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Sample records for antimony hydrides

  1. A NOVEL METHOD OF THE HYDRIDE SEPARATION FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ARSENIC AND ANTIMONY BY AAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganden Supriyanto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel method is proposed for the hydride separation when determinining of arsenic and antimony by AAS. A chromatomembrane cell was used as preconcentration-, extraction- and separation-manifold instead of the U-tube phase separator, which is normally fitted in continuous flow vapour systems generating conventionaly the hydrides. The absorbances of the hydrides produced were measured by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer at 193.7 nm and 217.6 nm. Under optimized analytical conditions, the calibration plot for arsenic was linear from 50 to 500 ng.mL-1 (r2 = 0.9982. The precision for three subsequent measurements of 500 ng.mL-1 arsenic gave rise to a relative standard deviation of 0.4%. The detection limit was 15 ng.mL-1, which is much lower compared with that of the conventional hydride system (2000 ng.mL-1. A similar result was observed in case of antimony: the detection limit was 8 ng.mL-1 when the proposed method was applied. Consequently, the sensitivity of the novel method surpasses systems with conventional hydride generation, i.e. the precision and the acuracy increase whereas the standard deviation and the detection limit decrease. The proposed method was applied in pharmacheutial analysis and the certified As-content of a commercial product was very sufficiently confirmed.   Keywords: Chromatomembrane Cell, Hydride separation, Arsenic detection, Antimony detection, AAS

  2. Determination of antimony by using a quartz atom trap and electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menemenlioglu, Ipek; Korkmaz, Deniz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2007-01-15

    The analytical performance of a miniature quartz trap coupled with electrochemical hydride generator for antimony determination is described. A portion of the inlet arm of the conventional quartz tube atomizer was used as an integrated trap medium for on-line preconcentration of electrochemically generated hydrides. This configuration minimizes transfer lines and connections. A thin-layer of electrochemical flow through cell was constructed. Lead and platinum foils were employed as cathode and anode materials, respectively. Experimental operation conditions for hydride generation as well as the collection and revolatilization conditions for the generated hydrides in the inlet arm of the quartz tube atomizer were optimized. Interferences of copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, arsenic, selenium, lead and tin were examined both with and without the trap. 3{sigma} limit of detection was estimated as 0.053 {mu}g l{sup -1} for a sample size of 6.0 ml collected in 120 s. The trap has provided 18 fold sensitivity improvement as compared to electrochemical hydride generation alone. The accuracy of the proposed technique was evaluated with two standard reference materials; Trace Metals in Drinking Water, Cat CRM-TMDW and Metals on Soil/Sediment 4, IRM-008.

  3. Determination of antimony by using a quartz atom trap and electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menemenlioglu, Ipek; Korkmaz, Deniz; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2007-01-01

    The analytical performance of a miniature quartz trap coupled with electrochemical hydride generator for antimony determination is described. A portion of the inlet arm of the conventional quartz tube atomizer was used as an integrated trap medium for on-line preconcentration of electrochemically generated hydrides. This configuration minimizes transfer lines and connections. A thin-layer of electrochemical flow through cell was constructed. Lead and platinum foils were employed as cathode and anode materials, respectively. Experimental operation conditions for hydride generation as well as the collection and revolatilization conditions for the generated hydrides in the inlet arm of the quartz tube atomizer were optimized. Interferences of copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, arsenic, selenium, lead and tin were examined both with and without the trap. 3σ limit of detection was estimated as 0.053 μg l -1 for a sample size of 6.0 ml collected in 120 s. The trap has provided 18 fold sensitivity improvement as compared to electrochemical hydride generation alone. The accuracy of the proposed technique was evaluated with two standard reference materials; Trace Metals in Drinking Water, Cat CRM-TMDW and Metals on Soil/Sediment 4, IRM-008

  4. Antimony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Sutphin, David M.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Carlin, James F.; Berger, Byron R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Antimony is an important mineral commodity used widely in modern industrialized societies. The element imparts strength, hardness, and corrosion resistance to alloys that are used in many areas of industry, including in lead-acid storage batteries. Antimony’s leading use is as a fire retardant in safety equipment and in household goods, such as mattresses. The U.S. Government has considered antimony to be a critical mineral mainly because of its use in military applications. The great majority of the world’s antimony comes from China, and much of the remainder is shipped to China for smelting. Antimony resources are unevenly distributed around the world. China has the bulk of the world’s identified resources; other countries that have identified antimony resources include Bolivia, Canada, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Tajikistan, and Turkey. Resources in the United States are located mainly in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, and Nevada. The most significant antimony mineral deposits occur in geologic environments with a thick sequence of siliciclastic sedimentary rocks in areas with significant fault and fracture systems. The most common antimony ore mineral is stibnite (Sb2 S3 ), but more than 100 other minerals also contain antimony. The presence of antimony in surface waters and groundwaters results primarily from rock weathering, soil runoff, and anthropogenic sources. Global emissions of antimony to the atmosphere average 6,100 metric tons per year. Empirical data suggest that the acid-generating potential of antimony mine waste is low.

  5. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts.

  6. Antimony speciation analysis in sediment reference materials using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potin-Gautier, M.; Pannier, F.; Quiroz, W.; Pinochet, H.; Gregori, I. de

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the development of suitable methodologies for determination of the speciation of antimony in sediment reference samples. Liquid chromatography with a post-column photo-oxidation step and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry as detection system is applied to the separation and determination of Sb(III), Sb(V) and trimethylantimony species. Post-column decomposition and hydride generation steps were studied for sensitive detection with the AFS detector. This method was applied to investigate the conditions under which speciation analysis of antimony in sediment samples can be carried out. Stability studies of Sb species during the extraction processes of solid matrices, using different reagents solutions, were performed. Results demonstrate that for the extraction yield and the stability of Sb species in different marine sediment extracts, citric acid in ascorbic acid medium was the best extracting solution for antimony speciation analysis in this matrix (between 55% and 65% of total Sb was recovered from CRMs, Sb(III) being the predominant species). The developed method allows the separation of the three compounds within 6 min with detection limits of 30 ng g -1 for Sb(III) and TMSbCl2 and 40 ng g -1 for Sb(V) in sediment samples

  7. Antimony speciation analysis in sediment reference materials using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potin-Gautier, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Pannier, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France)]. E-mail: Florence.pannier@univ-pau.fr; Quiroz, W. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile); Pinochet, H. [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile); Gregori, I. de [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2005-11-30

    This work presents the development of suitable methodologies for determination of the speciation of antimony in sediment reference samples. Liquid chromatography with a post-column photo-oxidation step and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry as detection system is applied to the separation and determination of Sb(III), Sb(V) and trimethylantimony species. Post-column decomposition and hydride generation steps were studied for sensitive detection with the AFS detector. This method was applied to investigate the conditions under which speciation analysis of antimony in sediment samples can be carried out. Stability studies of Sb species during the extraction processes of solid matrices, using different reagents solutions, were performed. Results demonstrate that for the extraction yield and the stability of Sb species in different marine sediment extracts, citric acid in ascorbic acid medium was the best extracting solution for antimony speciation analysis in this matrix (between 55% and 65% of total Sb was recovered from CRMs, Sb(III) being the predominant species). The developed method allows the separation of the three compounds within 6 min with detection limits of 30 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(III) and TMSbCl2 and 40 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(V) in sediment samples.

  8. Redox speciation analysis of antimony in soil extracts by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Gregori, Ida de E-mail: idegrego@ucv.cl; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2003-07-18

    A sensitive atomic spectrometric method for the redox speciation analysis of antimony in soils is described. The method is based on the selective generation of stibine from Sb(III) in a continuous flow system using atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection. Sb(V) is masked by citric or oxalic acid in HCl medium. The procedure was optimized with synthetic solutions of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The effect of carboxylic acid and HCl concentration on the recovery of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species from standard solutions, and on the fluorescence signal were studied. Both species were extracted from soil with H{sub 2}O, 0.05 mol l{sup -1} EDTA and 0.25 mol l{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Since the soil samples were collected from sites impacted by copper mining activities, the effect of Cu{sup 2+} on the determination of antimony in synthetic solutions and soil extracts was studied. Cu{sup 2+} decreased the Sb(III) signal, but had no effect on the total antimony determination. Therefore, the selective determination of Sb(III) was carried out in citric acid-HCl medium, using the analyte addition technique. Total antimony in soil extracts was determined using the standard calibration technique after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) at room temperature with KI-ascorbic acid. The Sb(V) concentration was calculated from the difference between total antimony and Sb(III). The limits of detection (PS Analytical, Excalibur Millennium model) were 17 and 10 ng l{sup -1} for Sb(III) and total antimony, respectively, and the R.S.D. at the 0.5-{mu}g l{sup -1} level were 2.5 and 2.4%, respectively. The total antimony concentration of soils is in the mg kg{sup -1} range; the Sb recovery from the different soils by the extracting solutions was between less than 0.02% and approximately 10%. Similar recoveries were obtained using EDTA and sulfuric acid solutions. Sb(V) was found to be the main antimony species extracted from soils.

  9. Trapping of antimony and bismuth hydrides on a molybdenum-foil strip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, S (2005), s148-s149 ISSN 0009-2770. [Meeting on Chemistry and Life /3./. Brno, 20.09.2005-22.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : hydride generation * hydride trapping * molybdenum-foil strip device Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  10. Determination of antimony by electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in samples with high iron content using chelating resins as on-line removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolea, E.; Arroyo, D.; Laborda, F.; Castillo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the removal of the interference caused by iron on electrochemical generation of stibine is proposed. It consists of a chelating resin Chelex 100 column integrated into a flow injection system and coupled to the electrochemical hydride generator quartz tube atomic absorption spectrometer (EcHG-QT-AAS). Iron, as Fe(II), is retained in the column with high efficiency, close to 99.9% under optimal conditions. No significant retention was observed for Sb(III) under same conditions and a 97 ± 5% signal recovery was achieved. An electrochemical hydride generator with a concentric configuration and a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was employed. The system is able to determine antimony concentrations in the range of ng ml -1 in presence of iron concentrations up to 400 mg l -1 . The procedure was validated by analyzing PACS-2 marine sediments reference material with a 4% (w/w) iron content and a [Fe]:[Sb] ratio of 4000:1, which caused total antimony signal suppression on the electrochemical hydride generation system. A compost sample with high iron content (0.7%, w/w), was also analyzed. A good agreement was found on both samples with the certified value and the antimony concentration determined by ICP-MS, respectively

  11. The determination of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and tin in complex environmental samples by hydride generation AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.; Beach, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hydride generation techniques are used routinely for the determination of As, Se, Sb and Sn in water samples. Advantages include high sensitivity, simplicity, and relative freedom from interferences. Continuous-flow designs greatly reduce analysis time as well as improve precision and allow for automation. However the accurate analysis of more complex environmental samples such as industrial sludges, soil samples, river sediments, and fly ash remains difficult. Numerous contributing factors influence the accuracy of the hydride technique. Sample digestion methods and sample preparation procedures are of critical importance. The digestion must adequately solubilize the elements of interest without loss by volatilization. Sample preparation procedures that guarantee the proper analyte oxidation state and eliminate the nitric acid and inter-element interferences are needed. In this study, difficult environmental samples were analyzed for As, Se, Sb, and Sn by continuous flow hydride generation. Sample preparation methods were optimized to eliminate interferences. The results of spike recovery studies will be presented. Data from the analysis of the same samples by graphite furnace AAS will be presented for comparison of accuracy, precision, and analysis time

  12. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  13. Speciation of inorganic antimony in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottled water using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry (HG-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwo, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a regulated drinking water contaminant that has been found to leach from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic containers into the waters stored in them. The common inorganic species of antimony in water are Sb(III) and Sb(V), with the former being more toxic and the latter being more soluble. In order to assess the extent to which waters stored in PET bottles are contaminated with inorganic Sb and to further examine the effect of typical storage conditions on migration rates, speciation analysis of inorganic Sb using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry (HG-AAS) was undertaken on selected PET plastic bottled waters marketed in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Six brands of PET plastic bottled waters were obtained at source on the day of packaging, and analyses undertaken on samples of the waters stored in the plastic containers at intervals of four weeks for twelve weeks, under three carefully chosen storage conditions distinctive of bottled water usage. Selected physicochemical properties of samples of the waters stored in the plastic containers and total Sb of samples of the plastic containers were also determined to discover the effect of some physical properties and certain major ions, and the influence of the different quality PET plastic types on Sb migration respectively. The study revealed amounts of total Sb in the PET plastic containers of the 6 brands ranging from 123.46 mg/kg to 146.45 mg/kg. The selected physicochemical properties of the waters stored in the PET plastic containers considered were pH (6.78 – 7.43), Ca2+ (1.61 – 12.39 mg/L), Mg2+ (1.00 – 4.96 mg/L), HCO3− (6.18 – 55.41 mg/L) and TDS (8.70 – 70.40 mg/L)). PET bottled waters of 5 out of the 6 brands contained Sb (initial total Sb ranging from 1.11 – 14.65 μg/L) before storage. Total Sb concentrations of the waters stored in the plastic containers were observed to increase with storage time under all the three storage conditions for

  14. Trapping interference effects of arsenic, antimony and bismuth hydrides in collection of selenium hydride within iridium-modified transversally-heated graphite tube atomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furdíková, Zuzana; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2009), s. 323-328 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : selenium hydride trapping * arsine * stibine Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2009

  15. Trapping of hydride forming elements within miniature electrothermal devices. Part 3. Investigation of collection of antimony and bismuth on a molybdenum foil strip following hydride generation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; Dočekal, Bohumil; Hrušovská, Zuzana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2006), s. 444-449 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400310507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : bismuth ine * stibine * hydride trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.092, year: 2006

  16. Sequential determination of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and tellurium in foods via rapid hydride evolution and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, J.A.; Jones, J.W.; Capar, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of acid digests of foods for As, Se, Sb, and Te was semiautomated. Hydrides generated by controlled addition of base stabilized NaBH 4 solution to acid digests are transported directly into a shielded, hydrogen (nitrogen diluted), entrained-air flame for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of the individual elements. The detection limits, based on 1 g of digested sample, are approximately 10 to 20 ng/g for all four elements. Measurement precision is 1 to 2 percent relative standard deviation for each element measured at 0.10 μg. A comparison is made of results of analysis of lyophilized fish tissues for As and Se by instrumental neutron activation (INAA), hydride generation with atomic absorption spectrometry, fluorometry, and spectrophotometry. NBS standard reference materials (orchard leaves and bovine liver) analyzed for As, Se, and Sb by this method show excellent agreement with certified values and with independent NAA values

  17. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-06-20

    Atomization conditions for antimony hydride in the plasma atomizer based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with atomic absorption spectrometric detection were optimized. Argon was found as the best discharge gas under a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 while the DBD power was optimum at 30 W. Analytical figures of merit including interference study of As, Se and Bi have been subsequently investigated and the results compared to those found in an externally heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA). The limit of detection (LOD) reached in DBD (0.15 ng mL -1  Sb) is comparable to that observed in QTA (0.14 ng mL -1  Sb). Finally, possibility of Sb preconcentration by stibane in situ trapping in a DBD atomizer was studied. For trapping time of 300 s, the preconcentration efficiency and LOD, respectively, were 103 ± 2% and 0.02 ng mL -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fractionation and redox speciation of antimony in agricultural soils by hydride generation--atomic fluorescence spectrometry and stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) during extraction with different extractant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Potin-Gautier, Martine; De Graegori, Ida

    2004-01-01

    This stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species was studied during single extraction from soils by water. EDTA, diluted H2SO4 and H3PO4, and oxalic acid/oxalate solutions, with and without ascorbic acid, were used as stabilizing reagent of both Sb species. Antimony redox speciation in soil extracts was performed by selective hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Simulated extraction procedures (without soil) showed that, except in oxalate medium, Sb(III) was oxidized to Sb(V), and this reaction was avoided with ascorbic acid. Recovery studies from a spiked agricultural soil showed that no oxidation but sorption of Sb(III) occurred during the extraction process in water and H2SO4 medium, and quantitative oxidation in EDTA and oxalate medium. With ascorbic acid, this oxidation was totally avoided in EDTA and partially avoided in oxalate solution. A new sequential extraction procedure was proposed and applied to the fractionation and redox speciation of antimony in agricultural soils, using EDTA + ascorbic acid, pH 7 (available under complexing and moderately reducible conditions); oxalic acid/oxalate + ascorbic acid (extractable in reducible conditions) and HNO3 + HCl + HF (residual fraction). The proposed extraction scheme can provide information about the availability and mobility of antimony redox species in agricultural soils.

  19. Investigation of trapping interference effects of arsenic, antimony and bismuth in collection of selenium hydride within an iridium-modified THGA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrušovská, Zuzana; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, S (2005), s143-s144 ISSN 0009-2770. [Meeting on Chemistry and Life /3./. Brno, 20.09.2005-22.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310507 Grant - others:GA FRVŠ(CZ) G6/919/2005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : hydride generation * hydride trapping * mutual interference effects Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  20. Antimony speciation in soils: improving the detection limits using post-column pre-reduction hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Waldo; Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea

    2011-04-15

    HG-AFS is highly sensitive and low cost detection system and its use for antimony chemical speciation coupled to HPLC is gaining popularity. However speciation analysis in soils is strongly hampered because the most efficient extractant reported in the literature (oxalic acid) strongly inhibits the generation of SbH(3) by Sb(V), the major species in this kind of matrix, severely affecting its detection limits. The purpose of this research is to reduce the detection limit of Sb(V), by using a post column on-line reduction system with l-cysteine reagent (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS). The system was optimized by experimental design, optimum conditions found were 2% (w/v) and 10°C temperature coil. Detection limits of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in oxalic acid (0.25 mol L(-1)) were improved from 0.3 and 0.1 μg L(-1) to 0.07 and 0.07 μg L(-1), respectively. The methodology developed was applied to Chilean soils, where Sb(V) was the predominant species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Speciation analysis of antimony in marine biota by HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS: Extraction procedures and stability of antimony species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Ida; Quiroz, Waldo; Pinochet, Hugo; Pannier, Florence; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2007-09-30

    Speciation analysis of antimony in marine biota is not well documented, and no specific extraction procedure of antimony species from algae and mollusk samples can be found in the literature. This work presents a suitable methodology for the speciation of antimony in marine biota (algae and mollusk samples). The extraction efficiency of total antimony and the stability of Sb(III), Sb(V) and trimethylantimony(V) in different extraction media (water at 25 and 90 degrees C, methanol, EDTA and citric acid) were evaluated by analyzing the algae Macrosystis integrifolia (0.55+/-0.04mugSbg(-1)) and the mollusk Mytilus edulis (0.23+/-0.01mugSbg(-1)). The speciation analysis was performed by anion exchange liquid chromatography (post-column photo-oxidation) and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry as detection system (HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS). Results demonstrated that, based on the extraction yield and the stability, EDTA proved to be the best extracting solution for the speciation analysis of antimony in these matrices. The selected procedure was applied to antimony speciation in different algae samples collected from the Chilean coast. Only the inorganic Sb(V) and Sb(III) species were detected in the extracts. In all analyzed algae the sum of total antimony extracted (determined in the extracts after digestion) and the antimony present in the residue was in good agreement with the total antimony concentration determined by HG-AFS. However, in some extracts the sum of antimony species detected was lower than the total extracted, revealing the presence of unknown antimony species, possibly retained on the column or not detected by HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS. Further work must be carried out to elucidate the identity of these unknown species of antimony.

  2. Simultaneous speciation analysis of Sb(III), Sb(V) and (CH3)3SbCl2 by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection (HPLC-HG-AFS): application to antimony speciation in sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Ida; Quiroz, Waldo; Pinochet, Hugo; Pannier, Florence; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2005-10-14

    This paper presents an improvement for the simultaneous separation of Sb(V), Sb(III) and (CH3)3SbCl2 species by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its detection by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The separation was performed on an anion exchange column PRP-X100 using a gradient elution program between EDTA/KHP (potasium hydrogen phtalate) as first mobile phase and phosphate solutions solution as the second one. The chromatographic separation and the HG-AFS parameters were optimized by experimental design. The best results were obtained by using an elution program with 20 mmol l(-1) EDTA + 2 mmol(-01) KHP solution at pH 4.5, during 1.15 min, then change to 50 mmol l(-1) (NH4)2HPO4 solution at pH 8.3, switching back after 4.0 min to the first mobile phase, until 5 min, with a constant flow rate of 1.5 ml min(-1). Retention time of Sb(V), Sb(III) and trimethylantimony species were 1.22, 2.31 and 3.45 min and the detection limits were 0.13; 0.07 and 0.13 microg l(-1), respectively. Studies on the stability of this antimony species in sea water samples on the function of the elapsed time of storage in refrigerator at 4 degrees C was performed employing the optimized method. Results revealed that Sb(III) is easily oxidized within some hours to Sb(V) in sea water stored at 4 degrees C. However, when the sea water was immediately mixed with EDTA no oxidation of Sb(III) was observed up to 1 week of storage. The proposed methodology was then applied to the antimony speciation in sea water samples.

  3. Antimony: a flame fighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzer, Niki E.; Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony is a brittle, silvery-white semimetal that conducts heat poorly. The chemical compound antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) is widely used in plastics, rubbers, paints, and textiles, including industrial safety suits and some children’s clothing, to make them resistant to the spread of flames. Also, sodium antimonate (NaSbO3) is used during manufacturing of high-quality glass, which is found in cellular phones.

  4. Hydrid Antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhal, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 17-25 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/1004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hydrid * antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  5. [Pollution characteristics of antimony, arsenic and mercury in human hair at Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bi-Jun; Wu, Feng-Chang; Deng, Qiu-Jing; Mo, Chang-Li; Zhu, Jing; Zeng, Li; Fu, Zhi-You; Li, Wen

    2009-03-15

    The concentration levels of antimony, arsenic and mercury in human hair collected from Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry after having been digested by nitric acid and perchloric acid. The contents of Sb, As and Hg are 15.9, 4.21, 1.79 microg/g in the samples from Xikuangshan antimony mining area and 0.532, 0.280, 0.338 microg/g in the samples from Guiyang City respectively. The contents of Sb, As and Hg in human hair of Xikuangshan antimony area are much higher than those of Guiyang City. The independent-samples t-test shows that there are no marked differences in the contents of Sb and As between male and female hair samples from both Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City (p > 0.05), while Hg contents in male hair are apparently higher than those in female hair from Guiyang City (p mining area may significantly affect human health than in the un-mining areas.

  6. Boron Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-07-01

    of direct interest could be b.P.4d. ’Thus the discovory of a now proj.ect, since silano is probably too readily infla-zmablo for practical usc’ this...devoted, ho specc4fie compounds vhitih a’-ould be tocdte at prescnt arc: nron tiy * silano , %;2.SiFi3 , diothyl sila~no, (C2 115 )2 Si112, mono r.-rop; ! (n...Bcrohydrido or Li h.... I .A-4A- The prepuation of Silano med of Stannane by the interaction or lithium aluzirun hydride v-ithl silicon tetrtchiorido and

  7. Antimony and arsenic biogeochemistry in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Xu-Zhou; Sun, You-Xu; Liu, Su-Mei; Huang, Daji; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of the metalloid elements arsenic and antimony in the East China Sea (ECS), one of the most important marginal seas for western Pacific, were examined in May 2011. Dissolved inorganic arsenic (As(V) and As(III)) and antimony (Sb(V) and Sb(III)) species were determined by selective hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Results show that total dissolved inorganic arsenic (TDIAs; [TDIAs]=[As(V)]+[As(III)]) were moderately depleted in the surface water and enriched in the deep water. Arsenite (As(III)) showed different vertical profiles with that of TDIAs, with significant surface enrichment in the middle shelf region where the concentrations of phosphate were extremely low. Speciation of dissolved arsenic was subtly controlled by the stoichiometric molar ratio of arsenate (As(V)) to phosphate. The average As(V)/P ratio for the ECS in spring 2011 was 10.8×10-3, which is higher than previous results and indicates the arsenate stress. The concentrations of total dissolved inorganic antimony (TDISb; [TDISb]=[Sb(V)]+[Sb(III)]) were high near the Changjiang Estuary and the coastal area of Hangzhou Bay and decreased moderately off the coast. TDISb displayed moderate conservative behavior in the ECS that confirms by the correlations with salinity and dissolved aluminum. Different with that of As(III), antimonite (Sb(III)) concentrations were extremely lower in the ECS, with relative higher concentration appeared at the bottom layer which indicates the contribution from sediment-water interface. A preliminary box model was established to estimate the water-mass balance and antimony budgets for the ECS. Compared with other areas in the world, the concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic and antimony in the ECS remain at natural levels.

  8. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  9. Blistering and hydride embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals have been categorized into several groups. Two of the groups, hydrogen blistering and hydride embrittlement, are reasonably well understood, and problems relating to their occurrence may be avoided if that understanding is used as a basis for selecting alloys for hydrogen service. Blistering and hydride embrittlement are described along with several techniques of materials selection and used to minimize their adverse effects. (U.S.)

  10. Determination of arsenic, selenium and antimony by neutron activation analysis. Application to hair samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, H.A.; Hoede, D.; Nieuwendijk, B.J.T.; Sloot, H.A. van der; Teunissen, G.J.A.; Woittiez, J.R.W.

    1983-04-01

    A fast rabbit system for instrumental activation analysis with reactor neutrons is described. Its use in the determination of selenium in hair is discussed. A survey is given of the correction factors which are inherent to the use of short-lived radionuclides. An alternative to INAA is NAA based on the separation of arsenic, selenium and antimony by hydride evaporation and adsorption to active carbon. Data for some Standard Reference Materials are given. This work was done under research contract 2440/RI/RB with the IAEA

  11. Mineral resource of the month: antimony

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article describes the characteristics and industrial uses of antimony. Antimony, which is produced as a byproduct of mining other metals such as gold, lead or silver, is used in everything from flame retardants, batteries, ceramics and glass. It is also used in glass for television picture tubes, computer monitors, pigments and catalysts.

  12. Bonding of xenon hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Peralta, N.; Juarez, R.; Cerpa, E.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Merino, G.

    2009-01-01

    We have computed the structure and stability of the xenon hydrides HXeY (with Y = F, Cl, Br, I, CCH, CN, NC) using relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at ZORA-BP86/TZ2P level. All model systems HXeY studied here are bound equilibrium structures, but they are also significantly destabilized

  13. Heteronuclear compounds of arsenic and antimony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauser, James E.

    1982-09-01

    Volatilization of secondary metals such as arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, during the smelting of copper ores, is important because of environmental and resource considerations. The Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, has been studying copper concentrate roasting in conjunction with the volatility of these minor constituents. Some unusual vaporization behavior initiated this supplemental paper which shows that when the mixed sulfides of arsenic and antimony are heated, the volatilization of arsenic is retarded and the volatilization of antimony increased. Mixed oxides of arsenic and antimony also exhibit exceptional volatilization behavior. These anomalous vaporization behaviors are attributed to the formation of heteronuclear compounds of arsenic and antimony, but the colligative properties of solutions may also be a factor.

  14. Electrolytic hydriding and hydride distribution in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.H.L.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been made of the electrolytic hydriding of zircaloy-4 in the range 20-80 0 C, for reaction times from 5 to 30 hours, and the effect of potential, pH and dissolved oxygen has been investigated. The hydriding reaction was more sensitive to time and temperature conditions than to the electrochemical variables. It has been shown that a controlled introduction of hydrides in zircaloy is feasible. Hydrides were found to be plate like shaped and distributed mainly along grain-boundaries. It has been shown that hydriding kinetics do not follow a simple law but may be described by a Johnson-Mehl empirical equation. On the basis of this equation an activation energy of 9.400 cal/mol has been determined, which is close to the activation energy for diffusion of hydrogen in the hydride. (author)

  15. Surface complexation of antimony on kaolinite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Sudipta; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical fate of antimony (Sb) - a similar oxyanion as arsenic (As) - in a variety of environment is largely unexplored. Kaolinite is an important, naturally occurring clay mineral in soils and aquifers and is known to control the fate of several contaminants via a multitude of geochemical processes, primarily adsorption. Here we report adsorption of antimony on kaolinite as a function of solution chemistry: initial antimony concentration, pH, ionic strength, and a competing anion. A surface complexation modeling (SCM) approach was undertaken to understand the potential mechanistic implications of sorption envelope data. In the SCM, a multicomponent additive approach, in which kaolinite is assumed to be a (1:1) mixture of quartz (≡SiOH) and gibbsite (≡AlOH), was tested. Results indicated that ionic strength has a minimal effect on antimony adsorption. For the lower initial antimony concentration (4.11 μM), the additive model with binuclear surface complexes on quartz and gibbsite showed a better fit at pH3.5. However, the additive model with binuclear surface complex on quartz and mononuclear surface complex on gibbsite showed an excellent fit of the data. Phosphate greatly influenced antimony adsorption on kaolinite at both low and high antimony loadings, indicating competition for available surface sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  17. Investigation into the reduction of antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornibrook, C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a program being implemented to decrease the antimony being released in waste water from the processing of liquid low-level radioactive wastes. The process being studied is the use of a crossflow membrane filter to remove antimony, and possibly cobalt 58. The process will evaluate the efficiency gains available from changing the oxidation states of the antimony with respect to the removal efficiency. Ion absorbers and ion exchange media will also be evaluated. The equipment is to be first tested on waste water from the November outage of Oconee, and then to use it on other radwaste processing studies

  18. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  19. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  20. FIRST REPORT ON OTOTOXICITY OF MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Maria Valete-Rosalino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pentavalent antimonials are the first drug of choice in the treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis. Data on ototoxicity related with such drugs is scarcely available in literature, leading us to develop a study on cochleovestibular functions. Case Report: A case of a tegumentary leishmaniasis patient, a 78-year-old man who presented a substantial increase in auditory threshold with tinnitus and severe rotatory dizziness during the treatment with meglumine antimoniate, is reported. These symptoms worsened in two weeks after treatment was interrupted. Conclusion: Dizziness and tinnitus had already been related to meglumine antimoniate. However, this is the first well documented case of cochlear-vestibular toxicity related to meglumine antimoniate.

  1. Sorption of antimony on human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofal, M.; Amin, H.; Alian, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the uptake of toxic elements on human teeth represents an interesting research area, as the fate of these elements when present in the human food is of health significance. Since antimony is one of the common toxic elements and since, the chemical behaviour of antimony is similar to that of arsenic, one of the most important toxic elements commonly encountered in cases of food poisoning, it has been decided to investigate its uptake on human teeth and on other restoration materials. The radioactive tracer technique was used to evaluate the concentration of antimony sorbed on teeth. This tracer was obtained by irradiation of antimony metal in the reactor, subsequent dissolution in concentrated sulphuric acid, evaporation to dryness and making the solution 6 M in Hydrochloric acid (1). Antimony prepared in this way is in the trivalent state (Sb III). Sorption was studied in water, tea, coffee, red tea and chicken soup. The highest sorption was achieved from water and chicken soup and least sorption was noticed in case of coffee. The results are presented in the form of the depletion of the radioactivity (A) of antimony with time in presence of a tooth in water and other drinks

  2. Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, R. Morris

    1990-10-30

    A process for the non-catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds, which contain at least one reducible functional group, which comprises reacting the organic compound, a hydride complex, preferably a transition metal hydride complex or an organosilane, and a strong acid in a liquid phase.

  3. Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor); Fultz, Brent (Inventor); Witham, Charles K. (Inventor); Bowman, Robert C. (Inventor); Hightower, Adrian (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  4. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  7. Chlorination of antimony and its volatilization treatment of waste antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.

