flux density during reactor core transients. The total signal consists of a beta emission, prompt, and gamma component and a background signal. The model has been verified by means of experimental data obtained during measurements on the LVR-15 research reactor and at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. (author) 9 figs., 21 refs

  15. Process effects on leakage current of Si-PIN neutron detectors with porous microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Baoning; Zhao, Kangkang; Yang, Taotao [Beijing University of Technology, Chaoyang District, Pingleyuan 100, 100124 Beijing (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, 215123 Suzhou (China); Jiang, Yong; Fan, Xiaoqiang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianshan Road 64, 621900 Mianyang (China); Lu, Min [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, 215123 Suzhou (China); Han, Jun [Beijing University of Technology, Chaoyang District, Pingleyuan 100, 100124 Beijing (China)

    2017-06-15

    Using the technique of Microfabrication, such as deep silicon dry etching, lithography, etc. Si-PIN neutron detectors with porous microstructure have been successfully fabricated. In order to lower the leakage current, the key fabrication processes, including the Al windows opening, deep silicon etching and the porous side wall smoothing, have been optimized. The cross-section morphology and current-voltage characteristics have been measured to evaluate the microfabrication processes. With the optimized conditions presented by the measurements, a neutron detector with a leakage current density of 2.67 μA cm{sup -2} at a bias of -20 V is obtained. A preliminary neutron irradiation test with {sup 252}Cf neutron source has also been carried out. The neutron irradiation test shows that the neutron detection efficiency of the microstructured neutron detectors is almost 3.6 times higher than that of the planar ones. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Current signal of silicon detectors facing charged particles and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamrita, H.

    2005-07-01

    This work consisted in collecting and studying for the first time the shapes of current signals obtained from charged particles or heavy ions produced by silicon detectors. The document is divided into two main parts. The first consisted in reducing the experimental data obtained with charged particles as well as with heavy ions. These experiments were performed at the Orsay Tandem and at GANIL using LISE. These two experiments enabled us to create a data base formed of current signals with various shapes and various times of collection. The second part consisted in carrying out a simulation of the current signals obtained from the various ions. To obtain this simulation we propose a new model describing the formation of the signal. We used the data base of the signals obtained in experiments in order to constrain the three parameters of our model. In this model, the charge carriers created are regarded as dipoles and their density is related to the dielectric polarization in the silicon detector. This phenomenon induces an increase in permittivity throughout the range of the incident ion and consequently the electric field between the electrodes of the detector is decreased inside the trace. We coupled with this phenomenon a dissociation and extraction mode of the charge carriers so that they can be moved in the electric field. (author)

  17. The effect of cathode bias (field effect) on the surface leakage current of CdZnTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Hubert Chen, C.M.; Cook, W.R.; Harrison, F.A.; Kuvvetli, I.; Schindler, S.M.; Stahle, C.M.; Parker, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    Surface resistivity is an important parameter of multi-electrode CZT detectors such as coplanar-grid, strip, or pixel detectors. Low surface resistivity results in a high leakage current and affects the charge collection efficiency in the areas near contacts. Thus, it is always desirable to have the surface resistivity of the detector as high as possible. In the past the most significant efforts were concentrated to develop passivation techniques for CZT detectors. However, as we found, the field-effect caused by a bias applied on the cathode can significantly reduce the surface resistivity even though the detector surface was carefully passivated. In this paper we illustrate that the field-effect is a common feature of the CZT multi-electrode detectors, and discuss how to take advantage of this effect to improve the surface resistivity of CZT detectors

  18. The MINERνA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentini, G. A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA (Main INjector Experiment for ν-A) is a dedicated neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab. It uses a fine-grained fully active detector to make precision measurements of neutrino and antineutrino interactions on a variety of different nuclear targets (plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and H2O) for energies up to few GeV. An overview of the experiment and a description of the detector are presented.

  19. A discriminator with a current-sum multiplicity output for the PHENIX multiplicity vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.S.; Kennedy, E.J.; Jackson, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    A current output multiplicity discriminator for use in the front-end electronics (FEE) of the Multiplicity Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector at RHIC has been fabricated in the a 1.2-micro CMOS, n-well process. The discriminator is capable of triggering on input signals ranging from 0.25 MIP to 5 MIP. Frequency response of the discriminator is such that the circuit is capable of generating an output for every bunch crossing (105 ns) of the RHIC collider. Channel-to-channel threshold matching was adjustable to ± 4 mV. One channel of multiplicity discriminator occupied an area of 85 micro x 630 micro and consumed 515 microW from a single 5-V supply. Details of the design and results from prototype device testing are presented

  20. The effect of cathode bias (field effect) on the surface leakage current of CdZnTe detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Chen, C.M.H.; Cook, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    Surface resistivity is an important parameter of multi-electrode CZT detectors such as coplanar-grid, strip, or pixel detectors. Low surface resistivity results in a high leakage current and affects the charge collection efficiency in the areas near contacts. Thus, it is always desirable to have ...

  1. Application of Reactor Antineutrinos: Neutrinos for Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suekane, F.

    2013-02-01

    In nuclear reactors, 239Pu are produced along with burn-up of nuclear fuel. 239Pu is subject of safeguard controls since it is an explosive component of nuclear weapon. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is watching undeclared operation of reactors to prevent illegal production and removal of 239Pu. In operating reactors, a huge numbers of anti electron neutrinos (ν) are produced. Neutrino flux is approximately proportional to the operating power of reactor in short term and long term decrease of the neutrino flux per thermal power is proportional to the amount of 239Pu produced. Thus rector ν's carry direct and real time information useful for the safeguard purposes. Since ν can not be hidden, it could be an ideal medium to monitor the reactor operation. IAEA seeks for novel technologies which enhance their ability and reactor neutrino monitoring is listed as one of such candidates. Currently neutrino physicists are performing R&D of small reactor neutrino detectors to use specifically for the safeguard use in response to the IAEA interest. In this proceedings of the neutrino2012 conference, possibilities of such reactor neutrinos application and current world-wide R&D status are described.

  2. Progress of MCT Detector Technology at AIM Towards Smaller Pitch and Lower Dark Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, D.; Schirmacher, W.; Hanna, S.; Mahlein, K. M.; Fries, P.; Figgemeier, H.

    2017-09-01

    We present our latest results on cooled p-on- n planar mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) photodiode technology. Along with a reduction in dark current for raising the operating temperature ( T op), AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) has devoted its development efforts to shrinking the pixel size. Both are essential requirements to meet the market demands for reduced size, weight and power and high-operating temperature applications. Detectors based on the p-on- n technology developed at AIM now span the spectrum from the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) to the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) with cut-off wavelengths from 5 μm to about 13.5 μm at 80 K. The development of the p-on- n technology for VLWIR as well as for MWIR is mainly implemented in a planar photodetector design with a 20- μm pixel pitch. For the VLWIR, dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' are demonstrated for operating temperatures between 30 K and 100 K. This allows for the same dark current performance at a 20 K higher operating temperature than with previous AIM technology. For MWIR detectors with a 20- μm pitch, noise equivalent temperature differences of less than 30 mK are obtained up to 170 K. This technology has been transferred to our small pixel pitch high resolution (XGA) MWIR detector with 1024 × 768 pixels at a 10- μm pitch. Excellent performance at an operating temperature of 160 K is demonstrated.

  3. Description of current pulses induced by heavy ions in silicon detectors (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrita, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Parlog, M. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Borderie, B., E-mail: borderie@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Lavergne, L. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Rivet, M.F.; Barbey, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Chabot, M. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Chbihi, A. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Cussol, D. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Univ. de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Oliveira Santos, F. de [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Edelbruck, P. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Frankland, J.D. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Galichet, E. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Conservatoire National des Arts et Metier, F-75141 Paris Cedex 03 (France); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ.e Claude Bernard Lyon I, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lopez, O. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Univ. de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2011-06-21

    Current pulses induced in a silicon detector by 10 different heavy ion species at known energies around 10 A MeV have been sampled in time at high frequency. Their individual average shapes are quite well reproduced by a fit procedure based on our recent charge carrier collection treatment which considers the progressive extraction of the electrons and holes from the high carrier density zone along the ionizing particle track. This region is assumed to present a supplementary dielectric polarization and consequently a disturbed electric field. The influence of the nature of the heavy ion on the values of the three fit parameters is analyzed.

  4. Quark jets from antineutrino interactions. 2. Inclusive particle spectra and multiplicities in the quark jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammosov, V.V.; Denisov, A.G.; Gapienko, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    The results on inclusive particle production in the antineutrino charged current induced hadron jets observed in the Fermilab 15- ft. bubble chamber are presented. Fractional energy distributions, particle ratios and average multiplicities of the hadrons in the jets are measured. Ratios between the inclusive production rates of different mesons in the jets are studied to seek evidence for the d-quark origin of the observed hadrons. Good over-all agreement with the hypothesis of d-quark fragmentation with universal fragmentation functions obeying isospin systematics is established [ru

  5. Short gamma ray bursts triggered by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasin, Hannah; Perego, Albino [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Arcones, Almudena [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRB) are one of the most energetic events in the universe. Neutron star mergers are the most favourable candidate for the subclass of GRBs that last less than two seconds. It has been suggested that the annihilation of neutrino-antineutrino pairs emitted by the hot and dense merger remnant could be enough to launch a relativistic jet, producing such a burst. We calculate the energy deposition by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation based on the results of a Newtonian simulation of the aftermath of a binary neutron star merger. In addition, we investigate the necessary requirements for launching a GRB and compare with our numerical results.

  6. Single neutral pion production by charged-current ν¯μ interactions on hydrocarbon at 〈Eν〉=3.6 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Le

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for ν¯e appearance oscillation experiments. The differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  7. Study of the prospective usefulness of the detection of antineutrinos to monitor nuclear power plants for non proliferation purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormon, S.

    2012-01-01

    The field of applied neutrino physics has shown new developments in the last decade. Indeed, the antineutrinos (n e ) emitted by a nuclear power plant depend on the composition of the fuel: thus their detection could be exploited for determining the isotopic composition of the reactor fuel. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has expressed its interest in the potentialities of this detection as a new safeguard tool and has created an Ad Hoc working group devoted to this study. Our aim is to determine on the one hand, the current sensitivity reached with the n e detection and on the other hand, the sensitivity required to be useful to the IAEA and then we deduce the required performances required for a cubic meter detector. We will first present the physics on which our feasibility study relies: the neutrinos, the b-decay of the fission products (FP) and their conversion into ne spectra. We will then present our simulation tools: we use a package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE), initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3 labs to study Generation IV reactors. Thanks to MURE coupled with nuclear data bases, we build the ne spectra by summing the FP contributions. The method is the only one that allows the ne spectra calculations associated to future reactors: we will present the predicted spectra for various innovative fuels. We then calculate the emitted ne associated to various concepts of current and future nuclear reactors in order to determine the sensitivity of the ne probe to various diversion scenarios, taking neutronics into account. The reactor studied are Canadian Deuterium, Pebble Bed Reactor and Fast Breeder Reactor. (author)

  8. On neutrino and antineutrino scattering by electrons, and by partons

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, J S

    1975-01-01

    Assuming a non-derivative point interaction, and Born approximation, there are some simple relations between neutrino and antineutrino scattering on electrons or partons. They have been observed already, for some special cases, in the results of explicit calculations. Here they are obtained from simple and general considerations. (8 refs).

  9. On neutrino and antineutrino scattering by electrons, and by partons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.; Dass, G.V.

    1975-09-01

    Assuming a non-derivative point interaction, and Born approximation, there are some simple relations between neutrino and antineutrino scattering on electrons or partons. They have been observed already, for some special cases, in the results of explicit calculations. Here they are obtained from simple general considerations. (author)

  10. Measurement of total and differential cross sections of neutrino and antineutrino coherent π± production on carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislivec, A.; Higuera, A.; Aliaga, L.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Caceres v., G. F. R.; Cai, T.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chavarria, E.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Hurtado, K.; Jena, D.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Nguyen, C.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sultana, M.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Tagg, N.; Valencia, E.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; Zavala, G.; MinerνA Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    Neutrino induced coherent charged pion production on nuclei, ν¯ μA →μ±π∓A , is a rare inelastic interaction in which the four-momentum squared transferred to the nucleus is nearly zero, leaving it intact. We identify such events in the scintillator of MINERvA by reconstructing |t | from the final state pion and muon momenta and by removing events with evidence of energetic nuclear recoil or production of other final state particles. We measure the total neutrino and antineutrino cross sections as a function of neutrino energy between 2 and 20 GeV and measure flux integrated differential cross sections as a function of Q2 , Eπ, and θπ . The Q2 dependence and equality of the neutrino and antineutrino cross sections at finite Q2 provide a confirmation of Adler's partial conservation of axial current hypothesis.

  11. Antineutrino science in KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuto [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The primary goal of KamLAND is a search for the oscillation of anti ν{sub e}'s emitted from distant power reactors. The long baseline, typically 180 km, enables KamLAND to address the oscillation solution of the ''solar neutrino problem'' with anti ν{sub e}'s under laboratory conditions. KamLAND found fewer reactor anti ν{sub e} events than expected from standard assumptions about anti ν{sub e} propagation at more than 9 σ confidence level (C.L.). The observed energy spectrum disagrees with the expected spectral shape at more than 5 σ C.L., and prefers the distortion from neutrino oscillation effects. A three-flavor oscillation analysis of the data from KamLAND and KamLAND + solar neutrino experiments with CPT invariance, yields Δm{sub 21}{sup 2} = [7.54{sub -0.18}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}, 7.53{sub -0.18}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}], tan{sup 2}θ{sub 12} = [0.481{sub -0.080}{sup +0.092}, 0.437{sub -0.026}{sup +0.029}], and sin{sup 2}θ{sub 13} = [0.010{sub -0.034}{sup +0.033}, 0.023{sub -0.015}{sup +0.015}]. All solutions to the solar neutrino problem except for the large mixing angle region are excluded. KamLAND also demonstrated almost two cycles of the periodic feature expected from neutrino oscillation effects. KamLAND performed the first experimental study of antineutrinos from the Earth's interior so-called geoneutrinos (geo anti ν{sub e}'s), and succeeded in detecting geo anti ν{sub e}'s produced by the decays of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th within the Earth. Assuming a chondritic Th/U mass ratio, we obtain 116{sub -27}{sup +28} anti ν{sub e} events from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, corresponding a geo anti ν{sub e} flux of 3.4{sub -0.8}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at the KamLAND location. We evaluate various bulk silicate Earth composition models using the observed geo anti ν{sub e} rate. (orig.)

  12. Constant-current regulator improves tunnel diode threshold-detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancro, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    Grounded-base transistor is placed in a tunnel diode threshold detector circuit, and a bias voltage is applied to the tunnel diode. This provides the threshold detector with maximum voltage output and overload protection.

  13. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betin, J; Zhabin, E; Krampit, I; Smirnov, V

    1980-04-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc.

  14. An overview of current developments in position-sensitive hybrid photon detectors and photo-multiplier tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gys, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in position-sensitive hybrid photon detectors and photo-multiplier tubes have stimulated increased interest from a variety of fields such as astronomy, biomedical imaging and high- energy physics. These devices are sensitive to single photons over a photon energy spectrum defined by the transmission of the optical entrance window and the photo-cathode type. Their spatial resolution ranges from a few millimeters for pad hybrid photon detectors and multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes down to a few tens of microns for pixel hybrid photon detectors and electron-bombarded charge-coupled devices. Basic technological and design aspects are assessed in this paper. (21 refs).

  15. Neutrino-antineutrino pair production by hadronic bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacca, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    I will report on recent calculations of neutrino-antineutrino pair production from bremsstrahlung processes in hadronic collisions and consider temperature conditions relevant for core collapse supernovae. Earlier studies on bremsstrahlung from neutron-neutron collisions showed that the approximation used in typical supernova simulation to model this process differs by about a factor of 2 from predictions based on chiral effective field theory, where the chiral expansion of two-body forces is considered up to the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. When the density of neutrons is large enough this process may compete with other non-hadronic reactions in the production of neutrinos, in particular in the case of μ and τ neutrinos, which are not generated by charged-current reactions. A natural question to ask is then: what is the effect of neutrino pair production from collisions of neutrons with finite nuclei? To tackle this question, we recently have addressed the case of neutron- α collisions, given that in the P-wave channels the neutron- α scattering features a resonance near 1 MeV. We find that the resonance leads to an enhanced contribution in the neutron spin structure function at temperatures in the range of 0 . 1 - 4 MeV. For significant density fractions of α in this temperature range, this process is competitive with contributions from neutron-neutron scattering. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work was supported in parts by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant Number SAPIN-2015-0003).

  16. Neutrino and antineutrino charge-exchange reactions on 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samana, A. R.; Krmpotic, F.; Paar, N.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    We extend the formalism of weak interaction processes, obtaining new expressions for the transition rates, which greatly facilitate numerical calculations, for both neutrino-nucleus reactions and muon capture. Explicit violation of the conserved vector current hypothesis by the Coulomb field, as well as development of a sum-rule approach for inclusive cross sections, has been worked out. We have done a thorough study of exclusive (ground-state) properties of 12 B and 12 N within the projected quasiparticle random phase approximation (PQRPA). Good agreement with experimental data achieved in this way put into evidence the limitations of the standard RPA and QRPA models, which come from the inability of the RPA to open the p 3/2 shell and from the nonconservation of the number of particles in the QRPA. The inclusive neutrino/antineutrino (ν/ν-tilde) reactions 12 C(ν,e - ) 12 N and 12 C(ν-tilde,e + ) 12 B are calculated within both the PQRPA and the relativistic QRPA. It is found that (i) the magnitudes of the resulting cross sections are close to the sum-rule limit at low energy, but significantly smaller than this limit at high energies, for both ν and ν-tilde; (ii) they increase steadily when the size of the configuration space is augmented, particularly for ν/ν-tilde energies >200 MeV; and (iii) they converge for sufficiently large configuration space and final-state spin. The quasi-elastic 12 C(ν,μ - ) 12 N cross section recently measured in the MiniBooNE experiment is briefly discussed. We study the decomposition of the inclusive cross section based on the degree of forbiddenness of different multipoles. A few words are dedicated to the ν/ν-tilde- 12 C charge-exchange reactions related to astrophysical applications.

  17. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  18. Dead time of different neutron detectors associated with a pulsed electronics with current collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacconnet, Eugene; Duchene, Jean; Duquesne, Henry; Schmitt, Andre

    1968-01-01

    After having outlined that the development of fast neutron reactor physics, notably kinetics, requires highly efficient neutron detectors and pulse measurement chains able to cope with high counting rates, the authors report the measurement of dead time of various neutron detectors which are used in the experimental study of fast neutron reactors. They present the SAITB 1 electronic measurement set, its components, its general characteristics, the protected connection between the detector and the electronics. They present and report the experiment: generalities about detector location and measurements, studied detectors (fission chambers, boron counters), and report the exploitation of the obtained results (principle, data, high-threshold counting gain) [fr

  19. Optimal design of superconducting fault detector for superconductor triggered fault current limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, S.-W.; Kim, H.-R.; Hyun, O.-B.; Sim, J.; Park, K.B.; Lee, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and tested a superconducting fault detector (SFD) for a 22.9 kV superconductor triggered fault current limiters (STFCLs) using Au/YBCO thin films. The SFD is to detect a fault and commutate the current from the primary path to the secondary path of the STFCL. First, quench characteristics of the Au/YBCO thin films were investigated for various faults having different fault duration. The rated voltage of the Au/YBCO thin films was determined from the results, considering the stability of the Au/YBCO elements. Second, the recovery time to superconductivity after quench was measured in each fault case. In addition, the dependence of the recovery characteristics on numbers and dimension of Au/YBCO elements were investigated. Based on the results, a SFD was designed, fabricated and tested. The SFD successfully detected a fault current and carried out the line commutation. Its recovery time was confirmed to be less than 0.5 s, satisfying the reclosing scheme in the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO)'s power grid

  20. Accounting for Dark Current Accumulated during Readout of Hubble's ACS/WFC Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, Jenna E.; Grogin, Norman A.; Coe, Dan A.; ACS Team

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the properties of excess dark current accumulated during the 100-second full-frame readout of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) detectors. This excess dark current, called "readout dark", gives rise to ambient background gradients and hot columns in each ACS/WFC image. While readout dark signal is removed from science images during the bias correction step in CALACS, the additional noise from the readout dark is currently not taken into account. We develop a method to estimate the readout dark noise properties in ACS/WFC observations. We update the error (ERR) extensions of superbias images to include the appropriate noise from the ambient readout dark gradient and stable hot columns. In recent data, this amounts to about 5 e-/pixel added variance in the rows farthest from the WFC serial registers, and about 7 to 30 e-/pixel added variance along the stable hot columns. We also flag unstable hot columns in the superbias data quality (DQ) extensions. The new reference file pipeline for ACS/WFC implements these updates to our superbias creation process.

  1. A new anti-neutrino detection technique based on positronium tagging with plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consolati, G. [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Franco, D., E-mail: dfranco@in2p3.fr [APC, Univ. Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris (France); Jollet, C. [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Meregaglia, A., E-mail: amerega@in2p3.fr [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Minotti, A. [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Perasso, S.; Tonazzo, A. [APC, Univ. Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris (France)

    2015-09-21

    The main signature for anti-neutrino detection in reactor and geo-neutrino experiments based on scintillators is provided by the space–time coincidence of positron and neutron produced in the Inverse Beta Decay reaction. Such a signature strongly suppresses backgrounds and allows for measurements performed underground with a relatively high signal-to-background ratio. In an aboveground environment, however, the twofold coincidence technique is not sufficient to efficiently reject the high background rate induced by cosmogenic events. Enhancing the positron–neutron twofold coincidence efficiency may pave the way to future aboveground detectors for reactor monitoring. We propose a new detection scheme based on a threefold coincidence, among the positron ionization, the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) decay, and the neutron capture, in a sandwich detector with alternated layers of plastic scintillator and aerogel powder. We present the results of a set of dedicated measurements on the achievable light yield and on the o-Ps formation and lifetime. The efficiencies for signal detection and background rejection of a preliminary detector design are also discussed.