    2011-01-01

    For the waste antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst, the chlorination of antimony and its volatilization treatment were proposed, and evaluated using hydrogen chloride gas at 873-1173 K. During the treatment, the weight loss of the composite oxide sample, which resulted from the volatilization of antimony, was confirmed. An X-ray diffraction analysis showed that uranium oxide, U 3 O 8 , was formed during the reaction. After the treatment at 1173 K for 1 h, almost all the uranium contained in the waste catalyst was dissolved by a 3 M nitric acid solution at 353 K within 10 min, although that of the non-treated catalyst was less than 0.1%. It was found that the chlorination and volatilization treatment was effective to separate antimony from the composite oxide catalyst and change uranium into its removable form. (orig.)

  8. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  9. Microbial antimony biogeochemistry: Enzymes, regulation, and related metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Qian Wang,; Oremland, Ronald S.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a toxic metalloid that occurs widely at trace concentrations in soil, aquatic systems, and the atmosphere. Nowadays, with the development of its new industrial applications and the corresponding expansion of antimony mining activities, the phenomenon of antimony pollution has become an increasingly serious concern. In recent years, research interest in Sb has been growing and reflects a fundamental scientific concern regarding Sb in the environment. In this review, we summarize the recent research on bacterial antimony transformations, especially those regarding antimony uptake, efflux, antimonite oxidation, and antimonate reduction. We conclude that our current understanding of antimony biochemistry and biogeochemistry is roughly equivalent to where that of arsenic was some 20 years ago. This portends the possibility of future discoveries with regard to the ability of microorganisms to conserve energy for their growth from antimony redox reactions and the isolation of new species of “antimonotrophs.”

  10. Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Antimony Susceptibility ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Probing natural antimony resistance using customised DNA microarrays with oligos of all ABC transporters · Slide 38 · Comparative proteomics to reveal changes in drug resistant parasites · isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ®) allows global analyses of protein expression and quantitative ...

  11. Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Antimony Susceptibility ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Antimony Susceptibility/Resistance in L. donovani Rentala Madhubala School of Life Sciences Jawaharlal Nehru ... tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ®) allows global analyses of protein expression and quantitative comparison among samples by mass spectrometry.

  12. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  13. Simultaneous determination of asrenic, mercury, antimony and selenium in biological materials with prior collection of gaseous products followed by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.Y.; Chen, P.Y.; Yang, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    A method combining prior collection of gaseous products with subsequent neutron activation analysis has been developed for simultaneous determination of traces of arsenic, mercury, antimony and selenium in biological materials. The generation of hydrides of arsenic, antimony and selenium and cold vapor of mercury in the generation and collection system was investigated by the use of radiotracers of the respective elements. The result indicates that selenium and mercury can be completely evaporated from the digested sample solution in 5M HCl with the addition of 5% sodium tetrahydroborate solution, while additional reduction process by potassium iodide and ascorbic acid is needed for complete evaporation of arsenic and antiomony. The gaseous products were collected in a quartz tube for neutron irradiation. The detection limits of these elements were found to be in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -8 g under the present experimental conditions. The reliability was checked with NBS standard reference materisl. (author)

  14. Thermomechanical properties of hafnium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato; Kurosaki, Ken; Muta, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Uno, Masayoshi; Konashi, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Fine bulk samples of delta-phase Hf hydride with various hydrogen contents (C H ) ranging from 1.62 to 1.72 in the atomic ratio (H/Hf) were prepared, and their thermomechanical properties were characterized. At room temperature, the sound velocity and Vickers hardness were measured. The elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the thermal expansion was measured by using a dilatometer, and the linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. Empirical equations describing the thermomechanical properties of Hf hydride as a function of C H were proposed. (author)

  15. In vitro antileishmanial properties of neutron-irradiated meglumine antimoniate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta Etel Treiger; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mail: samanta@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia]. E-mail: jaosso@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de [Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo (IMT-SP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Protozoologia]. E-mail:hfandrad@usp.br

    2005-10-15

    Pentavalent antimony, as meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam), is the main treatment for leishmaniasis, a complex of diseases caused by the protozoan Leishmania, and an endemic and neglected threat in Brazil. Despite over half a century of clinical use, their mechanism of action, toxicity and pharmacokinetic data remain unknown. The analytical methods for determination of antimony in biological systems remain complex and have low sensitivity. Radiotracer studies have a potential in pharmaceutical development. The aim of this study was to obtain a radiotracer for antimony, with suitable physical and biological properties. Meglumine antimoniate was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, producing two radioisotopes {sup 122} Sb and {sup 124} Sb, with high radionuclidic purity and good specific activity. This compound showed the same antileishmanial activity as the native compound. The use of the radiotracers, easily created by neutron irradiation, could be an interesting tool to solve important questions in antimonial pharmacology. (author)

  16. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  17. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD... Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT...of both Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions and Boron Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions with Oxygen: Anionic Products The anionic products of reactions

  18. The presence of antimony in various dental filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokhia, Anat; Combe, E.C.; Lilley, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Antimony was determined in a number of non-metallic dental materials currently used for tooth restoration. The method applied was instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of antimony in some of the brands tested was found to be as high as 900 fold that in the normal hard dental tissues. (author)

  19. The exposure to and health effects of antimony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    of the eyes, skin, and lungs. Long-term inhalation of antimony can potentiate pneumoconiosis, altered electrocardiograms, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach ulcers, results which were confirmed in laboratory animals. Although there were investigations of the effect of antimony in sudden infant...

  20. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  1. Pharmacokinetic of antimony in mice with cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mails: samanta@usp.br; nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia]. E-mail: jaosso@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) remains a major world health problem, with about 1.5 million new cases each year. Caused by protozoa Leishmania, in South America, this infection can vary from a chronic skin ulcer, to an erosive mucosal disease and severe facial disfigurement. Pentavalent antimony (Sb{sup +5}) as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) or meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) are main drugs for treating most forms of human leishmaniasis. For six decades, despite the recent developments, the effective therapy to cutaneous leishmaniasis has been based on long parenteral courses of such drugs, even though these are fairly costly, toxic and inconvenient to use, without adequate knowledge on their pharmacokinetics or mechanism of action. Pharmacokinetics studies could be based on bioactive traceable drugs, usually with radioactive isotopes, but antimony radioisotopes are unavailable commercially. Neutron irradiation is a powerful tool in the analysis of mineral content of samples, for antimony, there are at least two main isotopes that could be formed after neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor. The aim of the present study was to construct antimony salts with those radioisotopes to obtain tracers to compare the pharmacokinetic and the tissue distribution of neutron irradiated meglumine antimoniate in healthy and cutaneous leishmaniasis experimentally infected mice. Meglumine antimoniate, (Glucantime, Aventis, S.P, Brazil), was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (IPEN/CNEN-SP), producing two radioisotopes {sup 122}Sb and {sup 124}Sb. Its biodistribution was verified in BALB/c mice experimentally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis, which received a single intraperitoneal dose of the drug. At different times after injection, the tissues and blood were excised and activity measured in a NaI (Tl) scintillation counter. Compared with the healthy mice, experimentally infected mice had significantly lower maximum concentration of antimony

  2. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly followed...... by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was investigated...

  3. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  4. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  5. Hydrogen vibrations in nickel hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, J.; Daniels, W.B.; Kitchens, T.A.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Passell, L.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines nickel hydride which was prepared in a BeCu high pressure cell at room temperature by applying a hydrogen gas pressure of 7kbar to pellets pressed from fine nickel powder. It explains that the rate and degree of completion of the hydride formation was first checked by neutron diffraction using deuterium gas with the result that a deuterium to metal ratio of approximately 0.75 was reached. It points out that after desorption of the deuterium, the nickel sample was charged with hydrogen for the inelastic incoherent neutron scattering measurements. The chapter notes that measurements were performed with the Be filter technique at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor, and finds that the optic modes appear as a broad band in the phonon density of states from about 70 to 110 MeV with peaks at approximately 88 and 108 MeV. It finally discusses the effect of hydride formation on the acoustic phonon density of states

  6. Structural and electrical characterization of zinc oxide doped with antimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Juárez Díaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the results of structural and electrical characterization realized on zinc oxide single crystal samples with (001 orientation, which were doped with antimony. Doping was carried out by antimony thermal diffusion at 1000 °C for periods of 1 and 2 hours under nitrogen environment from a solid source formed by antimony oxide. Electrical characterization by I-V curves and Hall effect shown an increase in acceptor concentration which demonstrates that doping is effective and create holes in zinc oxide samples.

  7. Obtaining zircaloy powder through hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupim, Ivaldete da Silva; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are good options for the metal matrix in dispersion fuels for power reactors due to their low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, good corrosion resistance, good mechanical strength and high thermal conductivity. A necessary step for obtaining such fuels is producing Zr alloy powder for the metal matrix composite material. This article presents results from the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation tests with the purpose to embrittle the alloy as a first step for comminuting. Several hydrogenation tests were performed and studied through thermogravimetric analysis. They included H 2 pressures of 25 and 50 kPa and temperatures ranging between from 20 to 670 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis showed in the hydrogenated samples the predominant presence of ZrH 2 and some ZrO 2 . Some kinetics parameters for the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation reaction were obtained: the time required to reach the equilibrium state at the dwell temperature was about 100 minutes; the hydrogenation rate during the heating process from 20 to 670 deg C was about 21 mg/h, and at constant temperature of 670 deg C, the hydride rate was about 1.15 mg/h. The hydrogenation rate is largest during the heating process and most of it occurs during this period. After hydrogenated, the samples could easily be comminuted indicating that this is a possible technology to obtain Zircaloy powder. The results show that only few minutes of hydrogenation are necessary to reach the hydride levels required for comminuting the Zircaloy. The final hydride stoichiometry was between 2.7 and 2.8 H for each Zr atom in the sample (author)

  8. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Regeneration of lithium aluminum hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James; Reilly, James J

    2008-12-31

    Lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH(4)) is a promising compound for hydrogen storage, with a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density and a low decomposition temperature. Similar to other metastable hydrides, LiAlH(4) does not form by direct hydrogenation at reasonable hydrogen pressures; therefore, there is considerable interest in developing new routes to regenerate the material from the dehydrogenated products LiH and Al. Here we demonstrate a low-energy route to regenerate LiAlH(4) from LiH and Ti-catalyzed Al. The initial hydrogenation occurs in a tetrahydrofuran slurry and forms the adduct LiAlH(4).4THF. The thermodynamics of this reversible reaction were investigated by measuring pressure-composition isotherms, and the free energy was found to be small and slightly negative (DeltaG = -1.1 kJ/mol H(2)), suggesting an equilibrium hydrogen pressure of just under 1 bar at 300 K. We also demonstrate that the adduct LiAlH(4).4THF can be desolvated at low temperature to yield crystalline LiAlH(4).

  11. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  12. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  13. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  14. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.; Baruj, A.; Borzone, E.M.; Cardenas, R.; Szames, E.; Somoza, J.; Rivas, S.; Sanchez, F.A.; Marin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH 2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  15. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, F.B.; Wong, Y.W.; Chan, Y.N.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H 2 separation factors and rates of HT--H 2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H 2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  16. Disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Motyka, T.

    1991-01-01

    A plan has been established for disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides used in Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium production or Materials Test Facility (MTF) R ampersand D operations. The recommended plan assumes that the first tritium-exposed metal hydrides will be disposed of after startup of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) Expansion Project in 1992, and thus the plan is consistent with the new disposal requiremkents that will be in effect for the SWDF Expansion Project. Process beds containing tritium-exposed metal hydride powder will be disposed of without removal of the powder from the bed; however, disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydride powder that has been removed from its process vessel is also addressed

  17. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  18. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A.

    2005-09-01

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  19. Complex processing of antimony-mercury gold concentrates of Dzhizhikrut Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdusalyamova, M.N.; Gadoev, S.A.; Dreisinger, D.; Solozhenkin, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Present article is devoted to complex processing of antimony-mercury gold concentrates of Dzhizhikrut Deposit. The purpose of research was obtaining the metallic mercury and antimony with further gold and thallium extraction.

  20. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  1. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...... to irradiation-induced swelling....

  2. The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components Delayed Hydride Cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Puls, Manfred P

    2012-01-01

    By drawing together the current theoretical and experimental understanding of the phenomena of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys, The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrides on the Integrity of Zirconium Alloy Components: Delayed Hydride Cracking provides a detailed explanation focusing on the properties of hydrogen and hydrides in these alloys. Whilst the focus lies on zirconium alloys, the combination of both the empirical and mechanistic approaches creates a solid understanding that can also be applied to other hydride forming metals.   This up-to-date reference focuses on documented research surrounding DHC, including current methodologies for design and assessment of the results of periodic in-service inspections of pressure tubes in nuclear reactors. Emphasis is placed on showing that our understanding of DHC is supported by progress across a broad range of fields. These include hysteresis associated with first-order phase transformations; phase relationships in coherent crystalline metallic...

  3. Preliminary development of flaw evaluation procedures for delayed hydride cracking initiation under hydride non-ratcheting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Cui, J.; Kawa, D.; Shek, G.K.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The flaw evaluation procedure for Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) initiation currently provided in the CSA Standard N285.8 was developed for hydride ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides do not completely dissolve at peak temperature. Test results have shown that hydrided regions formed under non-ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides completely dissolve at peak temperature, have significantly higher resistance to cracking than those formed under ratcheting conditions. This paper presents some preliminary work on the development of a procedure for the evaluation of DHC initiation for flaws under hydride non-ratcheting conditions. (author)

  4. Heat-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae for antimony speciation and antimony(III) preconcentration in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcellino, Sebastien [Universite de Lyon, Lyon1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques, CNRS UMR 5180, bat CPE, 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Attar, Hossein [Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Sciences Separatives, CNRS UMR 7178, ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France); Lievremont, Didier; Lett, Marie-Claire [Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Genetique et Microbiologie, CNRS UMR 7156, 28 rue Goethe, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Barbier, Frederique [CNRS USR 59, Service Central d' Analyse, 59 Chemin du Canal BP22 69390 Vernaison (France); Lagarde, Florence [Universite de Lyon, Lyon1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques, CNRS UMR 5180, bat CPE, 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Sciences Separatives, CNRS UMR 7178, ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: florence.lagarde@univ-lyon1.fr

    2008-11-23

    An analytical method was developed for antimony speciation and antimony(III) preconcentration in water samples. The method is based on the selective retention of Sb(III) by modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of Sb(V). Heat, caustic and solvent pretreatments of the biomass were investigated to improve the kinetics and thermodynamics of Sb(III) uptake process at room temperature. Heating for 30 min at 80 deg. C was defined as the optimal treatment. Antimony accumulation by the cells was independent of pH (5-10) and ionic strength (0.01-0.1 mol L{sup -1}). 140 mg of yeast and 2 h of contact were necessary to ensure quantitative sequestration of Sb(III) up to 750 {mu}g L{sup -1}. In these conditions, Sb(V) was not retained. Sb(V) was quantified in sorption supernatant by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Sb(III) was determined after elution with 40 mmol L{sup -1} thioglycolic acid at pH 10. A preconcentration factor close to nine was achieved for Sb(III) when 100 mL of sample was processed. After preconcentration, the detection limits for Sb(III) and Sb(V) were 2 and 5 ng L{sup -1}, respectively, using ICP-MS, 7 and 0.9 {mu}g L{sup -1} using ICP-OES. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked river and mineral water samples. The relative standard deviations (n = 3) were in the 2-5% range at the tenth {mu}g L{sup -1} level and less than 10% at the lowest Sb(III) and Sb(V) tested concentration (0.1 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Corrected recoveries were in all cases close to 100%.

  5. Synthesis of Nano-Light Magnesium Hydride for Hydrogen Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Nano-light magnesium hydride that has the capability for hydrogen storage was synthesized from treatment of magnesium ribbon with hydrogen peroxide. The optimum time for complete hydrogenation of the magnesium hydride was 5 hours.

  6. Antimony recovery from end-of-life products and industrial process residues: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, David; Arnout, Sander; Jones, Peter Tom; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Antimony has become an increasingly critical element in recent years, due to a surge in industrial demand and the Chinese domination of primary production. Antimony is produced from stibnite ore (Sb2O3) which is processed into antimony metal and antimony oxide (Sb2O3). The industrial importance of antimony is mainly derived from its use as flame retardant in plastics, coatings, and electronics, but also as decolourizing agent in glass, alloys in lead-acid batteries, and catalysts for the p...

  7. Experimental investigation of strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4 with various hydride orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A; Catherine, C.S.; Cappelaere, C.; Bornert, M.; Caldemaison, D.

    2005-01-01

    This experimental investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides on the mechanical response of Zircaloy-4. Ring tensile tests are performed on unirradiated CWSR Zircaloy-4, charged with about 200 or 500wppm hydrogen. Hydrides are oriented either parallel ('tangential'), or perpendicular ('radial') to the circumferential tensile direction. Tangential hydrides are usually observed in cladding tubes, however, hydrides can be reoriented after cooling under stress to become radial and then trigger brittle behavior. In this investigation, we perform, 'macroscopic' or SEM in-situ tensile tests on smooth rings, at room temperature. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. The results lead to the following conclusions: neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the strain modes are affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are. Indeed, only 200wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fails in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases samples reach at least 750 MPa before failure, with ductile or brittle mode. (authors)

  8. Selective oxidation of propene on bismuth molybdate and mixed oxides of tin and antimony and of uranium and antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendleton, P.; Taylor, D.

    1976-01-01

    Propene + 18 0 2 reactions have been studied in a static reaction system on bismuth molybdate and mixed oxides of tin and antimony and of uranium and antimony. The [ 16 0] acrolein content of the total acrolein formed and the proportion of 16 0 in the oxygen of the carbon dioxide by-product have been determined. The results indicate that for each catalyst the lattice is the only direct source of the oxygen in the aldehyde, and that lattice and/or gas phase oxygen is used in carbon dioxide formation. Oxygen anion mobility appears to be greater in the molybdate catalyst than in the other two. (author)

  9. Hydriding and dehydriding rates and hydrogen-storage capacity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fe2O3 (expected to increase hydriding rate) was selected as an oxide to be added. Ti was also selected since, it was considered to increase the hydriding and dehydriding rates by forming Ti hydride. A sample, Mg–14Ni–3Fe2O3–3Ti, was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding and its hydrogen storage properties were ...

  10. Aluminum Hydride Catalyzed Hydroboration of Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismuto, Alessandro; Thomas, Stephen P; Cowley, Michael J

    2016-12-05

    An aluminum-catalyzed hydroboration of alkynes using either the commercially available aluminum hydride DIBAL-H or bench-stable Et 3 Al⋅DABCO as the catalyst and H-Bpin as both the boron reagent and stoichiometric hydride source has been developed. Mechanistic studies revealed a unique mode of reactivity in which the reaction is proposed to proceed through hydroalumination and σ-bond metathesis between the resultant alkenyl aluminum species and HBpin, which acts to drive turnover of the catalytic cycle. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsley, M.B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180 0 to 280 0 K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch

  12. Neutron activation analysis of arsenic and antimony in human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Yukio; Isono, Hideo; Kozuka, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation method for the determination of trace amounts of arsenic and antimony in human hair samples is studied. The sample of hair (100 mg) irradiated for 5 hours with a neutron flux of 2.1x10 12 n/cm 2 s was decomposed with a sulfuric-nitric acid mixture after addition of each 5 mg of arsenic and antimony as carrier. Arsine and stibine were evolved from the solution of decomposed hair by reduction with 3 g of granular zinc and were absorbed in 0.1N iodine solution for half an hour. Metal arsenic was separated from iodine solution by precipitation with sodium hypophosphite, followed by precipitation of antimony as sulfide with thioacetamide. These precipitates were dissolved and their gamma-ray spectra were measured with a well type 3''x3'' NaI(TI) detector equipped with a 200 channel pulse-height analyzer. After the measurement of gamma-ray spectra, the chemical yields were determined by colorimetric methods. The relative standard deviations were 7% and 4% for 0.01 μg As and 0.024 μg Sb, respectively. The sensitivity of this method was estimated to be 1x10 -3 μg for arsenic and 2x10 -3 μg for antimony. (auth.)

  13. Electrical Properties of Antimony (Sb) Metal Contacts to Silicon (Si ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigates the behaviour of the contacts formed by Antimony (Sb) metal to Silicon (Si) thin films for electric field values 10 – 100V/m. Measurements of I-v characteristics were obtained at temperatures 303, 313, 323, 333, 343 and 353K respectively. The results show linear I – V relationship over a specified range ...

  14. electrocardiographic findings in ethiopians on penta valent antimony ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East Africa Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 11 November 2001. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN ETHIOPIANS ON PENTA VALENT ANTIMONY THERAPY FOR VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS. N. Berhe, MD, DTMH, Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Y. Abraham, ...

  15. Vapor pressures of dimethylcadmium, trimethylbismuth, and tris(dimethylamino)antimony

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávek, Pavel; Fulem, Michal; Pangrác, Jiří; Hulicius, Eduard; Růžička, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 360, Dec (2013), s. 106-110 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15286S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : vapor pressure * dimethylcadmium * trimethylbismuth * tris(dimethylamino)antimony * sublimation and vaporization enthalpy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.241, year: 2013

  16. Application of KWU antimony removal process at Gentilly-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundar, Y.; Odar, S.; Streit, K.; Allsop, H.; Guzonas, D.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the work performed to adapt the KWU PWR antimony removal process to CANDU plant conditions, and the application of the process at the Hydro Quebec unit, Gentilly-2. The results of the application will be presented and the 'lessons learned' will be discussed in detail. (author)

  17. Antimony content of macrofungi from clean and polluted areas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovička, J.; Řanda, Zdeněk; Jelínek, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 11 (2006), s. 1837-1844 ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : mushrooms * antimony pollution * bioaccumulation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.442, year: 2006

  18. The decoration of vicinal copper polycrystalline surface by Antimony

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlovu, GF

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra-high Vacuum Variable Temperature Scanning Tunnelling Microscope was used to study the growth mechanism of Antimony on vicinal Cu polycrystalline samples. The STM data after deposition of 0.3 ML Sb at 300°C showed localization of Sb atoms...

  19. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1...... strongly to Pd hydride than to Pd. The activation barrier for desorption at a H coverage of one mono layer is slightly lower on Pd hydride, whereas the activation energy for adsorption is similar on Pd and Pd hydride. It is concluded that the higher sticking probability on Pd hydride is most likely caused...

  20. Sealed metal-hydride batteries for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, R. D.

    Nickel and silver-metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications by Eagle-Picher. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems. Nickel-metal hydride batteries have twice the gravimetric energy density of nickel-cadmium batteries and twice the volumetric energy density of nickel-hydrogen batteries. Silver-metal hydride batteries have the potential of three times the energy density of nickel-metal hydride. Aerospace metal hydride batteries are hermetically sealed, operate at low pressure and are prismatic in geometry. They exhibit excellent overcharge and overdischarge capability. The objective of current programs at Eagle-Picher is to develop high energy density, long cycle life metal-hydride batteries for the aerospace market and to establish a testing database to support future applications.

  1. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed

  2. Magnesium hydrides and their phase transitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paidar, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 23 (2016), s. 9769-9773 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen * magnesium and transition metal hydrides * crystal structure stability * displacive phase transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  3. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202 ISSN 1862-5282 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  4. BioGeochemistry of antimony, Sources, Transfers, Impacts and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Gael; Pinelli, Eric; Hedde, Mickael; Guiresse, Maritxu; De Vleeschouwer, François; Silvestre, Jérôme; Enrico, Maxime; Gandois, Laure; Monna, Fabrice; Gers, Charles; Probst, Anne

    2013-04-01

    BioGeoSTIB is a project funded by ADEME (French Environmental Protection Agency). Its aim is to provide a better understanding of biogeochemical cycle disturbances of antimony by man. Specifically, it is focused on the atmosphere-soil-organism interfaces. Based on a multi-scale approach, the impact of antimony on organisms and organism communities and the factors of Sb dispersion in the environment aim to better characterized. This report gives the main results of 2 and 1 -2 years of research. Using peat bogs as environmental archives, we show that Sb contamination in soils date back to the beginning of the metallurgy. Atmospheric deposition of Sb largely increased by 100 times during the Industrial Revolution compared to natural levels (~0,001-0,01 mg m-2 an-1) estimated in the deepest peat layers. This disturbance in the antimony geochemical cycle modified its concentrations in soils. One main source of present Sb contamination is automotive traffic due to Sb in braking lines. This emerging contamination was characterized close to a roundabout. This additional source of Sb does not seem to impact soil fauna but Sb concentrations in soil solutions exceed 1 μg L-1. Genotoxicity tests have been performed on the model plant Vicia faba and show that antimony is genotoxic at its lowest concentrations and that there is a synergistic effect lead, a trace metal frequently found in association with antimony in the environment. It is a main issue to determine Sb critical loads in the environment but main identified lacks are thermodynamic data, which are not available yet, to model the behavior of Sb in soil solutions and the fact the antimony is always associated with other anthropogenic trace metals like lead. Critical thresholds of Sb have been determined for the first time based on genotoxicity experiment. Simulations show that these thresholds can be exceeded in the future, whereas present limits for invertebrates (US-EPA) are and will not be reached. However

  5. In Vitro antileishmanial properties of neutron-irradiated meglumine antimoniate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Etel Treiger Borborema

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Pentavalent antimony, as meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime® or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam® , is the main treatment for leishmaniasis, a complex of diseases caused by the protozoan Leishmania, and an endemic and neglected threat in Brazil. Despite over half a century of clinical use, their mechanism of action, toxicity and pharmacokinetic data remain unknown. The analytical methods for determination of antimony in biological systems remain complex and have low sensitivity. Radiotracer studies have a potential in pharmaceutical development. The aim of this study was to obtain a radiotracer for antimony, with suitable physical and biological properties. Meglumine antimoniate was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, producing two radioisotopes 122Sb and 124Sb, with high radionuclidic purity and good specific activity. This compound showed the same antileishmanial activity as the native compound. The use of the radiotracers, easily created by neutron irradiation, could be an interesting tool to solve important questions in antimonial pharmacology.Os antimoniais pentavalentes, como o antimoniato de meglumina (Glucantime® ou estibogluconato de sódio (Pentostam® , são o principal tratamento para a leishmaniose, um complexo de doenças causadas pelo protozoário parasita Leishmania, uma doença endêmica e negligenciada no Brasil. Apesar do seu uso clínico por mais de meio século, seu mecanismo de ação, toxicidade e dados de farmacocinética permanecem desconhecidos. Os métodos analíticos para determinação de antimônio em sistemas biológicos são complexos e apresentam baixa sensibilidade. Estudos utilizando radiotraçadores têm papel potencial no desenvolvimento farmacológico. O objetivo deste estudo foi desenvolver um radiotraçador de antimônio, com propriedades físicas e biológicas adequadas. O antimoniato de meglumina foi irradiado por nêutrons no reator nuclear IEA-R1, produzindo dois radioisótopos: 122

  6. Selective synthesis of ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongying; Shen, Shuling; Zhang, Yejun; Gu, Hongwei; Wang, Qiangbin

    2013-11-18

    Ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals (CAS NCs) have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaics and photoelectric nanodevices due to their tunable band gaps in the near-IR regime. Although much progress in the synthesis of CAS NCs has been achieved, the selective synthesis of CAS NCs with controllable morphologies and compositions is preliminary: in particular, a facile method is still in demand. In this work, we have successfully selectively synthesized high-quality CAS NCs with diverse morphologies, compositions, and band gaps, including rectangular CuSbS2 nanosheets (NSs), trigonal-pyramidal Cu12Sb4S13 NCs, and rhombic Cu3SbS3 NSs, by cothermodecomposition of copper diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Cu(Ddtc)2) and antimony diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Sb(Ddtc)3). The direct and indirect band gaps of the obtained CAS NCs were systematically studied by performing Kubelka-Munk transformations of their solid-state diffuse reflectance spectra.

  7. Determination of phosphorus contamination during antimony implantation by measurement and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, M.; Hulenyi, L.; Kinder, R.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental determination of phosphorus cross-contamination during antimony implantation is presented. As a suitable structure for this experiment, a buried layer was employed which is created by implanting antimony followed by a long diffusion process. The samples implanted in different implanters were analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), four-point probe and spreading resistance methods. The obtained results were compared with those calculated by program SUPREM-IV. Methods that can and cannot be used to determine phosphorus contamination during antimony implantation and to estimate the fluence of phosphorus being co-implanted with antimony are described in detail

  8. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.P. da.

    1981-01-01

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  9. High dose implantations of antimony for buried layer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailliard, J.P.; Dupuy, M.; Garcia, M.; Roussin, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Electrical and physical properties of high dose implantations of antimony in silicon have been studied for use in buried layer applications. The results have been obtained both on and oriented silicon wafers. Following implantations which lead to amorphization we perform an annealing at 600 0 C for 10 mn in order to recrystallize the layer. The observed electrical properties (μ, R) show that the concentration of electrically active antimony ions is greater than that predicted from the solubility of antimony in silicon. Further annealing (in the range 1050 0 - 1200 0 ) induces: firstly a precipitation of the Sb and secondly a diffusion and dissolution of the precipitates. There is a different evolution of the defects in the and silicon slices. T.E.M. reveals no defects in the wafers after one hour annealing at 1200 0 C, whereas defects and twins remain in wafers. Having obtained the evolution of R with time and temperature it is then determined the implantation and annealing conditions which lead to the low resistivity (R = 10) needed for buried layer applications. Results with very many industrially made devices are discussed

  10. Hydridation of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domizzi, G; Luppo, M.I; Ortiz, M; Vigna, G

    2004-01-01

    The production of Ti pieces or their alloys through powder metallurgy is an economical alternative that replaces the costly methods commonly used. The Ti-6AI-4V alloy is widely used in the aerospace, chemical and medical industries. The use of powder from the alloy instead of using more pure alloyed titanium powders, further simplifies the production process. The presence of V allows the phase β to stabilize at very low temperatures and both alloys alter the Ti-H equilibrium diagram. This work analyzes to what degree these effects influence the obtaining of powders from this alloy from that of hydridation and dehydridation. Although it has slower kinetics, powders can be produced in times similar to those found for grade 2 Ti since the distribution of hydrides in the sample is uniform and the material is fragile enough for concentrations of approximately 0.7 H/Ti (CW)

  11. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  12. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  13. Aluminum Hydride as a Fuel Supplement to NanoThermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: An experimental study was conducted in which aluminum hydride (alane, AlH3) replaced nanoaluminum incrementally as a fuel in a...pressurization rate, and burning velocity when micron-scale aluminum hydride was used as a minor fuel component in a nanoaluminum–copper-oxide thermite...mixture. Peak pressurization rates were found when the aluminum hydride made up about 25% of the fuel by mole. Pressurization rates increase by a

  14. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Research on the Characteristics and Mechanism of the Cumulative Release of Antimony from an Antimony Smelting Slag Stacking Area under Rainfall Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Deng, Renjian

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to study the characteristics and the mechanism of the cumulative release of antimony at an antimony smelting slag stacking area in southern China. A series of dynamic and static leaching experiments to simulate the effects of rainfall were carried out. The results showed that the release of antimony from smelting slag increased with a decrease in the solid-liquid ratio, and the maximum accumulated release was found to be 42.13 mg Sb/kg waste and 34.26 mg Sb/kg waste with a solid/liquid ratio of 1 : 20; the maximum amount of antimony was released within 149–420 μm size fraction with 7.09 mg/L of the cumulative leaching. Also, the antimony release was the greatest and most rapid at pH 7.0 with the minimum release found at pH 4.0. With an increase in rainfall duration, the antimony release increased. The influence of variation in rainfall intensity on the release of antimony from smelting slag was small. PMID:28804669

  16. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, F.

    1968-01-01

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezchikov, V.G.; Skachkova, I.N.; Kuznetsova, T.S.; Khrushcheva, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10 -3 % vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  18. THE STEREOCHEMISTRY AND MECHANISM OF HYDRIDE REDUCTIONS OF CYCLOHEXENE OXIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HYDRIDES, *OXIDATION REDUCTION REACTIONS), (* CYCLOHEXANOLS , SYNTHESIS (CHEMISTRY)), (*STEREOCHEMISTRY, CYCLOHEXANES), (*BOROHYDRIDES, REDUCTION...CHEMISTRY)), DIBORANES, OXYGEN HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CYCLOHEXANONES, CYCLOHEXENES , MOLECULAR ISOMERISM, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

  19. Triethylborane-induced radical reactions with gallium hydride reagent HGaCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, S; Fujita, K; Nakamura, T; Yorimitsu, H; Shinokubo, H; Matsubara, S; Oshima, K

    2001-06-14

    [see reaction]. A gallium hydride reagent, HGaCl2, was found to act as a radical mediator, like tributyltin hydride. Treatment of alkyl halides with the gallium hydride reagent, generated from gallium trichloride and sodium bis(2-methoxyethoxy)aluminum hydride, provided the corresponding reduced products in excellent yields. Radical cyclization of halo acetals was also successful with not only the stoichiometric gallium reagent but also a catalytic amount of gallium trichloride combined with stoichiometric aluminum hydride as a hydride source.

  20. Antimony leaching from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic used for bottled drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Paul; Prapaipong, Panjai; Shock, Everett; Hillaireau, Alice

    2008-02-01

    Antimony is a regulated contaminant that poses both acute and chronic health effects in drinking water. Previous reports suggest that polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics used for water bottles in Europe and Canada leach antimony, but no studies on bottled water in the United States have previously been conducted. Nine commercially available bottled waters in the southwestern US (Arizona) were purchased and tested for antimony concentrations as well as for potential antimony release by the plastics that compose the bottles. The southwestern US was chosen for the study because of its high consumption of bottled water and elevated temperatures, which could increase antimony leaching from PET plastics. Antimony concentrations in the bottled waters ranged from 0.095 to 0.521 ppb, well below the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 6 ppb. The average concentration was 0.195+/-0.116 ppb at the beginning of the study and 0.226+/-0.160 ppb 3 months later, with no statistical differences; samples were stored at 22 degrees C. However, storage at higher temperatures had a significant effect on the time-dependent release of antimony. The rate of antimony (Sb) release could be fit by a power function model (Sb(t)=Sb 0 x[Time, h]k; k=8.7 x 10(-6)x[Temperature ( degrees C)](2.55); Sb 0 is the initial antimony concentration). For exposure temperatures of 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, and 85 degrees C, the exposure durations necessary to exceed the 6 ppb MCL are 176, 38, 12, 4.7, 2.3, and 1.3 days, respectively. Summertime temperatures inside of cars, garages, and enclosed storage areas can exceed 65 degrees C in Arizona, and thus could promote antimony leaching from PET bottled waters. Microwave digestion revealed that the PET plastic used by one brand contained 213+/-35 mgSb/kg plastic; leaching of all the antimony from this plastic into 0.5L of water in a bottle could result in an antimony concentration of 376 ppb. Clearly, only a small

  1. Complexation of HSA with different forms of antimony (Sb): An application of fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wenjuan; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) pollution has been of a great environmental concern in some areas in China. Sb enters human body via drinking water, inhalation and food chain, unavoidably interacts with human serum albumin (HSA) in blood plasma, and consequently does harm to human health. The harmful effects of Sb on human health depend on the Sb species and their binding ability to HSA. In the present study, binding of three forms of Sb with HSA was investigated by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. All of antimony potassium tartrate, antimony trichloride and potassium pyroantimonate quenched fluorescence of HSA. Values of conditional stability constant K a (×10 5 /M) for Sb and HSA systems were 8.13–9.12 for antimony potassium tartrate, 2.51–4.27 for antimony trichloride and 3.63–9.77 for potassium pyroantimonate. The binding constant K b (×10 4 /M) values of HSA with antimony potassium tartrate, antimony trichloride and potassium pyroantimonate were 0.02–0.07, 3.55–5.01, and 0.07–1.08, respectively. There was one independent class of binding site for antimony trichloride towards HSA. There was more than one Sb binding site and negative cooperativity between multiple binding sites for potassium pyroantimonate and antimony potassium tartrate towards HSA. The binding ability of HSA to complex Sb followed the order: antimony trichloride>potassium pyroantimonate>antimony potassium tartrate. -- Highlights: ► The first study reporting interaction of Sb with HSA. ► Sb can effectively quench the fluorescence of HSA. ► The binding ability of HSA to Sb was dependent on the form of Sb. ► Binding differences indicate differences in toxicity of various forms Sb to human. ► HAS-Sb binding parameters are important for understanding toxicity of Sb

  2. Heavy weight vehicle traffic and its relationship with antimony content in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Waldo; De Gregori, Ida; Basilio, Paola; Bravo, Manuel; Pinto, Marcela; Lobos, Maria Gabriela

    2009-05-01

    Brake pads systems are nowadays considered as one of the most important sources of antimony in airborne particulate matter. One way that antimony can enter the body is through the lungs and specially by the interaction of antimony with -SH groups present in erythrocyte membrane cells. In spite of that, there are no studies about antimony enrichment in blood of workers exposed to high vehicle traffic. Port workers are generally exposed to heavy weight vehicle traffic. In Chile the biggest marine port is found in Valparaíso City. In this study antimony in whole blood and its fractions (erythrocytes-plasma and erythrocytes membranes-cytoplasm) of 45 volunteers were determined. The volunteers were port workers from Valparaíso city, and two control groups, one from Valparaíso and another from Quebrada Alvarado, the latter being a rural area located about 100 Km away from Valparaíso. The results demonstrate that port workers are highly impacted by antimony emissions from heavy weight vehicle traffic showing an average concentration of 27 +/- 9 ng Sb kg(-1), 5-10 times higher than the concentration of antimony in the blood of control groups. These are the highest antimony levels in blood ever reported in the literature. The highest antimony percentages (>60%) were always found in the erythrocyte fractions. However, the exposure degree to vehicle traffic is significant over antimony distribution in plasma, erythrocytes and cytoplasm. This results shows that the antimony mass in the erythrocyte membranes, was approximately constant at 1.0 +/- 0.1 ng Sb g(-1) of whole blood in all blood samples analyzed.

  3. Initiation of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalabi, A.F.; Meneley, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys is caused by the repeated precipitation and cracking of brittle hydrides. The growth kinetic of the hydrides have been measured to evaluate the critical hydride length for crack initiation. Hydride growth leading to crack initiation follows an approximate (time) 1/3 law on the average; crack propagation proceeds in a stepwise fashion. The critical length of hydride for crack initiation increases with stress and temperature. The fracture criterion for crack initiation predicts the critical hydride length at a give stress level and temperature. The fracture initiation mechanism of the hydride confirms the temperature effects for heating and cooling cycles under services loads. (orig.)

  4. Leishmania donovani isolates with antimony-resistant but not -sensitive phenotype inhibit sodium antimony gluconate-induced dendritic cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Haldar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The inability of sodium antimony gluconate (SAG-unresponsive kala-azar patients to clear Leishmania donovani (LD infection despite SAG therapy is partly due to an ill-defined immune-dysfunction. Since dendritic cells (DCs typically initiate anti-leishmanial immunity, a role for DCs in aberrant LD clearance was investigated. Accordingly, regulation of SAG-induced activation of murine DCs following infection with LD isolates exhibiting two distinct phenotypes such as antimony-resistant (Sb(RLD and antimony-sensitive (Sb(SLD was compared in vitro. Unlike Sb(SLD, infection of DCs with Sb(RLD induced more IL-10 production and inhibited SAG-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and leishmanicidal effects. Sb(RLD inhibited these effects of SAG by blocking activation of PI3K/AKT and NF-kappaB pathways. In contrast, Sb(SLD failed to block activation of SAG (20 microg/ml-induced PI3K/AKT pathway; which continued to stimulate NF-kappaB signaling, induce leishmanicidal effects and promote DC activation. Notably, prolonged incubation of DCs with Sb(SLD also inhibited SAG (20 microg/ml-induced activation of PI3K/AKT and NF-kappaB pathways and leishmanicidal effects, which was restored by increasing the dose of SAG to 40 microg/ml. In contrast, Sb(RLD inhibited these SAG-induced events regardless of duration of DC exposure to Sb(RLD or dose of SAG. Interestingly, the inhibitory effects of isogenic Sb(SLD expressing ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter MRPA on SAG-induced leishmanicidal effects mimicked that of Sb(RLD to some extent, although antimony resistance in clinical LD isolates is known to be multifactorial. Furthermore, NF-kappaB was found to transcriptionally regulate expression of murine gammaglutamylcysteine synthetase heavy-chain (mgammaGCS(hc gene, presumably an important regulator of antimony resistance. Importantly, Sb(RLD but not Sb(SLD blocked SAG-induced mgammaGCS expression in DCs by

  5. Comparison of modification with strontium and the refining with antimony in A 356 aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuoco, Ricardo; Correa, Edison Roberto; Correa, Alzira V.O.; Bocalini Junior, Mario

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and Antimony treated A356 aluminium alloy samples were metallographically characterized in the as cast and solution and aged conditions. Antimony treated alloy has shown slower spheroidizing kinetics of the Silicon particles during solution treatment, lower porosity level and higher tensile strength and elongation than Strontium treated one. (author)

  6. Effect of antimony on the microbial growth and the activities of soil enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Youn-Joo; Kim, Minjin

    2009-02-01

    The effects of antimony (Sb) on microbial growth inhibition and activities of soil enzymes were investigated in the present study. Test bacterial species were Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus aureus. Among the microorganisms tested, S. aureus was the most sensitive. The 50% effects on the inhibition of specific growth rate of E. coli, B. subtilis, and, S. aureus were 555, 18.4, and 15.8 mg Sb L(-1), respectively. A silt loam soil was amended with antimony and incubated in a controlled condition. Microbial activities of dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase (P cycle), arylsulfatase (S cycle), beta-glucosidase (C cycle), urease (N cycle), and fluorescein diacetate hydrolase in soil were measured. Activities of urease and dehydrogenase were related with antimony and can be an early indication of antimony contamination. The maximum increase in soil urease activity by antimony was up to 168% after 3d compared with the control. The activities of other four enzymes (acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate hydrolase, arylsulfatase and ss-glucosidase) were less affected by antimony. This study suggested that antimony affects nitrogen cycle in soil by changing urease activity under the neutral pH, however, soil enzyme activities may not be a good protocol due to their complex response patterns to antimony pollution.

  7. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  8. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Génin, X.; Bayle, J. P.; Dugne, O.; Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  9. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florencio, O.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1982-01-01

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author) [pt

  10. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  11. The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessinger, Brad; Apps, John A.

    2003-03-23

    A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous species at elevated temperatures and pressures, this study provides the necessary foundation for future exploration into transport and depositional processes in polymetallic ore deposits. The HKF equation of state parameters for gold, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and silver sulfide and hydroxide complexes were derived from experimental equilibrium constants using nonlinear regression calculations. In order to ensure that the resulting parameters were internally consistent, those experiments utilizing incompatible thermodynamic data were re-speciated prior to regression. Because new experimental studies were used to revise the HKF parameters for H2S0 and HS-1, those metal complexes for which HKF parameters had been previously derived were also updated. It was found that predicted thermodynamic properties of metal complexes are consistent with linear correlations between standard partial molal thermodynamic properties. This result allowed assessment of several complexes for which experimental data necessary to perform regression calculations was limited. Oxygen fugacity-temperature diagrams were calculated to illustrate how thermodynamic data improves our understanding of depositional processes. Predicted thermodynamic properties were used to investigate metal transport in Carlin-type gold deposits. Assuming a linear relationship between temperature and pressure, metals are predicted to predominantly be transported as sulfide complexes at a total aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.05 m. Also, the presence of arsenic and antimony mineral phases in the deposits are shown to restrict mineralization within a limited range of chemical conditions. Finally, at a lesser aqueous sulfur

  12. Metabolism of antimony-124 in lactating dairy cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruwaene, R. van; Gerber, G.B.; Kirchmann, R.; Colard, J.

    1982-01-01

    Lactating cows received oral and intravenous administrations of radioactive antimony (III) chloride to study its intestinal and urinary excretion, secretion into milk and organ distribution. Milk samples were taken twice a day and the milk, feces and urine assayed using gamma spectroscopy. Cows administered orally were sacrificed at 102 days and those injected intravenously at 70 days. Distribution of 124 Sb in the organs was determined at the time of sacrifice. Excretion of 124 Sb occurs mainly via urine, little is secreted into milk. Highest organ concentrations are in the spleen, liver and bone. (U.K.)

  13. Extraction of antimony and arsenic from sulphidic concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BalហPeter

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of both mineral processing and extractive metallurgy of minerals depends on the separation of individual mineral components and on the exposure of their surface. The production of flotation concentrates, with particle sizes of tens of microns, is not sufficient for many hydrometallurgical processes to operate at their optimum. As a consequence, metallurgical plants require for the effective processing high temperatures and pressures and some sort of concentrate pretreatment. Mechanical activation is an innovative procedure where an improvement in hydrometallurgical processes can be attained via a combination of new surface area and formation of crystalline defects in minerals. The lowering of reaction temperatures, the increase of rate and amount of solubility, preparation of water soluble compounds, the necessity for simpler and less expensive reactors and shorter reaction times are some of the advantages of mechanical activation. The environmental aspects of these processes are particularly attractive.This paper is devoted to the examples of application of mechanochemical treatment in the processing of sulfidic concentrates. The sulphide concentrates of various origin (Peru, Chile, Slovakia were succesfully tested for antimony and arsenic extraction. The mechanochemical treatment improve the degree of recovery and the rate of leaching of both metals. Two modes of mechanochemical treatment were tested: the mechanical activation before leaching and the mechanochemical leaching which integrates mechanical activation and leaching into a common step. The flowsheet consisted of mechanochemical leaching in an attritor and further operations as filtration, cementation, antimony precipitation, crystallization and arsenic precipitation. The pilot plant unit was designed for 500 kg per day feed of tetrahedrite concentrate. For the antimony extraction, electrowinning has also been considered. The residue which is a CuAgAu concentrate was

  14. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  15. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  16. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Determination of a massive zirconium hydride production cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loche, J.-P.

    1979-06-01

    This note includes: a bibliographical study on the physical, chemical and metallurgical properties of zirconium and its hydride, a brief review of the different methods of zirconium hydride conditioning and a more detailed study of the conditioning process by massive hydride formation. A systematic study was devoted to the thermal method of hydrogen incorporation with a view to obtaining articles of homogeneous composition and of hydrogen concentration as close as possible to the formula ZrH 2 . This was achieved by original tests designed to measure the plasticity of the metal or of its hydride during the process. The hydride formation cycle considered optimum is described for an initial metal of carefully selected chemical and metallurgical properties [fr

  18. Surface melting of deuterium hydride thick films

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Feng Chuan Liu,; Vilches, O.E.; Coddens, G.

    1990-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been used to measure, below the bulk melting temperature, the thickness and the diffusion coefficient of the mobile surface layer of 8 and 10 layer thick films of deuterium hydride (HD) condensed on MgO(100). The measurements show that the close-packed surface of solid HD surface melts gradually, with the thickness of the melted layer increasing from 0.5 to 6 molecular layers as the temperature rises from 4 K to 0.05 K below the bulk melting temperature. T...

  19. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2002-01-01

    , explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  20. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  1. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M.A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found

  2. Electrical conductivity of uranium-antimony oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golunski, S.E.; Nevell, T.G.; Hucknall, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The relative ionic and electronic contributions to the electrical conductivity of a uranium-antimony oxide catalyst and of USbO 5 have been determined from measurements of a.c. and d.c. conductance. Under inert atmospheres (390 to 775 K) conduction in the catalyst (predominantly USb 3 O 10 together with small proportions of Sb 2 O 4 and USbO 5 ) is associated with both electronic and effectively charged atomic point defects. Only electronic conduction occurs in USbO 5 . Under oxygen (10 to 70 kPa, 493 to 682 K) both materials are n-type semiconductors at higher temperatures, but at lower temperatures semiconducting behaviour varies with the pressure of oxygen. Heating USbO 5 in oxygen induces an ionic contribution to conductivity. Ionic conduction in the catalyst is eliminated by heating in hydrogen or propene at 470 K but is restored by heating in oxygen. It is suggested that both charged oxygen vacancies and interstitial oxide ions are involved in interactions of gaseous components with uranium-antimony oxides. With alkenes, interstitial oxide ions give rise to the products of selective partial oxidation. (author)

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  4. Neutron scattering on hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempelmann, R.

    1986-11-01

    This review surveys the application of neutron scattering for the investigation of the microscopic behaviour of hydrogen in intermetallic compounds. This concerns the structure as well as the dynamics. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on Ti 1.2 Mn 1.8 D 3 and LaNi 5 D 7 . In the latter case the dominant nickel scattering could be suppressed by isotope substitution with 60 Ni, and the anisotropic broadening of the Bragg peaks could be modelled in a correspondingly modified Rietveld-profile refinement. For the investigation of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides by means of quasielastic neutron scattering an iterative multiple scattering correction procedure has been developped which allows a reliable determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides comprises three types of jumps: escape jumps out of energetically lower interstitials, transport jumps over the energetically higher sites and locally restricted jump processes. For Ti 1.2 Mn 1.8 H 3 the main features of the diffusional behaviour could be described quantitatively in the framework of a three state model. By means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy information about the occupied hydrogen sites and thus about the structure can be extracted from the symmetry splitting of the vibrational modes. In this way we showed that in α-LaNi 5 H x , La 2 Ni 4 -octahedral and La 2 Ni 2 -tetrahedral interstitial sites are occupied. (orig./GG)

  5. Segregation of antimony in InP in MOVPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In this work the segregation of antimony in indium phosphide in metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE)was systematically investigated. Therefore phosphine stabilized InP surfaces were treated with tri-methyl-antimony (TMSb) in MOVPE. An antimony rich Sb/InP surface was established, showing a typical spectra for the antimonides observed in reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS).Adsorption and desorption of antimony are investigated, as well as the incorporation of Sb during overgrowth of the Sb/InP surface with InP. Therefore the growth parameters temperature, TMSb partial pressure and treatment time are varied and their influence investigated. The experiments are monitored in-situ with RAS, the achieved data is correlated with ex-situ characterisation such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It is shown that under treatment with TMSb a stable Sb/InP surface is formed within seconds, which does not change under further TMSb treatment. This process is rarely influenced by the TMSb partial pressure. On the contrary, the desorption of Sb is a very slow process. Two main processes can be distinguished: The desorption of excess Sb from the surface and the formation of the MOVPE prepared InP (2 x 1) surface. The reaction velocity of adsorption and desorption increases with temperature. Above a critical value the increase of TMSb partial pressure has no influence on the time for desorption. During overgrowth of the Sb/InP surface the opposite temperature dependence is observed: with increasing growth temperature the typical spectra for antimonides is observed longer. An analysis of the grown samples with XRD and SIMS showed the formation of an InPSb double quantum well. One layer is formed at the interface, the second one 50 nm-120 nm deep in the InP. The location of the 2nd InPSb layer can be correlated with the vanishing of the Sb signature in RAS. The distance between the quantum wells increases with growth temperature, until it

  6. Segregation of antimony in InP in MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeke, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    In this work the segregation of antimony in indium phosphide in metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE)was systematically investigated. Therefore phosphine stabilized InP surfaces were treated with tri-methyl-antimony (TMSb) in MOVPE. An antimony rich Sb/InP surface was established, showing a typical spectra for the antimonides observed in reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS).Adsorption and desorption of antimony are investigated, as well as the incorporation of Sb during overgrowth of the Sb/InP surface with InP. Therefore the growth parameters temperature, TMSb partial pressure and treatment time are varied and their influence investigated. The experiments are monitored in-situ with RAS, the achieved data is correlated with ex-situ characterisation such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It is shown that under treatment with TMSb a stable Sb/InP surface is formed within seconds, which does not change under further TMSb treatment. This process is rarely influenced by the TMSb partial pressure. On the contrary, the desorption of Sb is a very slow process. Two main processes can be distinguished: The desorption of excess Sb from the surface and the formation of the MOVPE prepared InP (2 x 1) surface. The reaction velocity of adsorption and desorption increases with temperature. Above a critical value the increase of TMSb partial pressure has no influence on the time for desorption. During overgrowth of the Sb/InP surface the opposite temperature dependence is observed: with increasing growth temperature the typical spectra for antimonides is observed longer. An analysis of the grown samples with XRD and SIMS showed the formation of an InPSb double quantum well. One layer is formed at the interface, the second one 50 nm-120 nm deep in the InP. The location of the 2nd InPSb layer can be correlated with the vanishing of the Sb signature in RAS. The distance between the quantum wells increases with growth temperature, until it

  7. Removal of arsenic and antimony from anode slime by vacuum dynamic flash reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deqiang; Qiu, Keqiang

    2011-04-15

    Anode slime is an important material of recycling precious metals. Up to now, treating the arsenic- and antimony-rich anode slime by conventional processes has the following problems: its economic and environmental effect is less than satisfactory, and the removal effect of arsenic and antimony from anode slime in present processes is not all that could be desired. Therefore, vacuum dynamic flash reduction, a new process for treating arsenic- and antimony-rich anode slime, was investigated in this work. During vacuum dynamic flash reduction, silver from the arsenic- and antimony-rich anode slime was left behind in the distilland as the silver alloy, and trivalent oxides of arsenic and antimony were evaporated in the distillate. The experimental results showed that the evaporation percent of the arsenic- and antimony-rich anode slime was 65.6%. Namely, 98.92% by weight of arsenic and 93.67% by weight of antimony can be removed under the following experimental conditions: temperature of 1083 K, vacuum evaporation time of 60 min, and air flow rate of 400 mL/min corresponding to the residual gas pressure of 250 Pa. Moreover, vacuum treatment eliminates much of the air pollution and material losses associated with other conventional treatment methods.

  8. Immobilization of antimony waste slag by applying geopolymerization and stabilization/solidification technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Güray

    2014-11-01

    During the processing of antimony ore by pyrometallurgical methods, a considerable amount of slag is formed. This antimony waste slag is listed by the European Union as absolutely hazardous waste with a European Waste Catalogue code of 10 08 08. Since the levels of antimony and arsenic in the leachate of the antimony waste slag are generally higher than the landfilling limits, it is necessary to treat the slag before landfilling. In this study, stabilization/solidification and geopolymerization technologies were both applied in order to limit the leaching potential of antimony and arsenic. Different combinations ofpastes by using Portland cement, fly ash, clay, gypsum, and blast furnace slag were prepared as stabilization/solidification or geopoljymer matrixes. Sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution and sodium hydroxide solution at 8 M were used as activators for geopolymer samples. Efficiencies of the combinations were evaluated in terms of leaching and unconfined compressive strength. None of the geopolymer samples prepared with the activators yielded arsenic and antimony leaching below the regulatory limit at the same time, although they yielded high unconfined compressive strength levels. On the other hand, the stabilization/solidification samples prepared by using water showed low leaching results meeting the landfilling criteria. Use of gypsum as an additive was found to be successful in immobilizing the arsenic and antimony.

  9. In Vitro Antiparasitic and Apoptotic Effects of Antimony Sulfide Nanoparticles on Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Soflaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is one of the most important sever diseases in tropical and subtropical countries. In the present study the effects of antimony sulfide nanoparticles on Leishmania infantum in vitro were evaluated. Antimony sulfide NPs (Sb2S5 were synthesized by biological method from Serratia marcescens bacteria. Then the cytotoxicity effects of different concentrations (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of this nanoparticle were assessed on promastigote and amastigote stages of L. infantum. MTT method was used for verification results of promastigote assay. Finally, the percentages of apoptotic, necrotic, and viable cells were determined by flow cytometry. The results indicated the positive effectiveness of antimony sulfide NPs on proliferation of promastigote form. The IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration of antimony sulfide NPs on promastigotes was calculated 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity effect was dose-dependent means by increasing the concentration of antimony sulfide NPs, the cytotoxicity curve was raised and the viability curve of the parasite dropped simultaneously. Moreover, the IC50 of antimony sulfide NPs on amastigote stage was calculated 25 μg/mL. On the other hand, however, antimony sulfide NPs have a low cytotoxicity effect on uninfected macrophages but it can induce apoptosis in promastigote stage at 3 of 4 concentrations.

  10. The potential DNA toxic changes among workers exposed to antimony trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shanawany, Safaa; Foda, Nermine; Hashad, Doaa I; Salama, Naglaa; Sobh, Zahraa

    2017-05-01

    Occupational exposure to antimony has gained much interest when specific toxic effects were noticed among workers processing antimony. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the potential DNA oxidative damage occurring among Egyptian workers occupationally exposed to antimony trioxide. The study was conducted on 25 subjects exposed to antimony trioxide while working in the polymerization process of polyester in Misrayon and Polyester Fiber Company, KafrEldawwar, Beheira, Egypt. Urinary antimony levels were assessed using inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and considered as a biological exposure index. DNA damage and total oxidant capacity (TOC) were assessed using ELISA. DNA damage was detected in the form of increased apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites among antimony trioxide-exposed workers compared to control subjects, but it could not be explained by oxidative mechanisms due to lack of significant correlation between DNA damage and measured TOC. Antimony trioxide might have a genotoxic impact on occupationally exposed workers which could not be attributed to oxidative stress in the studied cases.

  11. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  12. Behaviour of antimony during thermal treatment of Sb-rich halogenated waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J. [Laboratoire Gestion des Risques et Environnement, 25 rue de Chemnitz, 68200 Mulhouse (France); Dorge, S., E-mail: sophie.dorge@uha.fr [Laboratoire Gestion des Risques et Environnement, 25 rue de Chemnitz, 68200 Mulhouse (France); Trouve, G. [Laboratoire Gestion des Risques et Environnement, 25 rue de Chemnitz, 68200 Mulhouse (France); Venditti, D.; Durecu, S. [TREDI Departement de Recherche, Technopole de Nancy-Brabois, 9 avenue de la Foret de Haye, BP 184, 54505 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2009-07-30

    Antimony compounds have a wide range of industrial applications, particularly as additives in flame retardants. To ensure environmentally friendly waste incineration of Sb-rich wastes, it is essential to strengthen the knowledge about the fate of antimony and the potential formation of harmful species. Investigations should be conducted particularly in relation with the main operational parameters controlling the process, chiefly temperature, residence time and air supply in the oven and in the post-combustion zone, prior final adapted cleaning of the flue-gas stream. Experimental studies focusing on antimony behaviour were undertaken through laboratory-scale thermal treatment at 850 deg. C and 1100 deg. C of a Sb-rich halogenated waste, originating from the sector of flame retardants formulation. The configuration of our laboratory experimental device allowed to achieve only low oxidative conditions in the waste bed, but high oxidative strength coupled with high temperature and sufficient gas residence time in the post-combustion zone, as prescribed during the incineration of hazardous wastes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to assess the partition of antimony in the different compartments of the process. The oxidation degree of antimony in the gas-phase was determined by the use of electrochemical techniques, namely polarography coupled with anodic stripping voltamperometry. The partition of antimony between the residual ash and the gas-phase under moderate oxidative conditions in the waste bed was constant, whatever the temperature: the volatilization rate for antimony was {approx}64%, while a {approx}36% fraction remained in the residual bottom ashes. But interestingly, while at 850 {sup o}C, antimony was mainly present in the gas-phase at a +III oxidation degree, an increase in temperature of 250 {sup o}C favoured the presence of antimony to its highest oxidation degree +V in the flue-gas stream, a valence known to be involved in less toxic species.

  13. Synthesis, characterisation and electrochemical evaluation of reduced graphene oxide modified antimony nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silwana, Bongiwe; Horst, Charlton van der [Natural Resources and the Environment (NRE), Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa); SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Iwuoha, Emmanuel [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Somerset, Vernon, E-mail: vsomerset@csir.co.za [Natural Resources and the Environment (NRE), Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa)

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates some aspects on the synthesis and characterisation of nanoparticles of metallic alloys using polyvinyl alcohol as a stabiliser, which combines high surface area and superior hybrid properties. The present experimental design was to synthesise a nanocomposite of reduced graphene oxide and antimony nanoparticles to be used as thin films for macro- and micro-carbon electrodes for enhancing sensing of different toxic metal pollutants in the environment. The synthetic process of reduced graphene oxide was done using the modified Hummers method while antimony pentachloride was reduced with sodium borohydride into nanoparticles of antimony using polyvinyl-alcohol as a stabiliser. The systematic investigation of morphology was done by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscope, which revealed the synthesis of a product, consists of reduced graphene oxide antimony nanoparticles. The electrochemical behaviour of the reduced graphene oxide antimony nanoparticles coated on a glassy carbon electrode was performed using voltammetric and impedance techniques. Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the overall resistance, including the charge–transfer resistance, was smaller with reduced graphene oxide antimony nanoparticles than reduced graphene oxide and antimony nanoparticles, on their own. Evaluation of the reduced graphene oxide antimony nanoparticle sensor in the stripping voltammetry has shown a linear working range for concentration of platinum (II) between 6.0 × 10{sup −6}–5.4 × 10{sup −5} μg L{sup −1} with limit of detection of 6 × 10{sup −6} μg L{sup −1} (signal-to-noise ratio = 3), which is below the World Health Organisation guidelines for freshwater. - Highlights: • Reduced graphene oxide modified antimony nanoparticles were chemically synthesised. • TEM results show rGO-Sb nanoparticles with a diameter range of between 2 and 20 nm. • Impedance results confirm

  14. An investigation of inorganic antimony species and antimony associated with soil humic acid molar mass fractions in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steely, Sarah; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antimony compounds is often suspected in the soil of apple orchards contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide and in the soil of shooting ranges. Nitric acid (1 M) extractable Sb from the shooting range (8300 μg kg -1 ) and the apple orchard (69 μg kg -1 ) had considerably higher surface Sb levels than the control site ( -1 ), and Sb was confined to the top ∼30 cm soil layer. Sb(V) was the principal species in the shooting range and the apple orchard surface soils. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) analysis of humic acids isolated from the two contaminated soils demonstrated that Sb has complexed to humic acid molar mass fractions. The results also indicate that humic acids have the ability to arrest the mobility of Sb through soils and would be beneficial in converting Sb(III) to a less toxic species, Sb(V), in contaminated areas. - The soil surface and depth distribution Sb(V) and Sb(III) species in a contaminated apple orchard and a shooting range, and the effect soil humic acids on inorganic antimony species is reported

  15. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  16. Varicella zoster virus reactivation during or immediately following treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis with antimony compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barbieri Barros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antimony compounds are the cornerstone treatments for tegumentary leishmaniasis. The reactivation of herpes virus is a side effect described in few reports. We conducted an observational study to describe the incidence of herpes zoster reactivation during treatment with antimony compounds. The global incidence of herpes zoster is approximately 2.5 cases per 1,000 persons per month (or 30 cases per 1,000 persons per year. The estimated incidence of herpes zoster in patients undergoing antimony therapy is higher than previously reported.

  17. Antimony(V) and Bismuth(V) Complexes of Lapachol: Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Cytotoxic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Demicheli; Carlos A. de Simone; Frédéric Frézard; Eufrânio N. da Silva Júnior; Cláudio L. Donnici; Elene C. Pereira-Maia; Ludmila G. de Oliveira; Meiriane M. Silva; Flávia C. S. de Paula

    2011-01-01

    Antimony(V) and bismuth(V) complexes of lapachol have been synthesized by the reaction of Ph3SbCl2 or Ph3BiCl2 with lapachol (Lp) and characterized by several physicochemical techniques such as IR, and NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The compounds contain six-coordinated antimony and bismuth atoms. The antimony(V) complex is a monomeric derivative, (Lp)(Ph3Sb)OH, and the bismuth(V) complex is a dinuclear compound bridged by an oxygen atom, (Lp)2(Ph3Bi)2O. Both compounds inhibited ...