  2. The case for a directional dark matter detector and the status of current experimental efforts

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlen, S; Battat, J B R; Billard, J; Bozorgnia, N; Burgos, S; Caldwell, T; Carmona, J M; Cebrián, S; Colas, P; Dafni, T; Daw, E; Dujmic, D; Dushkin, A; Fedus, W; Ferrer, E; Finkbeiner, D; Fisher, P H; Forbes, J; Fusayasu, T; Galan, J; Gamble, T; Ghag, C; Giomataris, Yu; Gold, M; Gomez, H; Gómez, M E; Gondolo, P; Green, A; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Hagemann, C; Hattori, K; Henderson, S; Higashi, N; Ida, C; Iguaz, F J; Inglis, A; Irastorza, I G; Iwaki, S; Kaboth, A; Kabuki, S; Kadyk, J; Kallivayalil, N; Kubo, H; Kurosawa, S; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lamy, T; Lanza, R; Lawson, T B; Lee, A; Lee, E R; Lin, T; Loomba, D; López, J; Luzón, G; Manobu, T; Martoff, J; Mayet, F; McCluskey, B; Miller, E; Miuchi, K; Monroe, J; Morgan, B; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Naka, T; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Nicklin, G G; Nishimura, H; Niwa, K; Paling, S M; Parker, J; Petkov, A; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Sahin, T; Sanderson, R; Sanghi, N; Santos, D; Sato, O; Sawano, T; Sciolla, G; Sekiya, H; Slatyer, T R; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Sugiyama, A; Takada, A; Takahashi, M; Takeda, A; Tanimori, T; Taniue, K; Tomas, A; Tomita, H; Tsuchiya, K; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E; Ueno, K; Vahsen, S; Vanderspek, R; Vergados, J; Villar, J A; Wellenstein, H; Wolfe, I; Yamamoto, R K; Yegoryan, H

    2010-01-01

    We present the case for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity. This document was developed at the 2009 CYGNUS workshop on directional dark matter detection, and contains contributions from theorists and experimental groups in the field. We describe the need for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity; each directional dark matter experiment presents their project's status; and we close with a feasibility study for scaling up to a one ton directional detector, which would cost around $150M.

  3. Unfolding neutron spectrum with Markov Chain Monte Carlo at MIT research Reactor with He-3 Neutral Current Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, A.; Anderson, A. J.; Billard, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Formaggio, J. A.; Hasselkus, C.; Newman, E.; Palladino, K.; Phuthi, M.; Winslow, L.; Zhang, L.

    2018-02-01

    The Ricochet experiment seeks to measure Coherent (neutral-current) Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering (CEνNS) using dark-matter-style detectors with sub-keV thresholds placed near a neutrino source, such as the MIT (research) Reactor (MITR), which operates at 5.5 MW generating approximately 2.2 × 1018 ν/second in its core. Currently, Ricochet is characterizing the backgrounds at MITR, the main component of which comes in the form of neutrons emitted from the core simultaneous with the neutrino signal. To characterize this background, we wrapped Bonner cylinders around a 32He thermal neutron detector, whose data was then unfolded via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to produce a neutron energy spectrum across several orders of magnitude. We discuss the resulting spectrum and its implications for deploying Ricochet at the MITR site as well as the feasibility of reducing this background level via the addition of polyethylene shielding around the detector setup.

  4. Net charge of quark jets in (anti)neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teper, M.

    1981-01-01

    We analyse recent measurements of the net charges of quark jets in neutrino and antineutrino interactions. The data indicates that (i) the two quarks in the nucleon fragmentation region prefer to behave as a diquark rather than as a pair of independent quarks, and (ii) the struck quark does not appear to suffer any soft charge exchange of the kind that occurs when a valence quark inside a nucleon is slowed to x approx. O. (orig.)

  5. Bilocal current densities and mean trajectories in a Young interferometer with two Gaussian slits and two detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, L. P., E-mail: lpwithers@mitre.org [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030-4444 (United States); Narducci, F. A., E-mail: francesco.narducci@navy.mil [Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The recent single-photon double-slit experiment of Steinberg et al., based on a weak measurement method proposed by Wiseman, showed that, by encoding the photon’s transverse momentum behind the slits into its polarization state, the momentum profile can subsequently be measured on average, from a difference of the separated fringe intensities for the two circular polarization components. They then integrated the measured average velocity field, to obtain the average trajectories of the photons enroute to the detector array. In this paper, we propose a modification of their experiment, to demonstrate that the average particle velocities and trajectories change when the mode of detection changes. The proposed experiment replaces a single detector by a pair of detectors with a given spacing between them. The pair of detectors is configured so that it is impossible to distinguish which detector received the particle. The pair of detectors is then analogous to the simple pair of slits, in that it is impossible to distinguish which slit the particle passed through. To establish the paradoxical outcome of the modified experiment, the theory and explicit three-dimensional formulas are developed for the bilocal probability and current densities, and for the average velocity field and trajectories as the particle wavefunction propagates in the volume of space behind the Gaussian slits. Examples of these predicted results are plotted. Implementation details of the proposed experiment are discussed.

  6. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betin, J.; Zhabin, E.; Krampit, I.; Smirnov, V.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc. (M.S.)

  7. CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. J. Schmid; V. Yu. Glebov; A. V. Friensehner; D. R. Hargrove; S. P. Hatchett; N. Izumi; R. A. Lerche; T. W. Phillips; T. C. Sangster; C. Silbernagel; C. Stoecki

    2001-01-01

    We have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.4 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.0 mA/W at 1000 V/mm. These values are approximately 2 to 5x times higher than those reported for natural Type IIa diamond at similar E-field and thickness (1mm). These characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to target chamber center (TCC), and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and x-rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. The acquired neutron spectra could then be used to extract DD fuel areal density from the downscattered secondary to secondary ratio

  8. Neutrino-4 experiment on search for sterile neutrino with multi-section model of detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Samoilov, R.; Fomin, A.; Polyushkin, A.; Zinoviev, V.; Neustroev, P.; Golovtsov, V.; Chernyj, A.; Zherebtsov, O.; Martemyanov, V.; Tarasenkov, V.; Aleshin, V.; Petelin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Tuzov, A.; Sazontov, S.; Ryazanov, D.; Gromov, M.; Afanasiev, V.; Zaytsev, M.; Chaikovskii, M.

    2017-09-01

    In order to carry out research in the field of possible existence of a sterile neutrino the laboratory based on SM-3 reactor (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. The prototype of a multi-section neutrino detector with liquid scintillator volume of 350 l was installed in the middle of 2015. It is a moveable inside the passive shielding detector, which can be set at distance range from 6 to 11 meters from the reactor core. Measurements of antineutrino flux at such small distances from the reactor core are carried out with moveable detector for the first time. The measurements carried out with detector prototype demonstrated a possibility of measuring a reactor antineutrino flux in difficult conditions of cosmic background at Earth surface.

  9. Shell-model computed cross sections for charged-current scattering of astrophysical neutrinos off 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostensalo, Joel; Suhonen, Jouni; Zuber, K.

    2018-03-01

    Charged-current (anti)neutrino-40Ar cross sections for astrophysical neutrinos have been calculated. The initial and final nuclear states were calculated using the nuclear shell model. The folded solar-neutrino scattering cross section was found to be 1.78 (23 ) ×10-42cm2 , which is higher than what the previous papers have reported. The contributions from the 1- and 2- multipoles were found to be significant at supernova-neutrino energies, confirming the random-phase approximation (RPA) result of a previous study. The effects of neutrino flavor conversions in dense stellar matter (matter oscillations) were found to enhance the neutrino-scattering cross sections significantly for both the normal and inverted mass hierarchies. For the antineutrino scattering, only a small difference between the nonoscillating and inverted-hierarchy cross sections was found, while the normal-hierarchy cross section was 2-3 times larger than that of the nonoscillating cross section, depending on the adopted parametrization of the Fermi-Dirac distribution. This property of the supernova-antineutrino signal could probably be used to distinguish between the two hierarchies in megaton LAr detectors.

  10. Modelling of illuminated current–voltage characteristics to evaluate leakage currents in long wavelength infrared mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Qiu, WeiCheng; Hu, Weida

    2014-01-01

    The current–voltage characteristics of long wavelength mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors have been studied using a recently suggested method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. Diodes fabricated on in-house grown arsenic and vacancy doped epitaxial layers were evaluated for their leakage currents. The thermal diffusion, generation–recombination (g-r), and ohmic currents were found as principal components of diode current besides a component of photocurrent due to illumination. In addition, both types of diodes exhibited an excess current component whose growth with the applied bias voltage did not match the expected growth of trap-assisted-tunnelling current. Instead, it was found to be the best described by an exponential function of the type, I excess  = I r0  + K 1 exp (K 2 V), where I r0 , K 1 , and K 2 are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. A study of the temperature dependence of the diode current components and the excess current provided the useful clues about the source of origin of excess current. It was found that the excess current in diodes fabricated on arsenic doped epitaxial layers has its origin in the source of ohmic shunt currents. Whereas, the source of excess current in diodes fabricated on vacancy doped epitaxial layers appeared to be the avalanche multiplication of photocurrent. The difference in the behaviour of two types of diodes has been attributed to the difference in the quality of epitaxial layers

  11. First Anti-neutrino Oscillation Results from the T2K Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are some of the most abundant but yet most elusive particles in the universe. They have almost no mass, only interact weakly and relatively little is known about their properties. Furthermore it has been firmly established over the last decade that neutrinos can undergo flavour transitions as mass and flavor eigenstates are not identical. These neutrino oscillations have been studied using natural sources as well as nuclear reactors or with neutrinos produced at accelerators. T2K is a long baseline neutrino oscillation beam that uses a beam of muon (anti-)neutrinos that is directed form J-PARC at the east cost of Japan over a distance of almost 300 km to the SuperKamiokande water Cherenkov detector in the west. The facility is complemented by a near detector complex 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target to characterise the beam and the neutrino interaction dynamics. T2K has taken data with a muon neutrino beam since early 2010 and is studying the disappearance of muon neutrinos as well...

  12. Experimental conditions for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with reactor antineutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Youl Pac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the optimized experimental requirements to determine neutrino mass hierarchy using electron antineutrinos (ν¯e generated in a nuclear reactor. The features of the neutrino mass hierarchy can be extracted from the |Δm312| and |Δm322| oscillations by applying the Fourier sine and cosine transforms to the L/E spectrum. To determine the neutrino mass hierarchy above 90% probability, the requirements on the energy resolution as a function of the baseline are studied at sin2⁡2θ13=0.1. If the energy resolution of the neutrino detector is less than 0.04/Eν and the determination probability obtained from Bayes' theorem is above 90%, the detector needs to be located around 48–53 km from the reactor(s to measure the energy spectrum of ν¯e. These results will be helpful for setting up an experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, which is an important problem in neutrino physics.

  13. Observation of Energy and Baseline Dependent Reactor Antineutrino Disappearance in the RENO Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J H; Choi, W Q; Choi, Y; Jang, H I; Jang, J S; Jeon, E J; Joo, K K; Kim, B R; Kim, H S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kim, S Y; Kim, W; Kim, Y D; Ko, Y; Lee, D H; Lim, I T; Pac, M Y; Park, I G; Park, J S; Park, R G; Seo, H; Seo, S H; Seon, Y G; Shin, C D; Siyeon, K; Yang, J H; Yeo, I S; Yu, I

    2016-05-27

    The RENO experiment has analyzed about 500 live days of data to observe an energy dependent disappearance of reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} by comparing their prompt signal spectra measured in two identical near and far detectors. In the period between August of 2011 and January of 2013, the far (near) detector observed 31 541 (290 775) electron antineutrino candidate events with a background fraction of 4.9% (2.8%). The measured prompt spectra show an excess of reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} around 5 MeV relative to the prediction from a most commonly used model. A clear energy and baseline dependent disappearance of reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} is observed in the deficit of the observed number of ν[over ¯]_{e}. Based on the measured far-to-near ratio of prompt spectra, we obtain sin^{2}2θ_{13}=0.082±0.009(stat)±0.006(syst) and |Δm_{ee}^{2}|=[2.62_{-0.23}^{+0.21}(stat)_{-0.13}^{+0.12}(syst)]×10^{-3}  eV^{2}.

  14. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Colin E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  15. Energy distribution of antineutrinos originating from the decay of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.

    1979-01-01

    The energy spectrum of antineutrinos around a nuclear reactor has been derived by summing contributions from individual fission products. The resulting spectrum is weaker at energies above approx. 8 MeV than earlier published antineutrino spectra. The reason may be connected to the strong feeding of high-lying daughter states in the beta decay of fission products with high disintegration energies

  16. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E., E-mail: few@tulane.ed [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Byrne, J. [University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Collett, B. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jones, G.L. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Komives, A. [Physics Department, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135 (United States); Laptev, A. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Noid, G.; Stephenson, E.J. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Stern, I.; Trull, C. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Yerozolimsky, B.G. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The aCORN experiment is designed to make a precision (<1%) measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. It uses a new method proposed in 1996 by Yerozolimsky and Mostovoy. Electrons and recoil protons from neutron decay in a cold beam are detected in coincidence. The momenta of the particles are selected so that the protons form two kinematically distinct time-of-flight groups as a function of electron energy. The count rate asymmetry in these two groups is proportional to the a-coefficient. Precision spectroscopy of the protons is not required. The apparatus is currently under construction. It will be integrated and tested at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) and then moved to the NIST Center for Neutron Research for the initial physics run.

  17. Pin Diode Detector For Radiation Field Monitoring In A Current Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Kadmon, Y.; Tirosh, D.; Osovizky, A.; Vulasky, E.; Tal, N.

    1999-01-01

    Thus paper presents calculations and tests made for a detector based on a bare Pin diode and a Pin diode coupled to a plastic scintillator. These configurations have a variety of applications in radiation field monitoring. For example, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology which becomes an established diagnostic imaging modality. Flour-18 is one of the major isotopes being used by PET imaging. The PET method utilizes short half life β + radioisotopes which, by annihilation, produce a pair of high energy photons (511 keV). Fluoro-deoxyglucose producers are required to meet federal regulations and licensing requirements. Some of the regulations are related to the production in chemistry modules regarding measuring the Start Of Synthesis (SOS) activity and verifying the process repeatability. Locating a radiation detector based on Pin diode inside the chemistry modules is suitable for this purpose. The dimensions of a Pin diode based detector can be small, with expected linearity over several scale decades

  18. Current applications of semiconductor x-ray detectors in chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, N.E.

    1975-07-01

    In the last few years, semiconductor detectors have been used as X-ray detectors with great success, and the routine rapid accumulation of X-ray spectra is now possible. This review surveys the historical development of the detectors, the utilisation, and relative merits of various means of exciting the X-radiation from the elements in the sample, and compares the technique with other methods claiming to offer the capability of simultaneous multi-element analysis. It is concluded that it is of average sensitivity, but offers some advantages from its non-destructive nature, and in some cases its ability to offer information about the spatial distribution of elements in a sample. Other types of analysis may also be possible simultaneously. Sample preparation techniques are reviewed, especially techniques of manufacturing thin samples. An appendix contains details of the very wide variety of samples which have been analysed. More than 350 references are included. (auth.)

  19. Measuring delayed part of the current of a self powered neutron detector and comparison with calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kophazi, J.; Czifrus, Sz.; Feher, S.; Por, G.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the measurement of the delayed signal of a Rh emitter Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) separately from other signal components originating from (n-gamma-e), (background gamma-e) and other effects. In order to separate the delayed signal, the detector was removed from the reactor core and placed to an adequately distant location during the measurement, where the radiation from the core was negligible. The experiment was carried out on the 100kW light water tank-type reactor of Technical University of Budapest and the results of the measurement were compared with the results of Monte Carlo calculations.(author)

  20. Diffractive production of p-mesons and of pπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in νp and anti νp charged-current interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV ν 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2 , x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions. (orig.)

  1. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, S.T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory being developed at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and θ 13 . At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle

  2. Neutron radiative capture reactions on nuclei of relevance to 0νββ, dark matter and neutrino/antineutrino searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, W.; Bhike, Megha

    2015-05-01

    A program is underway at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the neutron capture cross section in the 0.5 to 15 MeV energy range on nuclei whose radioactive daughters could potentially create backgrounds in searches for rare events. Here, we refer to neutrino-less double-beta decay and dark-matter searches, and to detectors built for neutrino and/or antineutrino studies. Neutron capture cross-section data obtained by using the activation method are reported for 40Ar, 74,76Ge, 128,130Te and 136Xe and compared to model calculations and evaluations.

  3. Neutron radiative capture reactions on nuclei of relevance to 0νββ, dark matter and neutrino/antineutrino searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornow W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A program is underway at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL to measure the neutron capture cross section in the 0.5 to 15 MeV energy range on nuclei whose radioactive daughters could potentially create backgrounds in searches for rare events. Here, we refer to neutrino-less double-beta decay and dark-matter searches, and to detectors built for neutrino and/or antineutrino studies. Neutron capture cross-section data obtained by using the activation method are reported for 40Ar, 74,76Ge, 128,130Te and 136Xe and compared to model calculations and evaluations.

  4. Neutron radiative capture reactions on nuclei of relevance to 0νββ, dark matter and neutrino/antineutrino searches

    OpenAIRE

    Tornow W.; Bhike Megha

    2015-01-01

    A program is underway at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the neutron capture cross section in the 0.5 to 15 MeV energy range on nuclei whose radioactive daughters could potentially create backgrounds in searches for rare events. Here, we refer to neutrino-less double-beta decay and dark-matter searches, and to detectors built for neutrino and/or antineutrino studies. Neutron capture cross-section data obtained by using the activation method are reported for 40Ar...

  5. Status of the experiment on the laboratory search for the electron antineutrino magnetic moment at the level mu subnu <= 3 x 10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 mu sub B

    CERN Document Server

    Neganov, B S; Yukhimchuk, A A; Bogdanova, L N; Beda, A G; Starostin, A S

    2001-01-01

    The experiment on the direct detection of antineutrino-electron scattering using a 40 MCi tritium beta-active source will allow to lower the present-day laboratory limit for the neutrino magnetic moment by two orders of magnitude. The experiment brings together novel unique technologies in studies of rare processes of neutrino-electron scattering: 1) and artificial source of antineutrinos from tritium decay of 40-MCi activity with the antineutrino flux density approx = 6 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1; 2) new types of detectors capable of detecting electrons with energy down to approx 10 eV, namely, a silicon cryogenic detector based on the ionization-into-heat conversion effect, a high-pure germanium detector with the internal signal amplification in the electric field. A compact installation located in a specially equipped laboratory underground (<= 100 water equivalent meters) will provide favorable background conditions for running the experiment. With the background level about 0.1 even...

  6. Electronic alarm device for radioactivity detector associated with a direct current amplifier or with a integration-based counting assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmaretz, Marc; Ferlicot, Rene

    1964-04-01

    The authors report the study of a device aimed at triggering sound and light alarms when a radiation detector associated with a direct current amplifier or with a counting assembly detects a radiation intensity greater than one or two previously defined thresholds. This device can be used at any time for a detection assembly which is not continuously monitored. It has been designed to be adapted to the CEA standard electronics currently used in installations and on which the alarm function had not been initially foreseen. The assembly comprises an additional safety device for the control of any untimely shutdown of the detection chain [fr

  7. Search for Electron Antineutrino Appearance at the Δm2∼1 eV2 Scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Spitz, J.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Marsh, W.; Moore, C. D.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Bugel, L.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Conrad, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration reports initial results from a search for ν μ →ν e oscillations. A signal-blind analysis was performed using a data sample corresponding to 3.39x10 20 protons on target. The data are consistent with background prediction across the full range of neutrino energy reconstructed assuming quasielastic scattering, 200 ν QE <3000 MeV: 144 electronlike events have been observed in this energy range, compared to an expectation of 139.2±17.6 events. No significant excess of events has been observed, both at low energy, 200-475 MeV, and at high energy, 475-1250 MeV. The data are inconclusive with respect to antineutrino oscillations suggested by data from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Principles and applications of a neutral current detector for neutrino physics and astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.; Stodolsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    We study neutrino detection through the elastic scattering of neutrinos on nuclei and identification of the recoil energy. The very large value of the cross section compared to previous methods indicates a detector would be relatively light and suggests the possibility of a true 'neutrino observatory'. We examine a realization in terms of the superconducting grain idea, which appears in principle feasible through extension and extrapolation of presently known techniques. Such a detector would permit determination of the neutrino spectrum and should be intensive to neutrino oscillations. Various applications and tests are discussed, including spallation sources, reactors, supernovas, solar and terrestrial neutrinos. A supernova would permit a simple determination of the number of neutrinos and their masses, while for solar neutrinos rates of thousands of S.N.U. are theoretically attainable. A preliminary estimate of the most difficult backgrounds is attempted. (orig.)

  9. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  10. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-01

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  11. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-15

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  12. Calculation of induced current densities and specific absorption rates (SAR) for pregnant women exposed to hand-held metal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Chan, Dulciana D; Casamento, Jon P; Bassen, Howard I

    2003-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in combination with a well established frequency scaling method was used to calculate the internal fields and current densities induced in a simple model of a pregnant woman and her foetus, when exposed to hand-held metal detectors. The pregnant woman and foetus were modelled using a simple semi-heterogeneous model in 10 mm resolution, consisting of three different types of tissue. The model is based on the scanned shape of a pregnant woman in the 34th gestational week. Nine different representative models of hand-held metal detectors operating in the frequency range from 8 kHz to 2 MHz were evaluated. The metal detectors were placed directly on the abdomen of the computational model with a spacing of 1 cm. Both the induced current density and the specific absorption rate (SAR) are well below the recommended limits for exposure of the general public published in the ICNIRP Guidelines and the IEEE C95.1 Standard. The highest current density is 8.3 mA m -2 and the highest SAR is 26.5 μW kg -1 . Compared to the limits for the induced current density recommended in the ICNIRP Guidelines, a minimum safety factor of 3 exists. Compared to the IEEE C95.1 Standard, a safety factor of 60,000 for the specific absorption rate was found. Based on the very low specific absorption rate and an induced current density below the recommended exposure limits, significant temperature rise or nerve stimulation in the pregnant woman or in the foetus can be excluded

  13. Isotopic identification using Pulse Shape Analysis of current signals from silicon detectors: Recent results from the FAZIA collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, G., E-mail: pastore@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gruyer, D. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ottanelli, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Le Neindre, N. [LPC Caen, Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, 14000 Caen (France); Pasquali, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Alba, R. [INFN LNS, Via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Barlini, S.; Bini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bonnet, E. [SUBATECH, EMN-IN2P3/CNRS-Université de Nantes, Nantes (France); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Borderie, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R. [LPC Caen, Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, 14000 Caen (France); Bruno, M. [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Casini, G. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); and others

    2017-07-11

    The FAZIA apparatus exploits Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) to identify nuclear fragments stopped in the first layer of a Silicon-Silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescope. In this work, for the first time, we show that the isotopes of fragments having atomic number as high as Z∼20 can be identified. Such a remarkable result has been obtained thanks to a careful construction of the Si detectors and to the use of low noise and high performance digitizing electronics. Moreover, optimized PSA algorithms are needed. This work deals with the choice of the best algorithm for PSA of current signals. A smoothing spline algorithm is demonstrated to give optimal results without requiring too much computational resources.