  18. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis

  19. Investigation process of alcoholysis of hydride aluminium-adobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numanov, M.I.; Normatov, I.Sh.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2001-01-01

    Considering of that process of acid treatment of aluminium-adobe hydride realizes in the ethyl alcohol media it was necessary study the process of alcoholysis of AlH 3 and aluminium additives. In the end of article authors became to conclusion that deficiency of spontaneous alcoholysis of AlH 3 in adobe caused by protective action of fiber; solvate ability of LiCl and alkoxy aluminium hydride of lithium-LiCl·CO 2 H 5 OH, Li Al(OC 2 H 5 ) 4 ·nC 2 H 5 OH decreasing the expectancy of responding of alcohol with aluminium hydride

  20. Ab initio studies on the electronic structure and properties of aluminum hydrides that are analogues of boron hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasu, K; Chandrakumar, K R S; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2010-11-25

    Although the boron hydrides are well-known in the literature, the aluminum hydride chemistry is limited to very few systems such as AlH(3), its dimer, and its polymeric form. In view of the recent experimental studies on the possible existence of the aluminum hydrides, herein, we have undertaken a systematic study on the electronic structure and properties of these aluminum hydrides. Under this, we have studied different classes of hydrides, viz., closo (Al(n)H(n+2)), nido (Al(n)H(n+4)), and arachno (Al(n)H(n+6)), similar to the boranes. All the aluminum hydrides are found to have exceptionally large highest-occupied molecular orbital-lowest-unoccupied molecular orbital gaps, low electron affinities, large ionization potentials and also large enthalpy and free energy of atomization. In addition, most of the structures are also found to have high symmetries. These exceptional properties can be indicative of the pronounced stability, and hence, it is expected that other aluminum hydride complexes can indeed be observed experimentally.

  1. High Growth Rate Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy at Low Temperature through Use of Uncracked Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ptak, Aaron J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Braun, Anna [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

    2018-01-22

    We demonstrate hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of GaAs with unusually high growth rates (RG) at low temperature and atmospheric pressure by employing a hydride-enhanced growth mechanism. Under traditional HVPE growth conditions that involve growth from Asx species, RG exhibits a strong temperature dependence due to slow kinetics at the surface, and growth temperatures >750 degrees C are required to obtain RG > 60 um/h. We demonstrate that when the group V element reaches the surface in a hydride, the kinetic barrier is dramatically reduced and surface kinetics no longer limit RG. In this regime, RG is dependent on mass transport of uncracked AsH3 to the surface. By controlling the AsH3 velocity and temperature profile of the reactor, which both affect the degree of AsH3 decomposition, we demonstrate tuning of RG. We achieve RG above 60 um/h at temperatures as low as 560 degrees C and up to 110 um/h at 650 degrees C. We incorporate high-RG GaAs into solar cell devices to verify that the electronic quality does not deteriorate as RG is increased. The open circuit voltage (VOC), which is a strong function of non-radiative recombination in the bulk material, exhibits negligible variance in a series of devices grown at 650 degrees C with RG = 55-110 um/h. The implications of low temperature growth for the formation of complex heterostructure devices by HVPE are discussed.

  2. Process for production of a metal hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  3. Hydrogen storage properties of metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, energy needs are mainly covered by fossil energies leading to pollutant emissions mostly responsible for global warming. Among the different possible solutions for greenhouse effect reduction, hydrogen has been proposed for energy transportation. Indeed, H 2 can be seen as a clean and efficient energy carrier. However, beside the difficulties related to hydrogen production, efficient high capacity storage means are still to be developed. Many metals and alloys are able to store large amounts of hydrogen. This latter solution is of interest in terms of safety, global yield and long term storage. However, to be suitable for applications, such compounds must present high capacity, good reversibility, fast reactivity and sustainability. In this paper, we will review the structural and thermodynamic properties of metallic hydrides. (authors)

  4. Boron hydride analogues of the fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quong, A.A.; Pederson, M.R.; Broughton, J.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The BH moiety is isoelectronic with C. We have studied the stability of the (BH) 60 analogue of the C 60 fullerene as well as the dual-structure (BH) 32 icosahedron, both of them being putative structures, by performing local-density-functional electronic calculations. To aid in our analysis, we have also studied other homologues of these systems. We find that the latter, i.e., the dual structure, is the more stable although the former is as stable as one of the latter's lower homologues. Boron hydrides, it seems, naturally form the dual structures used in algorithmic optimization of complex fullerene systems. Fully relaxed geometries are reported as well as electron affinities and effective Hubbard U parameters. These systems form very stable anions and we conclude that a search for BH analogues of the C 60 alkali-metal supeconductors might prove very fruitful

  5. The progress of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurczyk, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews research at the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, on the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials. Nanocrystalline materials have been synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing. Examples of the materials include TiFe - , ZrV 2- , LaNi 5 and Mg 2 Ni-type phases. Details on the process used and the enhancement of properties due to the nanoscale structures are presented. The synthesized alloys were used as negative electrode materials for Ni-MH battery. The properties of hydrogen host materials can be modified substantially by alloying to obtain the desired storage characteristics. For example, it was found that the respective replacement of Fe in TiFe by Ni and/or by Cr, Co, Mo improved not only the discharge capacity but also the cycle life of these electrodes. The hydrogen storage properties of nanocrystalline ZrV 2 - and LaNi 5 -type powders prepared by mechanical alloying and annealing show no big difference with those of melt casting (polycrystalline) alloys. On the other hand, a partial substitution of Mg by Mn or Al in Mg 2 Ni alloy leads to an increase in discharge capacity, at room temperature. Furthermore, the effect of the nickel and graphite coating on the structure of some nanocrystalline alloys and the electrodes characteristics were investigated. In the case of Mg 2 Ni-type alloy mechanical coating with graphite effectively reduced the degradation rate of the studied electrode materials. The combination of a nanocrystalline TiFe - , ZrV 2 - and LaNi 5 -type hydride electrodes and a nickel positive electrode to form a Ni-MH battery, has been successful. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  7. In situ trapping of As, Sb and Se hydrides on nanometer-sized ceria-coated iron oxide-silica and slurry suspension introduction to ICP-OES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dados, A; Kartsiouli, E; Chatzimitakos, Th; Papastephanou, C; Stalikas, C D

    2014-12-01

    A procedure is developed for the analysis of sub-μg L(-1) levels of arsenic, antimony and selenium after preconcentration of their hydrides. The study highlights the capability of an aqueous suspension of a nanometer-sized magnetic ceria, in the presence of iodide, to function as a sorbent for the in situ trapping and preconcentration of the hydrides of certain metalloids. After extraction, the material is magnetically separated from the trapping solution and analyzed. A slurry suspension sampling approach with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is employed for measurements, as the quantitative elution of the adsorbed metalloids is not feasible. The whole analytical procedure consists of five steps: (i) pre-reduction of As, Sb and Se, (ii) generation of the hydrides AsH3, SbH3 and SeH2, (iii) in situ collection in the trapping suspension of magnetic ceria, (iv) isolation of the particles by applying a magnetic field, and (v) measurement of As, Sb and Se concentrations using ICP-OES. Under the established experimental conditions, the efficiency of trapping accounted for 94 ± 2%, 89 ± 2% and 98 ± 3% for As, Sb and Se, respectively, signifying the effective implementation of the overall procedure. The applicability of the procedure has been demonstrated by analyzing tap and lake water and a reference material (soft drinking water). The obtained analytical figures of merit were satisfactory for the analysis of the above metalloids in natural waters by ICP-OES. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose; Perry, Daniel; Wendt, Joel; Manginell, Ronald; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Luhman, Dwight; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    Antimony donor implants next to silicon quantum dots have been detected with integrated solid-state diode detectors with single ion precision. Devices with counted number of donors have been fabricated and low temperature transport measurements have been performed. Charge offsets, indicative of donor ionization and coupling to the quantum dot, have been detected in these devices. The number of offsets corresponds to 10-50% of the number of donors counted. We will report on tunneling time measurements and spin readout measurements on the donor offsets. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Fluoride and oxyfluoride compounds and niobium, antimony and tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbin, Odile.

    1982-02-01

    This paper is a detailed bibliographic report on fluoride and oxyfluoride compounds and niobium, antimony and tellurium oxides. Compounds identified to date are: NbF 3 , NbF 4 , NbF 5 , NbF 6 , NbO 2 F, NbOF 3 , Nb 3 O 7 F, SbF 3 , SbF 5 , SbOF, SbOF 3 , SbO 2 F, Sb 2 O 3 , Sb 2 O 4 , TeF 4 , Te 2 F 10 , TeF 6 , Te 2 OF 10 , Te 3 O 2 F 14 , Te 6 F 26 O 5 , TeO, TeO 2 , TeO 3 . Synthesis processes, physical properties and chemical properties are given for each of the above compounds [fr

  10. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  11. Antimony Accumulation Risk in Lettuce Grown in Brazilian Urban Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mancarella

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of the Brazilian population inhabits urban areas. Diffused poverty and the lack of fresh vegetables have generated malnutrition and unbalanced diets. Thus, the interest in growing food locally, in urban allotments and community gardens, has increased. However, urban agriculture may present some risks caused by the urban pollution. Road traffic is considered the biggest source of heavy metals in urban areas. Hence, the objective of the study was the assessment of the accumulation of heavy metals in an urban garden in the city of Recife, at different distances from a road with high traffic burden. The results showed that the distance from the street decreased the accumulation of many potentially toxic elements. Furthermore, the human health risk was estimated, revealing that greater danger was associated with the accumulation of antimony. Concentration of other elements in the leaf tissues were within previously reported thresholds.

  12. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  13. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  14. A mechanistic approach to develop the secondary hydriding criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, I.; Sorokin, A.; Kanukova, V.; Likhanskii, V.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable criteria of secondary hydriding failures are important to assure safe operation of nuclear fuel in LWR power units. The present paper reviews available data on massive hydriding of Zirconium claddings covering out-of-pile studies and in-pile tests in research reactors. Analyses of these experimental data give evidence that threshold conditions leading to the onset of massive hydriding are drastically changed under irradiation. The changes are caused mainly by irradiation damage of oxygen sublattice in ZrO 2 by fission fragments leaving the periphery of fuel pellets. The tests in research reactors provide a basis to develop a parametric dependency which relates the threshold of massive hydriding to composition of steam-hydrogen mixture, irradiation dose rate and temperature

  15. DETERMINATION OF METAL HYDRIDE SYSTEMS CHARACTERISTICS WHILE HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Kluchka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental dependence of the pressure of hydrogen in the hydride cartridge when it is heated is obtained. Experimental data prove the theoretical values with an accuracy of ≈ 6%.

  16. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-07

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  17. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper T. Møller

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted how complex metal hydrides may act in an integrated setup with a fuel cell. This review focuses on the unique properties of light element complex metal hydrides mainly based on boron, nitrogen and aluminum, e.g., metal borohydrides and metal alanates. Our hope is that this review can provide new inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy.

  18. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  19. Antimony as a global dilemma: Geochemistry, mobility, fate and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Indika; Vithanage, Meththika; Bundschuh, Jochen

    2017-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of antimony (Sb) in environmental, biological and geochemical systems originating from natural, geological and anthropogenic sources are of particular global concern. This review presents a critical overview of natural geochemical processes which trigger the mobilization of Sb from its host mineral phases and related rocks to the surrounding environments. The primary source of Sb contamination in the environment is geogenic. The geochemical characteristics of Sb are determined by its oxidation states, speciation and redox transformation. Oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals and aqueous dissolution are the most prevalent geochemical mechanisms for the release of Sb to the environment. Transformation of mobile forms of Sb is predominantly controlled by naturally occurring precipitation and adsorption processes. Oxyhydroxides of iron, manganese and aluminum minerals have been recognized as naturally occurring Sb sequestrating agents in the environment. Antimony is also immobilized in the natural environment via precipitation with alkali and heavy metals resulting extremely stable mineral phases, such as schafarzikite, tripuhyite and calcium antimonates. Many key aspects, including detection, quantification, and speciation of Sb in different environmental systems as well as its actual human exposure remain poorly understood. Identification of global distribution of most vulnerable Sb-contaminated regions/countries along with aquifer sediments is an urgent necessity for the installation of safe drinking water wells. Such approaches could provide the global population Sb-safe drinking and irrigation water and hinder the propagation of Sb in toxic levels through the food chain. Hence, raising awareness through the mobility, fate and transport of Sb as well as further transdisciplinary research on Sb from global scientific communities will be a crucial stage to establish a sustainable Sb mitigation on a global scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  20. NEW THIO S2- ADDUCTS WITH ANTIMONY (III AND V HALIDE: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASSAN ALLOUCH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Five new S2- adducts with SbIII and SbV halides have been synthesized and studied by infrared. Discrete structures have been suggested, the environment around the antimony being tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal or octahedral.

  1. Antimony-based focal plane arrays for shortwave-infrared to visible applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop antimony-based focal plane arrays (FPAs) for NASA's imaging and spectroscopy applications in the spectral band from visible to...

  2. Antimony-Based Focal Plane Arrays for Shortwave-Infrared to Visible Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop antimony-based focal plane arrays (FPAs) for NASA's imaging and spectroscopy applications in the spectral band from visible to...

  3. Liquid-liquid extraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium by zinc diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, S.; Wyttenbach, A.

    1978-03-01

    The authors report the solvent extraction, oxidation, reduction, extraction in the presence of iron, and reextraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium. These processes were studied using radioactive tracers. (G.T.H.)

  4. Reactions of zinc hydride and magnesium hydride with pyridine; synthesis and characterization of 1,4-dihydro-1-pyridylzinc and -magnesium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A.J. de; Boersma, J.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of 1,4-dihydro-1-pyridylzinc and -magnesium complexes are described. Zinc hydride and magnesium hydride dissolve in and react with pyridine, and the reaction has been studied in detail in the case of zinc hydride. Evaporation of the solvent after 1–2 hours at 0°C

  5. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, E.Yu.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Khoruzhij, O.V.; Likhanskij, V.V.; Sorokin, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO 2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  6. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Setten, M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Popa, V.A.; de Wijs, G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW

  7. Solving crystal structures of metal and chemical hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cerny, Radovan

    2008-01-01

    The methods of structural characterization of metal and chemical hydrides are reviewed. The existing difficulties and problems are outlined and possible solutions presented. It is shown that powder diffraction, and especially the Direct Space Method, is essential component of hydride research. Crystal structures containing as many as 55 independent atoms (including hydrogen) have been fully characterized using powder diffraction. This is of great importance, because rapid collection of powder...

  8. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  9. The use of metal hydrides in fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo V. Lototskyy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews state-of-the-art developments in hydrogen energy systems which integrate fuel cells with metal hydride-based hydrogen storage. The 187 reference papers included in this review provide an overview of all major publications in the field, as well as recent work by several of the authors of the review. The review contains four parts. The first part gives an overview of the existing types of fuel cells and outlines the potential of using metal hydride stores as a source of hydrogen fuel. The second part of the review considers the suitability and optimisation of different metal hydrides based on their energy efficient thermal integration with fuel cells. The performances of metal hydrides are considered from the viewpoint of the reversible heat driven interaction of the metal hydrides with gaseous H2. Efficiencies of hydrogen and heat exchange in hydrogen stores to control H2 charge/discharge flow rates are the focus of the third section of the review and are considered together with metal hydride – fuel cell system integration issues and the corresponding engineering solutions. Finally, the last section of the review describes specific hydrogen-fuelled systems presented in the available reference data.

  10. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, Silvia N.; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S.; Gribaudo, Luis M. J.; Hermida, Jorge D.; Ovejero, Jose; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.; Vicente, Eduardo E.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH 3 : a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH 3 . The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  11. Exposure to antimony from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) trays used in ready-to-eat meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldimann, M; Blanc, A; Dudler, V

    2007-08-01

    Antimony residues, a result of the use of a polycondensation catalyst in the production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) oven-proof trays, were analysed in ready-to-eat meals. The toxicity of antimony has raised concerns about consumer safety; therefore, the migration of small fractions of these residues into ready meals and foods as a result of cooking directly in the PET trays was studied. A straightforward approach of measuring real samples was selected to obtain accurate exposure data. Background antimony concentration was determined separately from a series of lunch meals, which ranged from not detectable to 3.4 microg kg(-1). Microwave and conventional oven-cooking caused a distinct increase in the concentration of antimony in food and ready meals of 0-17 and 8-38 microg kg(-1), respectively, depending, to a certain extent, on the industrial preparations. The migrated quantities of antimony corresponded to 3-13 microg. For comparison, PET roasting bags and ready-made dough products in PET baking dishes were also evaluated. About half of the products prepared at a temperature of 180 degrees C exceeded the specific migration limit set for food contact material by the European Commission. However, the migrated amounts of antimony relative to the accepted tolerable daily intake (TDI) show that exposure from this type of food is currently not of toxicological concern.

  12. Fullerene hydride - A potential hydrogen storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nai Xing Wang; Jun Ping Zhang; An Guang Yu; Yun Xu Yang; Wu Wei Wang; Rui long Sheng; Jia Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen, as a clean, convenient, versatile fuel source, is considered to be an ideal energy carrier in the foreseeable future. Hydrogen storage must be solved in using of hydrogen energy. To date, much effort has been put into storage of hydrogen including physical storage via compression or liquefaction, chemical storage in hydrogen carriers, metal hydrides and gas-on-solid adsorption. But no one satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. C 60 H 36 , firstly synthesized by the method of the Birch reduction, was loaded with 4.8 wt% hydrogen indicating [60]fullerene might be as a potential hydrogen storage material. If a 100% conversion of C 60 H 36 is achieved, 18 moles of H 2 gas would be liberated from each mole of fullerene hydride. Pure C 60 H 36 is very stable below 500 C under nitrogen atmosphere and it releases hydrogen accompanying by other hydrocarbons under high temperature. But C 60 H 36 can be decomposed to generate H 2 under effective catalyst. We have reported that hydrogen can be produced catalytically from C 60 H 36 by Vasks's compound (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) under mild conditions. (RhCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) having similar structure to (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ), was also examined for thermal dehydrogenation of C 60 H 36 ; but it showed low catalytic activity. To search better catalyst, palladium carbon (Pd/C) and platinum carbon (Pt/C) catalysts, which were known for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds, were tried and good results were obtained. A very big peak of hydrogen appeared at δ=5.2 ppm in 1 H NMR spectrum based on Evans'work (fig 1) at 100 C over a Pd/C catalyst for 16 hours. It is shown that hydrogen can be produced from C 60 H 36 using a catalytic amount of Pd/C. Comparing with Pd/C, Pt/C catalyst showed lower activity. The high cost and limited availability of Vaska's compounds, Pd and Pt make it advantageous to develop less expensive catalysts for our process based on

  13. High growth rate hydride vapor phase epitaxy at low temperature through use of uncracked hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kevin L.; Braun, Anna; Simon, John; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of GaAs with unusually high growth rates (RG) at low temperature and atmospheric pressure by employing a hydride-enhanced growth mechanism. Under traditional HVPE growth conditions that involve growth from Asx species, RG exhibits a strong temperature dependence due to slow kinetics at the surface, and growth temperatures >750 °C are required to obtain RG > 60 μm/h. We demonstrate that when the group V element reaches the surface in a hydride, the kinetic barrier is dramatically reduced and surface kinetics no longer limit RG. In this regime, RG is dependent on mass transport of uncracked AsH3 to the surface. By controlling the AsH3 velocity and temperature profile of the reactor, which both affect the degree of AsH3 decomposition, we demonstrate tuning of RG. We achieve RG above 60 μm/h at temperatures as low as 560 °C and up to 110 μm/h at 650 °C. We incorporate high-RG GaAs into solar cell devices to verify that the electronic quality does not deteriorate as RG is increased. The open circuit voltage (VOC), which is a strong function of non-radiative recombination in the bulk material, exhibits negligible variance in a series of devices grown at 650 °C with RG = 55-110 μm/h. The implications of low temperature growth for the formation of complex heterostructure devices by HVPE are discussed.

  14. Isolation of a mixed valence diiron hydride: evidence for a spectator hydride in hydrogen evolution catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguang; Nilges, Mark J; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Stein, Matthias

    2013-03-06

    The mixed-valence diiron hydrido complex (μ-H)Fe2(pdt)(CO)2(dppv)2 ([H1](0), where pdt =1,3-propanedithiolate and dppv = cis-1,2-C2H2(PPh2)2), was generated by reduction of the differous hydride [H1](+) using decamethylcobaltocene. Crystallographic analysis shows that [H1](0) retains the stereochemistry of its precursor, where one dppv ligand spans two basal sites and the other spans apical and basal positions. The Fe---Fe bond elongates to 2.80 from 2.66 Å, but the Fe-P bonds only change subtly. Although the Fe-H distances are indistinguishable in the precursor, they differ by 0.2 Å in [H1](0). The X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum reveals the presence of two stereoisomers, the one characterized crystallographically and a contribution of about 10% from a second symmetrical (sym) isomer wherein both dppv ligands occupy apical-basal sites. The unsymmetrical (unsym) arrangement of the dppv ligands is reflected in the values of A((31)P), which range from 31 MHz for the basal phosphines to 284 MHz for the apical phosphine. Density functional theory calculations were employed to rationalize the electronic structure of [H1](0) and to facilitate spectral simulation and assignment of EPR parameters including (1)H and (31)P hyperfine couplings. The EPR spectra of [H1](0) and [D1](0) demonstrate that the singly occupied molecular orbital is primarily localized on the Fe center with the longer bond to H, that is, Fe(II)-H···Fe(I). The coupling to the hydride is A((1)H) = 55 and 74 MHz for unsym- amd sym-[H1](0), respectively. Treatment of [H1](0) with H(+) gives 0.5 equiv of H2 and [H1](+). Reduction of D(+) affords D2, leaving the hydride ligand intact. These experiments demonstrate that the bridging hydride ligand in this complex is a spectator in the hydrogen evolution reaction.

  15. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  16. Simulation of antimony adsorption on nano-zero valent iron and kaolinite and analyzing the influencing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidnia, Setareh; Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Darban, Ahmad Khodadadi; Mohseni, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Antimony is one of the most toxic pollutants in industrial and mineral wastewaters threatening the life of humans and other creatures. We simulated the adsorption of antimony in the presence of nano-zero valent iron (nZVI) adsorbent, on kaolinite and in the presence of nZVI coated on kaolinite from mineral wastewater using VISUAL MINTEQ 3.1 software. Our aim was to determine the factors affecting the adsorption of antimony by applying simulation. The simulation was performed using an adsorption model of a diffuse layer model. The results of the simulation indicated that the nZVI concentration, initial concentrations of antimony and pH factor are effective on the adsorption of antimony. In the conducted stimulation, the optimum pH was 2-5 and the highest adsorption occurred in an acidic state. With increasing initial concentrations of antimony in the simulation, we concluded that nZVI had absorbed various concentrations above 90% and, by increasing the concentration of nZVI, antimony adsorption rate increased. The increased surface area of nZVI and the expansion of more interchangeable surfaces available for reaction with antimony ions causes more antimony ions to be adsorbed. In all cases, the coefficient of determination between the laboratory results and the model predictions that was obtained was more than 0.9.

  17. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  18. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Ruben Fortunato; Martin, Juan Ezequiel; Orellano, Pablo; Dorao, Carlos; Analia Soldati; Ghilarducci, Ada Albertina; Corso, Hugo Luis; Peretti, Hernan Americo; Bolcich, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  19. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G.; Breckenridge, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H − (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M IIa H − (M IIa = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H − and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH − and MgH − species, the other M IIa H − species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns 2 ) and H − (1s 2 ). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M IIa H − species than for RG–H − . Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M IIa H − species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M IIa atom to move away from the incoming H −

  20. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  1. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr--2.5% Nb (Cb) which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles

  2. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  3. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat; Luca Ammirabile

    2015-01-01

    Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron s...

  4. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  5. New fluorescent polymeric nanocomposites synthesized by antimony dodecyl-mercaptide thermolysis in polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the formation of semiconductive Sb2S3 nanoparticles inside amorphous polystyrene has been achieved by thermal degradation of the corresponding antimony dodecyl-mercaptide, Sb(SC12H253. The thermolysis of the dodecyl-mercaptide precursor was studied as both pure phase and mercaptide solution in polystyrene. The thermal decomposition of the antimony mercaptide precursor at 350°C, under vacuum, showed the formation of a mixture of antimony trisulfide (stibnite, Sb2S3 and zero-valent antimony (Sb phase. X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD and Rietveld analysis carried out on the obtained nanostructured powder confirmed the presence of Sb and Sb2S3 phases in 10.4 wt% and 89.6 wt% amount, respectively. The same pyrolysis reaction was carried out in the polymer and the resulting nanocomposite material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, UV-VIS spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nanocomposite structural characterization indicated the presence of well-dispersed nanoclusters of antimony and stibnite (15–30 nm in size inside the amorphous polymeric phase. Optical measurements on the obtained nanocomposite films showed a strong emission at 432 nm upon excitation at 371 nm, probably related to the presence of Sb2S3 nanoclusters.

  6. Predictors of an unsatisfactory response to pentavalent antimony in the treatment of American visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Mácia A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Although treatment of visceral leishmaniasis with pentavalent antimony is usually successful, some patients require second-line drug therapy, most commonly with amphotericin B. To identify the clinical characteristics that predict an inadequate response to pentavalent antimony, a case-control study was undertaken in Teresina, Piaui, Brazil. Over a two-year period, there were 19 cases of VL in which the staff physicians of a hospital prescribed second-line therapy with amphotericin B after determining that treatment with pentavalent antimony had failed. The control group consisted of 97 patients that were successfully treated with pentavalent antimony. A chart review using univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. The cure rate was 90% with amphotericin B. The odds ratio for the prescription of amphotericin B was 10.2 for children less than one year old, compared with individuals aged over 10 years. Patients who presented coinfection had an OR of 7.1 while those on antibiotics had an OR of 2.8. These data support either undertaking a longer course of therapy with pentavalent antimony for children or using amphotericin B as a first-line agent for children and individuals with coinfections. It also suggests that chemoprophylaxis directed toward bacterial coinfection in small children with VL may be indicated.

  7. Comparison of Hydrogen Elimination from Molecular Zinc and Magnesium Hydride Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, J.; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-beta-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the

  8. Use of triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid as risk mitigant for aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2017-08-08

    A process and a resulting product by process of an aluminum hydride which is modified with by physically combining in a ball milling process an aluminum hydride with a triammonium salt of aurin tricarboxylic acid. The resulting product is an aluminum hydride which is resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while maintaining useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  9. Synthesis of highly active Mg-Based hydrides using hydriding combustion synthesis and NbF5 Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chourashiya, M. G.; Park, C. N.; Park, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Superiority of the hydriding combustion (HC) technique over conventional metallurgical approach to the synthesis of cost-effective Mg based hydrides, which show promise as hydrogen storage materials, is well known. In the present research, we report further improvements in HC prepared Mg-based ma...... samples achieved the maximum absorption/desorption limits (5.3 wt.%) at as low as 100°C, underlining the possibility of the use of these materials in portable hydrogen storage devices.......Superiority of the hydriding combustion (HC) technique over conventional metallurgical approach to the synthesis of cost-effective Mg based hydrides, which show promise as hydrogen storage materials, is well known. In the present research, we report further improvements in HC prepared Mg......-based materials, achieved by optimizing the preparative parameters of HC and by catalytic addition. Mg90-Ni60-C40 composites prepared using optimized processing parameters were ball-milled with NbF5 (10 h) and characterized for their micro-structural and hydriding properties. The ball-milled/catalyzed powder...

  10. Hydrides and deuterides of lithium and sodium. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, E.

    1990-01-01

    An interionic potential model is developed for lighter and heavier alkali hydrides and deuterides. The method uses a combination of theoretical techniques, empirical fit, and a few plausible assumptions. An assessment of the derived potentials is made by calculating the lattice statics and dynamics of the crystals and by comparing both with experiment (where available) and with other calculations. The potentials are found to describe the elastic and dielectric properties reasonably well. The phonon dispersion curves of hydride and deuteride of sodium are compared with the calculations of Dyck and Jex based on force constant model approach and the results are discussed. The need for further experiments on heavier hydrides and deuterides is stressed. (author)

  11. Research in Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuing from a special issue in Batteries in 2016, nineteen new papers focusing on recent research activities in the field of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been selected for the 2017 Special Issue of Ni/MH Batteries. These papers summarize the international joint-efforts in Ni/MH battery research from BASF, Wayne State University, Michigan State University, FDK Corp. (Japan, Institute for Energy Technology (Norway, Central South University (China, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry (China, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology (China, Shenzhen Highpower (China, and University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa from 2016–2017 through reviews of AB2 metal hydride alloys, Chinese and EU Patent Applications, as well as descriptions of research results in metal hydride alloys, nickel hydroxide, electrolyte, and new cell type, comparison work, and projections of future works.

  12. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  13. Mixed Antimony(V Complexes with Different Sugars to Modulate the Oral Bioavailability of Pentavalent Antimonial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weverson A. Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the association of the drug meglumine antimoniate (MA with β-cyclodextrin can improve its bioavailability by the oral route. In this work, ribose and maltose were investigated for their ability to form mixed or association complexes with MA, release MA and modulate the serum levels of Sb after oral administration in mice. Analysis of the MA/ribose composition by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS-IT-TOF revealed the presence of mixed meglumine-Sb-ribose and Sb-ribose complexes. Analysis of the MA/maltose composition suggested the formation of MA-maltose association compounds. Circular dichroism characterization of these compositions following dilution in water at 37 °C suggested a partial and slow dissociation of the association compounds. When the MA/ribose composition was administered orally and compared to MA, the serum concentration of Sb was significantly lower after 1 h and greater after 3 h. On the other hand, the MA/maltose composition showed similar serum Sb concentration after 1 h and higher level of Sb after 3 h, when compared to MA. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated the formation of mixed or association complexes of MA with sugars, such as maltose and ribose, which promoted sustained serum level of Sb after oral administration.

  14. A comparative study of antimony accumulation in plants growing in two mining areas in Iran, Moghanlo, and Patyar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajiani, N.J.; Ghaderian, S.M.; Karimi, N.; Schat, H.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony occurs locally at high concentrations in some mineralized soils. Very little is known about behavior of antimony in plants. In this study, we analyzed the soil and vegetation of two mining areas in Iran, Patyar, and Moghanlo. Total Sb concentrations in soil were 358–3482 mg/kg in Moghanlo

  15. Complex metal hydrides for hydrogen, thermal and electrochemical energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage...... field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...... inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy....

  16. Microcapsulated rare earth - nickel hydride-forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Oguro, K.; Kato, A.; Suzuki, H.; Ishii, E.