  14. Super high voltage Schottky diode with low leakage current for x- and γ-ray detector application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosyachenko, L. A.; Sklyarchuk, V. M.; Sklyarchuk, O. F.; Maslyanchuk, O. L.; Gnatyuk, V. A.; Aoki, T.

    2009-01-01

    A significant improvement in x-/γ-ray detector performance has been achieved by forming both rectifying and near-Ohmic contacts by the deposition of Ni on opposite surfaces of semi-insulating CdTe crystals pretreated by special chemical etching and Ar-ion bombardment with different parameters. The reduced injection of the minority carriers from the near-Ohmic contact in the neutral part of the diode provides low leakage current even at high bias ( 2 at 2000 V and 293 K). The electrical properties of the detectors are well described quantitatively by the generation-recombination Sah-Noyce-Shockley theory excepting the high reverse voltage range where some injection of minority carriers takes place

  15. Comparison radiation dose of Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique with fixed tube current multi-detector row CT scanning of lower extremity venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok; Jang, Keun Jo; Jeon, Sang Hwan; Kim, Yong Soo

    2007-01-01

    Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique automatically adjusts tube current based on size of body region scanned. The purpose of the current study was to compare noise, and radiation dose of Multi-Detector row CT (MDCT) of lower extremity performed with Z-axis modulation technique of automatic tube current modulation with manual selection fixed tube current. Fifty consecutive underwent MDCT venography of lower extremity with use of a MDCT scanner fixed tube current and Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique (10, 11 and 12 HU noise index, 70∼450 mA). Scanning parameters included 120 kVp, 0.5 second gantry rotation time, 1.35:1 beam pitch, and 1 mm reconstructed section thickness. For each subject, images obtained with Z-axis modulation were compared with previous images obtained with fixed tube current (200, 250, 300 mA) and with other parameters identical. Images were compared for noise at five levels: iliac, femoral, popliteal, tibial, and peroneal vein of lower extremity. Tube current and gantry rotation time used for acquisitions at these levels were recorded. All CT examinations of study and control groups were diagnostically acceptable, though objective noise was significantly more with Z-axis automatic tube current modulation. Compared with fixed tube current, Z-axis modulation resulted in reduction of CTDIvol (range, -6.5%∼-35.6%) and DLP (range,-0.2%∼-20.2%). Compared with manually selected fixed tube current, Z-axis automatic tube current modulation resulted in reduced radiation dose at MDCT of lower extremity venography

  16. Determination of the ratio r v = d v u v of the valence quark distributions in the proton from neutrino and antineutrino reactions on hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1994-12-01

    Based on a QCD analysis of the parton momentum distributions in the proton, the ratio r v = d v / u v of the d and u valence quark distributions is determined as function of x in the range 0.01< x<0.7. The analysis uses data from neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions on hydrogen and deuterium, obtained with BEBC in the (anti)neutrino wideband beam of the CERN SPS. Since v mainly depends on the deuterium/hydrogen ratios of the normalised x-y-Q 2-distributions many systematic effects cancel. It is found that r v decreases with increasing x, and drops below the naive SU(6) expectation of 0.5 for x≳0.3. An extrapolation of r v to x=1 is consistent with the hypothesis r v (1)=0.

  17. Neutrino-argon interactions in the T2K near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Lukas; Radermacher, Thomas; Roth, Stefan; Steinmann, Jochen [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The T2K near detector employs three large, argon-filled TPCs with a total fiducial volume of about 10 m{sup 3} at ambient pressure. These TPCs have been exposed to the intense T2K muon-neutrino beam since the start of the experiment. The beam has a mean neutrino energy of 600 MeV and so far, data corresponding to over 6 . 10{sup 20}(4 . 10{sup 20}) protons on target was recorded in neutrino (anti-neutrino) mode. We expect about 600 charged current neutrino-argon interactions in the data. That enables us to do the world's first neutrino-Argon cross section measurement in gaseous argon, thus making an important contribution to constraining nuclear interaction models for future neutrino oscillation measurements. This talk describes the physics goals and present the current status of the analysis.

  18. Angular detector of defects in a metallic tube by eddy currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broudeur, R.

    1990-01-01

    The angular detector of defects in a metallic tube has two centering pieces for the clad positioning on both sides of a backing ring of the measuring coil. The inner diameter of the backing ring and the diameter of the centering pieces are in the ratio 4/3±0.6/3 and their axis are eccentric. This setting over associated at the guiding piece of the sheath in rotation gives at the measuring coil a functioning as a ponctual probe [fr

  19. Status of a Deep Learning Based Measurement of the Inclusive Muon Neutrino Charged-current Cross Section in the NOvA Near Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Biswaranjan [Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2017-10-10

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the NuMI beam from Fermilab and two sampling calorimeter detectors placed off-axis from the beam. The 293 ton Near Detector measures the unoscillated neutrino energy spectrum, which can be used to predict the neutrino energy spectrum observed at the 14 kton Far Detector. The Near Detector also provides an excellent opportunity to measure neutrino interaction cross sections with high statistics, which will benefit current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis implements new algorithms to identify $\

  20. Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia la factibilidad del uso de los detectores de antineutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares. Usando un modelo sencillo de cascada de fisión a dos componentes, se ilustra la dependencia del número de antineutrinos detectados a una distancia L del reactor según la composición nuclear del combustible. Se explica el principio de detección de neutrinos de reactores en base al decaimiento beta inverso y se describe como los detectores de neutrinos pueden emplearse para el monitoreo de la producción de materiales fisibles en el reactor. Se comenta como generalizar este análisis al caso real de un reactor nuclear in situ y uno de los principales experimentos internacionales dedicados a este propósito. We study the feasibility to use antineutrinos detectors for monitoring of nuclear reactors. Using a simple model of fission shower with two components, we illustrate how the numbers of antineutrinos detected at a distance L from the reactor depend on the composition of the nuclear combustible. We explain the principles of reactor neutrino detection using inverse beta decays and we describe how neutrinos detectors can be used for monitoring the production of fissile materials within the reactors. We comment how to generalize this analysis to the realistic case of a nuclear reactor in situ and one of the main international experiments dedicated to study the use of neutrinos detectors as nuclear safeguards.

  1. The LHCb RICH system: current detector performance and status of the upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    LHCb is a precision experiment devoted to the study of CP violation and rare decays of b and c quarks, and to the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system is a key component of the LHCb experiment: it consists of two RICH detectors that provide charged particle identification over a wide momentum range (2-100 GeV/c) and angular acceptance (15-300 mrad). The LHCb RICH system has been performing extremely well during Run 1 and is providing the LHCb experiment also in Run 2 with a robust, reliable and precise particle identification system. Performance of the RICH detectors measured from data will be presented, with special reference to its dependence on calibration parameters and event multiplicities. The LHCb experiment is preparing for an upgrade during the second LHC long shutdown (2019-2020) in order to fully exploit the LHC flavour physics potential. A five-fold increase in instantaneous luminosity is foreseen reac...

  2. Measurement of the Current Related Damage Rate at {-}50(°) C and Consequences on Macropixel Detector Operation in Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segneri, Gabriele; Brown, Craig; Carpenter, James-D.; Kuhnle, Bernd; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Rummel, Stefan; Struder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes; Whitford, Chris

    2009-12-01

    A diode irradiation with 10-MeV protons was performed to measure the silicon current related damage rate at a temperature of -50°C. This measurement was fundamental to predict the performance of the detectors which will be used in the X-ray spectrometers of the Simbol-X and BepiColombo space missions. These detectors consist of arrays of large area silicon drift chambers with integrated depleted p-channel field effect transistors. The leakage current increase due to radiation damage and its consequent energy resolution degradation can be critical for these missions, specially for BepiColombo. These effects cannot be predicted because, during the whole missions, the sensors will be kept at temperatures below -40°C, and the existing models are based on measurements on structures which underwent annealing at higher temperatures. An irradiation experiment was performed to measure the current related damage rate at - 50°C, and the obtained value was (11.1 ± 0.2) X 10-17 A/cm. This result implies that it will be possible to achieve the Simbol-X energy resolution, whereas some annealing strategies will be needed for the BepiColombo mission. The annealing behaviour at 60°C was studied as well and the results are in agreement with the already available measurements.

  3. Determination of the direction to a source of antineutrinos via inverse beta decay in Double Chooz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, Ya.

    2016-11-01

    To determine the direction to a source of neutrinos (and antineutrinos) is an important problem for the physics of supernovae and of the Earth. The direction to a source of antineutrinos can be estimated through the reaction of inverse beta decay. We show that the reactor neutrino experiment Double Chooz has unique capabilities to study antineutrino signal from point-like sources. Contemporary experimental data on antineutrino directionality is given. A rigorous mathematical approach for neutrino direction studies has been developed. Exact expressions for the precision of the simple mean estimator of neutrinos' direction for normal and exponential distributions for a finite sample and for the limiting case of many events have been obtained.

  4. CeLAND: search for a 4th light neutrino state with a 3 PBq 144Ce-144Pr electron antineutrino generator in KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gando, A; Gando, Y; Hayashida, S; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishidoshiro, K; Ishikawa, H; Koga, M; Matsuda, R; Matsuda, S; Mitsui, T; Motoki, D; Nakamura, K; Oki, Y; Otani, M; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, BD; Yamada, S; Yamauchi, Y; Yoshida, H; Cribier, M; Durero, M; Fischer, V; Gaffiot, J; Jonqueres, N; Kouchner, A; Lasserre, T; Leterme, D; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Mention, G; Rampal, G; Scola, L; Veyssiere, C; Vivier, M; Yala, P; Berger, BE; Kozlov, A; Banks, T; Dwyer, D; Fujikawa, BK; Han, K; Kolomensky, YG; Mei, Y; O' Donnell, T; Decowski, P; Markoff, DM; Yoshida, S; Kornoukhov, VN; Gelis, TVM; Tikhomirov, GV; Learned, JG; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Karwowski, HJ; Efremenko, Y; Detwiler, A; Enomoto, S

    2017-05-12

    The reactor neutrino and gallium anomalies can be tested with a 3-4 PBq (75-100 kCi scale) 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino beta-source deployed at the center or next to a large low-background liquid scintillator detector. The antineutrino generator will be produced by the Russian reprocessing plant PA Mayak as early as 2014, transported to Japan, and deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) as early as 2015. KamLAND's 13 m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure the energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, sterile neutrino state. This will provide a comprehensive test of the electron dissaperance neutrino anomalies and could lead to the discovery of a 4th neutrino state for Δm$2\\atop{new}$ ≳ 0.1 eV2 and sin2(2θnew) > 0.05.

  5. Analysis of a Current-Mode Detector for the NOPTREX Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera Velarde, Daniela; Noptrex Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Charge, Parity and Time reversal (CPT) symmetries are an important aspect of the Standard Model. One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is the observed matter/antimatter asymmetry seen in the universe, which requires the violation of time reversal symmetry (T). The primary goal of the Neutron Optics Time Reversal Experiment (NOPTREX) is to search for T-violation in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target. Preliminary measurements were taken on indium and tantalum resonances at the NOBORU test beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) to test the functionality of a prototype detector for the full experiment. We will discuss the analysis of this data as well as the construction of a secondary experiment to measure the angular correlation κ (J) of liquid 131Xe. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107 and Berea College Office of Internships.

  6. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dye, S.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96822 (United States); College of Natural Sciences, Hawaii Pacific University, 45-045 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe, Hawaii 96744 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory being developed at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and {theta}{sub 13}. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  7. A study of inclusive antineutrino interactions in propane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, F.A.

    1979-02-01

    Some results obtained using the heavy liquid bubble chamber Gargamelle situated at the CERN Proton Synchrotron neutrino beam facility are presented. The deep inelastic scattering of antineutrinos is analysed and interpreted in the theoretical framework of Bjorken scaling and the Quark Parton model of the nucleon. This model predicts that scaling should occur in regions of high four momentum squared. The effect of not being in that region is investigated. In particular the data suggest that in the region of low four momentum transfer the results can still be interpreted in the scaling framework. A model is presented which enables extraction of the neutron to proton cross section, and the result is interpreted within the quark model. (author)

  8. Proposal on electron anti-neutrino mass measurement at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Takayoshi.

    1981-03-01

    Some comment on the proposed experiment, namely the measurement of electron anti-neutrino mass, is described. Various experiments with the measurement of β-ray from tritium have been reported. The precise measurement of the shape of the Kurie plot is required in this kind of experiment. The present experiment aimed at more accurate determination of neutrino mass than any other previous ones. An important point of the present experiment is to reduce the background due to the β-ray from evaporating tritium. The source candidates have low evaporation rate. A double focus √2π air core spectrometer is employed for the measurement of β-ray. The spectrometer was improved to meet the present purpose. The accumulated event rate was expected to be about 10 times higher than Russian experiment. The estimated energy resolution was about 30 eV. The neutrino mass with less than 10 eV accuracy will be obtained. (Kato, T.)

  9. Study of μ e events produced in antineutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Kochowski, C.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Bertrand, D.; Bertrand-Coremans, Gh.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper, A. M.; Deck, L.; Erriquez, O.; Faulkener, P.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Hulth, P. O.; Iaselli, G.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Lagraa, M.; Leighton-Davis, S.; Middleton, R.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Natali, S.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Talebzadeh, M.; van Doninck, W.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wernhard, K. L.; Wittek, W.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1984-12-01

    A study is presented of μ e events from an exposure of BEBC, filed with an heavy H 2/ Ne mixture, to a wide band antineutrino beam at the CERN SPS. The prompt μ + e - rate, based on the observation of 45 events with p μ>4 GeV/c and p e>0.8 GeV/c, is found to be 0.31±0.05±0.02%, in agreement with previous determinations made on much smaller statistics. The differential kinematical variables characterizing the events and the content of strange particles are as expected for the production of charmed hadrons which subsequently decay semi-leptonically. An upper limit of 2.0±10-4 at 90% C.L. is given for the production rate of prompt μ + e + events. No evidence is found for a significant production of Beauty hadrons.

  10. Coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos by quarks in a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Wilmot, G.

    1988-01-01

    An earlier paper presented the theory of a method for observation of neutrinos and antineutrinos. The method gives large cross sections. In this paper the theory is extended for a crystal with nuclei described by the modern theory of quarks. Results of experiments with a tritium antineutrino source, a nuclear reactor, and solar neutrinos are presented. Solar neutrinos lead to a positive result for the Eotvos experiment, for equal torsion balance masses composed of materials with different Debye temperatures

  11. Experimental determination of differential cross-sections of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Anne-Marie.

    1975-05-01

    The experimental determination of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos differential cross-sections by the analysis of pictures taken in the CERN Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber is presented. The methods used to solve experimental difficulties (muon identification, hadronic energy determination) and the errors on the experimental distributions are explained in detail. Then, the structure functions in charge changing interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos are analyzed and interpreted in terms of parton distribution inside the nucleon [fr

  12. A Self-Powered Thin-Film Radiation Detector Using Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (Author’s Final Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    of electromagnetic 85 pulse effects on cables and electrical devices4 and as a self - powered detector for in-core neutron flux measurement in nuclear...AFCEC-CX-TY-TP-2016-0003 A SELF - POWERED THIN-FILM RADIATION DETECTOR USING INTRINSIC HIGH-ENERGY CURRENT (HEC) (AUTHOR’S FINAL VERSION...14 -- 5 Oct 15 A self - powered thin-film radiation detector using intrinsic high-energy current (HEC) (Author’s Final Version) FA8051-15-P-0010

  13. Measurement of the mixing leptonic parameter θ13 at the Double Chooz reactor antineutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims at measuring the neutrino mixing parameter θ13 by studying the oscillations of de ν-bar e produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors located in France. The experimental concept consists in comparing the signal of two identical 10.3 m 3 detectors, allowing to cancel most of the experimental systematic uncertainties. The near detector, whose goal is the flux normalization and a measurement without oscillation, is expected to be delivered in 2013. The farthest detector from the source is taking data since April 2011 and is sensitive to θ 13 , which is expected to affect both the rate and the shape of the measured de ν-bar e . In this thesis, are first presented the Double Chooz experiment, with its ν-bar e source, its detection method, and the expected signal and backgrounds. In order to perform a selection, important quantities have to be reconstructed, calibrated, and saved in data files. The channel time offsets determination, the energy and vertex reconstruction algorithm CocoReco, the reconstruction packages of the Common Trunk, and the light trees maker Cheetah are especially presented. Concerning the data analysis, all the selection cuts and results for signal and backgrounds are discussed, particularly the multiplicity cut, the multiple off time window method, the lithium veto cut, and the cosmogenic 9 Li background studies. The Double Chooz experiment observed 8,249 de ν-bar e candidates in 227.93 days in its far detector only. The reactor antineutrino flux prediction used the Bugey 4 flux measurement after correction for differences in core composition. The expectation in case of no-oscillation is 8,937 events and this deficit is interpreted as evidence for ν-bar e disappearance. From a rate and shape analysis, is found sin 2 2θ = 0,109± 0,030 (stat) ± 0,025 (syst), with Δm 2 31 = 2,32 x 10 -3 eV 2 , while the no-oscillation hypothesis is even excluded at 2.9 σ. (author) [fr

  14. Measurement of neutral current e±p cross sections at high Bjorken x with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2013-12-01

    The neutral current e ± p cross section has been measured up to values of Bjorken x≅1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 187 pb -1 of e - p and 142 pb -1 of e + p collisions at √(s)=318 GeV. Differential cross sections in x and Q 2 , the exchanged boson virtuality, are presented for Q 2 ≥725 GeV 2 . An improved reconstruction method and greatly increased amount of data allows a finer binning in the high-x region of the neutral current cross section and leads to a measurement with much improved precision compared to a similar earlier analysis. The measurements are compared to Standard Model expectations based on a variety of recent parton distribution functions.

  15. Measurement of neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross sections at high Bjorken x with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-15

    The neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross section has been measured up to values of Bjorken x{approx_equal}1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 187 pb{sup -1} of e{sup -}p and 142 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}p collisions at {radical}(s)=318 GeV. Differential cross sections in x and Q{sup 2}, the exchanged boson virtuality, are presented for Q{sup 2}{>=}725 GeV{sup 2}. An improved reconstruction method and greatly increased amount of data allows a finer binning in the high-x region of the neutral current cross section and leads to a measurement with much improved precision compared to a similar earlier analysis. The measurements are compared to Standard Model expectations based on a variety of recent parton distribution functions.

  16. A comprehensive search for “anomalies” from neutrino and anti-neutrino oscillations at large mass differences (Δm^2 ~ 1eV^2) with two LAr–TPC imaging detectors at different distances from the CERN-PS.

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, C; Bagliani, D; Baibussinov, B; Bilokon, H; Boffelli, F; Bonesini, M; Calligarich, E; Canci, N; Centro, S; Cesana, A; Cieslik, K; Cline, D B; Cocco, A G; De Gerone, M; Dequal, D; Dermenev, A; Dolfini, R; Dussoni, S; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Ferrari, A; Fiorillo, G; Garvey, G T; Gatti, F; Gibin, D; Gigli Berzolari, A; Gninenko, S; Guber, F; Guglielmi, A; Haranczyk, M; Holeczek, J; Ivashkin, A; Kirsanov, M; Kisiel, J; Kochanek, I; Kurepin, A; Łagoda, J; Louis, W C; Lucchini, G; Mania, S; Mannocchi, G; Matveev, V; Menegolli, A; Meng, G; Mills, G B; Montanari, C; Otwinowski, S; Palczewski, T J; Perfetto, F; Periale, L; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Płoński, P; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rossella, M; Sala, P; Scantamburlo, E; Scaramelli, A; Segreto, E; Sergiampietri, F; Suvorova, O; Stefan, D; Stepaniak, J; Sulej, R; Terrani, M; Testera, G; Tlisov, D; Trinchero, G; Van de Water, R G; Varanini, F; Ventura, S; Vignoli, C; Wang, H G; Yang, X; Zani, A; Zaremba, K

    2011-01-01

    The present proposal describes an experimental search of sterile neutrinos beyond the Standard Model with the CERN-PS beam and the innovative technology of imaging in ultra-pure cryogenic liquid Argon. The proposal is based on two strictly identical LAr-TPC detectors observing the electron-neutrino signal in the ”Far” and “Near” positions, the first one of about 600 tons placed 850 m the second one of about 150 tons at about 6.5 times shorter distance from the proton target. This project will exploit the ICARUS T600 — now running in the underground experiment CNGS2 with neutrinos from the CERN-SPS — moved from GranSasso to the CERN “Far” position. The additional T150 will be constructed and located in the “Near” position. In the two positions, the radial and energy spectra of the nu_e beam are practically identical. Comparing the two detectors, in absence of oscillations, all cross sections and experimental biases cancel out and the two experimentally observed event distributions must be ...

  17. Pulse shape discrimination with silicon detectors using charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrita, H.; Rauly, E.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Borderie, B.; Chabot, M.; Edelbruck, P.; Lavergne, L.; Le Bris, J.; Le Neindre, N.; Richard, A.; Rivet, M.F.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Barbey, S.; Becheva, E.; Bzyl, F.R.; D' Esesquelles, P.; Galichet, E.; Lalu, G.; Martinet, G.; Pierre, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France); Legou, Th.; Tillier, J.; Bocage, F.; Bougault, R.; Carniol, B.; Cussol, D.; Etasse, D.; Grevy, S.; Lopez, O.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E. [Caen Univ., LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSI, 14 - Caen (France); Galichet, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metier, 75 - Paris (France); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph. [Villeurbanne Univ., Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 69 (France); Lanzalone, G. [Catania Univ., INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, (Italy); Politi, G. [Catania Univ., INFN, Sezione di Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Rosato, E. [Napoli, Univ., Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche e Sezione INFN (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    For the first time shapes of current pulses from light charged particles and carbon ions are presented. Capabilities for pulse shape discrimination techniques are demonstrated. In this work, charge and current-sensitive preamplifier prototypes for nuclear structure and dynamics experiments have been developed and tested with the aim of improving PSD (pulse shape discrimination) method by studying in detail current signal shapes from particles and ions over a large energy range. Note that current signal shapes have been recently used in atomic cluster studies to identify partitions of carbon cluster fragmentation. The paper is organized as follows. Section 2 is devoted to characterization of preamplifiers. In section 3, results of on beam tests will be presented, discussed and compared to a simple simulation.