    1985-01-01

    Fine particles of hydride-forming alloys such as LaNi/sub 5/ and MmNi/sub 4.5/Mn/sub 0.5/ (MM : mischmetal) were coated with metallic copper thin layer by chemical plating method. Hydrogen storage capacities of alloys were not appreciably affected by the plating treatment. The capsulated alloy powders were easily pressed into pellets. The pellets obtained had high thermal conductivity and porosity enough to permeate hydrogen, leading to fast reaction kinetics. These were able to withstand more than 5,000 repeated hydriding-dehydriding cycles without disintegrating

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz(-), were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  19. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ohba, Nobuko; Noritake, Tatsuo; Towata, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  20. Research on secondary hydriding for advanced nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, S. K. et al. [Hanyang Univ, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    First, hydriding kinetics of zirconium alloys are derived as follows: Zircaloy-2 : 1.1X10{sup 7} exp(-20,800/RT), Zircaloy-4 : 6.9X10{sup 7} exp(-23,800/RT), ZIRLO{sup TM} : 1.5X10{sup 6} exp(-18,000/RT) and it is found that it is a linear kinetics. Second, H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O-ratio-controlling experiments are performed as a function of the ratios, 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 5}. and 10{sup 3} in order to examine the oxidation enhancement under the competing environment of oxidation and hydriding. The results show that under the mixture environment hydriding reaction takes place initially, then reaction turn into oxidation with the growing oxide, and finally turn back into hydriding reaction because of oxide breakage. It is confirmed that the oxidation in the second stage is greatly enhanced due to hydride precipitation. Third, micro-structural analysis is carried out by using SEM/TEM to see the roles of the oxide in the massive hydriding process. It turns out that micro-structural changes of the oxide takes place at the beginning of the massive hydriding. Fourth experiments are carried out both in the pre-transition (at 370 deg C for 72 hours) and in the post-transition regime (at 700 deg C for 210 minutes) to see the pressure effects on the oxidation kinetics. Through this investigation, it is revealed that under 15MPa steam pressure the oxidation is enhanced by 50% in the pre-transition and by 150% in the post-transition regime, respectively. Last, the two stage diffusion FGR model originated from FRAPCON-III code is successfully transplanted in the FEMAXI-IV code and thoroughly reviewed and compared with single stage diffusion FGR model with grain boundary saturation of the FEMAXI-IV code. According to the benchmarking of the computation results against the high burn-up in-pile data it turns out that both predict quite well though the single stage diffusion FGR model somewhat underestimates the release rate. These results will be able to be applicable for the

  1. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage...... field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...... inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy....

  2. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Kjell; Oskarsson, Magnus; Bergqvist, Hans

    2003-04-01

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  3. Study of upscaling possibilities for antimony sulfide solid state sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Archontoula; Raptis, Dimitrios; Dracopoulos, Vasilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Solid state solar cells of inverted structure were constructed by successive deposition of nanoparticulate titania, antimony sulfide sensitizer and P3HT on FTO electrodes with PEDOT:PSS:Ag as counter electrode. Sensitized photoanode electrodes were characterized by XRD, Raman, XPS, FESEM and UV-vis. Small laboratory scale cells were first constructed and optimized. Functional cells were obtained by annealing the antimony sulfide film either in air or in inert atmosphere. High short-circuit currents were recorded in both cases with air-annealed sample producing more current but lower voltage. Small unit cells were combined to form cell modules. Connection of unit cells in parallel increased current but not proportionally to that of the unit cell. Connection in series preserved current and generated voltage multiplication. Cells were constructed and studied under ambient conditions, without encapsulation. The results encourage upscaling of antimony sulfide solar cells.

  4. Anodic stripping voltammetry of antimony using gold nanoparticle-modified carbon screen-printed electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Renedo, Olga; Arcos Martinez, M. Julia

    2007-01-01

    Carbon screen-printed electrodes (CSPE) modified with gold nanoparticles present an interesting alternative in the determination of antimony using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Metallic gold nanoparticles deposits have been obtained by direct electrochemical deposition. Scanning electron microscopy measurements show that the electrochemically synthesized gold nanoparticles are deposited in aggregated form. Any undue effects caused by the presence of foreign ions in the solution were also analyzed to ensure that common interferents in the determination of antimony by ASV. The detection limit for Sb(III) obtained was 9.44 x 10 -10 M. In terms of reproducibility, the precision of the above mentioned method in %R.S.D. values was calculated at 2.69% (n = 10). The method was applied to determine levels of antimony in seawater samples and pharmaceutical preparations

  5. Conceptual design for treatment of mining and metallurgical wastewaters which contains arsenic and antimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kamberović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary design for treatment of mining and metallurgical wastewaters (MMW from the basin of antimony “Zajača“, which contains high concentrations of arsenic and antimony. MMW have been investigated in laboratory, due to large difference in concentrations of pollutants. Metallurgical wastewaters were treated using iron (II-sulfate and lime milk used to adjust the pH value at 7. After chemical treatment of metallurgical wastewater and its joining with mining wastewater, residual amount of arsenic in water was below maximum allowed concentrations, while the concentration of antimony, remained above the maximum allowed value. The final phase of purification process was performed using ion exchange resin. After treatment of MMW, they can be used as technical water in the smelting process of secondary raw lead materials.

  6. Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Response from Copper Antimony Zinc Sulfide Thin Films on Transparent Conducting Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K. Sarswat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper antimony sulfide (CAS is a relatively new class of sustainable absorber material, utilizing cost effective and abundant elements. Band gap engineered, modified CAS thin films were synthesized using electrodeposition and elevated temperature sulfurization approach. A testing analog of copper zinc antimony sulfide (CZAS film-electrolyte interface was created in order to evaluate photoelectrochemical performance of the thin film of absorber materials. Eu3+/Eu2+ redox couple was selected for this purpose, based on its relative band offset with copper antimony sulfide. It was observed that zinc has a significant effect on CAS film properties. An enhanced photocurrent was observed for CAS film, modified with zinc addition. A detailed investigation has been carried out by changing stoichiometry, and corresponding surface and optical characterization results have been evaluated. A summary of favorable processing parameters of the films showing enhanced photoelectrochemical response is presented.

  7. Antimony(V) and bismuth(V) complexes of lapachol: synthesis, crystal structure and cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ludmila G de; Silva, Meiriane M; Paula, Flávia C S de; Pereira-Maia, Elene C; Donnici, Cláudio L; Simone, Carlos A de; Frézard, Frédéric; Silva, Eufrânio N da; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2011-12-13

    Antimony(V) and bismuth(V) complexes of lapachol have been synthesized by the reaction of Ph₃SbCl₂ or Ph₃BiCl₂ with lapachol (Lp) and characterized by several physicochemical techniques such as IR, and NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The compounds contain six-coordinated antimony and bismuth atoms. The antimony(V) complex is a monomeric derivative, (Lp)(Ph₃Sb)OH, and the bismuth(V) complex is a dinuclear compound bridged by an oxygen atom, (Lp)₂(Ph₃Bi)₂O. Both compounds inhibited the growth of a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line and the complex of Bi(V) was about five times more active than free lapachol. This work provides a rare example of an organo-Bi(V) complex showing significant cytotoxic activity.

  8. Antimony(V and Bismuth(V Complexes of Lapachol: Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Cytotoxic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Demicheli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony(V and bismuth(V complexes of lapachol have been synthesized by the reaction of Ph3SbCl2 or Ph3BiCl2 with lapachol (Lp and characterized by several physicochemical techniques such as IR, and NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The compounds contain six-coordinated antimony and bismuth atoms. The antimony(V complex is a monomeric derivative, (Lp(Ph3SbOH, and the bismuth(V complex is a dinuclear compound bridged by an oxygen atom, (Lp2(Ph3Bi2O. Both compounds inhibited the growth of a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line and the complex of Bi(V was about five times more active than free lapachol. This work provides a rare example of an organo-Bi(V complex showing significant cytotoxic activity.

  9. Genotoxicity studies of heavy metals: lead, bismuth, indium, silver and antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Keiko; Satoh, Hiroshi; Chiba, Momoko; Okamoto, Masahide; Serizawa, Koji; Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Many kinds of heavy metals are used in industry; thus, it is important for us to clarify their toxicity. For example, lead, which is a component of solder, is notorious for its neurotoxicity, and substitute materials have been sought for many years. Therefore, we examined the genotoxicity of lead and also those of metallic bismuth, indium, silver and antimony which are possible substitutes for lead in solder. Bacterial reverse mutation tests and chromosomal aberration tests in cultured mammalian cells were performed according to standard procedures. Antimony showed genotoxicity in both tests, and bismuth also showed positive results in the chromosomal aberration test. In contrast, lead, indium, and silver were considered to be inactive by the criteria of the present study. Although further studies are needed because of the difficulty of genotoxicity evaluation using an in vitro system, sufficient precautions should be made when antimony and bismuth are used.

  10. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Breckenridge, W. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup −} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup −} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup −} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup −} and MgH{sup −} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup −}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species than for RG–H{sup −}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup −}.

  11. On-line lab-in-syringe cloud point extraction for the spectrophotometric determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Portugal, Lindomar A; Estela, José M; Rocha, Fábio R P; Cerdà, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Most of the procedures for antimony determination require time-consuming sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction with organic solvents), which are harmful to the environment. Because of the high antimony toxicity, a rapid, sensitive and greener procedure for its determination becomes necessary. The goal of this work was to develop an analytical procedure exploiting for the first time the cloud point extraction on a lab-in-syringe flow system aiming at the spectrophotometric determination of antimony. The procedure was based on formation of an ion-pair between the antimony-iodide complex and H(+) followed by extraction with Triton X-114. The factorial design showed that the concentrations of ascorbic acid, H2SO4 and Triton X-114, as well as second and third order interactions were significant at the 95% confidence level. A Box-Behnken design was applied to obtain the response surfaces and to identify the critical values. System is robust at the 95% confidence level. A linear response was observed from 5 to 50 µg L(-1), described by the equation A=0.137+0.050C(Sb) (r=0.998). The detection limit (99.7% confidence level), the coefficient of variation (n=5; 15 µg L(-1)) and the sampling rate was estimated at 1.8 µg L(-1), 1.6% and 16 h(-1), respectively. The procedure allows quantification of antimony in the concentrations established by environmental legislation (6 µg L(-1)) and it was successfully applied to the determination of antimony in freshwater samples and antileishmanial drugs, yielding results in agreement with those obtained by HGFAAS at the 95% confidence level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Purity and crystallinity of microwave synthesized antimony sulfide microrods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Alonso, Claudia, E-mail: claudiamartinezalonso30@gmail.com [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76010 (Mexico); Olivos-Peralta, Eliot U. [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos, 62580 (Mexico); Sotelo-Lerma, Mérida [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83000 (Mexico); Sato-Berrú, Roberto Y. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, MéxicoD.F., 04510 (Mexico); Mayén-Hernández, S.A. [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76010 (Mexico); Hu, Hailin, E-mail: hzh@ier.unam.mx [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad NacionalAutónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos, 62580 (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    Antimony sulfide (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) is a promising semiconductor material for solar cell applications. In this work, microrods of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} were synthesized by microwave heating with different sulfur sources, solvents, temperature, heating rate, power, and solution concentration. It was found that 90% of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} can be obtained with thiourea (TU) or thioacetamide (TA) as sulfur sources and that their optical band gap values were within the range of 1.59–1.60 eV. The most crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} were obtained by using TU. The morphology of the Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} with TU the individual rods were exhibited, whereas rods bundles appeared in TA-based products. The solvents were ethylene glycol (EG) and dimethylformamide (DMF). EG generates more heat than DMF during the microwave synthesis. As a result, the Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} obtained with EG contained a larger percentage of oxygen and smaller crystal sizes compared to those from DMF. On the other hand, the length and diameter of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} microrods can be increased by applying higher heating power although the crystal size did not change at all. In summary, pure and highly crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} microrods of 6–10 μm long and 330–850 nm in diameter can be obtained by the microwave method with a careful selection of chemical and thermodynamic parameters of the synthesis. - Highlights: • Purity up to 90% of crystalline Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods can be obtained by microwave heating. • The combination of solvent and sulfide type affects crystallinity & purity of Sb2S3. • The high pressure generated in microwave heating helps to form Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods.

  13. Uranium Hydride Nucleation and Growth Model FY'16 ESC Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richards, Andrew Walter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holby, Edward F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Roland K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Uranium hydride corrosion is of great interest to the nuclear industry. Uranium reacts with water and/or hydrogen to form uranium hydride which adversely affects material performance. Hydride nucleation is influenced by thermal history, mechanical defects, oxide thickness, and chemical defects. Information has been gathered from past hydride experiments to formulate a uranium hydride model to be used in a Canned Subassembly (CSA) lifetime prediction model. This multi-scale computer modeling effort started in FY’13, and the fourth generation model is now complete. Additional high-resolution experiments will be run to further test the model.

  14. An evaluation of the migration of antimony from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic used for bottled drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapa-Martínez, C.A.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L.; Hernández-Ramírez, A.; Ruiz-Ruiz, E.; Maya-Treviño, L.; Guzmán-Mar, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    The leaching of antimony (Sb) from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottling material was assessed in twelve brands of bottled water purchased in Mexican supermarkets by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a hydride generation system (HG-AFS). Dowex® 1X8-100 ion-exchange resin was used to preconcentrate trace amounts of Sb in water samples. Migration experiments from the PET bottle material were performed in water according to the following storage conditions: 1) temperature (25 and 75 °C), 2) pH (3 and 7) and 3) exposure time (5 and 15 days), using ultrapure water as a simulant for liquid foods. The test conditions were studied by a 2 3 factorial experimental design. The Sb concentration measured in the PET packaging materials varied between 73.0 and 111.3 mg/kg. The Sb concentration (0.28–2.30 μg/L) in all of the PET bottled drinking water samples examined at the initial stage of the study was below the maximum contaminant level of 5 μg/L prescribed by European Union (EU) regulations. The parameters studied (pH, temperature, and storage time) significantly affected the release of Sb, with temperature having the highest positive significant effect within the studied experimental domain. The highest Sb concentration leached from PET containers was in water samples at pH 7 stored at 75 °C for a period of 5 days. The extent of Sb leaching from the PET ingredients for different brands of drinking water can differ by as much as one order of magnitude in experiments conducted under the worst-case conditions. The chronic daily intake (CDI) caused by the release of Sb in one brand exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulated CDI value of 400 ng/kg/day, with values of 514.3 and 566.2 ng/kg/day for adults and children. Thus, the appropriate selection of the polymer used for the production of PET bottles seems to ensure low Sb levels in water samples. - Highlights: • The PET safety due to the release of Sb was evaluated in Mexican water PET

  15. An evaluation of the migration of antimony from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic used for bottled drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapa-Martínez, C.A.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L.; Hernández-Ramírez, A.; Ruiz-Ruiz, E.; Maya-Treviño, L.; Guzmán-Mar, J.L., E-mail: jorge.guzmanmr@uanl.edu.mx

    2016-09-15

    The leaching of antimony (Sb) from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottling material was assessed in twelve brands of bottled water purchased in Mexican supermarkets by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a hydride generation system (HG-AFS). Dowex® 1X8-100 ion-exchange resin was used to preconcentrate trace amounts of Sb in water samples. Migration experiments from the PET bottle material were performed in water according to the following storage conditions: 1) temperature (25 and 75 °C), 2) pH (3 and 7) and 3) exposure time (5 and 15 days), using ultrapure water as a simulant for liquid foods. The test conditions were studied by a 2{sup 3} factorial experimental design. The Sb concentration measured in the PET packaging materials varied between 73.0 and 111.3 mg/kg. The Sb concentration (0.28–2.30 μg/L) in all of the PET bottled drinking water samples examined at the initial stage of the study was below the maximum contaminant level of 5 μg/L prescribed by European Union (EU) regulations. The parameters studied (pH, temperature, and storage time) significantly affected the release of Sb, with temperature having the highest positive significant effect within the studied experimental domain. The highest Sb concentration leached from PET containers was in water samples at pH 7 stored at 75 °C for a period of 5 days. The extent of Sb leaching from the PET ingredients for different brands of drinking water can differ by as much as one order of magnitude in experiments conducted under the worst-case conditions. The chronic daily intake (CDI) caused by the release of Sb in one brand exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulated CDI value of 400 ng/kg/day, with values of 514.3 and 566.2 ng/kg/day for adults and children. Thus, the appropriate selection of the polymer used for the production of PET bottles seems to ensure low Sb levels in water samples. - Highlights: • The PET safety due to the release of Sb was evaluated in Mexican water PET

  16. Selective extraction of traffic-related antimony compounds for speciation analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zih-Perenyi, K., E-mail: perkat@freestart.h [L. Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32. (Hungary); Neurohr, K., E-mail: kata.neurohr@gmail.co [L. Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32. (Hungary); Nagy, G. [Semmelweis University, Faculty of Pharmacy, H-1085 Budapest, Ulloi Str. 26. (Hungary); Balla, M., E-mail: balla@reakt.bme.h [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Techniques, H-1111 Budapest, Muegyetem rakpart 9 (Hungary); Lasztity, A., E-mail: alasztity@gmail.co [L. Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32. (Hungary)

    2010-09-15

    Most traffic-related antimony air pollutants are derived from brake dust. Brake dust contains Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}, used as a friction material in brake pads, and its high-temperature oxidation products, Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Systematic investigations were carried out to find the most selective leaching conditions for these substances. First, solubility experiments of the pure potential compounds mentioned above were carried out. Then, the leaching of these compounds from home-made artificial dusts previously spiked with these compounds at the trace level was investigated. A 0.5 mol L{sup -1} citric acid solution proved to leach the whole Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} content while extracting less than 10% Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and no Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} at all. It was found that Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} traces were soluble in a 6 mol L{sup -1} HCl solution, quantitatively and selectively. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry methods were developed to determine the Sb content of the extracts. The proposed method proved to be applicable to settled dust containing traffic-related Sb compounds. The detection limits were 1.2 and 0.3 {mu}g g{sup -1} for leaching by citric acid and HCl solution, respectively, which were adequate for Sb content determination in the urban dust studied. The reproducibility of the method expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The results showed that the concentration of leachable Sb was 40 {mu}g g{sup -1} in the settled dust of Budapest, about half of which corresponded to Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} content calculated as the difference of total and leachable fraction was about 10% with high uncertainty.

  17. Levels and risk factors of antimony contamination in human hair from an electronic waste recycling area, Guiyu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Ni, Wenqing; Chen, Yaowen; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jingwen; Wu, Kusheng

    2015-05-01

    The primitive electronic waste (e-waste) recycling has brought a series of environmental pollutants in Guiyu, China. Antimony is one of the important metal contaminants and has aroused the global concerns recently. We aimed to investigate concentrations of antimony in human hair from Guiyu and compared them with those from a control area where no e-waste recycling exists, and assessed the potential risk factors. A total of 205 human hair samples from Guiyu and 80 samples from Jinping were collected for analysis. All volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and other possible factors related to hair antimony exposure. The concentrations of hair antimony were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Our results indicated that the level of hair antimony in volunteers from Guiyu (median, 160.78; range, 6.99-4412.59 ng/g) was significantly higher than those from Jinping (median, 61.74; range, 2.98-628.43 ng/g). The residents who engaged in e-waste recycling activities in Guiyu had higher hair antimony concentrations than others (P waste recycling. Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that hair antimony concentrations were associated with education level (β = -0.064), the time of residence in Guiyu (β = 0.112), living house also served as e-waste workshop (β = 0.099), the work related to e-waste (β = 0.169), and smoking (β = 0.018). The elevated hair antimony concentrations implied that the residents in Guiyu might be at high risk of antimony contamination, especially the e-waste recycling workers. Work related to e-waste recycling activities and long-time residence in Guiyu contributed to the high hair antimony exposure.

  18. Systemic Meglumine Antimoniate in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis of Children: Clinical and Laboratory Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layegh, Pouran; Khademi, Zeinab; Afzal Aghaee, Monavar; Moghiman, Toktam

    2015-12-01

    Children account for 7%-20% of cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in Iran, but there are few safety data to guide pediatric antiparasitic therapy. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory tolerance of the systemic pentavalent antimonial compound meglumine antimoniate, in 70 Iranian children with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Adverse effects were similar to those seen in adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Co-doping with antimony to control phosphorous diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-02-15

    In germanium, phosphorous and antimony diffuse quickly and as such their transport must be controlled in order to design efficient n-typed doped regions. Here, density functional theory based calculations are used to predict the influence of double donor co-doping on the migration activation energies of vacancy-mediated diffusion processes. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous and antimony were found to be increased significantly when larger clusters involving two donor atoms and a vacancy were formed. These clusters are energetically stable and can lead to the formation of even larger clusters involving a number of donor atoms around a vacancy, thereby affecting the properties of devices.

  20. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U 3 O 8 without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  1. Quantifying the stress fields due to a delta-hydride precipitate in alpha-Zr matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tummala, Hareesh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This report is a preliminary study on δ-hydride precipitate in zirconium alloy performed using 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations. The ability of dislocations in modifying the largely anisotropic stress fields developed by the hydride particle in a matrix phase is addressed for a specific dimension of the hydride. The influential role of probable dislocation nucleation at the hydride-matrix interface is reported. Dislocation nucleation around a hydride was found to decrease the shear stress (S13) and also increase the normal stresses inside the hydride. We derive conclusions on the formation of stacks of hydrides in zirconium alloys. The contribution of mechanical fields due to dislocations was found to have a non-negligible effect on such process.

  2. Dislocation/hydrogen interaction mechanisms in hydrided nanocrystalline palladium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Connétable, Damien; Fivel, Marc; Tanguy, Döme; Delmelle, Renaud; Turner, Stuart; Malet, Loic; Godet, Stephane; Pardoen, Thomas; Proost, Joris; Schryvers, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale plasticity mechanisms activated during hydriding cycles in sputtered nanocrystalline Pd films have been investigated ex-situ using advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. The internal stress developing within the films during hydriding has been monitored in-situ. Results showed that in Pd films hydrided to β-phase, local plasticity was mainly controlled by dislocation activity in spite of the small grain size. Changes of the grain size distribution and the crystallographic texture have not been observed. In contrast, significant microstructural changes were not observed in Pd films hydrided to α-phase. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen loading on the nature and density of dislocations has been investigated using aberration-corrected TEM. Surprisingly, a high density of shear type stacking faults has been observed after dehydriding, indicating a significant effect of hydrogen on the nucleation energy barriers of Shockley partial dislocations. Ab-initio calculations of the effect of hydrogen on the intrinsic stable and unstable stacking fault energies of palladium confirm the experimental observations.

  3. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab-Zavar, M.H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: arbab@um.ac.ir; Chamsaz, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Youssefi, A. [Pare-Taavous Research Institute, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aliakbari, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-08-01

    An electrolytic hydride generation system for determination of another hydride forming element, cadmium, by catholyte variation electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) atomic absorption spectrometry is described. A laboratory-made electrolytic cell with lead-tin alloy as cathode material is designed as electrolytic generator of molecular hydride. The influences of several parameters on the analytical signal have been evaluated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. The significant parameters such as cathode surface area, electrolytic current, carrier gas flow rate and catholyte concentration have been optimized using univariate method. The analytical figures of merit of procedure developed were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 20 ng ml{sup -1}of cadmium. The concentration detection limit (3{sigma}, n = 8) of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} and repeatability (relative standard deviation, n = 7) of 3.1% were achieved at 10.0 ng ml{sup -1}. It was shown that interferences from major constituents at high concentrations were significant. The accuracy of method was verified using a real sample (spiked tap water) by standard addition calibration technique. Recovery of 104% was achieved for Cd in the spiked tap water sample.

  4. Metal Hydride assited contamination on Ru/Si surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachecka, Malgorzata; Lee, Christopher James; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) residual tin, in the form of particles, ions, and atoms, can be deposited on nearby EUV optics. During the EUV pulse, a reactive hydrogen plasma is formed, which may be able to react with metal contaminants, creating volatile and unstable metal hydrides that

  5. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzung, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author) [fr

  6. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, James W [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  7. Fractal analysis of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Julin, Peng; Xudong, Fan.

    1990-01-01

    The fractal scaling characteristics of the surface profile of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendritic structures have been obtained using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results are in remarkable agreement with the modified diffusion-limited aggregation model. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 13 figs

  8. A system of hydrogen powered vehicles with liquid organic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.

    1981-07-01

    A motor car system based on the hydrogen produced by nuclear power stations during the night in the summer, and coupled with organic liquid hydride seems to be a feasible system in the near future. Such a system is discussed and the cost is compared with gasoline. (Auth.)

  9. The Properties of Some Simple Covalent Hydrides: An Ab Initio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some properties of the monomeric binary hydrides of the elements of the first two rows of the periodic table have been determined using ab initio molecular orbital theory. The properties in question are the energetic, structural, electronic, topological and vibrational characteristics. In general, a gradual convergence towards ...

  10. Aluminium hydride: a reversible material for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L; Fewox, Christopher S; Stowe, Ashley C; Gray, Joshua R; Harter, Andrew G

    2009-07-07

    Aluminium hydride has been synthesized electrochemically, providing a synthetic route which closes a reversible cycle for regeneration of the material and bypasses expensive thermodynamic costs which have precluded AlH(3) from being considered as a H(2) storage material.

  11. New Orbital Hybridization Schemes for Metal Hydrides-Keeping p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. New Orbital Hybridization Schemes for Metal Hydrides - Keeping p Orbitals out of the Picture. J Chandrasekhar. Research News ... J Chandrasekhar1. Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India ...

  12. Optimization of Internal Cooling Fins for Metal Hydride Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Kukkapalli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride alloys are considered as a promising alternative to conventional hydrogen storage cylinders and mechanical hydrogen compressors. Compared to storing in a classic gas tank, metal hydride alloys can store hydrogen at nearly room pressure and use less volume to store the same amount of hydrogen. However, this hydrogen storage method necessitates an effective way to reject the heat released from the exothermic hydriding reaction. In this paper, a finned conductive insert is adopted to improve the heat transfer in the cylindrical reactor. The fins collect the heat that is volumetrically generated in LaNi5 metal hydride alloys and deliver it to the channel located in the center, through which a refrigerant flows. A multiple-physics modeling is performed to analyze the transient heat and mass transfer during the hydrogen absorption process. Fin design is made to identify the optimum shape of the finned insert for the best heat rejection. For the shape optimization, use of a predefined transient heat generation function is proposed. Simulations show that there exists an optimal length for the fin geometry.

  13. Diastereoselectivity in the reduction of bicyclic enones with hindered hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Camozzato, Andreza C.; Tenius, Beatriz S. M.; Oliveira, Eduardo R. de; Viegas Jr., Cláudio; Victor, Maurício M.; Silveira, Leandro G. da

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of five substituted octalones employing lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (L-selectride®) in THF and ethyl ether led to allylic alcohols with moderate diastereoselectivity. The stereoselectivity of addition of bulky hydrides showed to be different from most examples in the literature and was strongly influenced by substitution on the octalone ring.

  14. Diastereoselectivity in the reduction of bicyclic enones with hindered hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camozzato, Andreza C.; Tenius, Beatriz S. M.; Oliveira, Eduardo R. de; Viegas Junior, Claudio; Victor, Mauricio M.; Silveira, Leandro G. da

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of five substituted octalones employing lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (L-selectride R ) in THF and ethyl ether led to allylic alcohols with moderate diastereoselectivity. The stereoselectivity of addition of bulky hydrides showed to be different from most examples in the literature and was strongly influenced by substitution on the octalone ring. (author)

  15. Activation and discharge kinetics of metal hydride electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Stein Egil

    2003-07-01

    Potential step chronoamperometry and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (eis) measurements were performed on single metal hydride particles. For the {alpha}-phase, the bulk diffusion coefficient and the absorption/adsorption rate parameters were determined. Materials produced by atomisation, melt spinning and conventional casting were investigated. The melt spun and conventional cast materials were identical and the atomised material similar in composition. The particles from the cast and the melt spun material were shaped like parallelepipeds. A corresponding equation, for this geometry, for diffusion coupled to an absorption/adsorption reaction was developed. It was found that materials produced by melt spinning exhibited lower bulk diffusion (1.7E-14 m2/s) and absorption/adsorption reaction rate (1.0E-8 m/s), compared to materials produced by conventionally casting (1.1E-13 m2/s and 5.5E-8 m/s respectively). In addition, the influence of particle active surface and relative diffusion length were discussed. It was concluded that there are uncertainties connected to these properties, which may explain the large distribution in the kinetic parameters measured on metal hydride particles. Activation of metal hydride forming materials has been studied and an activation procedure, for porous electrodes, was investigated. Cathodic polarisation of the electrode during a hot alkaline surface treatment gave the maximum discharge capacity on the first discharge of the electrode. The studied materials were produced by gas atomisation and the spherical shape was retained during the activation. Both an AB{sub 5} and an AB{sub 2} alloy was successfully activated and discharge rate properties determined. The AB{sub 2} material showed a higher maximum discharge capacity, but poor rate properties, compared to the AB{sub 5} material. Reduction of surface oxides, and at the same time protection against corrosion of active metallic nickel, can explain the satisfying results of

  16. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  17. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  18. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  19. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1010, JUN (2018), s. 11-19 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * Stibane * atomization and preconcentration Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  20. Effects of spark plasma sintering conditions on the anisotropic thermoelectric properties of bismuth antimony telluride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Hegelund Spangsdorf, Steeven; Van Nong, Ngo

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3, 0.4 room-temperature thermoelectric power generation. In this work, p-type Bi0.4Sb1.6Te3 samples were prepared under various conditions (temperature, holding time, and ramp...

  1. Mixing of phosphorus and antimony ions in silicon by recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, H.L.; Lam, Y.W.; Wong, S.P.; Poon, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of mixing phosphorus and antimony ions in silicon by recoil implantation were examined. The electrical properties after ion mixing were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained using other techniques. Different degrees of activation were also studied, by investigating the annealing behaviour. (U.K.)

  2. Improvement of hydrogen storage kinetics in ball-milled magnesium doped with antimony

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír; Roupcová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 9 (2017), s. 6144-6151 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Hydrogen * Hydrogen storage * Storage capacity * Magnesium alloys * Antimony Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  3. Dismantling and chemical characterization of spent Peltier thermoelectric devices for antimony, bismuth and tellurium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balva, Maxime; Legeai, Sophie; Garoux, Laetitia; Leclerc, Nathalie; Meux, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Major uses of thermoelectricity concern refrigeration purposes, using Peltier devices, mainly composed of antimony, bismuth and tellurium. Antimony was identified as a critical raw material by EU and resources of bismuth and tellurium are not inexhaustible, so it is necessary to imagine the recycling of thermoelectric devices. That for, a complete characterization is needed, which is the aim of this work. Peltier devices were manually dismantled in three parts: the thermoelectric legs, the alumina plates on which remain the electrical contacts and the silicone paste used to connect the plates. The characterization was performed using five Peltier devices. It includes mass balances of the components, X-ray diffraction analysis of the thermoelectric legs and elemental analysis of each part of the device. It appears that alumina represents 45% of a Peltier device in weight. The electrical contacts are mainly composed of copper and tin, and the thermoelectric legs of bismuth, tellurium and antimony. Thermoelectric legs appear to be Se-doped Bi 2 Te 3 and (Bi 0,5 Sb 1,5 )Te 3 for n type and p type semiconductors, respectively. This work shows that Peltier devices can be considered as a copper ore and that thermoelectric legs contain high amounts of bismuth, tellurium and antimony compared to their traditional resources.

  4. ANTIMONY HALIDES AND HgX2 (X = Cl, Br AMINE ADDUCTS: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NDONGO GUEYE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight new SbF3, SbCl5 and HgX2 (X = Cl, Br amine adducts have been synthesized and their infrared study carried out. Discrete structures have been suggested on the basis of elemental analysis and infrared data, the coordination number of antimony varying from five to nine, while the environment around Hg is tetrahedral.

  5. On the segregation behavior of tin and antimony at grain boundaries of polycrystalline bcc iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Šandera, P.; Horníková, J.; Pokluda, J.; Godec, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 363, Feb (2016), 140-144 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0144 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : grain boundary segregation * tin * antimony * Fe based alloy * AES quantification Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  6. Morphology and photoresponse of crystalline antimony film grown on mica by physical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafa Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimony is a promising material for the fabrication of photodetectors. This study deals with the growth of a photosensitive thin film by the physical vapor deposition (PVD of antimony onto mica surface in a furnace tube. The geometry of the grown structures was studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and elemental diffraction analysis. XRD peaks of the antimony film grown on mica mostly matched with JCPDF Card. The formation of rhombohedral crystal structures in the film was further confirmed by SEM micrographs and chemical composition analysis. The Hall measurements revealed good electrical conductivity of the film with bulk carrier concentration of the order of 1022 Ω·cm-3 and mobility of 9.034 cm2/Vs. The grown film was successfully tested for radiation detection. The photoresponse of the film was evaluated using its current-voltage characteristics. These investigations revealed that the photosensitivity of the antimony film was 20 times higher than that of crystalline germanium.

  7. Reaction products and corrosion of molybdenum electrode in glass melt containing antimony oxides and sodium sulfate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, J.; Langrová, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2012), s. 280-285 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : antimony oxides * corrosion * glass melt * Molybdenum electrode * sulfate Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_03_280.pdf

  8. Differences in antimony and arsenic releases from lead smelter fly ash in soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ettler, V.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Valigurova, R.; Klementová, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 72, Supp. 4 (2012), s. 15-22 ISSN 0009-2819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Antimony * Arsenic * Lead smelting * Fly ash * Soil * Mobility Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.351, year: 2012

  9. Diel variation of arsenic, molybdenum and antimony in a stream draining natural As geochemical anomaly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, P.; Nováková, B.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Mihaljevič, M.; Rohovec, Jan; Filippi, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, APR (2013), s. 84-93 ISSN 0883-2927 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : arsenic * molybdenum * antimony * trace elements * diel cycle Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; DD - Geochemistry (GLU-S) Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2013

  10. Effect of hydrogenation conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of zirconium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Hiroaki; Nishikane, Ryoji; Ando, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Junji; Sakamoto, Kan; Harjo, Stefanus; Kawasaki, Takuro; Ohishi, Yuji; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2018-03-01

    Precipitation of brittle zirconium hydrides deteriorate the fracture toughness of the fuel cladding tubes of light water reactor. Although the hydride embrittlement has been studied extensively, little is known about physical properties of the hydride due to the experimental difficulties. In the present study, to elucidate relationship between mechanical properties and microstructure, two δ-phase zirconium hydrides and one ε-phase zirconium hydride were carefully fabricated considering volume changes at the metal-to-hydride transformation. The δ-hydride that was fabricated from α-zirconium exhibits numerous inner cracks due to the large volume change. Analyses of the neutron diffraction pattern and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data show that the sample displays significant stacking faults in the {111} plane and in the pseudo-layered microstructure. On the other hand, the δ-hydride sample fabricated from β-zirconium at a higher temperature displays equiaxed grains and no cracks. The strong crystal orientation dependence of mechanical properties were confirmed by indentation test and EBSD observation. The δ-hydride hydrogenated from α-zirconium displays a lower Young's modulus than that prepared from β-zirconium. The difference is attributed to stacking faults within the {111} plane, for which the Young's modulus exhibits the highest value in the perpendicular direction. The strong influence of the crystal orientation and dislocation density on the mechanical properties should be considered when evaluating hydride precipitates in nuclear fuel cladding.

  11. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sartor, George B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reeder, Craig L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  12. Efficient catalysis by MgCl2 in hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zelun; Zhu, Yunfeng; Li, Liquan

    2012-06-04

    Magnesium chloride efficiently catalyzed the hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis. Hydrogen yield of 1635 mL g(-1) was obtained (MgH(2)), i.e. with 96% conversion in 30 min at 303 K.

  13. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  14. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, Kurt; Balooch, Mehdi; Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Olander, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH1.6) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  15. Hydride precipitation in zirconium studied by pendulum techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Sprungmann, K.W.

    1983-12-01

    Measurements of the precipitation peak, the autotwisting strain and the properties of hydride dislocations have been used to map the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in polycrystalline samples and a single-crystal sample of α-zirconium. A low-frequency torsion pendulum was employed for some of the measurements and a low-frequency flexure pendulum for others. These pendulum techniques were successful in extending measurements of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in α-zirconium to the relatively low hydrogen concentration range 2 to 50 μg/g of technological interest in the nuclear industry. In addition, the results were used to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about the stress dependence of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary and the kinetics of hydride precipitation or dissolution in response to a step change in the applied stress

  16. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  17. Effects of metastability on hydrogen sorption in fluorine substituted hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatel, E.R.; Corno, M.; Ugliengo, P.; Baricco, M., E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Fluorine substitution in simple metal hydrides has been modelled. • The stability of the MH{sub (1−x)}F{sub x} solid solutions has been discussed. • Conditions for reversibility of sorption reactions have been suggested. - Abstract: In this work ab initio calculations and Calphad modelling have been coupled to describe the effect of fluorine substitution on the thermodynamics of hydrogenation–dehydrogenation in simple hydrides (NaH, AlH{sub 3} and CaH{sub 2}). These example systems have been used to discuss the conditions required for the formation of a stable hydride–fluoride solid solution necessary to obtain a reversible hydrogenation reaction.

  18. Modeling of hydrogen isotopes separation in a metal hydride bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Corriou, J.P.; Schweich, D.

    1999-01-01

    A predictive model for hydrogen isotopes separation in a non-isothermal bed of unsupported palladium hydride particles is derived. It accounts for the non-linear adsorption-dissociation equilibrium, hydrodynamic dispersion, pressure drop, mass transfer kinetics, heat of sorption and heat losses at the bed wall. Using parameters from the literature or estimated with classical correlations, the model gives simulated curves in agreement with previously published experiments without any parameter fit. The non-isothermal behavior is shown to be responsible for drastic changes of the mass transfer rate which is controlled by diffusion in the solid-phase lattice. For a feed at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, the endothermic hydride-to-deuteride exchange is kinetically controlled, whereas the reverse exothermic exchange is nearly at equilibrium. Finally, a simple and efficient thermodynamic model for the dissociative equilibrium between a metal and a diatomic gas is proposed. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Positronium hydride defects in thermochemically reduced alkaline-Earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thermochemical reduction of both hydrogen-doped MgO and CaO single crystals results in large concentrations of hydride (H - ) ions. In MgO crystals, positron lifetime and Doppler broadening experiments show that positrons are trapped at H - centers forming positronium hydride molecules [e + - H - ]. A value of 640 ps is obtained for the lifetime of the PsH states located in an anion vacancy In MgO positrons are also trapped at H 2- sites at low temperatures. The H 2- ions were induced in the crystals by blue light illumination. The formation of PsH states in CaO could not be conclusively established. (orig.)

  20. The Hall Effect in Hydrided Rare Earth Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, D. W.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Clark, N.

    We describe two new techniques for measuring the Hall effect in capped rare earth films during hydriding. In one, we simultaneously measure resistivity and the Hall coefficient for a rare earth film covered with four different thicknesses of Pd, recovering the charge transport quantities for both materials. In the second technique, we replace Pd with Mn as the covering layer. We will present results from both techniques.

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous previously unknown carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions were generated in the gas phase, identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing their electronic structure. Density functional theory calculations on the CAl5-9H- and CAl5-7H2- found that several of them possess unusually high carbon atom coordination numbers. These cluster compositions have potential as the basis for new energetic materials.

  2. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  3. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2014), s. 2313-2333 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metal-hydrid phase transformation * hydrogen diffusion * swelling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/pdfs.jsp?paperID=10195&mode=full

  4. Magnetization study of UNiSi and its hydride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebek, Josef; Andreev, Alexander V.; Honda, F.; Kolomiets, A. V.; Havela, L.; Sechovský, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2003), s. 1457-1460 ISSN 0587-4254. [International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 02). Cracow, 10.07.2002-13.07.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914; CEZ:MSM 113200002 Keywords : UNiSi * magnetic measurements * hydride Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2003

  5. Coated metal hydrides for stationary energy storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Priyen C.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores suitable materials for energy stores for stationary applications, specifically a prototype hydrogen store, domestic thermal store operating between 25-100 C and a moderate thermal store for a concentrated solar power (CSP) plant operating at 400 C. The approach incorporated a unique coating technique to deliver prototype hydrogen and thermal storage media, where the coating could offer commercial advantages, for example, in the form of hydride activation and enhanced kine...

  6. Testing setup for automatic cycling of metal hydride composites

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In a future hydrogen community, metal hydrides can be used in several new applications. The most common application is as hydrogen storage material for stationary or mobile applications. However, there exist plenty of other applications like heat storage systems, thermal compressors, air conditioning systems, hydrogen purifying systems, etc. For all of these applications cycling stability is a major issue as it determines operational strategies as well as overall lifecycle cost. For pure m...

  7. Instrinsic defect energies of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.; Stoneham, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the defect structure of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride. A potential model is obtained describing the statics and dynamics of these crystals. Intrinsic defect energies are calculated using the Harwell HADES program which is based on a generalised Mott-Littleton method. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, and suggest that the vacancy and interstitial migration mechanisms of anions and cations are all comparable in their contribution to ionic conduction. (author)

  8. Equilibrium dissociation pressures of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.M.; Webb, R.E.

    1977-12-01

    The equilibrium dissociation pressures of plateau composition lithium hydride and lithium deuteride have been measured from 450 to 750 0 C. These data were used to derive the relationship of dissociation pressure with temperature over this range and to calculate several thermodynamic properties of these materials. Thermodynamic properties determined included the enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of formation; the enthalpy and entropy of fusion; and the melting points

  9. Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuffler, Carter A.; Trant, Jarrod M.; Todreas, Neil E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper reports the results of the thermal-hydraulic and economic analyses performed for hydride fueled PWR cores as part of a collaborative project on hydride fuels undertaken by MIT and UC Berkeley. The use of hydride fuels allows increased fuel to coolant ratios in a given core volume, and the achievement of higher burnups and thermal power from a core loading. A parametric study was developed to determine the optimum combination of lattice pitch, rod diameter, and channel shape - further referred to as geometry - for minimizing the cost of electricity associated with the use of UZrH 1.6 fuel in PWRs. Results of the steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses are presented here. These are integrated with the results from fuel performance and neutronics studies into an economic model to reveal the desired optimal geometries. The thermal hydraulic analysis determines the maximum power that can be achieved for a given geometry, subject to steady-state and transient design constraints. Steady-state constraints include MDNBR, pressure drop, fuel temperature, and fuel rod vibrations. Transient constraints include the consideration of LOCA, LOFA, and over-power events. The fuel performance and neutronics analyses determine the maximum achievable burnup for a given geometry, subject to constraints on fuel internal pressure and fission gas release, clad oxidation, clad strain, and reactivity. All results are included in the economic model, which calculates the front and back end fuel cycle, operations and maintenance, and capital costs. Optimal designs include geometries where hydride fuel offers cost savings over oxide fuel, as well as geometries offering the lowest overall cost of electricity. All studies are performed for both UZrH 1.6 and UO 2 fuels, and the methodology is successfully validated by comparison of the predicted power, burnup, and cost of electricity for UO-2 fueled cores with corresponding data from

  10. Synthesis of Renewable Energy Materials, Sodium Aluminum Hydride by Grignard Reagent of Al

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-qin Wang; Jian-feng Gao; Zhi-gang Wu; Guo-li Ou; Yu Wang

    2015-01-01

    The research on hydrogen generation and application has attracted widespread attention around the world. This paper is to demonstrate that sodium aluminum hydride can be synthesized under simple and mild reaction condition. Being activated through organics, aluminum powder reacts with hydrogen and sodium hydride to produce sodium aluminum hydride under atmospheric pressure. The properties and composition of the sample were characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, and so forth. The results showed that...

  11. Long-term cycle stability of metal hydride-graphite composites

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Pohlmann, Carsten; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Recently, metal hydride composites (MHC) have been proposed which consist of a hydride forming metal alloy and a highly heat conduction secondary phase such as expanded natural graphite (ENG) in order to improve the thermal conductivity of metal hydride powder beds. However, only little data is available in the literature on the effects of extensive cycling on technically relevant properties of MHC. In this paper, hydrogenation characteristics, thermal conductivity and geometrical stability o...

  12. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  13. Metal hydride-based thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajo, John J.; Fang, Zhigang

    2017-10-03

    The invention provides a thermal energy storage system comprising a metal-containing first material with a thermal energy storage density of about 1300 kJ/kg to about 2200 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; a metal-containing second material with a thermal energy storage density of about 200 kJ/kg to about 1000 kJ/kg based on hydrogenation; and a hydrogen conduit for reversibly transporting hydrogen between the first material and the second material. At a temperature of 20.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal is converted to the hydride. At a temperature of 0.degree. C. and in 1 hour, at least 90% of the metal hydride is converted to the metal and hydrogen. The disclosed metal hydride materials have a combination of thermodynamic energy storage densities and kinetic power capabilities that previously have not been demonstrated. This performance enables practical use of thermal energy storage systems for electric vehicle heating and cooling.

  14. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  15. The effect of sample preparation on uranium hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos, A.; Stitt, C.A.; Scott, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Distinct differences in uranium hydride growth rates and characteristics between different surface preparation methods. • The primary difference between the categories of sample preparations is the level of strain present in the surface. • Greater surface-strain, leads to higher nucleation number density, implying a preferred attack of strained vs unstrained metal. • As strain is reduced, surface features such as carbides and grain boundaries become more important in controlling the UH3 location. - Abstract: The influence of sample cleaning preparation on the early stages of uranium hydriding has been examined, by using four identical samples but concurrently prepared using four different methods. The samples were reacted together in the same corrosion cell to ensure identical exposure conditions. From the analysis, it was found that the hydride nucleation rate was proportional to the level of strain exhibiting higher number density for the more strained surfaces. Additionally, microstructure of the metal plays a secondary role regarding initial hydrogen attack on the highly strained surfaces yet starts to dominate the system while moving to more pristine samples.

  16. A thermal neutron scattering law for yttrium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Michael; Holmes, Jesse

    2017-09-01

    Yttrium hydride (YH2) is of interest as a high temperature moderator material because of its superior ability to retain hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Thermal neutron scattering laws for hydrogen bound in yttrium hydride (H-YH2) and yttrium bound in yttrium hydride (Y-YH2) prepared using the ab initio approach are presented. Density functional theory, incorporating the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy, is used to simulate the face-centered cubic structure of YH2 and calculate the interatomic Hellmann-Feynman forces for a 2 × 2 × 2 supercell containing 96 atoms. Lattice dynamics calculations using PHONON are then used to determine the phonon dispersion relations and density of states. The calculated phonon density of states for H and Y in YH2 are used to prepare H-YH2 and Y-YH2 thermal scattering laws using the LEAPR module of NJOY2012. Analysis of the resulting integral and differential scattering cross sections demonstrates adequate resolution of the S(α,β) function. Comparison of experimental lattice constant, heat capacity, inelastic neutron scattering spectra and total scattering cross section measurements to calculated values are used to validate the thermal scattering laws.

  17. A thermal neutron scattering law for yttrium hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerkle Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yttrium hydride (YH2 is of interest as a high temperature moderator material because of its superior ability to retain hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Thermal neutron scattering laws for hydrogen bound in yttrium hydride (H-YH2 and yttrium bound in yttrium hydride (Y-YH2 prepared using the ab initio approach are presented. Density functional theory, incorporating the generalized gradient approximation (GGA for the exchange-correlation energy, is used to simulate the face-centered cubic structure of YH2 and calculate the interatomic Hellmann-Feynman forces for a 2 × 2 × 2 supercell containing 96 atoms. Lattice dynamics calculations using PHONON are then used to determine the phonon dispersion relations and density of states. The calculated phonon density of states for H and Y in YH2 are used to prepare H-YH2 and Y-YH2 thermal scattering laws using the LEAPR module of NJOY2012. Analysis of the resulting integral and differential scattering cross sections demonstrates adequate resolution of the S(α,β function. Comparison of experimental lattice constant, heat capacity, inelastic neutron scattering spectra and total scattering cross section measurements to calculated values are used to validate the thermal scattering laws.

  18. Autocatalytic effects in the mechanically induced hydriding of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bab, M.A.; Baum, L.A.; Mendoza-Zelis, L.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical milling of powders in a gaseous ambient is an efficient tool to induce gas-solid reactions and several nanocrystalline metallic oxides, nitrides and hydrides may be obtained at room temperature and moderated pressures by this route. We present here a study of the mechanically induced hydriding of Ti, Zr and Hf elemental powders, ground in an oscillatory mill under hydrogen gas at constant volume. The final formation of nanocrystalline cubic δ-MH 2 , together with a varying fraction of tetragonal ε-MH 2 , was verified by X-ray diffraction. From the measured pressure drop during the milling process the hydriding kinetics was determined and two distinct regimes were observed. For Ti and-at low milling frequencies-for Zr and Hf, a normal regime, characterized by a sigmoidal trend and a linear dependence of the rate constant on the milling intensity, was found. Otherwise, a sudden increase in the reacted fraction was observed in the absorption curve, typical of a self-sustained regime. The magnitude of the observed jump increases with the milling intensity and afterwards the reaction proceeds normally until it is completed. This critical behavior is discussed in terms of the reaction rate, the degree of transformation and the ε-phase content

  19. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  20. Carbon paste electrodes modified with a reaction product obtained by hydrolysis of an antimony(III) salt

    OpenAIRE

    Švancara, Ivan; Florescu, Monica; Stočes, Matěj; Baldrianová, Lucie; Svobodová, Eva; Badea, Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new type of antimony-modified electrode is described based on carbon-paste bulk dispersion of a precipitate obtained by hydrolysis of the respective Sb(III) salt. Subsequently, the resultant electrode (SbOL-CPE in two variants)  operated via the antimony film formed in nascenti at the electrode surface  was subjected to the basic characterisation with respect to its electroanalytical performance in the anodic stripping voltammetry of six heavy metal ions (Z...

  1. On the Effect of Antimony Segregation to the Electronic Properties of InAs/InAsSb Superlattices (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    distribution at the hetero-interfaces engendered by Sb segregation. * Electronic mail: heather.haugan.ctr@us.af.mil 2 I. INTRODUCTION Reuse After...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0231 ON THE EFFECT OF ANTIMONY SEGREGATION TO THE ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF INAS/INASSB SUPERLATTICES (PREPRINT...December 2016 Interim 11 September 2013 – 12 November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ON THE EFFECT OF ANTIMONY SEGREGATION TO THE ELECTRONIC

  2. Synthesis of Renewable Energy Materials, Sodium Aluminum Hydride by Grignard Reagent of Al

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research on hydrogen generation and application has attracted widespread attention around the world. This paper is to demonstrate that sodium aluminum hydride can be synthesized under simple and mild reaction condition. Being activated through organics, aluminum powder reacts with hydrogen and sodium hydride to produce sodium aluminum hydride under atmospheric pressure. The properties and composition of the sample were characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM, and so forth. The results showed that the product through this synthesis method is sodium aluminum hydride, and it has higher purity, perfect crystal character, better stability, and good hydrogen storage property. The reaction mechanism is also discussed in detail.

  3. Molecular Preadaptation to Antimony Resistance in Leishmania donovani on the Indian Subcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumetz, F; Cuypers, B; Imamura, H; Zander, D; D'Haenens, E; Maes, I; Domagalska, M A; Clos, J; Dujardin, J-C; De Muylder, G

    2018-04-25

    Antimonials (Sb) were used for decades for chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Now abandoned in the Indian subcontinent (ISC) because of Leishmania donovani resistance, this drug offers a unique model for understanding drug resistance dynamics. In a previous phylogenomic study, we found two distinct populations of L. donovani : the core group (CG) in the Gangetic plains and ISC1 in the Nepalese highlands. Sb resistance was only encountered within the CG, and a series of potential markers were identified. Here, we analyzed the development of resistance to trivalent antimonials (Sb III ) upon experimental selection in ISC1 and CG strains. We observed that (i) baseline Sb III susceptibility of parasites was higher in ISC1 than in the CG, (ii) time to Sb III resistance was higher for ISC1 parasites than for CG strains, and (iii) untargeted genomic and metabolomic analyses revealed molecular changes along the selection process: these were more numerous in ISC1 than in the CG. Altogether these observations led to the hypothesis that CG parasites are preadapted to Sb III resistance. This hypothesis was experimentally confirmed by showing that only wild-type CG strains could survive a direct exposure to the maximal concentration of Sb III The main driver of this preadaptation was shown to be MRPA , a gene involved in Sb III sequestration and amplified in an intrachromosomal amplicon in all CG strains characterized so far. This amplicon emerged around 1850 in the CG, well before the implementation of antimonials for VL chemotherapy, and we discuss here several hypotheses of selective pressure that could have accompanied its emergence. IMPORTANCE The "antibiotic resistance crisis" is a major challenge for scientists and medical professionals. This steady rise in drug-resistant pathogens also extends to parasitic diseases, with antimony being the first anti- Leishmania drug that fell in the Indian subcontinent (ISC). Leishmaniasis is a major but neglected infectious

  4. Selective speciation of inorganic antimony on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel column and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendil, Durali; Bardak, Hilmi; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-03-30

    A speciation system for antimony (III) and antimony (V) ions that based on solid phase extraction on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel has been established. Antimony was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Analytical conditions including pH, sample volume, etc., were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Sb (III) and Sb (V). Matrix effects on the recovery were also investigated. The recovery values and detection limit for antimony (III) at optimal conditions were found as >95% and 0.020 μg L(-1), respectively. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 50. The capacity of adsorption for the tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel was 7.9 mg g(-1). The validation was checked by analysis of NIST SRM 1573a Tomato laves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was successfully applied to speciation of antimony in tap water, mineral water and spring water samples. Total antimony was determined in refined salt, unrefined salt, black tea, rice, tuna fish and soil samples after microwave digestion and presented enrichment method combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of antimony mine drainage: challenges and opportunities with special emphasis on mineral adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Hu, Xiaoxian; Ren, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    The present article summarizes antimony mine distribution, antimony mine drainage generation and environmental impacts, and critically analyses the remediation approach with special emphasis on iron oxidizing bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria. Most recent research focuses on readily available low-cost adsorbents, such as minerals, wastes, and biosorbents. It is found that iron oxides prepared by chemical methods present superior adsorption ability for Sb(III) and Sb(V). However, this process is more costly and iron oxide activity can be inhibited by plenty of sulfate in antimony mine drainage. In the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria, sulfate can be reduced to sulfide and form Sb(2)S(3) precipitates. However, dissolved oxygen and lack of nutrient source in antimony mine drainage inhibit sulfate reducing bacteria activity. Biogenetic iron oxide minerals from iron corrosion by iron-oxidizing bacteria may prove promising for antimony adsorption, while the micro-environment generated from iron corrosion by iron oxidizing bacteria may provide better growth conditions for symbiotic sulfate reducing bacteria. Finally, based on biogenetic iron oxide adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria followed by precipitation, the paper suggests an alternative treatment for antimony mine drainage that deserves exploration.

  6. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  7. Hydride phase equilibria in V-Ti-Ni alloy membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Michael D., E-mail: michael.dolan@csiro.au [CSIRO Energy, Pullenvale, Queensland (Australia); Kochanek, Mark A.; Munnings, Christopher N. [CSIRO Energy, Pullenvale, Queensland (Australia); McLennan, Keith G. [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland (Australia); Viano, David M. [CSIRO Energy, Pullenvale, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • V{sub 70}Ti{sub 15}Ni{sub 15} (at.%) comprises a vanadium solid solution plus NiTi and NiTi{sub 2}. • Dissolution of Ni and Ti into vanadium solid solution increase critical temperature for BCT β-hydride formation. • Three V{sub SS} hydride phase fields were observed: BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT. • NiTi and NiTi{sub 2} phases do not stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. - Abstract: Vanadium is highly permeable to hydrogen which makes it one of the leading alternatives to Pd alloys for hydrogen-selective alloy membrane applications, but it is prone to brittle failure through excessive hydrogen absorption and transitions between the BCC α and BCT β phases. V-Ti-Ni alloys are a prospective class of alloy for hydrogen-selective membrane applications, comprising a highly-permeable vanadium solid solution and several interdendritic Ni-Ti compounds. These Ni-Ti compounds are thought to stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. This hypothesis was investigated through a systematic study of V{sub 70}Ti{sub 15}Ni{sub 15} by hydrogen absorption and X-ray diffraction under conditions relevant to membrane operation. Dissolved hydrogen concentration in the bulk alloy and component phases, phase identification, thermal and hydrogen-induced expansion, phase quantification and hydride phase transitions under a range of pressures and temperatures have been determined. The vanadium phase passes through three different phase fields (BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT) during cooling under H{sub 2} from 400 to 30 °C. Dissolution of Ni and Ti into the vanadium phase increases the critical temperature for β-hydride formation from <200 to >400 °C. Furthermore, the Ni-Ti phases also exhibit several phase transitions meaning their ability to stabilise the alloy is questionable. We conclude that this alloy is significantly inferior to V with respect to its stability when used as a hydrogen-selective membrane, but the hydride phase transitions suggest potential

  8. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.D. II.

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN + CpV(CO) 3 H - (Cp=eta 5 -C 5 H 5 and PPN = (Ph 3 P) 2 ) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN + CpV(CO) 3 H - reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN + [CpV(C) 3 X] - and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN + [CpV(CO) 3 ] 2 H - . The borohydride salt PPN + [CpV(CO) 3 BH 4 ] - has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO) 3 H - and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO) 3 H - . Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO) 2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO) 2 and CpCo(CO) 2 affords two new anions, PPN + [Cp 2 Rh 3 (CO) 4 ] - and PPN + [Cp 2 RhCo(CO) 2 ] - . CpMo(CO) 3 H reacts with CpMo(CO) 3 R (R=CH 3 ,C 2 H 5 , CH 2 C 6 H 5 ) at 25 to 50 0 C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO) 3 ] 2 and [CpMo(CO) 2 ] 2 . In general, CpV(CO) 3 H - appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO) 3 H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO) 3 H - generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO) 3 H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  9. Development and evaluation of a hydride technique for As, Sb, and Se determinations by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloat, Sharon Sue [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-10-01

    A literature review of hydride techniques, experimental facilities, development and evaluation of a hydride technique, and interelement effects are covered. Suggestions for future work are given. (LK)

  10. Antimony Influence on Shape of Eutectic Silicium in Al-Si Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolibruchová D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid AI-Si alloys are usually given special treatments before they are cast to obtain finer or modified matrix and eutectic structures, leading to improved properties. For many years, sodium additions to hypoeutectic and eutectic AI-Si melts have been recognized as the most effective method of modifying the eutectic morphology, although most of the group IA or IIA elements have significant effects on the eutectic structure. Unfortunately, many of these approaches also have associated several founding difficulties, such as fading, forming dross in presence of certain alloying elements, reduced fluidity, etc. ln recent years, antimony additions to AI-Si castings have attracted considerable attention as an alternative method of refining the eutectic structure. Such additions eliminate many of the difficulties listed above and provide permanent (i.e. non-fading refining ability. In this paper, the authors summarize work on antimony treatment of Al-Si based alloys.

  11. A facile and fast route to prepare antimony (Sb) nanostructures without additives

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, M.A.

    2011-12-01

    Herein, we report a safe, low cost and reproducible approach for the synthesis of antimony (Sb) nanostructures with most of them having prism like morphology and having well defined faces in the range of ∼70210 nm. The organics free approach is based on a reaction of antimony powder and pure water at ∼210 °C without using any harmful additives and amines. The XRD pattern confirmed the composition and crystallinity of the grown nanostructures. The reported method besides being organics free is economical, fast and free of pollution, which will make it suitable for large scale production. Furthermore, it is well expected that such a technique could be extended to prepare many other important metal and metal oxide nanostructures. The prospects of the process are bright and promising. © 2012 Sharif University of Technology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the efficiency of the processes of purification of antimony to semiconductor grade purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walis, L.; Rowinska, L.; Panczyk, E.

    1992-01-01

    A complex of techniques for purification of antimony from arsenic has been examined with the aid of radiotracer 76 As. The investigated processes comprised vacuum distillation, zone melting and remelting of the metal under artificial slags. The purification efficiencies for the above processes were high and amounted to 94% (for 30% of the charge), 50% (for 50% of the charge) and 99.5% (for 60% of the charge), respectively. Attempts were made to determine the kinetics of the separation of arsenic from antimony by distillation. The application of the radioactive tracer made it possible to determine rapidly the distribution of impurities after each stage of the process within a wide concentration range (10 -2 -10 -7 g/g). (author). 7 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Determination by neutron activation analysis of loss of arsenic, antimony, bromine and mercury during lyophilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, M.; Litman, R.

    1978-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used to monitor the loss of arsenic, as dimethylarsinic acid, (CH 3 ) 2 AsOOH, or as sodium arsenate (Na 2 HAsO 4 .7H 2 O), antimony (as potassium antimony, tartrate, KSbC 4 O 7 .1/2H 2 O) and bromine (as bromide ion) during lyophilization of acidified and neutral aqueous synthetic and environmental samples. Losses of Sb and As ranged from zero to 60%, while losses of bromine were constant (at 91%) in acidic solutions. The variable losses of As and Sb were due solely to the presence of and partial decomposition of the (CH 3 ) 2 AsOOH. Electrochemical oxidation of Br - to Br 2 is responsible for the high losses of bromine. In addition losses of mercury (as methylmercuric chloride) were 1O0% in both acidic and neutral aqueous synthetic samples during lyophilization. (author)

  14. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo [EcoTopia Science Institute (Japan); Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  15. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hardy, B. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Corgnale, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Motyka, Ted [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-31

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate a metal hydride-based TES system for use with a CSP system. A unique approach has been applied to this project that combines our modeling experience with the extensive material knowledge and expertise at both SRNL and Curtin University (CU). Because of their high energy capacity and reasonable kinetics many metal hydride systems can be charged rapidly. Metal hydrides for vehicle applications have demonstrated charging rates in minutes and tens of minutes as opposed to hours. This coupled with high heat of reaction allows metal hydride TES systems to produce very high thermal power rates (approx. 1kW per 6-8 kg of material). A major objective of this work is to evaluate some of the new metal hydride materials that have recently become available. A problem with metal hydride TES systems in the past has been selecting a suitable high capacity low temperature metal hydride material to pair with the high temperature material. A unique aspect of metal hydride TES systems is that many of these systems can be located on or near dish/engine collectors due to their high thermal capacity and small size. The primary objective of this work is to develop a high enthalpy metal hydride that is capable of reversibly storing hydrogen at high temperatures (> 650 °C) and that can be paired with a suitable low enthalpy metal hydride with low cost materials. Furthermore, a demonstration of hydrogen cycling between the two hydride beds is desired.

  16. Synthesis and vibrational spectrum of antimony phosphate, SbPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockner, Wolfgang; Hoyer, Lars P

    2002-07-01

    SbPO4 was synthesized via a new route by reacting antimony metal with meta-phosphoric acid, (HPO3)n at high temperatures. The Raman and IR spectra of the title compound were recorded and the vibrational modes assigned on the basis of a factor group analysis. The internal vibrations are derived from tetrahedral PO4 units (approaching Sb[PO4]) by the correlation method, although the structure is polymeric and not ionic.