  18. Development of an intelligent high-voltage direct-current power supply for nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiuliang

    1997-01-01

    The operation and performances of a new type direct-current high-voltage power supply are described. The power supply with intelligent feature is controlled by a single-chip microcomputer (8031), and various kinds of output voltage can be preset. The output-voltage is monitored and regulated by the single-chip microcomputer and displayed by LED. The output voltage is stable when the load current is within the allowable limits

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howcroft, Caius Leo Frederick [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  20. Analyses on the measurement of leakage currents in CdZnTe radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mescher, M.J.; Hoburg, J.F.; Schlesinger, T.E.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Models that place design constraints on devices which are used to measure the leakage currents in high-resistivity semiconductor materials are presented. If these design constraints are met, these models can then be used to quantitatively predict the surface sheet resistance of devices which are dominated by surface leakage currents. As a result, a means is provided to directly compare passivation techniques which are developed to decrease surface leakage currents. Furthermore, these models illustrate the necessity for inclusion of relevant geometrical data on sample size and shape and electrode configuration when reporting results of surface passivation techniques. These models specifically examine the case where a dc potential is applied across two electrodes on the surface of a semiconductor substrate which has a surface layer with lower resistivity than the bulk material. The authors describe several of the more common configurations used in analyzing passivation techniques for compounds of Cd 1-x Zn x Te (CZT) used for room-temperature radiation detection

  1. Modified electron beam induced current technique for in(Ga)As/InAsSb superlattice infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, N.; Reyner, C. J.; Ariyawansa, G.; Duran, J. M.; Scheihing, J. E.; Mabon, J.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-08-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements provide a powerful tool for characterizing semiconductor based materials and devices. By measuring the current generated by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), EBIC allows us to extract the minority carrier diffusion length (L) and the surface recombination velocity to diffusivity ratio (S/D) of a material. When combined with information on minority carrier lifetime (τ), for instance from time-resolved photoluminescence measurements, the minority carrier mobility of the material can be extracted. However, the EBIC technique relies heavily on the accurate modeling of the carrier generation and collection process. Traditionally, this was achieved using a combination of empirical analytical expressions (and later Monte Carlo simulations) for carrier generation and analytical diffusion/recombination expressions for carrier collection. This approach introduces significant uncertainties into the extracted material parameters. Here, we present a numerical approach to EBIC modeling which improves the spatial resolution of our model, while also retaining information regarding the relative EBIC signal as a function of incident beam energies and currents. We apply this technique to investigate the temperature dependent minority carrier mobility of InAs/InAsSb and InGaAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattice infrared detectors and compare our results to the values obtained using external quantum efficiency measurements of the same samples. Our approach not only allows for an improvement in the uncertainty of the extracted material parameters, but also offers insight into the material and device behavior as a function of nonequilibrium carrier concentration. The technique presented here offers potentially improved characterization of not only infrared detectors, but a range of semiconductor-based devices.

  2. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-01

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e + p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q 2 >185 GeV 2 ) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e ± p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q 2 . The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ are measured. The structure function xF 3 is determined by combining the e + p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e - p measurements. The interference structure function xF 3 γZ is extracted at Q 2 =1500 GeV 2 . The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-15

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2}) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e{sup {+-}}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q{sup 2}. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the reduced cross section {sigma} are measured. The structure function xF{sub 3} is determined by combining the e{sup +}p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e{sup -}p measurements. The interference structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}Z} is extracted at Q{sup 2}=1500 GeV{sup 2}. The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  4. Coordinate measurement by current division: a simple system for multichannel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, B.

    1981-08-01

    A simple current-division scheme is described based on an unorthodox connection of the 733 amplifier chip: a common-base input can be obtained by grounding the normal inputs and driving a gain control terminal. With ganged multiwire chambers detecting cosmic rays in the proportional region, under realistic operating conditions (charge approx. 2 picocoulombs per gap), the resolution is about 2% of full length. Calibration procedures are discussed, as are the effects of changing various parameters

  5. Measurement of neutral current cross sections at high Bjorken-x with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    A new method is employed to measure the neutral current cross section up to Bjorken-x values of one with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 65.1 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 16.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at {radical}(s)=318 GeV and 38.6 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions at {radical}(s)=300 GeV. Cross sections have been extracted for Q{sup 2}{>=}648 GeV{sup 2} and are compared to predictions using different parton density functions. For the highest x bins, the data have a tendency to lie above the expectations using recent parton density function parametrizations. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of neutral current cross sections at high Bjorken-x with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new method is employed to measure the neutral current cross section up to Bjorken-x values of one with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 65.1 pb -1 for e + p collisions and 16.7 pb -1 for e - p collisions at √(s)=318 GeV and 38.6 pb -1 for e + p collisions at √(s)=300 GeV. Cross sections have been extracted for Q 2 ≥648 GeV 2 and are compared to predictions using different parton density functions. For the highest x bins, the data have a tendency to lie above the expectations using recent parton density function parametrizations. (orig.)

  7. Ultra-Low Dark Current HgCdTe Detector in SWIR for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, C.; Boulade, O.; Gravrand, O.; Lobre, C.; Guellec, F.; Sanson, E.; Ballet, P.; Santailler, J. L.; Moreau, V.; Zanatta, J. P.; Fieque, B.; Castelein, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents recent developments at Commissariat à l'Energie atomique, Laboratoire d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Information infrared laboratory on processing and characterization of p-on- n HgCdTe (MCT) planar infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) in short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral band for the astrophysics applications. These FPAs have been grown using both liquid phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy on a lattice-matched CdZnTe substrate. This technology exhibits lower dark current and lower series resistance in comparison with n-on- p vacancy-doped architecture and is well adapted for low flux detection or high operating temperature. This architecture has been evaluated for space applications in long-wave infrared and very-long-wave infrared spectral bands with cut-off wavelengths from 10 μm up to 17 μm at 78 K and is now evaluated for the SWIR range. The metallurgical nature of the absorbing layer is also examined and both molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy have been investigated. Electro-optical characterizations have been performed on individual photodiodes from test arrays, whereas dark current investigation has been performed with a fully functional readout integrated circuit dedicated to low flux operations.

  8. Biased low differential input impedance current receiver/converter device and method for low noise readout from voltage-controlled detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V [Williamsburg, VA; Popov, Vladimir E [Newport News, VA

    2011-03-22

    A first stage electronic system for receiving charge or current from voltage-controlled sensors or detectors that includes a low input impedance current receiver/converter device (for example, a transimpedance amplifier), which is directly coupled to the sensor output, a source of bias voltage, and the device's power supply (or supplies), which use the biased voltage point as a baseline.

  9. Production of strange particles in antineutrino interactions at the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Erriquez, O; Bisi, V; Bonetti, S; Bonneaud, G; Bullock, F W; Cavalli, D; Escoubés, B; Fogli-Muciaccia, M T; Franzinetti, Carlo; Gamba, D; Guyonnet, J L; Halsteinslid, A; Huss, D; Jarlskog, C; Jones, T W; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Michette, A G; Myklebost, K; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Paty, M; Pullia, A; Racca, C; Riccati, L; Riester, J L; Rognebakke, A; Rollier, M; Romero, A; Sacco, R; Schäffer, M; Skjeggestad, O; Tvedt, B

    1978-01-01

    The authors have studied neutral strange particle production in the bubble chamber Gargamelle filled with propane and exposed to antineutrinos from the CERN PS. Cross sections are presented for Lambda , Sigma /sup 0/ and K/sup 0/ production. Associated production reactions ( Delta S=0) have been observed in the charged and the neutral current channels. From 45 candidates for the quasi-elastic reaction nu p to mu /sup +/ Lambda , on bound and free protons, estimates of the axial transition form factor M/sub A/ have been made using the total cross section and the t distribution. The weighted average from the two methods is M/sub A/=862+or-190 MeV. From a subsample of 15 candidates for nu interactions on free protons in propane, with (28+or-6)% background from nu interactions on bound protons, M/sub A/=883+or-243 MeV is obtained. The polarization of the Lambda hyperons has been studied for the quasi-elastic reaction. (11 refs).

  10. π0, rho0 ω0 production in high energy neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, J.

    1980-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with the hadronic shower in the neutrino and antineutrino interactions of the high energy charged-current type. The π 0 particles issued from this hadronic shower are analysed and the rho 0 and ω 0 production rate are determined in view to try to understand the quark fragmentation process, that is to say the QCD theory relative to the quark confinement problem. The experimental device is described in the chapter II. Chapter III is dealing with the analysis of the exposures obtained with this device, together with the incident neutrino energy determination methods and a general description of the final data characteristics. The π 0 production is studied from the decay γ observed in the bubble chamber. The existing different methods are analyzed and compared with the used one. The π 0 properties are studied in detail. In chapter 5, the rho 0 and ω 0 resonance production rate is calculated, using the previous chapter results. Finally, chapter 6 summarizes the thesis conclusions [fr

  11. Current state-of-the-art industrial and research applications using room-temperature CdTe and CdZnTe solid state detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Improvements of CdTe crystal quality and significant progress in the growth of large ingots of high resistivity CdZnTe material enable the fabrication of larger area detectors in single element form or monolithic arrays. These advances allow for the development of imaging devices of improved spatial resolution for industrial, research and medical applications. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors operate in single photon counting mode or in current mode (charge integrating mode). The paper presents advantages of CdTe and CdZnTe over common scintillator type detectors, but also presents the shortcomings of the former detectors with respect to charge collection which limit the yields of good spectrometers. The paper reviews industrial and research applications utilizing these detectors and in particular describes in detail two imaging systems for security screening and custom inspection. These systems are characterized by large dynamic range and good spatial resolution and are composed of large arrays of CdTe spectrometers and discriminator grade detectors. A wide energy range detector assembly, for astrophysical research of gamma ray bursts composed of CdTe, HgI 2 and CdZnTe spectrometers in two dimensional arrays is also presented. (orig.)

  12. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Bernard Raymond

    2006-01-01

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current ν μ and (bar ν) μ interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 ± 7.6(system.) ± 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 ± 4.7(system.) ± 5.6(stat.) events with Δm 2 = 2.4 x 10 -3 eV 2 , sin 2 (2θ) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by ν μ and 10 events being consistent with being produced by (bar ν) μ . No evidence of CPT violation is observed

  13. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Bernard Raymond [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2006-02-01

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current νμ and $\\bar{v}$μ interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 ± 7.6(system.) ± 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 ± 4.7(system.) ± 5.6(stat.) events with Δm2 = 2.4 x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2θ) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by νμ and 10 events being consistent with being produced by $\\bar{v}$μ. No evidence of CPT violation is observed.

  14. Application of automatic tube current modulation with 64-detector CT in infant brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianming; Xu Wenbiao; Luo Yuanli; Liu Hongsheng; Zhou Ning

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of automatic tube modulation on imaging quality and lesion revealed in infant brain. Methods: The infant patients of 200 cases were divided into four groups according to the values of SD (2.5, 2.75, 3.0, 4.0), 50 cases in each group. They were performed with the automatic tube current modulation scanning in brain. The imaging quality and radiation dose were analyzed. Results: When the values of SD were 2.5, 2.75, 3.0 and 4.0, the high values of CTDI vol were 60.0, 49.8, 42.9 and 25.8 mGy, respectively. The effective doses were (3.27±1.01), (2.78±0.85), (2.40±0.74) and (1.49±0.45) mSv·mGy -1 ·cm -1 , respectively. There was significant difference among those groups (F=48.99, P<0.05). The excellent imaging qualities were 100%, 96%, 70% and 20%, 12 cases were neonate in SD 2.5 group. In SD 2.75 group, the imaging quality of neonate (2 cases) were all fine. In SD 3.0 group, the imaging quality was not ideal for the ages less than 1 year. In SD 4.0 group, when the infants aged over 2 years and 6 months, or with the larger head circumference, their imaging quality were all excellent. Conclusions: The individual application of ATCM could obtain the best balance among imaging quality, radiation dose and diagnostic quality. The SD 2.5, 2.75, 3.0 and 4.0 might be suitable to infants of newborn, 1 month to 1 year old, 1 to 3 years, the larger head circumference and part of the reviewed cases. (authors)

  15. Diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in vp andbar ν p chargedcurrent interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV< E v <60 GeV the cross sections for diffractive ρ and diffractive ρπ production are found to be (0.64±0.14 (stat.)±0.08 (syst.))% and (0.28±0.08 (stat.)±0.04 (syst.))% of the charged-current cross section. The diffractive ρπ signal is consistent with being entirely due to diffractive a 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2, x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions.

  16. A microfabricated, low dark current a-Se detector for measurement of microplasma optical emission in the UV for possible use on-site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Karim, Karim S.; Karanassios, Vassili

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, samples are collected on-site (i.e., in the field) and are shipped to a lab for chemical analysis. An alternative is offered by using portable chemical analysis instruments that can be used on-site (i.e., in the field). Many analytical measurements by optical emission spectrometry require use of light-sources and of spectral lines that are in the Ultra-Violet (UV, ~200 nm - 400 nm wavelength) region of the spectrum. For such measurements, a portable, battery-operated, fiber-optic spectrometer equipped with an un-cooled, linear, solid-state detector may be used. To take full advantage of the advanced measurement capabilities offered by state-of-the-art solid-state detectors, cooling of the detector is required. But cooling and other thermal management hamper portability and use on-site because they add size and weight and they increase electrical power requirements. To address these considerations, an alternative was implemented, as described here. Specifically, a microfabricated solid-state detector for measurement of UV photons will be described. Unlike solid-state detectors developed on crystalline Silicon, this miniaturized and low-cost detector utilizes amorphous Selenium (a-Se) as its photosensitive material. Due to its low dark current, this detector does not require cooling, thus it is better suited for portable use and for chemical measurements on-site. In this paper, a microplasma will be used as a light-source of UV photons for the a-Se detector. For example, spectra acquired using a microplasma as a light-source will be compared with those obtained with a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer equipped with a Si-based 2080-element detector. And, analytical performance obtained by introducing ng-amounts of analytes into the microplasma will be described.

  17. An assessment of anti-neutrino mass determination via electrostatic measurements of tritium beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bas, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Data on the mass of the anti-neutrino determined via electrostatic measurements of tritium beta-decay are assessed. Relativistic calculations concerning the finite mass of the electron anti-neutrino and the recoil of the nucleus, are given for the theoretical end-point spectrum of tritium beta-decay. The specifications are given for an electrostatic Spherical Retarding Beta-Spectrometer, and an electrostatic Cylindrical Mirror Analyser, both used in the tritium beta-decay experiment. The electrostatic measurements lead to a value of less than 50 ev (90% C.L.) for the electron anti-neutrino mass. These results are discussed in terms of the resolution of the electrostatic equipment and the Monte Carlo simulations of the data collection. (UK)

  18. First test of Lorentz violation with a reactor-based antineutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Konno, T.; Kuze, M.; Aberle, C.; Buck, C.; Hartmann, F.X.; Haser, J.; Kaether, F.; Lindner, M.; Reinhold, B.; Schwetz, T.; Wagner, S.; Watanabe, H.; Anjos, J.C. dos; Gama, R.; Lima, H.P.-Jr.; Pepe, I.M.; Bergevin, M.; Felde, J.; Maesano, C.N.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S.; Dazeley, S.; Erickson, A.; Keefer, G.; Bezerra, T.J.C.; Furuta, H.; Suekane, F.; Bezrukhov, L.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.K.; Yanovitch, E.; Blucher, E.; Conover, E.; Crum, K.; Strait, M.; Worcester, M.; Busenitz, J.; Goon, J.TM.; Habib, S.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Reichenbacher, J.; Stancu, I.; Sun, Y.; Cabrera, A.; Franco, D.; Kryn, D.; Obolensky, M.; Roncin, R.; Tonazzo, A.; Caden, E.; Damon, E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Perasso, S.; Smith, E.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Franke, A.J.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Toups, M.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo-Anadon, J.I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Lopez-Castano, J.M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Chang, P.J.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; McKee, D.; Shrestha, D.; Chimenti, P.; Classen, T.; Collin, A.P.; Cucoanes, A.; Durand, V.; Fechner, M.; Fischer, V.; Hayakawa, T.; Lasserre, T.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Mention, G.; Mueller, Th.A.; Perrin, P.; Sida, J.L.; Sinev, V.; Veyssiere, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for Lorentz violation with 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events taken by the Double Chooz experiment in 227.9 live days of running. This analysis, featuring a search for a sidereal time dependence of the events, is the first test of Lorentz invariance using a reactor-based antineutrino source. No sidereal variation is present in the data and the disappearance results are consistent with sidereal time independent oscillations. Under the Standard-Model Extension, we set the first limits on 14 Lorentz violating coefficients associated with transitions between electron and tau flavor, and set two competitive limits associated with transitions between electron and muon flavor. (authors)

  19. Intrinsic limits on resolutions in muon- and electron-neutrino charged-current events in the KM3NeT/ORCA detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andre, M.; Androulakis, G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Avgitas, T.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Mart, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Billault, M.; Bondì, M.; Bormuth, R.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bourret, S.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buis, E.; Buompane, R.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; Celli, S.; Champion, C.; Cherubini, S.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, L.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cobas, D.; Cocimano, R.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Sio, C.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, A. F.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Durocher, M.; Eberl, T.; Eichie, S.; van Eijk, D.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Favaro, M.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Frascadore, G.; Furini, M.; Fusco, L. A.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Garufi, F.; Gay, P.; Gebyehu, M.; Giacomini, F.; Gialanella, L.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia, R.; Graf, K.; Grégoire, T.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Habel, R.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Harissopulos, S.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hevinga, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C. M. F.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; Jansweijerf, P.; Jongen, M.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Kießling, D.; Koffeman, E. N.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Leisos, A.; Leone, F.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Lo Presti, D.; Löhner, H.; Lonardo, A.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manzali, M.; Margiotta, A.; Margotti, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maris, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marzaioli, F.; Mele, R.; Melis, K. W.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Mijakowski, P.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Moussa, A.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nicolau, C. A.; Olcina, I.; Olivetto, C.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălas, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrini, G.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Pfutzner, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Pleinert, M.-O.; Poma, G. E.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Pratolongo, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rauch, T.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez García, A.; Sánchez Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schimmel, F.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sciacca, V.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spisso, B.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Terrasi, F.; Tézier, D.; Theraube, S.; Timmer, P.; Tönnis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Travaglini, R.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Versari, F.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Volkert, M.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Zachariadou, K.; Zani, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-05-01

    Studying atmospheric neutrino oscillations in the few-GeV range with a multi-megaton detector promises to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. This is the main science goal pursued by the future KM3NeT/ORCA water Cherenkov detector in the Mediterranean Sea. In this paper, the processes that limit the obtainable resolution in both energy and direction in charged-current neutrino events in the ORCA detector are investigated. These processes include the composition of the hadronic fragmentation products, the subsequent particle propagation and the photon-sampling fraction of the detector. GEANT simulations of neutrino interactions in seawater produced by GENIE are used to study the effects in the 1-20 GeV range. It is found that fluctuations in the hadronic cascade in conjunction with the variation of the inelasticity y are most detrimental to the resolutions. The effect of limited photon sampling in the detector is of significantly less importance. These results will therefore also be applicable to similar detectors/media, such as those in ice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.B.; Hall, D.S.

    1982-05-01

    Self-powered flux detectors are used in CANDU nuclear power reactors to determine the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor core for use by both the reactor control and safety systems. To establish the dynamic response of different types of flux detectors, the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories have an ongoing experimental irradiation program in the NRU research reactor for which a data acquistion system has been developed. The system described in this paper is used to measure the currents from the detectors both at a slow, regular logging interval, and at a rapid, adaptive rate following a reactor shutdown. Currents that range from 100 pA to 1 mA full scale can be measured from up to 38 detectors and stored at sampling rates of up to 20 samples per second. The dynamic characteristics of the detectors can be computed from the stored records. The data acquisition system comprises a DEC LSI-11/23 microcomputer, dual cartridge disks, floppy disks, a hard copy and a video display terminal. The RT-11 operating system is used and all application programs are written in FORTRAN

  1. Current Status of RENO Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2010-01-01

    The RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is under construction to measure the value of the smallest and unknown neutrino mixing angle θ 13 . The experiment will compare the measured fluxes of electron antineutrinos at two detectors located at 290 m and 1.4 km distances from the center of the Yonggwang nuclear reactors in Korea, with world-second largest thermal power output of 16.4 GW. Construction of experimental halls and access tunnels for both near and far detector sites was completed in early 2009. The detectors are near completion, and data-taking is planned to start in mid 2010. An expected number of observed antineutrino is roughly 510 and 80 per day in the near detector and far detector, respectively. An estimated systematic uncertainty associated with the measurement is less than 0.6%, and an expected statistical error is about 0.3%. With three years of data, the experiment will search for the mixing angle values of sin 2 (2θ 13 ) down to 0.02 in 90% C.L. limit. In this talk, the construction status will be presented. (author)

  2. Influence of the parameters of supplying pulses and polarization voltage on the signal and shape of current characteristics of the electron capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.; Sliwka, I.; Drozdowicz, B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper contains results of measurements of current characteristics and of the signal for the constant concentration of freon F-11 of the ECD supplied with pulse voltage of changeable time of pulse duration t p , amplitude U 1 and the time of pulse repetition t r . In the course of measurements the detector worked at temperature 573 K with the additional constant polarization voltage. The polarization voltage has been observed to cause the effect of hypercoulometry. The presented mathematical analysis helps to determine the values of the coefficient of efficiency of electron capture p, the coefficient of electron loss k D , the coefficient of collecting of electric charges by the anode k' 3 and the coefficient of collecting of electric charges by the detector cathode k u . The coefficients are determined on the basis of experimental measurements. An attempt of physical interpretation of calculated values of these coefficients and their dependence on the parameters of the pulses supplying the detector has been presented. This interpretation requires the assumption that in some pulse periods t r the concentration of positive ions in the detector considerably exceeds concentration n 0 + = √a xα e /V, where a is an efficiency of the carrier gas ionization, α e is the coefficient of the electron-ion recombination and V is the detector volume. This statement helping to describe the effects observed in the electron capture polarized by voltage U a contradicts the recognized concept that the concentration of positive ions in the detector does not exceed the concentration n 0 + . The paper shows that the detector of the cylindrical construction, supplied with a pulse voltage can be used for coulometric measurements and the voltage polarizing the cathode can cause an effect of hypercoulometry. 33 figs., 9 refs. (author)

  3. Special features of the inverse-beta-decay reaction proceeding on a proton in a reactor-antineutrino flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeikin, V. I., E-mail: kopeikin46@yandex.ru; Skorokhvatov, M. D., E-mail: skorokhvatov-md@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The evolution of the reactor-antineutrino spectrum and the evolution of the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction in the course of reactor operation and after reactor shutdown are considered. The present-day status in determining the initial reactor-antineutrino spectrum on the basis of spectra of beta particles from mixtures of products originating from uranium and plutonium fission is described. A local rise of the experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos with respect to the expected spectrum is studied.

  4. The SNO+ experiment. Current status and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozza, Valentina [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator based experiment that reuses the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector. The detector, located 2 km underground in a mine near Sudbury, Canada, consists of a 12 m diameter acrylic vessel which will be filled with 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator. The main physics goal of SNO+ is to search for the neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 130}Te. During the double-beta phase, the liquid scintillator will be initially loaded with 0.3-0.5% natural tellurium. In 5 years of data taking, SNO+ expects to reach a sensitivity on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of 55-133 meV, just above the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region. Recently, the possibility to deploy up to 10 times more natural tellurium has been investigated, by which SNO+ could explore deep into the parameter space for the inverted hierarchy in the near future. Designed as a general purpose neutrino experiment, SNO+ can additionally measure the reactor antineutrino oscillations, geo-neutrinos in a geologically-interesting location, watch supernova neutrinos and measure low-energy solar neutrinos. A first commissioning phase with the detector filled with water will begin soon. The scintillator phase is expected to start after few months of water data taking. The 0νββ decay phase is foreseen for the 2017. In this talk the current status and the broad physics program of SNO+ will be presented.

  5. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  6. Theoretical antineutrino detection, direction and ranging at long distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jocher, Glenn R., E-mail: gjocher@integrity-apps.com [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Bondy, Daniel A., E-mail: dbondy@integrity-apps.com [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Dobbs, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.M.Dobbs.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Dye, Stephen T., E-mail: sdye@phys.hawaii.edu [College of Natural Sciences, Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, HI 96744 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Georges, James A., E-mail: James.A.Georges.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Learned, John G., E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Mulliss, Christopher L., E-mail: Christopher.L.Mulliss.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Usman, Shawn, E-mail: Shawn.Usman@nga.mil [InnoVision Basic and Applied Research Office, Sensor Geopositioning Center, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, 7500 GEOINT Dr., Springfield, VA, 22150 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we introduce the concept of what we call “NUDAR” (NeUtrino Direction and Ranging), making the point that measurements of the observed energy and direction vectors can be employed to passively deduce the exact three-dimensional location and thermal power of geophysical and anthropogenic neutrino sources from even a single detector. Earlier studies have presented the challenges of long-range detection, dominated by the unavoidable inverse-square falloff in neutrinos, which force the use of kiloton scale detectors beyond a few kilometers. Earlier work has also presented the case for multiple detectors, and has reviewed the background challenges. We present the most precise background estimates to date, all handled in full three dimensions, as functions of depth and geographical location. For the present calculations, we consider a hypothetical 138 kiloton detector which can be transported to an ocean site and deployed to an operational depth. We present a Bayesian estimation framework to incorporate any a priori knowledge of the reactor that we are trying to detect, as well as the estimated uncertainty in the background and the oscillation parameters. Most importantly, we fully employ the knowledge of the reactor spectrum and the distance-dependent effects of neutrino oscillations on such spectra. The latter, in particular, makes possible determination of range from one location, given adequate signal statistics. Further, we explore the rich potential of improving detection with even modest improvements in individual neutrino direction determination. We conclude that a 300 MW{sub th} reactor can indeed be geolocated, and its operating power estimated with one or two detectors in the hundred kiloton class at ranges out to a few hundred kilometers. We note that such detectors would have natural and non-interfering utility for scientific studies of geo-neutrinos, neutrino oscillations, and astrophysical neutrinos. This motivates the development of cost

  7. Readout electronics validation and target detector assessment for the Neutrinos Angra experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, T.A.; Anjos, J.C.; Azzi, G.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Chimenti, P.; Costa, J.A.; Dornelas, T.I.; Farias, P.C.M.A.; Guedes, G.P.; Gonzalez, L.F.G.; Kemp, E.; Lima, H.P.; Machado, R.; Nóbrega, R.A.; Pepe, I.M.; Ribeiro, D.B.S.; Simas Filho, E.F.; Valdiviesso, G.A.; Wagner, S.

    2016-01-01

    A compact surface detector designed to identify the inverse beta decay interaction produced by anti-neutrinos coming from near operating nuclear reactors is being developed by the Neutrinos Angra Collaboration. In this document we describe and test the detector and its readout system by means of cosmic rays acquisition. In this measurement campaign, the target detector has been equipped with 16 8-in PMTs and two scintillator paddles have been used to trigger cosmic ray events. The achieved results disclosed the main operational characteristics of the Neutrinos Angra system and have been used to assess the detector and to validate its readout system.

  8. Charged current weak interactions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.

    1977-01-01

    We review high energy neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions. An overview of the experimental data is given, including a discussion of the experimental status of the y anomaly. Locality tests, μ-e universality and charge symmetry invariance tests are discussed. Charm production is discussed. The experimental status of trimuon events and possible phenomenological models for these events are presented. (orig.) [de

  9. Current signal of silicon detectors facing charged particles and heavy ions; Reponse en courant des detecteurs silicium aux particules chargees et aux ions lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrita, H

    2005-07-01

    This work consisted in collecting and studying for the first time the shapes of current signals obtained from charged particles or heavy ions produced by silicon detectors. The document is divided into two main parts. The first consisted in reducing the experimental data obtained with charged particles as well as with heavy ions. These experiments were performed at the Orsay Tandem and at GANIL using LISE. These two experiments enabled us to create a data base formed of current signals with various shapes and various times of collection. The second part consisted in carrying out a simulation of the current signals obtained from the various ions. To obtain this simulation we propose a new model describing the formation of the signal. We used the data base of the signals obtained in experiments in order to constrain the three parameters of our model. In this model, the charge carriers created are regarded as dipoles and their density is related to the dielectric polarization in the silicon detector. This phenomenon induces an increase in permittivity throughout the range of the incident ion and consequently the electric field between the electrodes of the detector is decreased inside the trace. We coupled with this phenomenon a dissociation and extraction mode of the charge carriers so that they can be moved in the electric field. (author)

  10. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIGI, I.; BOLTON, T.; FORMAGGIO, J.; HARRIS, D.; MORFIN, J.; SPENTZOURIS, P.; YU, J.; KAYSER, B.; KING, B.J.; MCFARLAND, K.; PETROV, A.; SCHELLMAN, H.; VELASCO, M.; SHROCK, R.

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  11. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  12. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  13. Determination of the fission coefficients in thermal nuclear reactors for antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Lenilson M. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Cabral, Ronaldo G., E-mail: rgcabral@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, Joao C.C. dos, E-mail: janjos@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GLN - G

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear reactors in operation periodically need to change their fuel. It is during this process that these reactors are more vulnerable to occurring of several situations of fuel diversion, thus the monitoring of the nuclear installations is indispensable to avoid events of this nature. Considering this fact, the most promissory technique to be used for the nuclear safeguard for the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, it is based on the detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino from fissions that occur in the nuclear reactors. The detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino, they both depend on the single contribution for the total number of fission of each actinide in the core reactor, these contributions receive the name of fission coefficients. The goal of this research is to show the computational and mathematical modeling used to determinate these coefficients for PWR reactors. (author)

  14. Experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and spectra of main fissile isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinev, V. V., E-mail: vsinev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Within the period between the years 1988 and 1990, the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction on a proton was measured at the Rovno atomic power plant in the course of experiments conducted there. The measured spectrum has the vastest statistics in relation to other neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors and the lowest threshold for positron detection. An experimental reactor-antineutrino spectrum was obtained on the basis of this positron spectrum and was recommended as a reference spectrum. The spectra of individual fissile isotopes were singled out from the measured antineutrino spectrum. These spectra can be used to analyze neutrino experiments performed at nuclear reactors for various compositions of the fuel in the reactor core.

  15. Observation of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam Using the NOvA Prototype Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Enrique Arrieta [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The NOνA is a long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. It will study the oscillations between muon and electron neutrinos through the Earth. NOνA consists of two detectors separated by 810 km. Each detector will measure the electron neutrino content of the neutrino (NuMI) beam. Differences between the measurements will reveal details about the oscillation channel. The NOνA collaboration built a prototype detector on the surface at Fermilab in order to develop calibration, simulation, and reconstruction tools, using real data. This 220 ton detector is 110 mrad off the NuMI beam axis. This off-axis location allows the observation of neutrino interactions with energies around 2 GeV, where neutrinos come predominantly from charged kaon decays. During the period between October 2011 and April 2012, the prototype detector collected neutrino data from 1.67 × 1020 protons on target delivered by the NuMI beam. This analysis selected a number of candidate charged current muon neutrino events from the prototype data, which is 30% lower than predicted by the NOνA Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis suggests that the discrepancy comes from an over estimation of the neutrino flux in the Monte Carlo simulation, and in particular, from neutrinos generated in charged kaon decays. The ratio of measured divided by the simulated flux of muon neutrinos coming from charged kaon decays is: 0.70+0.108 -0.094. The NOνA collaboration may use the findings of this analysis to introduce a more accurate prediction of the neutrino flux produced by the NuMI beam in future Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Current Status of Luminosity Measurement with the CMD-3 Detector at the VEPP-2000 e + e − Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhenenkov, A E; Amirkhanov, A N; Anisenkov, A V; Aulchenko, V M; Banzarov, V Sh; Bashtovoy, N S; Bondar, A E; Bragin, A V; Eidelman, S I; Epifanov, D A; Epshteyn, L B; Erofeev, A L; Fedotovich, G V; Gayazov, S E; Grebenuk, A A; Gribanov, S S; Grigoriev, D N; Ignatov, F V; Ivanov, V L; Karpov, S V; Kazanin, V F; Korobov, A A; Kovalenko, O A; Kozyrev, A N; Kozyrev, E A; Krokovny, P P; Kuzmenko, A E; Kuzmin, A S; Logashenko, I B; Lukin, P A; Mikhailov, K Yu; Okhapkin, V S; Pestov, Yu N; Popov, A S; Razuvaev, G P; Ruban, A A; Ryskulov, N M; Shebalin, V E; Shemyakin, D N; Shwartz, B A; Sibidanov, A L; Solodov, E P; Talyshev, A A; Titov, V M; Vorobiov, A I; Yudin, Yu V

    2017-01-01

    The CMD-3 detector has taken data at the electron-positron collider VEPP-2000 since december 2010. The collected data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb-6 in the c.m. energy range from 0.32 up to 2 GeV. Preliminary results of the luminosity measurement are presented for various energy ranges and its accuracy is estimated to be 1%.

  17. Current and expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the HL-LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Kastanas, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has had an extremely successful data collecting period during 2017, recording over 45 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV. This was achieved, in part, by running the LHC at a high instantaneous lumi- nosity level of over 1.5 x 10+34 cm-2s-1, which corresponds to over 57 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. This talk will highlight the tracking and vertexing performance of the tracking detector within ATLAS (Inner Detector) throughout this successful year of data taking. In order to increase its potential for discoveries, the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) aims to increase the LHC data-set by an order of magnitude by collecting 3,000 fb-1 of recorded data. Starting, from mid-2026, the HL-LHC is expected to reach the peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 x 10+34 cm-2s-1, which corresponds to about 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. To cope with the large radiation doses and high pile...

  18. Reactor neutron converter into antineutrinos on base of lithium compounds and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Lyashchuk, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    A study on the possibility of using various lithium compounds as substances for reactor neutron converter into antineutrinos, was made. It is concluded that heavy water LiOD, LiODxD 2 O, LiD solutions are the most promising ones. They provide for high efficiency with reduction of the required lithium mass (300-350 times maximum) as compared with pure lithium converter

  19. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Weicheng [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Hu, Weida, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Cheng, Xiang' ai, E-mail: xiang-ai-cheng@126.com; Wang, Rui [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  20. New Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate fission fraction uncertainties for the reactor antineutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.B., E-mail: maxb@ncepu.edu.cn; Qiu, R.M.; Chen, Y.X.

    2017-02-15

    Uncertainties regarding fission fractions are essential in understanding antineutrino flux predictions in reactor antineutrino experiments. A new Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate the covariance coefficients between isotopes is proposed. The covariance coefficients are found to vary with reactor burnup and may change from positive to negative because of balance effects in fissioning. For example, between {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, the covariance coefficient changes from 0.15 to −0.13. Using the equation relating fission fraction and atomic density, consistent uncertainties in the fission fraction and covariance matrix were obtained. The antineutrino flux uncertainty is 0.55%, which does not vary with reactor burnup. The new value is about 8.3% smaller. - Highlights: • The covariance coefficients between isotopes vs reactor burnup may change its sign because of two opposite effects. • The relation between fission fraction uncertainty and atomic density are first studied. • A new MC-based method of evaluating the covariance coefficients between isotopes was proposed.

  1. Theoretical estimates of supernova-neutrino cross sections for the stable even-even lead isotopes: Charged-current reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almosly, W.; Carlsson, B. G.; Suhonen, J.; Toivanen, J.; Ydrefors, E.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed study of the charged-current supernova electron neutrino and electron antineutrino scattering off the stable even-mass lead isotopes A =204 , 206, and 208 is reported in this work. The proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) is adopted to construct the nuclear final and initial states. Three different Skyrme interactions are tested for their isospin and spin-isospin properties and then applied to produce (anti)neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections for (anti)neutrino energies below 80 MeV. Realistic estimates of the nuclear responses to supernova (anti)neutrinos are computed by folding the computed cross sections with a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution of the electron (anti)neutrino energies. The computed cross sections are compared with earlier calculations and the analyses are extended to take into account the effects coming from the neutrino oscillations.

  2. Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy in the future large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael; Feilitzsch, F V; Goeger-Neff, M; Lewke, T; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Todor, S; Winter, J

    2008-01-01

    The recent successes in neutrino physics prove that liquid-scintillator detectors allow to combine high energy resolution, efficient means of background reduction, and a large detection volume. In the planned LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) experiment, a target mass of 50 kt will enable the investigation of a variety of terrestrial and astrophysical neutrino sources. The high-statistics spectroscopy of geoneutrinos, solar neutrinos and supernova neutrinos will provide new insights in the heat production processes of Earth and Sun, and the workings of a gravitational collapse. The same measurements will as well investigate neutrino properties as oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy. A first spectroscopic measurement of the low flux of diffuse supernova neutrino background is within the sensitivity of the LENA detector. Finally, a life-time limit of several 1034 years can be set to the proton decay into proton and anti-neutrino, testing the predictions of SUSY theory. The present contribution includes a review of the scientific studies that were performed in the last years as well as a report on currently on-going R and D activities.

  3. Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy in the future large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, Michael; Feilitzsch, F V; Goeger-Neff, M; Lewke, T; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Todor, S; Winter, J [E15 Chair for Astroparticle Physics, Technische Universitat Miinchen, Physik Department, James-Franck-Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-11-01

    The recent successes in neutrino physics prove that liquid-scintillator detectors allow to combine high energy resolution, efficient means of background reduction, and a large detection volume. In the planned LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) experiment, a target mass of 50 kt will enable the investigation of a variety of terrestrial and astrophysical neutrino sources. The high-statistics spectroscopy of geoneutrinos, solar neutrinos and supernova neutrinos will provide new insights in the heat production processes of Earth and Sun, and the workings of a gravitational collapse. The same measurements will as well investigate neutrino properties as oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy. A first spectroscopic measurement of the low flux of diffuse supernova neutrino background is within the sensitivity of the LENA detector. Finally, a life-time limit of several 1034 years can be set to the proton decay into proton and anti-neutrino, testing the predictions of SUSY theory. The present contribution includes a review of the scientific studies that were performed in the last years as well as a report on currently on-going R and D activities.

  4. Current Results of NEUTRINO-4 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Samoilov, R.; Fomin, A.; Polyushkin, A.; Zinoviev, V.; Neustroev, P.; Golovtsov, V.; Chernyj, A.; Zherebtsov, O.; Martemyanov, V.; Tarasenkov, V.; Aleshin, V.; Petelin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Tuzov, A.; Sazontov, S.; Ryazanov, D.; Gromov, M.; Afanasiev, V.; Zaytsev, M.; Chaikovskii, M.

    2017-12-01

    The main goal of experiment “Neutrino-4” is to search for the oscillation of reactor antineutrino to a sterile state. Experiment is conducted on SM-3 research reactor (Dimitrovgrad, Russia). Data collection with full-scale detector with liquid scintillator volume of 3m3 was started in June 2016. We present the results of measurements of reactor antineutrino flux dependence on the distance in range 6- 12 meters from the center of the reactor. At that distance range, the fit of experimental dependence has good agreement with the law 1/L2. Which means, at achieved during the data collecting accuracy level oscillations to sterile state are not observed. In addition, the spectrum of prompt signals of neutrino-like events at different distances have been presented.

  5. Measurement of the Water to Scintillator Charged-Current Cross-Section Ratio for Muon Neutrinos at the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083872

    2017-10-02

    The T2K experiment is a 295-km long-baseline neutrino experiment which aims at the measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters. Precise measurements of these parameters require accurate extrapolation of interaction rates from the near detector, ND280, mainly made of scintillator (hydrocarbon), to Super-Kamiokande, the water Cherenkov far detector. Measurements on water and of the water to hydrocarbon ratio, contribute to eliminate the uncertainties arising from carbon/oxygen differences. The cross section on water is obtained by subtraction of event distributions in two almost identical sub-detectors, one of which is equipped with water-filled modules. The measurement is performed by selecting a muon neutrino charged-current sample, in an exposure of 5.80 × 10^(20) protons on target. The water to hydrocarbon cross-section ratio is extracted for good acceptance kinematic regions (only forward muons with momentum higher than 100 MeV), in bins of reconstructed energy, the very quantity used in T2K oscillatio...

  6. Beta-spectrometer with Si-detectors for the study of 144Ce-144Pr decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, I. E.; Bakhlanov, S. V.; Bazlov, N. V.; Chmel, E. A.; Derbin, A. V.; Drachnev, I. S.; Kotina, I. M.; Muratova, V. N.; Pilipenko, N. V.; Semyonov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Yeremin, V. K.

    2018-05-01

    Here we present the specifications of a newly developed beta-spectrometer, based on full absorption Si(Li) detector and thin transmission detector, allowing one to perform efficient separation beta-radiation and accompanying X-rays and gamma radiation. Our method is based on registration of coincident events from both detectors. The spectrometer can be used for precision measurements of various beta-spectra, namely for the beta-spectrum shape study of 144Pr, which is considered to be an advantageous anti-neutrino source for sterile neutrino searches.

  7. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76 Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse shape

  8. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-06-09

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse

  9. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  10. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Single Pion Production Cross Section on Water with the T2K Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2017-01-26

    The T2K off-axis near detector, ND280, is used to make the first differential cross section measurements of muon neutrino charged current single positive pion production on a water target at energies ${\\sim}0.8$~GeV. The differential measurements are presented as a function of muon and pion kinematics, in the restricted phase-space defined by $p_{\\pi^+}>200$MeV/c, $p_{\\mu^-}>200$MeV/c, $\\cos \\theta_{\\pi^+}>0.3$ and $\\cos \\theta_{\\mu^-}>0.3$. The total flux integrated $\

  11. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  12. Search for stellar collapse with the MACRO detector at Gran Sasso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The first MACRO supermodule commenced data taking in February 1989. Two complementary trigger and readout systems have been used to monitor the horizontal scintillation counters, which contain 42 tonnes (∼1 ktonne for the full MACRO detector) of liquid scintillator, for bursts of low energy anti-neutrinos from gravitational stellar collapses. This paper reports on an initial search and discusses the present as well as ultimate sensitivity of MACRO to this class of events. 4 figs

  13. Inclusive production of ρ0(770), f0(980) and f2(1270) mesons in νμ charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; LaRotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F.F.; Winton, L.J.; Yabsley, B.D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive production of the meson resonances ρ 0 (770), f 0 (980) and f 2 (1270) in neutrino-nucleus charged current interactions has been studied with the NOMAD detector exposed to the wide band neutrino beam generated by 450 GeV protons at the CERN SPS. For the first time the f 0 (980) meson is observed in neutrino interactions. The statistical significance of its observation is 6 standard deviations. The presence of f 2 (1270) in neutrino interactions is reliably established. The average multiplicity of these three resonances is measured as a function of several kinematic variables. The experimental results are compared to the multiplicities obtained from a simulation based on the Lund model. In addition, the average multiplicity of ρ 0 (770) in antineutrino-nucleus interactions is measured

  14. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  15. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  16. Properties of the hadronic system produced in antineutrino proton interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musgrave, B.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of the hadronic system produced in anti νp charged-current reactions into the current and target fragmentation components is discussed. The current fragments show properties in good qualitative agreement with the expectations of the naive quark-parton model. In particular, there is no evidence for either a Q 2 - or X/sub BJ/-dependence of the fragmentation functions. 7 references

  17. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  18. Hadronic final states in neutrino and antineutrino charged-current events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallini, B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the analyses concerning the hadronic systems produced in ν/antiν nucleon interactions are reviewed. Particular attention is devoted to the questions of factorization, scaling deviations of fragmentation functions, and the behavior of 2 (T)> of individual hadrons as a function of Q 2 . Tests of QCD ideas concerning these effects are discussed. Also the present status of the production of charmed states in ν/antiν interactions in bubble chambers is summarized

  19. Production of charmed hadrons in neutrino proton and antineutrino proton charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.; Burke, S.