  17. Preconcentration and Determination of Antimony in Drinking Water Bottled by Modified Nano-Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammad Zakizade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antimony trioxide (Sb2O3 has been utilized as a catalyst in polyethylene terephtalate (PET production, and the studies conducted on the bottled water has demonstrated that antimony can be leached from PET bottles into drinking water. Methods: In this study, a simple method was applied in order to determine the trace amount of antimony in bottled drinking water based on preconcentration /solid phase extraction. The nano alumina modified with Schiff base ligand was used in regard with Sb preconcentration. The experiments were performed in a continuous system and HCI was used as eluent of Sb ion. Several chemical and flow variables were optimized for a quantitative preconcentration and determination of Sb ion. The atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine Sb ion concentration. In order to study the keeping conditions on the leaching of Sb ion from PET plastic, drinking water bottles were kept in different conditions(room temperature, sunny light and -18˚C. Results: The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.5 to 15.0 ppm Sb with detection limit of 0.055 ppm. The flow rate of sample was optimized in range of 1.0-9.0 mLmin-1 and Sb ion can be quantitatively eluted at 90 Vsample: Veluent retio. Conclusion: The study results revealed that the modified nano alumina is an effective sorbent in regard with absorbing Sb ion from water and HCI 1M can be used as an appropriate eluent. Maximum leaching of Sb ion is observed when the bottled drinking water was exposed to the sun light. Keywords: Antimony; Bottled drinking water; Modified alumina; Preconcentration

  18. Purification of indium, gallium, and antimony by melting with synthetic slug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walis, L.; Rowinska, L.; Nowicki, A.

    1997-01-01

    The tracer technique has been used for metal purification process control. The indium, gallium and antimony have been purified up to semiconductor purity in the melting with synthetic slug process. The 115m Cd, 59 Fe, 204 Tl. 76 As, 210 Bi have been used as tracers. The high effectiveness of proposed purification method have been found in the cases of indium and gallium. 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Optical switching property of a light-induced pinhole in antimony thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Toshio; Tominaga, Junji; Nakano, Takashi; Atoda, Nobufumi

    1999-11-01

    Optical near-field recording, called a super-resolution near-field structure, records and retrieves small marks beyond the diffraction limit. A thin layer of an antimony (Sb) film, added to the usual phase-change optical disk, is the key material of this technique. Nonlinear optical properties of an Sb film, especially optical switching, were studied in the stationary state using a nanosecond pulse laser. Clear switching was observed under microscopic measurement.

  20. Antimony in the Contaminated Site of El Triunfo, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmolejo-Rodríguez A. J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimony has properties similar to arsenic with some of its compounds toxic to humans. Therefore it is necessary to control the wastes accumulated by anthropogenic activities, such as mining, where it is in tailings to be released to the environment. According to the Environment Protection Agency, the maximum value in sediments is 11.2 mg Sb kg–1 and the Earth’s crust average is 0.2 mg Sb kg–1. In this semiarid area, the drainage basin El Carrizal is impacted with wastes of an abandoned gold mine at the Mining District El Triunfo (MD – ET which have tailings with 17,600 mg kg–1 of antimony. In the main dry river (arroyo, the Sb content is between 0.6 and 122 mg kg–1. This element is transported from the source throughout the fluvial basin to discharge into the Pacific Ocean. In the arroyo mouth we collected one sedimentary core and the sediment from dunes (28.6 – 45.7 and 6.43 – 7.74 mg Sb kg–1. This research concluded the antimony is enriched in this semiarid system, with Normalized Enrichment Factors severely enriched mainly in arroyo sediments close to the MD-ET

  1. Sequestration of Antimony on Calcite Observed by Time-Resolved Nanoscale Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V; Montes-Hernandez, German; King, Helen E; Breedveld, Gijs D; Okkenhaug, Gudny

    2018-01-02

    Antimony, which has damaging effects on the human body and the ecosystem, can be released into soils, ground-, and surface waters either from ore minerals that weather in near surface environments, or due to anthropogenic releases from waste rich in antimony, a component used in batteries, electronics, ammunitions, plastics, and many other industrial applications. Here, we show that dissolved Sb can interact with calcite, a widespread carbonate mineral, through a coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. The process is imaged in situ, at room temperature, at the nanometer scale by using an atomic force microscope equipped with a flow-through cell. Time-resolved imaging allowed following the coupled process of calcite dissolution, nucleation of precipitates at the calcite surface and growth of these precipitates. Sb(V) forms a precipitate, whereas Sb(III) needs to be oxidized to Sb(V) before being incorporated in the new phase. Scanning-electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy allowed identification of the precipitates as two different calcium-antimony phases (Ca 2 Sb 2 O 7 ). This coupled dissolution-precipitation process that occurs in a boundary layer at the calcite surface can sequester Sb as a solid phase on calcite, which has environmental implications as it may reduce the mobility of this hazardous compound in soils and groundwaters.

  2. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); CIIDIT—Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Garcia, L.V. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); Loredo, S.L. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Unidad Monterrey, PIIT, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, 66455 (Mexico); CIIDIT—Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Apodaca, Nuevo León (Mexico); and others

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Antimony sulfide thin films were prepared by normal CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • These films were photoconductive. - Abstract: Antimony sulfide (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  3. pH-regulated antimony oxychloride nanoparticle formation on titanium oxide nanostructures: a photocatalytically active heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Buchholcz, Balázs

    2017-02-06

    Improving the catalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysts has become a hot topic recently. To this end, considerable progress has been made in the efficient separation of photogenerated charge carriers by e.g. the realization of heterojunction photocatalysts. V-VI-VII compound semiconductors, namely, bismuth oxyhalides, are popular photocatalysts. However, results on antimony oxyhalides [SbOX (X = Br, Cl, I)], the very promising alternatives to the well-known BiOX photomodifiers, are scarce. Here, we report the successful decoration of titanium oxide nanostructures with 8-11 nm diameter SbOX nanoparticles for the first time ever. The product size and stoichiometry could be controlled by the pH of the reactant mixture, while subsequent calcination could transform the structure of the titanate nanotube (TiONT) support and the prepared antimony oxychloride particles. In contrast to the ease of composite formation in the SbOX/TiONT case, anatase TiO could not facilitate the formation of antimony oxychloride nanoparticles on its surface. The titanate nanotube-based composites showed activity in a generally accepted quasi-standard photocatalytic test reaction (methyl orange dye decolorization). We found that the SbOCl/TiONT synthesized at pH = 1 is the most active sample in a broad temperature range.

  4. Increased parasite surface antigen-2 expression in clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani augments antimony resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Vasundhra; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Sandeep; Srividya, Gurumurthy; Negi, Narendra Singh; Singh, Ruchi; Salotra, Poonam

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) is a major cause of therapeutic failure in a large proportion of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) cases. Determinants of SAG resistance have been widely studied; however, the mechanism operating in clinical isolates is poorly understood. In the present study, expression of parasite surface antigen-2 (PSA-2) gene was studied in clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani comprising of antimony resistant (n=10) and sensitive (n=4) parasites. The expression of PSA-2 gene was found to be consistently high in SAG resistant clinical isolates (≥1.5-fold) at both transcript and protein level. Further, over-expression of PSA-2 in L. donovani isolates (LdPSA-2(++)) resulted in conversion of SAG sensitive phenotype to resistant. The LdPSA-2(++) parasites showed significantly decreased susceptibility towards SAG (>12-fold), amphotericin B (>4-fold) and miltefosine (>2.5-fold). Marked decrease in antimony accumulation and enhanced tolerance towards complement mediated lysis was evident in LdPSA-2(++) parasites. The study established the role of PSA-2 gene in SAG resistance and its potential as a biomarker to distinguish resistant and sensitive clinical isolates of L. donovani. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Parto prematuro após uso de antimonial pentavalente: relato de um caso Premature birth after the use of pentavalent antimonial: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Pinheiro Silveira

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de uma mulher de 19 anos, na 24ª semana de gravidez e com leishmaniose visceral. Tratada com antimonial pentavalente na posologia de 850mg/dia por 20 dias, ocorreu parto prematuro no quinto dia de tratamento e óbito da criança um dia após nascimento. Considerando a importância da protozoose no nosso meio e a raridade da associação com a gestação, julgamos de interesse a publicação do caso.A case is reported of a 19-year-old woman, at week 24 of gestation, with visceral leishmaniosis. She was treated with meglumine antimoniate at a dose of 850mg/day for 20 days. There occurred premature birth on day five of treatment and the neonate died one day after birth. Considering the importance of protozoiasis in our population and the rarity of the association with pregnancy, we resolved to publish the case.

  6. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  7. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  8. Silicon nanowires as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Son, Eun Jin; Park, Chan Beum

    2012-11-01

    We report a new possible application of hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis. H-SiNWs transfer hydride efficiently to regenerate NADH by oxidizing Si-Hx bonds. The oxidized H-SiNWs were readily recharged for the continuous regeneration of NADH and enzymatic reactions.

  9. Mechanisms of chemical generation of volatile hydrides for trace element determination (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    D'Ulivo, A.; Dědina, Jiří; Mester, Z.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Wang, Q.; Welz, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 6 (2011), s. 1283-1340 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : borane complexes * chemical generation of volatile hydrides (CHG) * volatile hydrides Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2011

  10. Experimental comparison on heat transfer-enhancing component of metal hydride bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun-goo, E-mail: hgkang@nfri.re.kr; Chung, Dong-you; Oh, Yun Hee; Chang, Min Ho; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Two small ZrCo metal hydride beds were developed. • Copper foam or fin as heat transfer-enhancing component are experimentally compared. • Copper foam bed is more efficient for uniform and rapid heating of metal hydride. • Copper foam bed is more efficient in removal of reaction heat during absorption. - Abstract: Metal hydride bed will be one of the key components for safe handling of tritium in fusion fuel cycle. In case of normal or emergency shutdown of fuel cycle, metal hydride bed installed in storage and delivery system (SDS) of tritium plant will absorb tritium gas in the system as soon as possible. Supply of hydrogen isotope gas to fueling system of fusion reactor will start from the metal hydride beds. Rapid delivery, rapid recovery including rapid heating and cooling are key issues. For better performance of metal hydride bed, various forms of heat transfer enhancing component or design can be applied. This study aims to help the selection of heat transfer enhancing component. Two small ZrCo beds with copper foam and copper fin were developed and experimented with hydrogen gas. Recovery and delivery performance, heating and cooling performance are compared. Experimental results show metal hydride bed with copper foam has improved performance. Uniform heating of metal hydride during desorption and removal of reaction heat during absorption are more efficient with copper foam bed than copper fin bed.

  11. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  12. Speculations on the existence of hydride ions in proton conducting oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and physical nature of the hydride ion is briefly treated. Several reactions of the hydride ion in oxides or oxygen atmosphere are given, A number of perovskites and inverse perovskites are listed. which contain the H- ion on the oxygen or B-anion sites in the archetype ABO(3) System...

  13. Pore-Confined Light Metal Hydrides for Energy Storage and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramwell, P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Light metal hydrides have enjoyed several decades of attention in the field of hydrogen storage, but their applications have recently begun to diversify more and more into the broader field of energy storage. For example, light metal hydrides have shown great promise as battery materials, in sensors

  14. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron spectrum and slightly more uniform axial power distribution. It achieves a cycle length of 18 months with sufficient excess reactivity. At Beginning of Cycle the fuel temperature coefficient of the hydride assembly is higher whereas the moderator and void coefficients are lower. The thermal hydraulic results show that the achievable fuel temperature in the hydride assembly is well below the design limits. The potential benefits of the use of hydride fuel in the current design of the HPLWR with the achieved improvements in the core neutronics characteristics are not sufficient to justify the replacement of the oxide fuel. Therefore for a final evaluation of the use of hydride fuels in HPLWR concepts additional studies which include modification of subassembly and core layout designs are required.

  15. Thermodynamic changes in mechanochemically synthesised magnesium hydride nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, Drew A.; Paskevicius, Mark; Buckley, Craig E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Hydrogen storage is a critical issue that must be overcome on the path towards realizing a hydrogel economy. Solid state storage of hydrogen in magnesium hydride (MgH 2 ) is an attractive solution due to its high hydrogen capacity and the relatively low cost and abundance of magnesium. However, the high thermal stability of MgH 2 makes it difficult to extract the hydrogen at near ambient conditions Recent theoretical work [1 - 3] suggests that reducing the particle size below 1 0 n m will reduce the enthalpy of MgH 2 resulting in a lower desorption temperature, with the effect becoming pronouncec below 3n m. We have used a mechanochemical ball milling method [4] to synthesize MgH; nanoparticles separated by a LiCI matrix. The change in microstructure of the synthesized MgH 2 as a function of the volume of LiCI used during the mechanochemical process was examined by Transmission Electron Microscopy, neutron diffraction and synchrotron x-ray diffraction and compared to the corresponding thermodynamic data obtained from hydrogen desorption measurements. The results show a decrease in enthalpy, in accord with theoretical studies, but that the decrease in desorption temperature is less than that expected due to a counteracting decrease in the entropy of MgH 2 [5]. This has consequences for current experimental research directions into nanosized hydride particles and suggests that future theoretical work must also take into account changes in the entropy in determining the thermodynamic changes in hydride nanoparticles.

  16. Delayed hydride cracking velocity in CANDU and RBMK pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Nikulina, A.V.; Zheltkovskaya, T.N.; Tsvelev, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Using a unified technique applied world-wide comparative tests were implemented to determine delayed hydride cracking (DHC) velocities in CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, RBMK standard and TMT-2 pressure tubes of Zr-2.5 Nb alloy and in RBMK E635 (Zr-1.2Sn-1Nb-0.35Fe) pressure tubes. The tests were carried on at 250 degree C using standard compact tension specimens 17 mm wide hydrogenated to 1 x 10 -4 and having an axial crack. The initial stress intensity factor (K 1 ) was specified as 15-20 MPa·√m. During testing the crack increment was controlled by the potential drop method while the true crack length that was used to calculate its evolution velocity was found after the specimen broke apart. The results of the tests evidence that the highest DHC velocity is inherent in the CANDU pressure tubes. The DHC velocity in the RBMK pressure tubes is lower by an order and even more. This difference in the DHC velocities proceeds from the dissimilar strengths of the CANDU and RBMK tubes and the specific features of their structures. The DHC velocity in the RBMK tubes also depends on their strength. The highest DHC resistance is demonstrated by the RBMK pressure tubes subjected to the standard treatment. For the initiate a hydride crack in them a much longer incubation period and a higher value of the initial stress intensity factor are needed. The DHC related problem is most urgent for the CANDU pressure tubes. To increase their resistance to hydride effected cracking their texture has to approach that of the RBMK pressure tubes. In doing so all the other operation properties inherent in the CANDU pressure tubes have to be retained at the previously achieved level

  17. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  18. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

    2008-12-31

    Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  19. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Blaine Kermit [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  20. Laboratory Rotational Spectroscopy of Astrophysical Interesting Diatomic Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfen, DeWayne; Ziurys, L.

    2008-05-01

    Diatomic hydride are among the most common molecular species in the interstellar medium (ISM). The low molecular mass and thus moments of inertia cause their rotational spectra to lie entirely in the submillimeter and far-infrared regions. Hence, the future airborne and space-borne platforms, such as SOFIA and Herschel, are primed to explore these prevalent molecules. However, in order to detect these species in the ISM, their rotational spectra must first be measured in the laboratory. Using submillimeter direct absorption methods in the Ziurys laboratory, we have recorded the spectra of several diatomic hydrides of astrophysical interest. We have measured the pure rotational spectrum of MnH (X7Σ+: N = 0 - 1) and MnD (N = 2 - 3), as well as the deuterium and carbon-13 isotopologues of CH, CD (X2Πr: N = 1 - 1 and 1 - 2) and 13CH (N = 1 - 1). Manganese hydride and deuteride were created in a DC discharge of H2 or D2 and manganese vapor, generated in a Broida-type oven. CD and 13CH were produced in an AC discharge of argon and CD4 or 13CH4. For MnH, the five strongest manganese hyperfine transitions were recorded in its N = 0 - 1 transition, each of which are additionally split by hydrogen hyperfine interactions. CD and 13CH also have multiple hyperfine components due to the D, 13C, and/or H atoms. The direct measurement of these fundamental transitions will allow for unambiguous astronomical detections. The results of these studies will be presented.

  1. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes with Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D

    2015-04-02

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studied for years, but questions remain due, in part, to the difficulty of probing the effects of protein motion and hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride allowed for observation of the change in barrier height upon inclusion of quantum dynamics. Similar calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle in order to approximate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The change in barrier height in YADH is indicative of a zero-point energy (ZPE) contribution and is evidence that catalysis occurs via a protein compression that mediates a near-barrierless hydride transfer. Calculation of the KIE using the difference in barrier height between the hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results.

  2. Complex rare-earth aluminum hydrides: mechanochemical preparation, crystal structure and potential for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenthaler, Claudia; Pommerin, André; Felderhoff, Michael; Sun, Wenhao; Wolverton, Christopher; Bogdanović, Borislav; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-11-25

    A novel type of complex rare-earth aluminum hydride was prepared by mechanochemical preparation. The crystal structure of the REAlH(6) (with RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds was calculated by DFT methods and confirmed by preliminary structure refinements. The trigonal crystal structure consists of isolated [AlH(6)](3-) octahedra bridged via [12] coordinated RE cations. The investigation of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides during thermolysis shows a decrease of thermal stability with increasing atomic number of the RE element. Rare-earth hydrides (REH(x)) are formed as primary dehydrogenation products; the final products are RE-aluminum alloys. The calculated decomposition enthalpies of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides are at the lower end for reversible hydrogenation under moderate conditions. Even though these materials may require somewhat higher pressures and/or lower temperatures for rehydrogenation, they are interesting examples of low-temperature metal hydrides for which reversibility might be reached.

  3. Single-Site Tetracoordinated Aluminum Hydride Supported on Mesoporous Silica. From Dream to Reality!

    KAUST Repository

    Werghi, Baraa

    2016-09-26

    The reaction of mesoporous silica (SBA15) dehydroxylated at 700 °C with diisobutylaluminum hydride, i-Bu2AlH, gives after thermal treatment a single-site tetrahedral aluminum hydride with high selectivity. The starting aluminum isobutyl and the final aluminum hydride have been fully characterized by FT-IR, advanced SS NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, multiple quanta (MQ) 2D 1H-1H, and 27Al), and elemental analysis, while DFT calculations provide a rationalization of the occurring reactivity. Trimeric i-Bu2AlH reacts selectively with surface silanols without affecting the siloxane bridges. Its analogous hydride catalyzes ethylene polymerization. Indeed, catalytic tests show that this single aluminum hydride site is active in the production of a high-density polyethylene (HDPE). © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the hydridation of uranium and rare-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J.

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the rate and the mechanism of the hydridation reaction of uranium and the lanthanide metals. Surface sensitive analysis was used to study the reaction of the metal surface with residual gases of the high vacuum atmosphere. The initial stages of the uranium-hydrogen reaction, taking place on a polished metal surface, were investigated utilizing a hot-stage microscope equipped with TV camera and a video-recorder. The characteristics of formation and advance mechanism of hydride phase in bulk uranium and lanthanide metals were studied utilizing metallographic examination of partially hydrided thin foil samples at different stages of the reaction. The interface velocity of the hydride in uranium was measured as a function of pressure and temprature in a constant volume system. A probabilistic kinetic model for a gas-solid interaction, controlled by a phase transformation step, was developed and applied to the hydridation of uranium and gadolinium

  5. Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal

  6. Modification of the hydriding of uranium using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.; Robinson-Weis, G.; Patterson, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The hydriding of depleted uranium at 76 Torr hydrogen and 130 0 C has been significantly reduced by implantation of oxygen ions. The high-dose implanted specimens had incubation times for the initiation of the reaction after exposure to hydrogen that exceeded those of the nonimplanted specimens by more than a factor of eight. Furthermore, the nonimplanted specimens consumed enough hydrogen to cause macroscopic flaking of essentially the entire surface in times much less than the incubation time for the high-dose implanted specimens. In contrast, the ion-implanted specimens reacted only at isolated spots with the major fraction of the surface area unaffected by the hydrogen exposure

  7. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong; Luo Deli

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 , O 2 and H 2 , therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG 0 <<0. The calculated equilibrium compositions are in agreement with those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The author has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect

  8. Parametrization of a reactive force field for aluminum hydride

    OpenAIRE

    Ojwang, J. G. O.; van Santen, Rutger A.; Kramer, Gert Jan; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-01-01

    A reactive force field, REAXFF, for aluminum hydride has been developed based on density functional theory (DFT) derived data. REAXFF_(AlH_3) is used to study the dynamics governing hydrogen desorption in AlH_3. During the abstraction process of surface molecular hydrogen charge transfer is found to be well described by REAXFF_(AlH_3). Results on heat of desorption versus cluster size show that there is a strong dependence of the heat of desorption on the particle size, which implies that nan...

  9. Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2013-06-25

    A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

  10. Hydrogen isotope exchange in a metal hydride tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a model of the displacement of one hydrogen isotope within a metal hydride tube by a different isotope in the gas phase that is blown through the tube. The model incorporates only the most basic parameters to make a clear connection to the theory of open-tube gas chromatography, and to provide a simple description of how the behavior of the system scales with controllable parameters such as gas velocity and tube radius. A single tube can be seen as a building block for more complex architectures that provide higher molar flow rates or other advanced design goals.

  11. Research in Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen papers focusing on recent research investigations in the field of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries have been selected for this Special Issue of Batteries. These papers summarize the joint efforts in Ni/MH battery research from BASF, Wayne State University, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Michigan State University, and FDK during 2015–2016 through reviews of basic operational concepts, previous academic publications, issued US Patent and filed Japan Patent Applications, descriptions of current research results in advanced components and cell constructions, and projections of future works.

  12. Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James J.; Adzic, Gordana D.; Johnson, John R.; Vogt, Thomas; McBreen, James

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

  13. Increased biliary excretion of glutathione is generated by the glutathione-dependent hepatobiliary transport of antimony and bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurasics, A; Koszorús, L; Varga, F; Gregus, Z

    1992-10-06

    We have recently demonstrated that the hepatobiliary transport of arsenic is glutathione-dependent and is associated with a profound increase in biliary excretion of glutathione (GSH), hepatic GSH depletion and diminished GSH conjugation (Gyurasics A, Varga F and Gregus Z, Biochem Pharmacol 41: 937-944 and Gyurasics A, Varga F and Gregus Z, Biochem Pharmacol 42: 465-468, 1991). The present studies in rats aimed to determine whether antimony and bismuth, other metalloids in group Va of the periodic table, also possess similar properties. Antimony potassium tartrate (25-100 mumol/kg, i.v.) and bismuth ammonium citrate (50-200 mumol/kg, i.v.) increased up to 50- and 4-fold, respectively, the biliary excretion of non-protein thiols (NPSH). This resulted mainly from increased hepatobiliary transport of GSH as suggested by a close parallelism in the biliary excretion of NPSH and GSH after antimony or bismuth administration. Within 2 hr, rats excreted into bile 55 and 3% of the dose of antimony (50 mumol/kg, i.v.) and bismuth (150 mumol/kg, i.v.), respectively. The time courses of the biliary excretion of these metalloids and NPSH or GSH were strikingly similar suggesting co-ordinate hepatobiliary transport of the metalloids and GSH. However, at the peak of their excretion, each molecule of antimony or bismuth resulted in a co-transport of approximately three molecules of GSH. Diethyl maleate, indocyanine green and sulfobromophthalein (BSP), which decreased biliary excretion of GSH, significantly diminished excretion of antimony and bismuth into bile indicating that hepatobiliary transport of these metalloids is GSH-dependent. Administration of antimony, but not bismuth, decreased hepatic GSH level by 30% and reduced the GSH conjugation and biliary excretion of BSP. These studies demonstrate that the hepatobiliary transport of trivalent antimony and bismuth is GSH-dependent similarly to the hepatobiliary transport of trivalent arsenic. Proportionally to their biliary

  14. Biodistribution of meglumine antimoniate in healthy and Leishmania (Leishmania infantum chagasi-infected BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Etel Treiger Borborema

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pentavalent antimonials such as meglumine antimoniate (MA are the primary treatments for leishmaniasis, a complex disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania . Despite over 70 years of clinical use, their mechanisms of action, toxicity and pharmacokinetics have not been fully elucidated. Radiotracer studies performed on animals have the potential to play a major role in pharmaceutical development. The aims of this study were to prepare an antimony radiotracer by neutron irradiation of MA and to determine the biodistribution of MA in healthy and Leishmania (Leishmania infantum chagasi-infected mice. MA (Glucantime(r was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, producing two radioisotopes, 122Sb and 124Sb, with high radionuclidic purity and good specific activity. This irradiated compound presented anti-leishmanial activity similar to that of non-irradiated MA in both in vitro and in vivo evaluations. In the biodistribution studies, healthy mice showed higher uptake of antimony in the liver than infected mice and elimination occurred primarily through biliary excretion, with a small proportion of the drug excreted by the kidneys. The serum kinetic curve was bi-exponential, with two compartments: the central compartment and another compartment associated with drug excretion. Radiotracers, which can be easily produced by neutron irradiation, were demonstrated to be an interesting tool for answering several questions regarding antimonial pharmacokinetics and chemotherapy.

  15. Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    None, None

    2013-05-14

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  16. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H 2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 o C at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  17. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  18. Electronically Unsaturated Three-Coordinate Aluminum Hydride and Organoaluminum Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, Billa; Bhandari, Mamta; Ravi, Satyam; Shamasundar, K R; Singh, Sanjay

    2018-02-16

    New three-coordinate and electronically unsaturated aluminum hydride [LAlH] + [HB(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ] - (LH=[{(2,6-iPr 2 C 6 H 3 N)P(Ph 2 )} 2 N]H) and aluminum methyl [LAlMe] + [MeB(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ] - cations have been prepared. The quantitative estimation of Lewis acidity by Gutmann-Beckett method revealed [LAlH] + [HB(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ] - to be better Lewis acid than B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 and AlCl 3 making these compounds ideal catalysts for Lewis acid-mediated reactions. To highlight that the work is of fundamental importance, catalytic hydroboration of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones have been demonstrated. Important steps of the catalytic cycle have been probed by using multinuclear NMR measurements, including successful characterization of the proposed aluminum benzyloxide cationic intermediate, [LAl-O-CH 2 Ph] + [HB(C 6 F 5 ) 3 ] - . The proposed catalytic cycle has been found to be consistent with experimental observations and computational studies clearly indicating the migration of hydride from cationic aluminum center to the carbonyl carbon is the rate-limiting step of the catalytic cycle. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. X-ray photochemistry of carbon hydride molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Alessandra; Miteva, Tsveta; Kennedy, Eugene T; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Bizau, Jean-Marc; Cubaynes, Denis; Sisourat, Nicolas; Carniato, Stéphane

    2018-02-07

    Hydride molecular ions are key ingredients of the interstellar chemistry since they are precursors of more complex molecules. In regions located near a soft X-ray source these ions may resonantly absorb an X-ray photon which triggers a complex chain of reactions. In this work, we simulate ab initio the X-ray absorption spectrum, Auger decay processes and the subsequent fragmentation dynamics of two hydride molecular ions, namely CH 2 + and CH 3 + . We show that these ions feature strong X-ray absorption resonances which relax through Auger decay within 7 fs. The doubly-charged ions thus formed mostly dissociate into smaller ionic carbon fragments: in the case of CH 2 + , the dominant products are either C + /H + /H or CH + /H + . For CH 3 + , the system breaks primary into CH 2 + and H + , which provides a new route to form CH 2 + near a X-ray source. Furthermore, our simulations provide the branching ratios of the final products formed after the X-ray absorption as well as their kinetic and internal energy distributions. Such data can be used in the chemistry models of the interstellar medium.

  20. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  1. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  2. Highly active and stable Pt electrocatalysts promoted by antimony-doped SnO2 supports for oxygen reduction reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Min; Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative composite supports for platinum catalysts were synthesized from antimony doped tin dioxide (ATO) nanoparticles. In the range of the antimony content from 0 to 11mol%, the highest electrical conductivity of 1.1Scm-1 at 130°C was obtained for the 5mol% Sb ATO, from which composite suppo...

  3. Leishmaniose cutânea com desfecho fatal durante tratamento com antimonial pentavalente American cutaneous leishmaniasis with fatal outcome during pentavalent antimoniate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiri Vanderlei Nogueira de Lima

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de paciente de 58 anos, hipertensa e diabética, com diagnóstico de leishmaniose tegumentar americana, tratada com antimoniato de N-metil-glucamina (15mg SbV/kg/dia, acompanhada pelo serviço de atenção básica em saúde e que evoluiu para óbito no 18º dia de tratamento.The authors report a case of a 58 years-old, hypertensive, diabetic female patient, with the diagnosis of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, undergoing treatment with Nmethyl glucamine antimoniate (15mg SbV/Kg/day. She was followed up by the basic health care service, but has died on the 18th treatment day.

  4. Identification and characterization of a new zirconium hydride; Identification et caracterisation d'un nouvel hydrure de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Morniroli, J.P.; Legris, A.; Thuinet, L. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, USTL, ENSCL, CNRS, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Zhao, Zhao; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Ambard, A.; Legras, L. [Electricite de France (EDF/RD), Centre des Renardieres, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Kihn, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    A study of hydrides characterization has been carried out in using the transmission electron microscopy technique. It has revealed the presence of small hydrides of acicular form whose length does not exceed 500 nm, among the zircaloy-4 samples hydrided by cathodic way. The electronic diffraction has shown that these small hydrides have a crystallographic structure different of those of the hydrides phases already index in literature. A more complete identification study has then been carried out. In combining the different electronic microscopy techniques (precession electronic micro diffraction and EELS) with ab initio calculations, a new hydride phase has been identified. It is called hydride {zeta}, is of trigonal structure with lattice parameters a{sub {zeta}} = a{sub {alpha}}{sub Zr} = 0.33 nm and c{sub {zeta}} 2c{sub {alpha}}{sub Zr} = 1.029 nm, its spatial group being P3m1. (O.M.)

  5. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs

  6. Synthesis, characterization and single crystal X-ray analysis of chlorobis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato-S,S′antimony(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P.S. Chauhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound chlorobis(N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamato-S,S′antimony(III has been prepared in distilled acetonitrile and characterized by physicochemical [melting point and molecular weight determination, elemental analysis (C, H, N, S & Sb], spectral [FT–IR, far IR, NMR (1H & 13C] studies. The crystal and molecular structure was further confirmed using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis which features a five-coordinate geometry for antimony(III within a ClS4 donor set. The distortion in the co-planarity of ClSbS3 evidences the stereochemical influence exerts by the lone pair of electrons on antimony(III. Two centrosymmetrically related molecule held together via C–H···Cl secondary interaction result in molecular aggregation of the compound.

  7. Selective liquid-liquid extraction of antimony(III from hydrochloric acid media by N-n-octylaniline in xylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. ANUSE

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available N-n-Octylaniline in xylene was used for the extraction separation of antimony(III from hydrochloric acid media. Antimony(III was extracted quantitatively with 10 mL 4 % N-n-octylaniline in xylene. It was stripped from the organic phase with 0.5 M ammonia and estimated photometrically by the iodide method. The effect of metal ion, acid, reagent concentration and various foreign ions was investigated. The method affords binary and ternary separation of antimony(III from tellurium(IV, selenium(IV, lead(II, bismuth(III, tin(IV, germanium(IV, copper(II, gold(III, iron(III and zinc(II. The method is applicable for the analysis of synthetic mixtures, alloys and semiconductor thin films. It is fast, accurate and precise.

  8. Studies of hydride formation and superconductivity in hydrides of alloys Th-M /M = La, Y, Ce, Zr and Bi/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterreicher, H.; Clinton, J.; Misroch, M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to gain a better insight into both the unusual composition of ThH15 and its superconductivity, an experimental study was conducted to assess the influence of partial replacement of Th in Th4H15 by elements which allow for a systematic alteration of spatial and electronic effects. For this purpose, substituent elements with the same number of valence electrons (4) but of smaller size (Zr) as well as elements with a smaller number of valence electrons (3) and either larger (La) or smaller size (Y) were selected. A few data with Ce and Bi as substituent atoms are also included. The matrix alloys for hydriding were obtained by induction melting under Ar in water-cooled Cu boats. Superconducting transition temperatures are found to decrease on substitution for Th in Th4H15. Hydrides derived from LaH3 by substitution for La by Th do not become superconducting. It is suggested that superconductivity in Th4H15 is connected with a deviation from the exact stoichiometry of Th4H15. A model of unsatisfied valencies may be of more general validity in predicting superconductivity.