    1987-01-01

    Using data from a νp and anti νp experiment with BEBC at CERN, the rates for inclusive production of D *+ , Λ c + and D 0 in νp scattering and of D *- in anti νp scattering are measured. Some examples of the exclusive production of D *+ , Λ c + and Σ c ++ are given. The cross section for the reaction νp → μ - Σ c ++ is estimated. (orig.)

  20. Production of charmed hadrons in neutrino proton and antineutrino proton charged current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Geiser, A.; Klein, H.; Kuhn, D.; Morrison, D. R. O.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hoffmann, E.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.; Burke, S.

    1987-12-01

    Usind data from a vp andbar v p experiment with BEBC at CERN, the rates for inclusive production of D *+, Λ {/c +} and D 0 in vp scattering and of D *- inbar v p scattering are measured. Some examples of the exclusive production of D *+, Λ {/c +} and ∑ {/c ++} are given. The cross section for the reaction vp→ μ - {/c ++} is estimated.

  1. Production of charmed hadrons in neutrino proton and antineutrino proton charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.; Burke, S.

    1987-08-01

    Using data from a νp and anti νp experiment with BEBC at CERN, the rates for inclusive production of D *+ , Λ c + and D 0 in νp scattering and of D *- in anti νp scattering are measured. Some examples of the exclusive production of D *+ , Λ c + and Σ c ++ are given. The cross section for the reaction νp → μ - Σ c ++ is estimated. (orig.)

  2. Hadronic final states in neutrino and antineutrino charged-current events

    CERN Document Server

    Tallini, B

    1979-01-01

    The results of the analyses concerning the hadronic systems produced in nu / nu nucleon interactions are reviewed. Particular attention is devoted to the questions of factorization, scaling deviations of fragmentation functions, and the behaviour of (p/sub T//sup 2/) of individual hadrons as a function of Q/sup 2/. Tests of QCD ideas concerning these effects are discussed. Also the present status of the production of charmed states in nu / nu interactions in bubble chambers is summarized. (19 refs).

  3. Measuring the neutrino mass hierarchy with the future KM3NeT/ORCA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofestaedt, Jannik

    2017-02-22

    The neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined by measuring the energy- and zenith-angle-dependent oscillation pattern of few-GeV atmospheric neutrinos that have traversed the Earth. This measurement is the main science goal of KM3NeT/ORCA ('Oscillation Research with Cosmics in the Abyss'), a planned multi-megaton underwater Cherenkov detector in the Mediterranean Sea. A key task is the reconstruction of shower-like events induced by electron neutrinos in charged-current interactions, which substantially affect the neutrino mass hierarchy sensitivity. In this thesis, numerous aspects of the expected neutrino detection performance of the planned ORCA detector are investigated. A new reconstruction algorithm for neutrino-induced shower-like events is developed. Excellent reconstruction accuracies are achieved, with a neutrino energy resolution better than 26%/24%, and a median neutrino direction resolution better than 11 /9 for electron neutrinos/antineutrinos in charged-current interactions with energies above 7 GeV. It is shown that these resolutions are close to the reconstruction accuracy limits imposed by intrinsic fluctuations in the Cherenkov light signatures. These intrinsic resolution limits are based on generic assumptions about event reconstruction in Cherenkov detectors and are derived as part of this thesis. Differences in event reconstruction capabilities between water- and ice-based Cherenkov detectors are discussed. The configuration of existing trigger algorithms is optimised for the ORCA detector. Based on the developed shower reconstruction, a detector optimisation study of the photosensor density is performed. In addition, it is shown that optical background noise in the deep Mediterranean Sea is not expected to compromise the feasibility of the neutrino mass hierarchy measurement with ORCA. Together, these investigations contribute significantly to the estimated neutrino mass hierarchy sensitivity of ORCA published in the 'Letter of

  4. Energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and searches for new physics (Resent developments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopejkin, V.I.; Sinev, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The study of the electron neutrino properties - its mass, mixing, magnetic moment - is the main goal of the present reactor antineutrino experiments. We consider the time evolution of the reactor ν bar e spectrum during reactor ON and reactor OFF periods. An important role of the time variations of the reactor ν bar e spectrum in searches for neutrino magnetic moment is discussed. Corrections to the predicted earlier theoretical and precise measured inverse beta-decay cross sections are calculated. We found that the residual ν bar e emission during the reactor OFF period can play a non-negligible role in oscillation experiments

  5. Neutrino (antineutrino) effective charge in a magnetized electron-positron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serbeto, A.; Rios, L.A.; Mendonca, J.T.; Shukla, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Using dynamical techniques of the plasma physics, the neutrino (antineutrino) effective charge in a magnetized dense electron-positron plasma is determined here. It shown that its value, which is determined by the plasma collective processes, depends mainly on the propagation direction of plasma waves and neutrinos against the external magnetic field direction. The direction dependence of the effective charge occurs due to the fact that the magnetic field breaks the plasma isotropy. The present theory gives a unified picture of the problem which is valid for an external magnetic field below the Landau-Schwinger critical value. Comparison with some of the results from the quantum field theory has been made

  6. Evidence for higher twist effects in fast π- production by antineutrinos in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, P. J.; Kasper, P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Azemoon, T.; Bertrand, D.; Berggren, M.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Iaselli, G.; Jones, G. T.; Lagraa, M.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Varvell, K.; Vallée, C.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.; Wells, J.; Zevgolatakos, E.

    1986-03-01

    Evidence for a significant higher twist contribution to high z π- production in antineutrino scattering is presented. In events with W>3 GeV and Q 2>1 GeV2 in our data, it accounts for (51 ±8)% of all π- with z above 0.5. It is consistent with the z- Q 2 correlations of Berger's higher twist prediction. The data are inconclusive concerning the predicted y-z correlation and p T dependence. The z - Q 2 correlation is not adequately described by the Lund Monte-Carlo.

  7. Evidence for higher twist effects in fast π- production by antineutrinos in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, P.J.; Azemoon, T.; Bullock, F.W.; Sansum, R.A.; Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Iaselli, G.; Bertrand, D.; Marage, P.; Berggren, M.; Hulth, P.O.; Coghen, T.; Gerbier, G.; Lagraa, M.; Neveu, M.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Simopoulo, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Varvell, K.; Wells, J.; Vallee, C.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for a significant higher twist contribution to high zπ - production in antineutrino scattering is presented. In events with W>3 GeV and Q 2 >1 GeV 2 in our data, it accounts for (51+-8)% of all π - with z above 0.5. It is consistent with the z-Q 2 correlations of Berger's higher twist prediction. The data are inconclusive concerning the predicted y-z correlation and psub(T) dependence. The z-Q 2 correlation is not adequately described by the Lund Monte-Carlo. (orig.)

  8. Angular distributions of neutrino and antineutrino scatterings by electrons and gauge models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, G.V.

    1976-01-01

    Assuming a nonderivative point interaction, and Born approximation, the complete angular distributions for the scatterings of neutrinos and antineutrinos by electrons are obtained from only simple general considerations, without explicit calculation; generalisation to parton targets is noted. Two pairs of simple constraints on the angular distributions can be violated only if the interaction has a helicity-flipping component; this can serve to disfavour the large class of models which are purely helicity-conserving. Comparison is made with some explicit calculations done for some special cases of some of the results. (author)

  9. Simulating detectors dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustom, Ibrahim Farog Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear detectors are used in all aspects of nuclear measurements. All nuclear detectors are characterized by their dead time i.e. the time needed by a detector to recover from a previous incident. A detector dead time influences measurements taken by a detector and specially when measuring high decay rate (>) where is the detector dead time. Two models are usually used to correct for the dead time effect: the paralayzable and the non-paralayzable models. In the current work we use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to simulate radioactivity and the effect of dead time and the count rate of a detector with a dead time =5x10 - 5s assuming the non-paralayzable model. The simulation indicates that assuming a non -paralayzable model could be used to correct for decay rate measured by a detector. The reliability of the non-paralayzable model to correct the measured decay rate could be gauged using the Monte Carlo simulation. (Author)

  10. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Bronuzzi, J.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set ...

  11. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set in full depletion. In a first step, Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is used to evaluate the soundness of this technique for interface traps characterization such as it may happen in bonded interfaces. Next, an analytical model is developed in details to give a better insight into the physics behind the TCT for interface layers. Further, this can be used as a simple tool to evidence what are the relevant parameters influencing the TCT signal and to set the basis for preliminary characterizations.

  12. Time-dependent flux from pulsed neutrons revealed by superconducting Nb current-biased kinetic inductance detector with "1"0B converter operated at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Narukami, Yoshito; Shishido, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Naohito; Ishida, Takekazu; Fujimaki, Akira; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Oikawa, Kenichi; Harada, Masahide; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new superconducting detector for a neutron based on Nb superconductor meanderline with a "1"0B conversion layer. We use a current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which is composed of a meanderline, for detection of a neutron with high spatial resolution and fast response. The thickness of Nb meanderlines is 40 nm and widths are 3 μm, 1 μm, and 0.6 μm. The CB-KIDs are fabricated at the center of the Si chip of the size 22 mm × 22 mm and the total area of CB-KIDs covers 8 mm × 8 mm. The chip was cooled to a temperature lower than 4 K below the transition temperature of Nb using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler. The Nb CB-KIDs with a "1"0B conversion layer output the voltage by irradiating pulsed neutrons at the material life science experimental facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) center. The response time of CB-KIDs is about a few tens ns. We have also obtained the time dependence of neutron flux generated from pulsed neutrons using a CB-KID. Experimental results were in good agreement with the simulated results. (author)

  13. UV detector based on InAlN/GaN-on-Si HEMT stack with photo-to-dark current ratio > 107

    Science.gov (United States)

    kumar, Sandeep; Pratiyush, Anamika Singh; Dolmanan, Surani B.; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Muralidharan, Rangarajan; Nath, Digbijoy N.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate an InAlN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistor based UV detector with a photo-to-dark current ratio of >107. The Ti/Al/Ni/Au metal stack was evaporated and thermal annealed rapidly for Ohmic contacts to the 2D electron gas (2DEG) at the InAlN/GaN interface, while the channel + barrier was recess etched to a depth of 20 nm to pinch-off the 2DEG between Source-Drain pads. A spectral responsivity (SR) of 32.9 A/W at 367 nm was measured at 5 V. A very high photo-to-dark current ratio of >107 was measured at a bias of 20 V. The photo-to-dark current ratio at a fixed bias was found to be decreasing with an increase in the recess length of photodetectors. The fabricated devices were found to exhibit a UV-to-visible rejection ratio of >103 with a low dark current of < 32 pA at 5 V. Transient measurements showed rise and fall times in the range of 3-4 ms. The gain mechanism was investigated, and carrier lifetimes were estimated which matched well with those reported elsewhere.

  14. A comparison of the performance of compact neutrino detector designs for nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyna, D. E.; McKeown, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction

  15. A method for prompt calculation of neutron flux from measured SPND [self-powered neutron detectors] currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulacsy, K.; Lux, I.

    1997-01-01

    A new, approximate method is given to calculate the in-core flux from the current of SPNDs, with a delay of only a few seconds. The stability of this stepwise algorithm is proven to be satisfactory, and the results of tests performed both on synthetic and on real data are presented. The reconstructed flux is found to follow both steady state and transient fluxes well. (author)

  16. Feasibility of creating a specialized reactimeter based on the inverse solution to kinetics equation with a current-mode neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, A. S., E-mail: alexsander.coshelev@yandex.ru; Arapov, A. V.; Ovchinnikov, M. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center–All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The file-evaluation results of a reactimeter based on the inverse solution to the kinetics equation (ISKE) are presented, which were obtained using an operating hardware-measuring complex with a KNK-4 neutron detector working in the current mode. The processing of power-recording files of the BR-1M, BR-K1, and VIR-2M reactors of the Russian Federal Nuclear Center—All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, which was performed with the use of Excel simulation of the ISKE formalism, demonstrated the feasibility of implementation of the reactivity monitoring (during the operation of these reactors at stationary power) beginning from the level of ~5 × 10{sup –4}β{sub eff}.

  17. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  18. Inclusive production of {rho}{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) mesons in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M. E-mail: mikhail.kirsanov@cern.ch; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; LaRotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T. [and others

    2001-05-07

    The inclusive production of the meson resonances {rho}{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) in neutrino-nucleus charged current interactions has been studied with the NOMAD detector exposed to the wide band neutrino beam generated by 450 GeV protons at the CERN SPS. For the first time the f{sub 0}(980) meson is observed in neutrino interactions. The statistical significance of its observation is 6 standard deviations. The presence of f{sub 2}(1270) in neutrino interactions is reliably established. The average multiplicity of these three resonances is measured as a function of several kinematic variables. The experimental results are compared to the multiplicities obtained from a simulation based on the Lund model. In addition, the average multiplicity of {rho}{sup 0}(770) in antineutrino-nucleus interactions is measured.

  19. Study of charged hadron multiplicities in charged-current neutrino-lead interactions in the OPERA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agafonova, N.; Malgin, A.; Matveev, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Shakirianova, I. [INR - Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, A.; Buontempo, S.; Consiglio, L.; Tioukov, V.; Voevodina, E. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Anokhina, A.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Podgrudkov, D.; Roganova, T. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, SINP MSU - Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Mizutani, F.; Ozaki, K.; Shibayama, E.; Takahashi, S. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Ariga, A.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Vuilleumier, J.L. [University of Bern, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Ariga, T. [University of Bern, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Kyushu University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Kose, U.; Longhin, A.; Pupilli, F.; Stanco, L. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bodnarchuk, I.; Chukanov, A.; Dmitrievski, S.; Gornushkin, Y.; Sotnikov, A.; Vasina, S. [JINR - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bozza, C.; Grella, G.; Stellacci, S.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno (Italy); ' ' Gruppo Collegato' ' INFN, Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Laudisio, F.; Medinaceli, E.; Roda, M.; Sirignano, C. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); Buonaura, A.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Galati, G.; Hosseini, B.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M.C.; Strolin, P. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Chernyavskiy, M.; Gorbunov, S.; Okateva, N.; Shchedrina, T.; Starkov, N. [LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); D' Ambrosio, N.; Di Marco, N.; Schembri, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); De Serio, M.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Paparella, L.; Pastore, A.; Simone, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Bari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Amo Sanchez, P. del; Duchesneau, D.; Pessard, H. [LAPP, Universite Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Di Ferdinando, D.; Mandrioli, G.; Patrizii, L.; Sirri, G.; Tenti, M. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dracos, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A. [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); Ebert, J.; Hagner, C.; Hollnagel, A.; Wonsak, B. [Hamburg University, Hamburg (Germany); Fini, R.A. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Fornari, F.; Mauri, N.; Pasqualini, L.; Pozzato, M. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fukuda, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Ishiguro, K.; Kitagawa, N.; Komatsu, M.; Miyanishi, M.; Morishima, K.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Niwa, K.; Rokujo, H.; Sato, O.; Shiraishi, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Gentile, V. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Goldberg, J. [Technion, Department of Physics, Haifa (Israel); Guler, A.M.; Kamiscioglu, M. [METU - Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Gustavino, C.; Loverre, P.; Monacelli, P.; Rosa, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Jakovcic, K.; Ljubicic, A.; Malenica, M. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kamiscioglu, C. [METU - Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey); Kim, S.H.; Park, B.D.; Yoon, C.S. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Klicek, B.; Stipcevic, M. [Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials and Sensing Devices, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kodama, K. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Matsuo, T.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Mikado, S. [Nihon University, Narashino, Chiba (Japan); Paoloni, A.; Spinetti, M.; Votano, L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Polukhina, N. [LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Engineering Physical Institute Moscow, Moscow (Russian Federation); Terranova, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G. [IIHE, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-01-15

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for ν{sub μ} → ν{sub τ} oscillations in appearance mode through the direct observation of tau neutrinos in the CNGS neutrino beam. In this paper, we report a study of the multiplicity of charged particles produced in charged-current neutrino interactions in lead. We present charged hadron average multiplicities, their dispersion and investigate the KNO scaling in different kinematical regions. The results are presented in detail in the form of tables that can be used in the validation of Monte Carlo generators of neutrino-lead interactions. (orig.)

  20. The electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in free neutron decay. Testing the standard model with the aSPECT-spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The β-decay of free neutrons is a strongly over-determined process in the Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics and is described by a multitude of observables. Some of those observables are sensitive to physics beyond the SM. For example, the correlation coefficients of the involved particles belong to them. The spectrometer aSPECT was designed to measure precisely the shape of the proton energy spectrum and to extract from it the electron anti-neutrino angular correlation coefficient a. A first test period (2005/2006) showed the ''proof-of-principles''. The limiting influence of uncontrollable background conditions in the spectrometer made it impossible to extract a reliable value for the coefficient a (published in 2008). A second measurement cycle (2007/2008) aimed to under-run the relative accuracy of previous experiments (δa)/(a)=5%. I performed the analysis of the data taken there which is the emphasis of this doctoral thesis. A central point are background studies. The systematic impact of background on a was reduced to (δa (syst.) )/(a)=0.61 %. The statistical accuracy of the analyzed measurements is (δa (stat.) )/(a)∼1.4 %. Besides, saturation effects of the detector electronics were investigated which were initially observed. These turned out not to be correctable on a sufficient level. An applicable idea how to avoid the saturation effects is discussed in the last chapter. (orig.)

  1. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  2. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  3. Short-wavelength infrared imaging using low dark current InGaAs detector arrays and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser illuminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Follman, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength IR (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7 °C. In addition, we have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640×512 readout integrated integrated circuits to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 μm at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0 °C. Noise due to the readout can be reduced from 95 to 57 electrons by using off-chip correlated double sampling. In addition, Aerius has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, and provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  4. SoLid: Search for Oscillations with Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK-CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Buhour, J. M.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Moortgat, C.; Pronost, G.; Raes, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Shitov, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2016-04-01

    Sterile neutrinos have been considered as a possible explanation for the recent reactor and Gallium anomalies arising from reanalysis of reactor flux and calibration data of previous neutrino experiments. A way to test this hypothesis is to look for distortions of the anti-neutrino energy caused by oscillation from active to sterile neutrino at close stand-off (˜ 6- 8m) of a compact reactor core. Due to the low rate of anti-neutrino interactions the main challenge in such measurement is to control the high level of gamma rays and neutron background. The SoLid experiment is a proposal to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor. This experiment uses a novel approach to detect anti-neutrino with a highly segmented detector based on Lithium-6. With the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localization of the Inverse Beta Decay products, a better experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other state-of-the-art technology. This compact system requires minimum passive shielding allowing for very close stand off to the reactor. The experimental set up of the SoLid experiment and the BR2 reactor will be presented. The new principle of neutrino detection and the detector design with expected performance will be described. The expected sensitivity to new oscillations of the SoLid detector as well as the first measurements made with the 8 kg prototype detector deployed at the BR2 reactor in 2013-2014 will be reported.

  5. Search for tZ Flavour Changing Neutral Currents in top-quark decays with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Durglishvili, Archil; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) processes in top-quark decays is presented. Data collected from proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 fb$^{−1}$, are analysed. A search is performed for top-quark pair-production events, with one top-quark decaying through the $t\\rightarrow qZ$ ($q=u,c$) FCNC channel, and other through the dominant Standard Model mode $t\\rightarrow bW$. Only decays of the $Z$ boson to charged leptons and leptonic $W$ boson decays are considered as signal. No evidence for a signal is found and the observed (expected) upper limits on the $t\\rightarrow uZ$ and $t\\rightarrow cZ$ branching ratios of $1.7\\times10^{-4}$ ($2.4\\times10^{-4}$) and $2.3\\times10^{-4}$ ($3.2\\times10^{-4}$) are set at 95% confidence level, respectively.

  6. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X-ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivero, P.; Manfredotti, C.; Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Paolini, C.; Lo Giudice, A.; Barrett, R.; Tucoulou, R.

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the large hadron collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of 'detector grade' artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitative study of the inhomogeneity of the charge transport parameter defined as the product of mobility and lifetime for both electron and holes. XBIL represents a technique complementary to ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL), which has already been used by our group, since X-ray energy loss profile in the material is different from that of MeV ions. X-ray induced luminescence maps have been performed simultaneously with induced photocurrent maps, to correlate charge transport and induced luminescence properties of diamond. Simultaneous XBICC and XBIL maps exhibit features of partial complementarity that have been interpreted on the basis of considerations on radiative and non-radiative recombination processes which compete with charge transport efficiency

  8. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodo, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  9. Cherenkov water detector NEVOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    A unique multipurpose Cherenkov water detector, the NEVOD facility, uses quasispherical measuring modules to explore all the basic components of cosmic rays on Earth's surface, including neutrinos. Currently, the experimental complex includes the Cherenkov water detector, a calibration telescope system, and a coordinate detector. This paper traces the basic development stages of NEVOD, examines research directions, presents the results obtained, including the search for the solution to the 'muon puzzle', and discusses possible future development prospects.

  10. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  11. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.

    2016-01-01

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb -1 are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the t → Wb branching fraction is set. The observed 95% CL limit is σ qg→t x B(t → Wb) < 3.4 pb and the expected 95% CL limit is σ qg→t x B(t → Wb) < 2.9 pb. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics Κ ugt /Λ < 5.8 x 10 -3 TeV.1 and Κ cgt /Λ < 13 x 10 -3 TeV and on the branching fractions B(t → ug) < 4.0 x 10 -5 and B(t → cg) < 20 x 10 -5 . (orig.)

  12. Search for single top-quark production via flavour changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; 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    2016-01-29

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm--quark initial states in proton--proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of $8\\;\\mbox{TeV}$ and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.3\\;\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$ are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the $t \\rightarrow Wb$ branching fraction is set. The observed $95\\,\\%$ CL limit is $\\sigma_{qg \\rightarrow t} \\times B(t \\rightarrow Wb)< 3.4\\;\\mbox{pb}$ and the expected $95\\,\\%$ CL limit is $\\sigma_{qg \\rightarrow t} \\times B(t \\rightarrow Wb)< 2.9\\;\\mbox{pb}$. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour changing neutral current inte...

  13. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents a search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. Data collected with the ATLAS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the $t \\rightarrow Wb$ branching fraction is set. The observed 95 \\% C.L. limit is $\\sigma_{qg \\rightarrow t} \\times B(t \\rightarrow Wb)< 3.4$ pb The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics $\\kappa_{ugt}/\\Lambda < 5.8\\cdot 10^{-3}$ TeV$^{-1}$ and $\\kappa_{cgt}/\\Lambda < 13\\cdot 10...

  14. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

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    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the [Formula: see text] branching fraction is set. The observed 95 % CL limit is [Formula: see text] and the expected 95 % CL limit is [Formula: see text]. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] and on the branching fractions [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text].

  15. Study of charged-current ep interactions at Q2 > 200 GeV2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-06-01

    Deep inelastic charged-current reactions have been studied in e + p and e - p collisions at a center of mass energy of about 300 GeV in the kinematic region Q 2 >200 GeV 2 and x>0.006 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The integrated cross sections for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 are found to be σ e + p→ anti νX =30.3 -4.2-2.6 +5.5+1.6 pb and σ e - p→νX =54.7 -9.8-3.4 +15.9+2.8 pb. Differential cross sections have been measured as functions of the variables x, y and Q 2 . From the measured differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , the W boson mass is determined to be M W =79 -7-4 +8+4 GeV. Measured jet rates and transverse energy profiles agree with model predictions. A search for charged-current interactions with a large rapidity gap yielded one candidate event, corresponding to a cross section σ e + p→ anti νX (Q 2 >200 GeV 2 ; η max -0.7 +1.8 ±0.1 pb. (orig.)

  16. Compensation and trapping in CdZnTe radiation detectors studied by thermoelectric emission spectroscopy, thermally stimulated conductivity, and current-voltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    In today's commercially available counter-select-grade CdZnTe crystals for radiation detector applications, the thermal ionization energies of the traps and their types, whether electron or hole traps, were measured. The measurements were successfully done using thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC). For reliability, the electrical contacts to the sample were found to be very important and, instead of Au Schottky contacts, In Ohmic contacts had to be used. For the filling of the traps, photoexcitation was done at zero bias, at 20K and at wavelengths which gave the maximum bulk photoexcitation for the sample. Between the temperature range from 20 to 400 K, the TSC current was found to be on the order of ∼ 10,000 times or even larger than the TEES current, in agreement with theory, but only TEES could resolve the trap type and was sensitive to the deep traps. Large concentration of hole traps at 0.1 and 0.6 eV were observed and smaller contraction of electron traps at 0.4 eV was seen. These deep traps cause compensation in the material and also cause trapping that degrades the radiation detection measurement

  17. Inverter ratio failure detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  18. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  19. Prospect for Charge Current Neutrino Interactions Measurements at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, P; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Cecchetti, A; Cecchini, S; Collazuol, G; Corso, F Dal; De Mitri, I; De Serio, M; Di Ferdinando, D; Dore, U; Dusini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Fanin, C; Fini, R A; Garfagnini, A; Grella, G; Kose, U; Laveder, M; Loverre, P; Longhin, A; Marsella, G; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Mezzetto, M; Muciaccia, M T; Orecchini, D; Paoloni, A; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Rescigno, R; Rosa, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Stanco, L; Stellacci, S; Surdo, A; Tenti, M; Togo, V

    2011-01-01

    Tensions in several phenomenological models grew with experimental results on neutrino/antineutrino oscillations at Short-Baseline (SBL) and with the recent, carefully recomputed, antineutrino fluxes from nuclear reactors. At a refurbished SBL CERN-PS facility an experiment aimed to address the open issues has been proposed [1], based on the technology of imaging in ultra-pure cryogenic Liquid Argon (LAr). Motivated by this scenario a detailed study of the physics case was performed. We tackled specific physics models and we optimized the neutrino beam through a full simulation. Experimental aspects not fully covered by the LAr detection, i.e. the measurements of the lepton charge on event-by-event basis and their energy over a wide range, were also investigated. Indeed the muon leptons from Charged Current (CC) (anti-)neutrino interactions play an important role in disentangling different phenomenological scenarios provided their charge state is determined. Also, the study of muon appearance/disappearance ca...

  20. A study of the EMC effect using neutrino and antineutrino interactions in neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Venus, W.; Apeldoorn, G. van; Jongejans, B.; Tenner, A.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Berggren, M.; Hulth, P.O.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Bobisut, F.; Sconza, A.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Rossi, A.M.; Cirio, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Romero, A.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Coghen, T.; Frodesen, A.G.; Gerbier, G.; Kasper, P.; Neveu, M.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Faccini-Turluer, M.L.; Vignaud, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nearly 40000 neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC are compared to measure the differences between neon and deuterium in the quark and antiquark distributions and in the nucleon structure functions. The ratio of Ne to D cross sections indicates some decrease between x ≅ 0.2 and x ≅ 0.6. The y distributions show there is no significant increase in the neon sea, but prefer a small decrease. Taken altogether the x and y distributions and the measured total cross-sections indicate some change in the shape of the valence distributions. No significant dependence on A is observed for either the shape of the sea or the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross-sections. (orig.)

  1. A study of the EMC effect using neutrino and antineutrino interactions in neon and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, J.; Saitta, B.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Allport, P.; Angelini, C.; Armenise, N.; Baldini, A.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bobisut, F.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F.; Calicchio, M.; Capiluppi, P.; Cirio, R.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Faccini-Turluer, M. L.; Fitch, P.; Frodesen, A. G.; Gerbier, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Jongejans, B.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Mandrioli, G.; Marage, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Mobayyen, M. M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Neveu, M.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Romero, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, A.; Sconza, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Schmitz, N.; Tenner, A.; Vallee, C.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Vignaud, D.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.

    1987-09-01

    Nearly 40000 neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC are compared to measure the differences between neon and deuterium in the quark and antiquark distributions and in the nucleon structure functions. The ratio of Ne to D cross sections indicates some decrease between x˜0.2 and x˜0.6. The y distributions show there is no significant increase in the neon sea, but prefer a small decrease. Taken altogether, the x and y distributions and the measured total cross-sections indicate some change in the shape of the valence distributions. No significant dependence on A is observed for either the shape of the sea or the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross-sections.

  2. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  3. Intrinsic limits on resolutions in muon- and electron-neutrino charged-current events in the KM3NeT/ORCA detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Amélineau, F.; Anassontzis, E.G.; André, M.; Androulakis, G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Avgitas, T.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Billault, M.; Bondì, M.; Bormuth, R.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bourret, S.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buis, E.; Buompane, R.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; Celli, S.; Champion, C.; Cherubini, S.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, L.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cobas, D.; Cocimano, R.; Coelho, J.A.B.; Coleiro, A.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D’Amato, C.; D’Amico, A.; D’Onofrio, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Sio, C.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, A.F.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Durocher, M.; Eberl, T.; Eichie, S.; van Eijk, D.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Favaro, M.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Frascadore, G.; Furini, M.; Fusco, L.A.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Garufi, F.; Gay, P.; Gebyehu, M.; Giacomini, F.; Gialanella, L.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia, R.; Graf, K.; Grégoire, T.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Habel, R.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Harissopulos, S.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henrys, S.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Hevinga, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.M.F.; Illuminati, G.; James, C.W.; Jansweijerf, P.; Jongen, M.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.F.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Kießling, D.; Koffeman, E.N.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Leisos, A.; Leone, F.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C.D.; Lo Presti, D.; Löhner, H.; Lonardo, A.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manzali, M.; Margiotta, A.; Margotti, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maris, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J.A.; Martini, A.; Marzaioli, F.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.W.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Mijakowski, P.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Moussa, A.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nicolau, C.A.; Olcina, I.; Olivetto, C.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pavalas, G.E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrini, G.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Pfutzner, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Pleinert, M.-O.; Poma, G.E.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Pratolongo, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rauch, T.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sánchez García, A.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schimmel, F.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sciacca, V.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spisso, B.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stellacci, S.M.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Terrasi, F.; Tézier, D.; Theraube, S.; Timmer, P.; Tönnis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Travaglini, R.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Versari, F.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Volkert, M.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Zachariadou, K.; Zani, S.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-01-01

    Studying atmospheric neutrino oscillations in the few-GeV range with a multi-megaton detector promises to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. This is the main science goal pursued by the future KM3NeT/ORCA water Cherenkov detector in the Mediterranean Sea. In this paper, the processes that limit

  4. Search for Flavour Changing Neutral Currents in Single Top-Quark Production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alhroob, Muhammad; Desch, Klaus

    This thesis represents the search for single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents using data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011, at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb$^{-1}$. Candidate events are selected with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum associated to the undetected neutrino and a jet originated from the hadronisation of a $b$ quark. Given the large expected number of background events and the small number of expected signal events, a neural network classifier is developed to combine many kinematic variables to create a powerful separator in order classify the events as a signal- or a background-like events. As no sign of new physics is seen in the neural network output distribution, a Bayesian statistical method is used to set an upper limit at 95% confidence level (C.L.) on the single top-quark production cross section through FCNC processes. The observed upper limit at 95% C.L. on the cro...

  5. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.

    1979-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector consisting of two electrodes defining an ionization chamber permitting entry of smoke, a radioactive source to ionize gas in the chamber and a potential difference applied across the first and second electrodes to cause an ion current to flow is described. The current is affected by entry of smoke. An auxiliary electrode is positioned in the ionization chamber between the first and second electrodes, and it is arranged to maintain or create a potential difference between the first electrode and the auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode may be used for testing or for adjustment of sensitivity. A collector electrode divides the chamber into two regions with the auxiliary electrode in the outer sensing region. (U.K.)

  6. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Abdallah, J. [Academia Sinica, Taipei (China). Inst. of Physics; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2016-02-15

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the t → Wb branching fraction is set. The observed 95% CL limit is σ{sub qg→t} x B(t → Wb) < 3.4 pb and the expected 95% CL limit is σ{sub qg→t} x B(t → Wb) < 2.9 pb. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics Κ{sub ugt}/Λ < 5.8 x 10{sup -3} TeV.1 and Κ{sub cgt}/Λ < 13 x 10{sup -3} TeV and on the branching fractions B(t → ug) < 4.0 x 10{sup -5} and B(t → cg) < 20 x 10{sup -5}. (orig.)

  7. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  8. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  9. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  10. First results of the deployment of a SoLid detector module at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, N.

    The SoLid experiment aims to resolve the reactor neutrino anomaly by searching for electron-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations. The search will be performed between 5.5 and 10 m from the highly enriched uranium core of the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The experiment utilises a novel approach to anti-neutrino detection based on a highly segmented, composite scintillator detector design. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved using a combination of high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6 LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localisation of the inverse beta decay products. This compact detector system requires limited passive shielding as it relies on spacial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. The first full scale, 288 kg, detector module was deployed at the BR2 reactor in November 2014. A phased three tonne experimental deployment will begin in the second half of 2016, allowing a precise search for oscillations that will resolve the reactor anomaly using a three tonne detector running for three years. In this talk the novel detector design is explained and initial detector performance results from the module level deployment are presented along with an estimation of the physics reach of the next phase.

  11. Background for Terrestrial Antineutrino Investigations: Scientific Basis of Knowledge on the Composition of the Deep Interior of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2004-01-01

    I present from a historical perspective a logical progression of understanding, related to the composition of the deep interior of the Earth, that comes from fundamental discoveries and from discoveries of fundamental quantitative relationships in nature. By following step by step the reasoning from that understanding, one might begin to appreciate what is not yet known that pertains to recent interest in geo-antineutrinos and also what should be investigated to further advance that understan...

  12. Ionization detectors, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevcik, J.

    1976-01-01

    Most measuring devices used in gas chromatography consist of detectors that measure the ionization current. The process is based on the collision of a moving high-energy particle with a target particle that is ionised while an electron is freed. The discussion of the conditions of the collision reaction, the properties of the colliding particles, and the intensity of the applied field point to a unified classification of ionisation detectors. Radioactive sources suitable for use in these detectors are surveyed. The slow-down mechanism, recombination and background current effect are discussed

  13. The status of BAT detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Amy; Markwardt, Craig B.; Krimm, Hans Albert; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cenko, Bradley

    2018-01-01

    We will present the current status of the Swift/BAT detector. In particular, we will report the updated detector gain calibration, the number of enable detectors, and the global bad time intervals with potential calibration issues. We will also summarize the results of the yearly BAT calibration using the Crab nebula. Finally, we will discuss the effects on the BAT survey, such as the sensitivity, localization, and spectral analysis, due to the changes in detector status.

  14. Search for flavour changing neutral currents in single top-quark production at √(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhroob, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    This thesis represents the search for single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents using data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011, at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb -1 . Candidate events are selected with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum associated to the undetected neutrino and a jet originated from the hadronisation of a b quark. Given the large expected number of background events and the small number of expected signal events, a neural network classifier is developed to combine many kinematic variables to create a powerful separator in order classify the events as a signal- or a background-like events. As no sign of new physics is seen in the neural network output distribution, a Bayesian statistical method is used to set an upper limit at 95% confidence level (C.L.) on the single top-quark production cross section through FCNC processes. The observed upper limit at 95% C.L. on the cross-section multiplied by the t→Wb branching fraction is measured to be σ qg→t x B(t →Wb) ugt )/(Λ) -3 TeV -1 and (K cgt )/(Λ) -2 TeV -1 , where Λ is the new physics scale, and on the branching fractions B(t→ug) -5 and B(t→cg) -4 . The limits on the branching fractions are the world's best limits to date and significantly improving the previous limits obtained by the DOe collaboration by a factor of 15.

  15. Reactor neutrinos study: integration and characterization of the Nucifer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiot, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The major advances done in the understanding of neutrinos properties and in detector technology have opened the door to a new discipline: the Applied Antineutrino Physics. Indeed, this particle has the great advantage to carry information from its emission place without perturbation. Because neutrinos are inextricably linked to nuclear processes, new applications are in nuclear safeguards. In this context, the Nucifer project aims to test a small electron-antineutrino detector to be installed a few 10 meters from a reactor core for monitoring its thermal power and for testing the sensitivity to the plutonium content. Moreover, recent re-analysis of previous short-distance reactor-neutrino experiments shows a significant discrepancy between measured and expected neutrino count rates. Among the various hypotheses a new phenomenon as the existence of a fourth sterile neutrino can explain this anomaly. To be able to count neutrinos and get the corresponding energy spectrum, the detection is based on the inverse beta decay in about 850 kg of doped liquid scintillator. The experimental challenge is to operate such a small detector in a high background place, due to the closeness with the surface and the reactor radiations. The detector is now finished and data taking has begun at the Osiris research reactor in Saclay since April 2012. Sadly, unexpected low liquid attenuation length and high gamma background level prevented us to highlight neutrinos. We are now waiting for a liquid change and a new lead wall to study reactor monitoring and to test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. (author) [fr

  16. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  17. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  18. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  19. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions < or similar 25 cm lateral to the reconstructed track were ascertained for these spots. The determined angular resolution of ∝1.4 at 1 GeV improves to ∝0.3 with rising muon energy. With the current analysis method

  20. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-15

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions current analysis

  1. Modelling of current-voltage characteristics of infrared photo-detectors based on type – II InAs/GaSb super-lattice diodes with unipolar blocking layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Gopal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that current-voltage characteristics of infrared photo-detectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb super-lattices with uni-polar blocking layers can be modelled similar to a junction diode with a finite series resistance on account of blocking barriers. As an example this paper presents the results of a study of current-voltage characteristics of a type II InAs/GaSb super-lattice diode with PbIbN architecture using a recently proposed [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 084502 (2014] method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. The thermal diffusion, generation – recombination (g-r, and ohmic currents are found as principal components besides a component of photocurrent due to background illumination. The experimentally observed reverse bias diode current in excess of thermal current (diffusion + g-r, photo-current and ohmic shunt current is reported to be best described by an exponential function of the type, Iexcess = Ir0 + K1exp(K2 V, where Ir0, K1 and K2 are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. The present investigations suggest that the exponential growth of excess current with the applied bias voltage may be taking place along the localized regions in the diode. These localized regions are the shunt resistance paths on account of the surface leakage currents and/or defects and dislocations in the base of the diode.

  2. Vector boson scattering and electroweak production of two like-charge W bosons and two jets at the current and future ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnoor, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The scattering of electroweak gauge bosons is closely connected to the electroweak gauge symmetry and its spontaneous breaking through the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. Since it contains triple and quartic gauge boson vertices, the measurement of this scattering process allows to probe the self-interactions of weak bosons. The contribution of the Higgs boson to the weak boson scattering amplitude ensures unitarity of the scattering matrix. Therefore, the scattering of massive electroweak gauge bosons is sensitive to deviations from the Standard Model prescription of the electroweak interaction and of the properties of the Higgs boson. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the scattering of massive electroweak gauge bosons is accessible through the measurement of purely electroweak production of two jets and two gauge bosons. No such process has been observed before. Being the channel with the least amount of background from QCD-mediated production of the same final state, the most promising channel for the first measurement of a process containing massive electroweak gauge boson scattering is the one with two like-charge W bosons and two jets in the final state. This thesis presents the first measurement of electroweak production of two jets and two identically charged W bosons, which yields the first observation of a process with contributions from quartic gauge interactions of massive electroweak gauge bosons. An overview of the most important issues in Monte Carlo simulation of vector boson scattering processes with current Monte Carlo generators is given in this work. The measurement of the final state of two jets and two leptonically decaying same-charge W bosons is conducted based on proton-proton collision data with a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV, taken in 2012 with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The cross section of electroweak production of two jets and two like-charge W bosons is measured with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations to be

  3. Charged corpuscular beam detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikawa, H; Nishikawa, Y

    1970-09-29

    The present invention relates to a charged particle beam detector which prevents transient phenomena disturbing the path and focusing of a charged particle beam travelling through a mounted axle. The present invention provides a charged particle beam detector capable of decreasing its reaction to the charge in energy of the charged particle beam even if the relative angle between the mounted axle and the scanner is unstable. The detector is characterized by mounting electrically conductive metal pieces of high melting point onto the face of a stepped, heat-resistant electric insulating material such that the pieces partially overlap each other and individually provide electric signals, whereby the detector is no longer affected by the beam. The thickness of the metal piece is selected so that an eddy current is not induced therein by an incident beam, thus the incident beam is not affected. The detector is capable of detecting a misaligned beam since the metal pieces partially overlap each other.

  4. Nuclear attenuation of fast hadrons produced in charged-current ν and anti ν interactions in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkot, W.; Coghen, T.; Czyzewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    The production of hadrons in charged-current (anti)neutrino interactions is studied with the bubble chamber BEBC exposed to the CERN (anti)neutrino wide-band beam. Fast-hadron production in a neon target is found to be attenuated as compared to that in a hydrogen target. This feature is discussed within theoretical models based on the idea of a hadron formation length. The experimental results favour the 'constituent' over the 'yo-yo' length concept, and suggest a quark cross section in the order of 3 mb. (orig.)

  5. Geneva University: Observation of electron-antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 19 March 2012 COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE 5 p.m. - École de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Observation of electron-antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay  Professor Yifang Wang Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, a multinational collaboration operating in the south of China, today reported the first results of its search for the last, most elusive piece of a long-standing puzzle: how is it that neutrinos can appear to vanish as they travel? The surprising answer opens a gateway to a new understanding of fundamental physics and may eventually solve the riddle of why there is far more ordinary matter than antimatter in the Universe today....

  6. Supernova relic electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos in future large-scale observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, C.; Welzel, J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the signal from supernova relic neutrinos in future large scale observatories, such as MEMPHYS (UNO, Hyper-K), LENA and GLACIER, at present under study. We discuss that complementary information might be gained from the observation of supernova relic electron antineutrinos and neutrinos using the scattering on protons on one hand, and on nuclei such as oxygen, carbon or argon on the other hand. When determining the relic neutrino fluxes we also include, for the first time, the coupling of the neutrino magnetic moment to magnetic fields within the core collapse supernova. We present numerical results on both the relic ν e and ν-bar e fluxes and on the number of events for ν e + C 12 , ν e + O 16 , ν e + Ar 40 and ν-bar e + p for various oscillation scenarios. The observation of supernova relic neutrinos might provide us with unique information on core-collapse supernova explosions, on the star formation history and on neutrino properties, that still remain unknown. (authors)

  7. Supernova relic electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos in future large-scale observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, C.; Welzel, J. [Institut de Physique Nuclueaire, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the signal from supernova relic neutrinos in future large scale observatories, such as MEMPHYS (UNO, Hyper-K), LENA and GLACIER, at present under study. We discuss that complementary information might be gained from the observation of supernova relic electron antineutrinos and neutrinos using the scattering on protons on one hand, and on nuclei such as oxygen, carbon or argon on the other hand. When determining the relic neutrino fluxes we also include, for the first time, the coupling of the neutrino magnetic moment to magnetic fields within the core collapse supernova. We present numerical results on both the relic {nu}{sub e} and {nu}-bar{sub e} fluxes and on the number of events for {nu}{sub e} + C{sup 12}, {nu}{sub e} + O{sup 16}, {nu}{sub e} + Ar{sup 40} and {nu}-bar{sub e} + p for various oscillation scenarios. The observation of supernova relic neutrinos might provide us with unique information on core-collapse supernova explosions, on the star formation history and on neutrino properties, that still remain unknown. (authors)

  8. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  9. Search for flavour changing neutral currents in single top-quark production at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhroob, Muhammad

    2013-03-15

    This thesis represents the search for single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents using data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011, at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb{sup -1}. Candidate events are selected with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum associated to the undetected neutrino and a jet originated from the hadronisation of a b quark. Given the large expected number of background events and the small number of expected signal events, a neural network classifier is developed to combine many kinematic variables to create a powerful separator in order classify the events as a signal- or a background-like events. As no sign of new physics is seen in the neural network output distribution, a Bayesian statistical method is used to set an upper limit at 95% confidence level (C.L.) on the single top-quark production cross section through FCNC processes. The observed upper limit at 95% C.L. on the cross-section multiplied by the t{yields}Wb branching fraction is measured to be {sigma}{sub qg{yields}t} x B(t {yields}Wb)< 3.9 pb. This upper limit is converted using a model-independent approach into upper limits on the coupling strengths (K{sub ugt})/({Lambda})<6.9.10{sup -3} TeV{sup -1} and (K{sub cgt})/({Lambda})<1.6.10{sup -2} TeV{sup -1}, where {Lambda} is the new physics scale, and on the branching fractions B(t{yields}ug)<5.7 .10{sup -5} and B(t{yields}cg)< 2.7.10{sup -4}. The limits on the branching fractions are the world's best limits to date and significantly improving the previous limits obtained by the DOe collaboration by a factor of 15.