  9. Nanoscaled hydrated antimony (V oxide as a new approach to first-line antileishmanial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco AMR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antonia MR Franco,1 Iryna Grafova,2 Fabiane V Soares,1,3 Gennaro Gentile,4 Claudia DC Wyrepkowski,1,3 Marcos A Bolson,5 Ézio Sargentini Jr,5 Cosimo Carfagna,4 Markku Leskelä,2 Andriy Grafov2 1Laboratory of Leishmaniasis and Chagas Disease, National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; 2Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; 3Multi-Institutional Post-Graduate Program in Biotechnology, Federal University of Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; 4Institute for Polymers, Composites, and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Pozzuoli, Naples Province, Italy; 5Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry, National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil Background: Coordination compounds of pentavalent antimony have been, and remain, the first-line drugs in leishmaniasis treatment for >70 years. Molecular forms of Sb (V complexes are commercialized as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam® and meglumine antimoniate (MA (Glucantime®. Ever-increasing drug resistance in the parasites limits the use of antimonials, due to the low drug concentrations being administered against high parasitic counts. Sb5+ toxicity provokes severe side effects during treatment. To enhance therapeutic potency and to increase Sb (V concentration within the target cells, we decided to try a new active substance form, a hydrosol of Sb2O5⋅nH2O nanoparticles (NPs, instead of molecular drugs. Methodology/principal findings: Sb2O5⋅nH2O NPs were synthesized by controlled SbCl5 hydrolysis in a great excess of water. Sb2O5⋅nH2O phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The surface of Sb (V NPs was treated with ligands with a high affinity for target cell membrane receptors. The mean particle size determined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy was ~35–45 nm. In vitro tests demonstrated a 2.5–3 times higher antiparasitic activity of Sb (V nanohybrid hydrosols

  10. Leachability of antimony from energy ashes. Total contents, leachability and remedial suggestions; Lakning av antimon fraan energiaskor. Totalhalter, lakbarhet samt foerslag till aatgaerder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, Mattias [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    In the current project total concentrations for antimony in 31 energy ashes have been compiled. The average concentration of antimony in boiler fly ash and grate boiler fly ash is 192 and 1,140 mg/kg, respectively. The corresponding antimony concentrations for boiler ashes and grate bottom ashes are 86,5 and 61,8 mg/kg, respectively. Multivariate calculations clearly pointed out waste as the major source for antimony in ashes. The difference between total antimony concentration in fly ash and bottom ash is greatest for grate boilers, in average 18 times higher in the fly ash. The difference for CFB/BFB-boilers is only slightly more than 2. However, based on amount, 75% of the total antimony inventory is recovered in the fly ashes for both CFB/BFB and grate boilers. Eleven (eight of which were bottom ashes) out of the 31 samples exceeded the guidelines for inert waste. It is clear that the higher ionic strength in the solutions from the fly ashes contribute to decrease the solubility for critical minerals retaining antimony. In addition, the fly ashes have considerably larger effective surface able to sorb trace elements. A clear and positive covariance was discovered between aluminium and antimony. Furthermore, it was noted that antimony showed no typical anionic behaviour despite the fact that it according to the geochemical calculations should be present as SbO{sub 3}{sup -}. At L/S 10, a maximum of 1% of the total antimony concentration is leached. This should be compared to chloride that had 94% of the total concentration leached at L/S 10. There was no correlation between the leached antimony concentrations and the total antimony concentrations. The sequential extractions also suggest a low leachability for antimony from the ashes. In average only 9,6% is released at pH 7, 7,3% at pH 5, 3,6% during reducing conditions and 3,2% during oxidising conditions. In total, only 24% of the total antimony concentrations is released during the four extraction steps. The

  11. Field-portable-XRF reveals the ubiquity of antimony in plastic consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew; Filella, Montserrat

    2017-04-15

    Very little systematic information exists on the occurrence and concentrations of antimony (Sb) in consumer products. In this study, a Niton XL3t field-portable-X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) spectrometer was deployed in situ and in the laboratory to provide quantitative information on Sb dissipated in plastic items and fixtures (including rubber, textile and foamed materials) from the domestic, school, vehicular and office settings. The metalloid was detected in 18% of over 800 measurements performed, with concentrations ranging from about 60 to 60,000μgg -1 . The highest concentrations were encountered in white, electronic casings and in association with similar concentrations of Br, consistent with the use of antimony oxides (e.g. Sb 2 O 3 ) as synergistic flame retardants. Concentrations above 1000μgg -1 , and with or without Br, were also encountered in paints, piping and hosing, adhesives, whiteboards, Christmas decorations, Lego blocks, document carriers, garden furniture, upholstered products and interior panels of private motor vehicles. Lower concentrations of Sb were encountered in a wide variety of items but its presence (without Br) in food tray packaging, single-use drinks bottles, straws and small toys were of greatest concern from a human health perspective. While the latter observations are consistent with the use of antimony compounds as catalysts in the production of polyethylene terephthalate, co-association of Sb and Br in many products not requiring flame retardancy suggests that electronic casings are widely recycled. Further research is required into the mobility of Sb when dissipated in new, recycled and aged polymeric materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual mode antimony electrode for simultaneous measurements of PO2 and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, F; Nilsson, G

    2000-01-01

    In biomedical research and clinical medicine there is a demand for potent sensors to measure the components that make up blood gas analyses. Today, as when the electrochemical PO2, PCO2 and pH electrodes were first introduced, these measurements are usually made with the same type of sensor technology. The aims of the present study were, firstly, to find out whether the platinum cathode in the Clark electrode can be replaced by antimony for oxygen measurements (amperometry (A)); secondly, whether, during oxygen measurements, the inherent corrosion potential of the antimony metal can be used for measurement of pH in the same measurement area (potentiometry (P)). An electrode of purified, crystallographically orientated monocrystalline antimony (COMA) connected to a reference electrode (silver-silver chloride) was used for the P measurements. Measurements of A (at -900 mV) and P were made in an aqueous environment regulated for oxygen, pH, and temperature. Reproducible oxygen sensitivities of 0.925 nA/% oxygen (2% CV (coefficient of variation)) (A), 10.7 mV/% (P), and 0.7 mV/% (P) were found in the oxygen range: 0-21%, <5%, and above 5%, respectively. The pH sensitivity was 57 mV/pH unit (P). Oxygen and pH measurements were less accurate at oxygen concentrations close to 0%. Both the oxygen and pH part of the composite electrode signal can be identified by this dual mode technique (A and P). The sensor seems to be promising as it provides measurements of two separate variables (oxygen and pH) and also has the desirable characteristics of a solid state sensor.

  13. Development and pharmacokinetic of antimony encapsulated in liposomes of phosphatidylserine using radioisotopes in experimental leishmaniasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borborema, Samanta Etel Treiger

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis are a complex of parasitic diseases caused by intra macrophage protozoa of the genus Leishmania, and is fatal if left untreated. Pentavalent antimonials, though toxic and their mechanism of action being unclear, remain the first-line drugs for treatment. Effective therapy could be achieved by delivering antileishmanial drugs to these sites of infection. Liposomes are phospholipid vesicles that promote improvement in the efficacy and action of drugs in target cell. Liposomes are taken up by the cells of mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS). The purpose of this study was to develop a preparation of meglumine antimonate encapsulated in liposomes of phosphatidylserine and to study its pharmacokinetic in healthy mice to establish its metabolism and distribution. Quantitative analysis of antimony from liposomes demonstrated that Neutron Activation Analysis was the most sensitive technique with almost 100 % of accuracy. All liposome formulations presented a mean diameter size of 150 nm. The determination of IC 50 in infected macrophage showed that liposome formulations were between 10 - 63 fold more effective than the free drug, indicating higher selectivity index. By fluorescence microscopy, an increased uptake of fluorescent-liposomes was seen in infected macrophages during short times of incubation compared with non-infected macrophages. Biodistribution studies showed that meglumine antimonate irradiated encapsulated in liposomes of phosphatidylserine promoted a targeting of antimony for MPS tissues and maintained high doses in organs for a prolonged period. In conclusion, these data suggest that meglumine antimonate encapsulated in liposomes showed higher effectiveness than the non-liposomal drug against Leishmania infection. The development of liposome formulations should be a new alternative for the chemotherapy of infection diseases, especially Leishmaniasis, as they are used to sustain and target pharmaceuticals to the local of infection. (author)

  14. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of Antimony after multiple intramuscular administrations in the Hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaser, May H.; Radwan, Mahasen A.; Zaghloul, Imam Y.

    2006-01-01

    The fate of pentavalent antimony (Sb) in different tissues in the body after intramuscular administration is of great interest for the future study of Sb therapy in different sitting. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of antimony (Sb) were studied in the hamster after daily dose of sodium stibogluconate equivalent to 120 mg kg of Sb, administered intramuscularly for two weeks. Liver, spleen, heart, kidney and skin tissues were isolated after blood collection at the specified time. Antimony was measured in these tissues after suitable treatment, ashing and processing, by flame less atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentration of Sb time profile in blood showed a linear raid decline with elimination half life (tz1/2) of 1.7h. The concentration of drug (ug/gm) declined in a biphasic manner from almost all tissues. However, the concentrations of Sb were declined in slower fashion from the hamster tissues than from the blood. The maximum concentration of Sb was determined in the kidney tissues (3416+-631ug/gm) while the lowest concentration was in the spleen (209+-187ug/gm). The maximum concentration of Sb in the kidney (ug/gm) was more than 25 fold higher than that measured from blood (ug/ml). The AUC of Sb in the studied tissues was in this rank: kidney>liver>skin>spleen>heart>blood. Surprisingly, the heart, spleen and liver showed a similar t1/2 of 5.2-6.2h while the kidney and skin had a t1/2 of about 3h. Therefore, disposition of Sb seems to kinetically follow multicompartmental compartmental model. The kidneys got the highest concentration of drug which may lead to nephrotoxicity on long term therapy. (author)

  15. Antimony Adsorption from Zarshouran Gold Mineral Processing Plant Wastewater by Nano Zero Valent Iron Coated on Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nader nosrati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effluent from Zarshouran gold mineral processing plant contains high quantities of arsenic, antimony, mercury, and bismuth. These metals and metalloids are soluble in water and very toxic when they enter the environment. Their solubility in water causes the polluted area to extend beyond their point of origin. In this article, different methods of antimony removal from water and wastewater were reviewed and the zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated on Bentonite were selected as an effective and low cost material for removing antimony from wastewater. For the purposes of this study, zero-valent iron nanoparticles of 40-100 nanometers in size were synthesized by dropwise addition of sodium borohydride solution to an Iron (III aqueous solution at  ambient temperature and mixed with nitrogen gas. To avoid particle agglomeration and to enhance the product’s environmentally safe application, the  nanoparticles were coated on Bentonite and characterized by SEM/EDAX and BET. The experiments were carried out by intense mixing of the adsorbent with 10ml of real/synthtic wastewater samples in 20ml bottles.  The effects of pH, contact time, temperature, and adsorbent dosage on antimony removal efficiency were investigated under intense mixing using a magnetic mixer. Finally, the effluents were filtered upon completion of the experiments and used for atomic adsorption analysis. The results of the experiments showed that the adsorption isotherms of the synthesized nanoparticles obeyed the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The experiments carried out on real samples showed that antimony adsorption capacity for B-nZVI was 2.6 mg/g of the adsorbent and that the highest antimony removal efficiency was 99.56%.

  16. Photodegradation of Naphthol green B in the presence of semiconducting antimony trisulphide - SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAKSHIT AMETA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Different methods of wastewater treatment are being used for the removal of dyes from their solution, but in most of the cases, either homogeneous catalysts or different adsorbents are used. These methods have their own merits and demerits. In the present work, antimony trisulphide was used as a heterogeneous catalyst. The effects of different parameters on the rate of the reaction were observed, such as pH, concentration of dye, amount of semiconductor and light intensity. A tentative mechanism is proposed in which the role of hydroxyl radical as an active oxidizing species is shown for degradation of Naphthol green B.

  17. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1−x) Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    H. B. Russell; A. N. Andriotis; M. Menon; J. B. Jasinski; A. Martinez-Garcia; M. K. Sunkara

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1?2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1?x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x?=?0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1?x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the h...

  18. Quantification and characterization of zirconium hydrides in Zircaloy-4 by the image analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.H.; Groos, M.; Bredel, T.; Trotabas, M.; Combette, P.

    1992-01-01

    The image analysis method is used to determine the hydrogen content in specimens of Zircaloy-4. Two parameters, surface density of hydride, S v , and degree of orientation, Ω, are defined to represent separately the hydrogen content and the orientation of hydrides. By analysing the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 specimens with known hydrogen content from 100 to 1000 ppm, a relationship is established between the parameter S v and the hydrogen content when the magnifications of the optical microscope are 1000 and 250. The degree of orientation for the hydride in the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding is about 0.3. (orig.)

  19. Analytical control of production of As, P, Si, B hydrides and the mixtures on their basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, N.T.; Vislykh, N.A.; Voevodina, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Highly sensitive and selective detectors which are in the basis of some analytical devices, such as chromatograph Tzvet 500G attachment POU-80, gigrometer Enisej gas analyzer Platon that permit to control the production of As, P, Si, B hydrides, are tested. The techniques of tetermination of constant gases, general carbon, moisture in the mixtures based on As, P, Si, B hydrides with diluting gases (H 2 , He, Ar) as well as hydrides in them and in the air of working premises, are suggested

  20. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs; Hidruros solidos como acumuladores de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Friedrichs, O.; Ares, J. R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2010-07-01

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH{sub 2} as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH{sub 2} are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  1. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of some hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, M.H.

    1976-06-01

    This work deals mainly with the thermodynamic and physical properties of the hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides. In addition, statistical models have been developed and applied to metal-hydrogen systems. A kinetic study of the uranium-hydrogen system was performed. The thermodynamic properties of the hydrides of neptunium, thorium, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium and europium were determined. In addition the samarium-europium-hydrogen ternary system was investigated. Moessbauer effect measurements of cubic neptunium hydrides were interpreted according to a model presented. A comparison. (author)

  2. Study of factors affecting a combustion method for determining carbon in lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barringer, R.E.; Thornton, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    An investigation has been made of the factors affecting a combustion method for the determination of low levels (300 to 15,000 micrograms/gram) of carbon in highly reactive lithium hydride. Optimization of the procedure with available equipment yielded recoveries of 90 percent, with a limit of error (0.95) of +-39 percent relative for aliquants containing 35 to 55 micrograms of carbon (500 to 800 micrograms of carbon per gram of lithium hydride sample). Sample preparation, thermal decomposition of the hydride, final ignition of the carbon, and carbon-measurement steps were studied, and a detailed procedure was developed. (auth)

  3. Study on an innovative fast reactor utilizing hydride neutron absorber - Final report of phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konashi, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Itoh, K.; Hirai, M.; Sato, J.; Kurosaki, K.; Suzuki, A.; Matsumura, Y.; Abe, S.

    2010-01-01

    These days, the demand to use nuclear resources efficiently is growing for long-term energy supply and also for solving the green house problem. It is indispensable to develop technologies to reduce environmental load with the nuclear energy supply for sustainable development of human beings. In this regard, the development of the fast breeder reactor (FBR) is preferable to utilize nuclear resources effectively and also to burn minor actinides which possess very long toxicity for more than thousands years if they are not extinguished. As one of the FBR developing works in Japan this phase I study started in 2006 to introduce hafnium (Hf) hydride and Gadolinium-Zirconium (Gd-Zr) hydride as new control materials in FBR. By adopting them, the FBR core control technology is improved by two ways. One is extension of control rod life time by using long life Hf hydride which leads to reduce the fabrication and disposal cost and the other is reduction of the excess reactivity by adopting Gd-Zr hydride which leads to reduce the number of control rods and simplifies the core upper structure. This three year study was successfully completed and the following results were obtained. The core design was performed to examine the applicability of the Hf hydride absorber to Japanese Sodium Fast Reactor (JSFR) and it is clarified that the control rod life time can be prolonged to 6 years by adopting Hf hydride and the excess reactivity of the beginning of the core cycle can be reduced to half and the number of the control rods is also reduced to half by using the Gd-Zr hydride burnable poison. The safety analyses also certified that the core safety can be maintained with the same reliability of JSFR Hf hydride and Gd-Zr hydride pellets were fabricated in good manner and their basic features for design use were measured by using the latest devices such as SEM-EDX. In order to reduce the hydrogen transfer through the stainless steel cladding a new technique which shares calorizing

  4. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  5. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  6. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performances of new antimony-containing graphite compounds used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailly, A.; Willmann, P.; Billaud, D.

    2002-01-01

    Graphite intercalation intercalated with metal alloys able to alloy reversibly lithium constitute a large set of new anodic materials for lithium-ion batteries of significantly improved reversible capacities. Especially, graphite intercalated with cesium-antimony alloys can be used as materials for anodes in lithium-ion batteries. Electrochemical insertion of lithium in such chemically modified precursors shows that lithium both intercalates in the empty van der Waals spaces of graphite and alloys reversibly with antimony. The total electrochemical reversible capacities, measured between 0 and 2 V vs Li + /Li, close to 700 mAh g -1 have been currently obtained

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were

  8. Comparison of delayed hydride cracking behavior of two zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni, L.M.E.; Mieza, J.I.; De Las Heras, E.; Domizzi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is an important failure mechanism that may occur in Zr alloys during service in water-cooled reactors. Two conditions must be attained to initiate DHC from a crack: the stress intensity factor must be higher than a threshold value called K IH and, hydrogen concentration must exceed a critical value. Currently the pressure tubes for CANDU reactor are fabricated from Zr–2.5Nb. In this paper the critical hydrogen concentration for DHC and the crack velocity of a developmental pressure tube, Excel, was evaluated and compared with that of Zr–2.5Nb. The DHC velocity values measured in Excel were higher than usually reported in Zr–2.5Nb. Due to the higher hydrogen solubility limits in Excel, its critical hydrogen concentration for DHC initiation is 10–50 wppm over that of Zr–2.5Nb in the range of 150–300 °C

  9. Modeling of hydride precipitation and re-orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-18

    In this report, we present a thermodynamic-­based model of hydride precipitation in Zr-based claddings. The model considers the state of the cladding immediately following drying, after removal from cooling-pools, and presents the evolution of precipitate formation upon cooling as follows: The pilgering process used to form Zr-based cladding imparts strong crystallographic and grain shape texture, with the basal plane of the hexagonal α-Zr grains being strongly aligned in the rolling-­direction and the grains are elongated with grain size being approximately twice as long parallel to the rolling direction, which is also the long axis of the tubular cladding, as it is in the orthogonal directions.

  10. Comparison of delayed hydride cracking behavior of two zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzoni, L.M.E. [CNEA – Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Hidrógeno en Materiales, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Mieza, J.I. [CNEA – Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Hidrógeno en Materiales, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Instituto Sabato, UNSAM–CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); De Las Heras, E. [CNEA – Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Hidrógeno en Materiales, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Domizzi, G., E-mail: domizzi@cnea.gov.ar [CNEA – Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Hidrógeno en Materiales, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Instituto Sabato, UNSAM–CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martín (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina)

    2013-08-15

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is an important failure mechanism that may occur in Zr alloys during service in water-cooled reactors. Two conditions must be attained to initiate DHC from a crack: the stress intensity factor must be higher than a threshold value called K{sub IH} and, hydrogen concentration must exceed a critical value. Currently the pressure tubes for CANDU reactor are fabricated from Zr–2.5Nb. In this paper the critical hydrogen concentration for DHC and the crack velocity of a developmental pressure tube, Excel, was evaluated and compared with that of Zr–2.5Nb. The DHC velocity values measured in Excel were higher than usually reported in Zr–2.5Nb. Due to the higher hydrogen solubility limits in Excel, its critical hydrogen concentration for DHC initiation is 10–50 wppm over that of Zr–2.5Nb in the range of 150–300 °C.

  11. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  12. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  13. Interface Enthalpy-Entropy Competition in Nanoscale Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Patelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effect of the interfacial free energy on the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption in nano-scaled materials. When the enthalpy and entropy terms are the same for all interfaces, as in an isotropic bi-phasic system, one obtains a compensation temperature, which does not depend on the system size nor on the relative phase abundance. The situation is different and more complex in a system with three or more phases, where the interfaces have different enthalpy and entropy. We also consider the possible effect of elastic strains on the stability of the hydride phase and on hysteresis. We compare a simple model with experimental data obtained on two different systems: (1 bi-phasic nanocomposites where ultrafine TiH2 crystallite are dispersed within a Mg nanoparticle and (2 Mg nanodots encapsulated by different phases.

  14. Parametrization of a reactive force field for aluminum hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojwang, J G O; van Santen, Rutger A; Kramer, Gert Jan; van Duin, Adri C T; Goddard, William A

    2009-07-28

    A reactive force field, REAXFF, for aluminum hydride has been developed based on density functional theory (DFT) derived data. REAXFF(AlH(3)) is used to study the dynamics governing hydrogen desorption in AlH(3). During the abstraction process of surface molecular hydrogen charge transfer is found to be well described by REAXFF(AlH(3)). Results on heat of desorption versus cluster size show that there is a strong dependence of the heat of desorption on the particle size, which implies that nanostructuring enhances desorption process. In the gas phase, it was observed that small alane clusters agglomerated into a bigger cluster. After agglomeration molecular hydrogen was desorbed from the structure. This thermodynamically driven spontaneous agglomeration followed by desorption of molecular hydrogen provides a mechanism on how mobile alane clusters can facilitate the mass transport of aluminum atoms during the thermal decomposition of NaAlH(4).

  15. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishvanath P.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Gerward, Leif

    2016-01-01

    at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable......Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting...... combination of low-and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors....

  16. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10{sup {minus}7} cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results.

  17. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10 -7 cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results

  18. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH2-x (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  19. Hydride phase dissolution enthalpy in neutron irradiated Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.

    2003-01-01

    The differential calorimetric technique has been applied to measure the dissolution enthalpy, ΔH irrad δ→α , of zirconium hydrides precipitated in structural components removed from the Argentine Atucha 1 PHWR nuclear power plant after 10.3 EFPY. An average value of ΔH irrad δ→α = 5 kJ/mol H was obtained after the first calorimetric run. That value is seven times lower than the value of ΔH δ→α = 37.7 kJ/mol H recently determined in Zircaloy-4 specimens taken from similar unirradiated structural components using the same calorimetric technique, [1]. Post-irradiation thermal treatments gradually increase that low value towards the unirradiated value with increasing annealing temperature similar to that observed for TSSd irrad . Therefore the same H atom trapping mechanism during reactor operation already proposed to explain the evolution of TSSd irrad is also valid for Q irrad δ→α . As the ratio Q/ΔH is proportional to the number N H of H atoms precipitated as hydrides, the increment of Q irrad δ→α with the thermal treatment indicates that the value of N H also grows with the annealing reaching the value corresponding to the bulk H concentration when ΔH irrad δ→α ≅ 37 kJ/mol H. That is a direct indication that the post-irradiation thermal treatment releases the H atoms from their traps increasing the number of H atoms available to precipitate at the end of each calorimetric run and/or isothermal treatment. (author)

  20. Neutron diffraction studies of transition metal hydride complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetzle, T.F.; Bau, R.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations of H 3 Ta(C 5 H 5 ) 2 (III), HW 2 (CO) 9 (NO) (IV), and HW 2 (CO) 8 (NO) (P(OCH 3 ) 3 ) (V) have been completed. Preliminary results are available for HFeCo 3 (CO) 9 [P(OCH 3 ) 3 ] 3 (VII). This work, together with studies of HMo 2 (C 5 H 5 ) 2 (CO) 4 (P(CH 3 ) 2 ) (VI) and [(C 2 H 5 ) 4 N] + [HCr 2 (CO) 10 ] - carried out at Argonne has led to some general observations on the geometry and the nature of bonding in these compounds. For example, in the structures of IV and V, both of which have bent W--H--W linkages (less than W--H--W in the range 125-130 0 ), there is conclusive evidence for the existence of a closed three-center W--H--W bond with significant metal-metal interaction. Such is the case, because extensions of the axial W--C and W--N bonds trans to the hydride intersect at a point near the center of the W--H--W triangle. The geometry of VI, which also contains a bent M--H--M bond, is consistent with that of IV and V. Bridging M--H bonds in these second- and third-row hydrides range in length from 1.85 to 1.89 A, compared to 1.75 A in the first-row polynuclear complex VII. For metals of corresponding rows, bridging M--H bonds are about 0.1 A longer than terminal bonds, which are classified as single covalent bonds

  1. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 examined by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weekes, H.E. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Jones, N.G. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Lindley, T.C. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Dye, D., E-mail: david.dye@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    The phenomenon of stress-reorientation has been investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction during the thermomechanical cycling of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tensile specimens. Results have shown that loading along a sample’s transverse direction (TD) leads to a greater degree of hydride reorientation when compared to rolling direction (RD)-aligned samples. The elastic lattice micro-strains associated with radially oriented hydrides have been revealed to be greater than those oriented circumferentially, a consequence of strain accommodation. Evidence of hydride redistribution after cycling, to α-Zr grains oriented in a more favourable orientation when under an applied stress, has also been observed and its behaviour has been found to be highly dependent on the loading axis. Finally, thermomechanical loading across multiple cycles has been shown to reduce the difference in terminal solid solubility of hydrogen during dissolution (TSS{sub D,H}) and precipitation (TSS{sub P,H}).

  2. Hydride Transfer in DHFR by Transition Path Sampling, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Heavy Enzyme Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is used to study fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. It remains controversial whether fast protein motions are coupled to the hydride transfer catalyzed by ecDHFR. Previous studies with heavy ecDHFR proteins labeled with 13C, 15N, and nonexchangeable 2H reported enzyme mass-dependent hydride transfer kinetics for ecDHFR. Here, we report refined experimental and computational studies to establish that hydride transfer is independent of protein mass. Instead, we found the rate constant for substrate dissociation to be faster for heavy DHFR. Previously reported kinetic differences between light and heavy DHFRs likely arise from kinetic steps other than the chemical step. This study confirms that fast (femtosecond to picosecond) protein motions in ecDHFR are not coupled to hydride transfer and provides an integrative computational and experimental approach to resolve fast dynamics coupled to chemical steps in enzyme catalysis. PMID:26652185

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution from hydrides based on titanium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovetskij, Yu.I.; Chernavskij, P.A.; Lunin, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution from intermetallide hydrides of the composition Zr-Me-H (Me=Co, Fe, Ni) has been studied. Hydrogen evolution from hydrides ZrHsub(1.98) and ZrCoHsub(2.88) is accompanied by phase transitions. On the basis of kinetics (the range 570-680 K) of hydrogen evolution for the systems ZrCosub(2)Hsub(0.20), ZrFeHsub(0.52) and ZrNiHsub(2.88) a conclusion is made on the constant character of their phase composition. For the hydrides mentioned as well as for TiHsub(1.93) kinetic dependences are presented. It is pointed out that the composition of surface and time of hydride storage make a considerable effect on kinetics of hydrogen evolution

  4. Unexpected formation of hydrides in heavy rare earth containing magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanding Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mg–RE (Dy, Gd, Y alloys show promising for being developed as biodegradable medical applications. It is found that the hydride REH2 could be formed on the surface of samples during their preparations with water cleaning. The amount of formed hydrides in Mg–RE alloys is affected by the content of RE and heat treatments. It increases with the increment of RE content. On the surface of the alloy with T4 treatment the amount of formed hydride REH2 is higher. In contrast, the amount of REH2 is lower on the surfaces of as-cast and T6-treated alloys. Their formation mechanism is attributed to the surface reaction of Mg–RE alloys with water. The part of RE in solid solution in Mg matrix plays an important role in influencing the formation of hydrides.

  5. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  6. The uranium zirconium hydride research reactor and its applications in research and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei; Wang Daohua; Jiang Xinbiao; A Jinyan; Yang Jun; Chen Da [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes briefly the performance, the configuration and the prospects of extensive applications in science, technology and education of the Uranium Zirconium Hydride research reactor in China. (author)

  7. Corrosion behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding material. Evaluation of the hydriding effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blat, M. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Dept. Etudes des Materiaux Les Renardieres; Bourgoin, J. [Electricite de France, 37 - Avoine (France)

    1997-04-01

    In this work, particular attention has been paid to the hydriding effect in PIE and laboratory test to validate a detrimental hydrogen contribution on Zircaloy 4 corrosion behavior at high burnup. Laboratory corrosion tests results confirm that hydrides have a detrimental role on corrosion kinetics. This effect is particularly significant for cathodic charged samples with a massive hydride outer layer before corrosion test. PIE show that at high burnup a hydride layer is formed underneath the metal/oxide interface. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms involved in this detrimental effect of hydrogen. Therefore, according to the laboratory tests results and PIE, hydrogen could be a strong contributor to explain the increase in corrosion rate at high burnup. (author) 12 refs.

  8. Structural and optical study on antimony-silicate glasses doped with thulium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosz, D; Zmojda, J; Kochanowicz, M; Miluski, P; Jelen, P; Sitarz, M

    2015-01-05

    Structural, spectroscopic and thermal properties of SiO₂-Al₂O₃-Sb₂O₃-Na₂O glass system doped with 0.2 mol% Tm₂O₃ have been presented. Synthesis of antimony-silicate glasses with relatively low phonon energy (600 cm(-1), which implicates a small non-radiative decay rate) was performed by conventional high-temperature melt-quenching methods. The effect of SiO₂/Sb₂O₃ ratio in fabricated Tm(3+) doped glass on thermal, structural and luminescence properties was investigated. On the basis of structural investigations decomposition of absorption bands in the infrared FTIR region was performed, thus determining that antimony ions are the only glass-forming ions, setting up the lattice of fabricated glasses. Luminescence band at the wavelength of 1.8 μm corresponding to (3)F₄→(3)H₆ transition in thulium ions was obtained under 795 nm laser pumping. It was observed that combination of relatively low phonon energy and greater separation of optically active centers in the fabricated glasses influenced in decreasing the luminescence intensity at 1800 nm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of Trace Antimony (III by Adsorption Voltammetry at Carbon Paste Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongyue He

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a sensitive method for the determination of trace antimonybased on the antimony-pyrogallol red (PGR adsorption at a carbon paste electrode (CPE.The optimal conditions were to use an electrode containing 25% paraffin oil and 75%high purity graphite powder as working electrode, a 0.10 mol/L HCl solution containing3.0×10-5 mol/L PGR as accumulation medium and a 0.20 mol/L HCl solution aselectrolyte with an accumulation time of 150 s and a reduction time of 60 s at -0.50 Vfollowed with a sweep from -0.50 V to 0.20 V. The mechanism of the electrode reactionwas discussed. Interferences of other metal ions were studied as well. The detection limitwas 1×10-9 mol/L. The linear range was from 2.0×10-9 mol/L to 5.0×10-7 mol/L.Application of the proposed method to the determination of antimony in water andhuman hair samples gave good results.

  10. Application of Hyphenated Techniques in Speciation Analysis of Arsenic, Antimony, and Thallium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmund Michalski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that metals and metalloids have a strong impact on the environment, the methods of their determination and speciation have received special attention in recent years. Arsenic, antimony, and thallium are important examples of such toxic elements. Their speciation is especially important in the environmental and biomedical fields because of their toxicity, bioavailability, and reactivity. Recently, speciation analytics has been playing a unique role in the studies of biogeochemical cycles of chemical compounds, determination of toxicity and ecotoxicity of selected elements, quality control of food products, control of medicines and pharmaceutical products, technological process control, research on the impact