  10. The Clover detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F A; Byrski, Th; Durien, D; Duchene, G; France, G de; Kharraja, B; Wei, L [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Butler, P; Jones, G; Jones, P [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Oliver Lodge Lab.; Hannachi, F [Daresbury Lab. (United Kingdom)

    1992-08-01

    The EUROGAM Phase I device is almost running for experiments and new technical developments are in progress for its second phase. For example, a composite Ge detector should enable: a very large photopeak efficiency with good energy and timing resolutions; and, the covering, with Ge, of a large portion of 4{pi}-Str. The Clover detector, proposed by the CRN, Strasbourg, is one of this new generation of Ge detectors. It is currently developed in France by the EUROGAM collaboration. The design, the technical characteristics of the counter and the first results of the prototype tests are discussed in this contribution. (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 2 refs.

  11. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  12. Neutral current induced neutrino oscillations in a supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A; Kusenko, Alexander; Segre, Gino

    1997-01-01

    Neutral currents induced matter oscillations of electroweak-active (anti-)neutrinos to sterile neutrinos can explain the observed motion of pulsars. In contrast to a recently proposed explanation of the pulsar birth velocities based on the electron to tau (muon) neutrino oscillations [hep-ph/9606428], the heaviest neutrino (either active or sterile) would have to have mass of order several keV.

  13. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips

  14. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xin Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  15. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Xin, E-mail: hxwang@iphy.me [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhan, Liang; Li, Yu-Feng; Cao, Guo-Fu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Shen-Jian [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-05-15

    We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  16. A precise determination of the nucleon structure functions in charged-current interactions on an iron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallage, B.

    1987-01-01

    570 000 neutrino-iron and 370 000 antineutrino-iron charged-current events were obtained from the Wide Band Beam exposure of the CDHS detector at CERN in 1983, at energies ranging from 20 to 400 GeV. These large statistics allowed a precise measurement of the charged-current differential cross-sections and a detailed study of systematic effects. The nucleon structure functions have been determined in the framework of the quark-parton model, in the kinematic range: 0.015 2 2 /c 2 . The longitudinal structure function F L (x) is in good agreement with the QCD predicted shape. Deviations from scale invariance are clearly seen from the functions F 2 and xF 3 . The Q 2 evolution of the valence quark distribution has been compared with the QCD prediction in order to measure the scale parameter Λ. A good agreement is obtained only if the low Q 2 points are removed from the comparison. Our experiment favours a value of Λ between 50 and 250 MeV [fr

  17. A silicon pixel detector prototype for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00714258

    2017-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector prototype for CLIC, currently under study for the innermost detector surrounding the collision point. The detector is made of a High-Voltage CMOS sensor (top) and a CLICpix2 readout chip (bottom) that are glued to each other. Both parts have a size of 3.3 x 4.0 $mm^2$ and consist of an array of 128 x 128 pixels of 25 x 25 $\\micro m^2$ size.

  18. Online monitoring of the Osiris reactor with the Nucifer neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, G.; Bouvet, L.; Collin, A. P.; Coulloux, G.; Cribier, M.; Deschamp, H.; Durand, V.; Fechner, M.; Fischer, V.; Gaffiot, J.; Gérard Castaing, N.; Granelli, R.; Kato, Y.; Lasserre, T.; Latron, L.; Legou, P.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Mention, G.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nghiem, T.-A.; Pedrol, N.; Pelzer, J.; Pequignot, M.; Piret, Y.; Prono, G.; Scola, L.; Starzinski, P.; Vivier, M.; Dumonteil, E.; Mancusi, D.; Varignon, C.; Buck, C.; Lindner, M.; Bazoma, J.; Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M.; Communeau, V.; Cucoanes, A.; Fallot, M.; Gautier, M.; Giot, L.; Guilloux, G.; Lenoir, M.; Martino, J.; Mercier, G.; Milleto, T.; Peuvrel, N.; Porta, A.; Le Quéré, N.; Renard, C.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Roy, D.; Vilajosana, T.; Yermia, F.; Nucifer Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Originally designed as a new nuclear reactor monitoring device, the Nucifer detector has successfully detected its first neutrinos. We provide the second-shortest baseline measurement of the reactor neutrino flux. The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products, combined with reactor core simulations, provides a new tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core and could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy to enhance the safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. Deployed at only 7.2 m away from the compact Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, the experiment also exhibits a well-suited configuration to search for a new short baseline oscillation. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment, describing the performances of the ˜0.85 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to ˜12 m of water and under intense background radiation conditions. Based on 145 (106) days of data with the reactor on (off), leading to the detection of an estimated 40760 ν¯ e , the mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 ±7 (stat )±18 (syst )ν¯ e/day , in agreement with the prediction of 277 ±23 ν¯ e/day . Because of the large background, no conclusive results on the existence of light sterile neutrinos could be derived, however. As a first societal application we quantify how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  19. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. CARIOCA : A Fast Binary Front-End Implemented in 0.25Pm CMOS using a Novel Current-Mode Technique for the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The CARIOCA front-end is an amplifier discriminator chip, using 0.25mm CMOS technology, developed with a very fast and low noise preamplifier. This prototype was designed to have input impedance below 10W. Measurements showed a peaking time of 14ns and noise of 450e- at zero input capacitance, with a noise slope of 37.4 e-/pF. The sensitivity of 8mV/fC remains almost unchanged up to a detector capacitance of 120pF.

  1. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  2. A review of the developments of radioxenon detectors for nuclear explosion monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivels, Ciara B.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Theodore W.; Kalinowski, Martin B.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-09-27

    Developments in radioxenon monitoring since the implementation of the International Monitoring System are reviewed with emphasis on the most current technologies to improve detector sensitivity and resolution. The nuclear detectors reviewed include combinations of plastic and NaI(Tl) detectors, high purity germanium detectors, silicon detectors, and phoswich detectors. The minimum detectable activity and calibration methods for the various detectors are also discussed.

  3. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  4. Testing for new physics with low-energy anti-neutrino sources: LAMA as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, I.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Gurentsov, V.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Miranda, O.G.; Semikoz, V.B.; Valle, J.W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Some electroweak models with extended neutral currents, such as those based on the E 6 group, lead to an increase of the ν-bar-e scattering cross section at energies below 100 keV. We propose to search for the heavy Z' boson contribution in an experiment with a high-activity artificial neutrino source and with a large-mass detector. We present the case for the LAMA experiment with a large NaI(Tl) detector located at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. The neutrino flux is known to within a one percent accuracy, in contrast to the reactor case and one can reach lower neutrino energies. Both features make our proposed experiment more sensitive to extended gauge models, such as the χ model. For a low enough background the sensitivity to the Z χ boson mass would reach 600 GeV for one year running of the experiment

  5. Detectors for CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggett, N.; Gordon, H.A.; Palmer, R.B.; Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    We discuss some current approaches to a large solid angle detector. An alternative approach for utilizing the high rate of events at CBA is to design special purpose detectors for specific physics goals which can be pursued within a limited solid angle. In many cases this will be the only way to proceed, and then high luminosity has a different significance. The total rate in the restricted acceptance is less likely to be a problem, while the need for high luminosity to obtain sufficient data is obvious. Eight such experiments from studies carried out in the community are surveyed. Such experiments could be run on their own or in combination with others at the same intersection, or even with a large solid angle detector, if a window can be provided in the larger facility. The small solid angle detector would provide the trigger and special information, while the facility would provide back-up information on the rest of the event. We consider some possibilities of refurbishing existing detectors for use at CBA. This discussion is motivated by the fact that there is a growing number of powerful detectors at colliding beam machines around the world. Their builders have invested considerable amounts of time, money and ingenuity in them, and may wish to extend the useful lives of their creations, as new opportunities arise

  6. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  7. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  8. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  9. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  10. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  11. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-11-01

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  12. Radiation damage in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    A survey is presented of the important damage-producing interactions in semiconductor detectors and estimates of defect numbers are made for MeV protons, neutrons and electrons. Damage effects of fast neutrons in germanium gamma ray spectrometers are given in some detail. General effects in silicon detectors are discussed and damage constants and their relationship to leakage current is introduced

  13. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km3 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Di Giacomo, Paola

    2009-01-01

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay). Because neutral and charged pions (made by hadron scattering in the flare) are born on the same foot, their link is compelling: the observed gamma flux [Grechnev V.V. et al., (arXiv:0806.4424), Solar Physics, Vol. 1, October, (2008), 252] reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Moreover while gamma photons might be absorbed (in deep corona) or at least reduced inside the flaring plasma, the secondaries neutrino are not. So pion neutrinos should be even more abundant than gamma ones. Tens-hundred MeV neutrinos may cross undisturbed the whole Sun, doubling at least their rate respect a unique solar-side for gamma flare. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds opening a windows for neutrino astronomy, already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events [Matthew D. Kistler et al. (0810.1959v1)]. However rarest (once a decade), brief (a few minutes) powerful solar neutrino 'flare' may shine and they may overcome by two to three order of magnitude the corresponding steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, leading in largest Neutrino detector at least to one or to meaning-full few events clustered signals. The voice of such a solar anti-neutrino flare component at a few tens MeVs may induce an inverse beta decay over a vanishing anti-neutrino solar background. Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube

  14. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  15. The D0 detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1995-02-01

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector

  16. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  17. Electromagnetic disturbance neutralizing radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripentog, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    A radiation detector of the Neher-White type is described which automatically neutralizes induced negative charges on the electrometer tube control grid which shut off the electrometer tube. The detector includes means for establishing a voltage of one polarity in response to plate current and voltage of opposite polarity in response to an absence of plate current and means for connecting the control grid to a reference potential for draining the negative charge in response to the voltage of opposite polarity. (author)

  18. Study of the muon-induced neutron background with the LVD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghetti, H.; Selvi, M.

    2005-01-01

    High energy neutrons, generated as a product of cosmic muon interaction in the rock or in the detector passive material, represent the most dangerous background for a large list of topics like reactor neutrino studies, the search for SN relic neutrinos, solar antineutrinos, etc.Up to now there are few measurements of the muon-produced neutron flux at large depth underground. Moreover it is difficult to reproduce the measured data with Monte Carlo simulation because of the large uncertainties in the neutron production and propagation models.We present here the results of such a measurement with the LVD detector, which is well suited for the detection of neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muons, reporting the neutron flux at various distances from the muon track, for different neutron energies (E > 20 MeV) and as a function of the muon track length in scintillator

  19. Determination of the parton distributions and structure functions of the proton from neutrino and antineutrino reactions on hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1994-12-01

    This analysis is based on data from neutrino and antineutrino scattering on hydrogen and deuterium, obtained with BEBC in the (anti) neutrino wideband beam of the CERN SPS. The parton momentum distributions in the proton and the proton structure functions are determined in the range 0.01

  20. Monte-Carlo simulations on the antineutrino detection in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zude, E.

    1991-09-01

    Aim of the present thesis was to study, how far a large-area neutron detector with high efficiency operated at the Corporation for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt can also by applied for experiments on the sub-threshold antineutron production in heavy ion reactions for the study of the equation of state of highly excited nuclear matter. The experimental part consisted in the partition at the construction, the taking into operation, and the calibration measurements of the target-detector system, as well at the experiments with the LAND detector for the study of the Coulomb excitation of 136 Xe projectiles in the reaction 136 Xe+ 208 Pb at 700 respectively 800 MeV/u. Studies on the suppression of neutron events against antineutron events in the data acquisition in a typical SIS/LAND experiment on the antineutron production in heavy ion collisions were performed. The possibilities available on the level of the hardware trigger for the suppression of (multiple) neutron events were studied. Thereby resulted a reachable suppression factor of ≅ 10 -3 . Studies on the off-line analysis of antineutron events exhibited problems, which base on the high matter density in the detector. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. Measurement of the leptonic mixing parameter θ13 at the reactor antineutrino experiment Double Chooz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, V.

    2014-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims at measuring the neutrino mixing parameter θ 13 by studying the oscillations of ν-bar e produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors located in France. The experimental concept consists in comparing the signal of 2 identical 10.3 m 3 detectors, allowing the cancellation of most of the experimental systematic uncertainties. The near detector, whose goal is the flux normalization and a measurement without oscillation, is expected to be delivered in 2013. The farthest detector from the source is taking data since april 2011 and is sensitive to θ 13 , which is expected to affect both the rate and the shape of measured ν-bar e . In 102 days with far detector only, 4121 ν-bar e candidates have been observed, while the expectation in case of no-oscillation is 4344 ± 165 events. This deficit is interpreted as evidence for ν-bar e disappearance. From a rate and shape analysis, it is found that sin 2 (θ 13 ) = [0.086±0.041(stat.)±0.030(syst)] with Δm 31 2 =2.4*10 -3 eV 2 , while the no-oscillation hypothesis is even excluded at 94.6%. We present in this document the concept and detection method of the Double Chooz experiment, along with its analysis strategy and first results on θ 13 . (author)

  2. Self-powered detectors with thulium emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Klar, E.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to fission chambers, prompt-indicating self-powered (SPN) detectors are used for measuring the neutron flux density in the core of power reactors. Although current SPN detectors with a cobalt emitter give satisfactora results, detectors with other emitter materials have been analyzed and tested. The author describes the properties and decay pattern of the nuclide thulium and presents the results of measurements made while testing thulium detectors. (orig.) [de

  3. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  4. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  5. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  6. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. The Borexino Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, David

    2010-04-01

    The Borexino detector is a large volume liquid scintillator detector for low energy neutrino spetroscopy currently running underground at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. Main goal of the experiment is the real-time measurement of sub-MeV solar neutrinos, and particularly of the mono-energetic (862KeV) 7Be electron capture neutrinos, via neutrino-electron scattering in ultra-pure liquid scintillator. We report the description of the detector itself from its construction to the final current configuration. The initial requirements are first presented, then the strategy developed to achieve them: choice of materials and components, purification of the scintillator, cleaning, leak tightness, fluid handling. Every single point is analyzed, particularly the purification plants, that allowed reaching an ultra high pure scintillator and the fluid handling system, a large modular system connecting fluid receiving, purification and fluid delivery processes for every fluid involved. The different phases of the filling follow: from air to water to the final liquid scintillator, mainly focusing on the scintillator filling. The performances of the detector and the results are then presented.

  8. First charged current data from the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinknecht, K.

    1977-01-01

    The CDHS Collaboration has analyzed data taken in the CERN narrow-band antineutrino and neutrino beams. From 12000 antineutrino and 36000 neutrino charged current events at neutrino energies between 30 GeV and 200 GeV, we obtain the average inelasticity and the cross-section ratio sigma antisub(ν)/sigmasub(ν) as a function of neutrino energy. On the basis of these data we cannot confirm the high y anomaly observed by previous experiments at Fermilab. Instead, the measured average inelasticity in anti neutrino reactions and the ratio of charged current total cross-sections sigma anti sub(ν)/sigma%sub(ν) are compatible with no energy variation within their errors in the energy range 30 + . (orig.) [de

  9. Solid state radiation detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A solid state radiation flux detector system utilizes a detector element, consisting of a bar of semiconductor having electrical conductance of magnitude dependent upon the magnitude of photon and charged particle flux impinging thereon, and negative feedback circuitry for adjusting the current flow through a light emitting diode to facilitate the addition of optical flux, having a magnitude decreasing in proportion to any increase in the magnitude of radiation (e.g. x-ray) flux incident upon the detector element, whereby the conductance of the detector element is maintained essentially constant. The light emitting diode also illuminates a photodiode to generate a detector output having a stable, highly linear response with time and incident radiation flux changes

  10. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top-quark decays to qZ in pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at √s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Abdallah, J. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Abdinov, O. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Aben, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics and University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2016-01-08

    A search for the flavour-changing neutral-current decay t→qZ is presented. Data collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 from proton–proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1}, are analysed. Top-quark pair-production events with one top quark decaying through the t→qZ (q=u,c) channel and the other through the dominant Standard Model mode t→bW are considered as signal. Only the decays of the Z boson to charged leptons and leptonic W boson decays are used. No evidence for a signal is found and an observed (expected) upper limit on the t→qZ branching ratio of 7×10{sup -4} (8×10{sup -4}) is set at the 95 % confidence level.

  11. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  12. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  13. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  14. Thin epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stab, L.

    1989-01-01

    Manufacturing procedures of thin epitaxial surface barriers will be given. Some improvements have been obtained: larger areas, lower leakage currents and better resolutions. New planar epitaxial dE/dX detectors, made in a collaboration work with ENERTEC-INTERTECHNIQUE, and a new application of these thin planar diodes to EXAFS measurements, made in a collaboration work with LURE (CNRS,CEA,MEN) will also be reported

  15. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  16. The neutrino experiment Double Chooz and data analysis with the near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Michael Werner

    2016-03-07

    During the last years there has been a huge progress in the field of neutrino physics. Neutrino oscillations are well established and almost all parameters, except a possible CP-violating phase, are determined to high precision. One experiment providing a precise measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} is the Double Chooz reactor antineutrino experiment. The reactor antineutrinos are detected via the inverse beta decay in two identical liquid scintillator based detectors. A few years ago, the value of θ{sub 13} was unknown and only an upper limit existed. Double Chooz was the first reactor antineutrino experiment presenting a result for a nonzero value of θ{sub 13}. The value for sin{sup 2}2θ{sub 13} from the latest Double Chooz publication is 0.090{sup +0.032}{sub -0.029}. As part of this thesis, an infrastructure for filling the Double Chooz near detector was established and 190 m{sup 3} of detector liquids were prepared successfully. The filling process was optimized to allow an efficient filling of the near detector. The total operation time was reduced to only 22 days. Compared to the far detector filling time of 2 months, this is a great improvement. The development of a completely new level measurement system was as well part of this thesis. Due to the excellent performance of the level measurement system, the hard restrictions for the safety of the Double Chooz detector were met during the entire filling process. Several power glitches and network failures did not harm the system and did not result in any loss of data. These irregularities and the simple maintenance and repair possibilities certify the success of the design concept for the new level measurement system. For this thesis, data from the Double Chooz near detector with a total live time of 110.4 days was used. The mass concentrations of uranium and thorium in the near detector were determined using BiPo coincidences. These events originate from the β-decay of {sup 214}Bi and {sup

  17. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented

  18. Standardization of detector control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Chikara

    2000-01-01

    Current and future detectors for high-energy and/or nuclear physics experiments require highly intelligent detector control systems. In order to reduce resources, the construction of a standardized template for the control systems based on the commercially available superviser control and data acquisition (SCADA) system has been proposed. The possibility of constructing this template is discussed and several key issues for evaluation of SCADA as the basis for such a template are presented. (author)

  19. Inclusive ϱ0 production in overlineνμp charged current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässler, H.; Lanske, D.; Schulte, R.; Jones, G. T.; Kennedy, B. W.; Middleton, R. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; Böckmann, K.; Gebel, W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Hoffmann, E.; Nellen, B.; Saarikko, H.; Klein, H.; Mittendorfer, J.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Clayton, E. F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Saitta, B.; Wells, J.; Aachen-Birmingham-Bonn-CERN-Imperial College-München (MPI)-Oxford Collaboration

    1986-07-01

    Inclusive ϱ0 production has been studied in antineutrino-proton charged current interactions, using a sample of 3340 events obtained in BEBC filled with hydrogen and exposed to the CERN wideband antineutrino beam. An average multiplicity of 0.11 ± 0.02 ϱ0 per event at a mean hadronic mass W of 4.2 GeV is observed. The ϱ0 production characteristics are determined as functions of pT, xF, and z. The ratio ϱ 0/"π 0" is found to be low at small z values consistent with centrally produced pions coming mainly from resonances. At large z values this ratio approaches 0.45 ± 0.15 which is compatible with a vector/pseudoscalar meson direct production ratio of one. The results are compared with those obtained from neutrino-proton interactions in the same experimental set-up.

  20. Inclusive rho0 production in anti νsub(μ)p charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graessler, H.; Lanske, D.; Schulte, R.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Saitta, B.; Wells, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusive rho 0 production has been studied in antineutrino-proton charged current interactions, using a sample of 3340 events obtained in BEBC filled with hydrogen and exposed to the CERN wideband antineutrino beam. An average multiplicity of 0.11+-0.02 rho 0 per event at a mean hadronic mass W of 4.2 GeV is observed. The rho 0 production characteristics are determined as functions of psub(T), chisub(F), and z. The ratio rho 0 /'π 0 ' is found to be low at small z values consistent with centrally produced pions coming mainly from resonances. At large z values this ratio approaches 0.45+-0.15 which is compatible with a vector/pseudoscalar meson direct production ratio of one. The results are compared with those obtained from neutrino-proton interactions in the same experimental set-up. (orig.)

  1. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  2. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  3. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top-quark decays $t\\to qZ$ in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allaire, Corentin; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Álvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkin, Ryan Justin; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Bakker, Pepijn Johannes; Bakshi Gupta, Debottam; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tyler Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bauer, Kevin Thomas; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Bergsten, Laura Jean; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Betti, Alessandra; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolz, Arthur Eugen; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Bonilla, Johan Sebastian; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozson, Adam James; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Braren, Frued; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Bruno, Salvatore; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burch, Tyler James; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Buschmann, Eric; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cai, Huacheng; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrá, Sonia; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casha, Albert Francis; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, David; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jue; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgeniya; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Kingman; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Yun Sang; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioară, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corrigan, Eric Edward; Corriveau, François; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dahbi, Salah-eddine; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Dann, Nick; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; 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Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Duvnjak, Damir; Dyndal, Mateusz; Dziedzic, Bartosz Sebastian; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Epland, Matthew Berg; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Fabiani, Veronica; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Minyu; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Fomin, Nikolai; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Spolidoro Freund, Werner; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; García Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gessner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; Gonnella, Francesco; Gonski, Julia; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Goy, Corinne; Gozani, Eitan; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Graham, Emily Charlotte; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guerguichon, Antinea; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gugel, Ralf; Gui, Bin; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gurbuz, Saime; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutelman, Benjamin Jacque; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Kunlin; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handl, David Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hankache, Robert; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Eva; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hlaluku, Dingane Reward; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Hohov, Dmytro; Holmes, Tova Ray; Holzbock, Michael; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hostiuc, Alexandru; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Huhtinen, Mika; Hunter, Robert Francis Holub; Huo, Peng; Hupe, Andre Marc; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Hyneman, Rachel; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Iltzsche, Franziska; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa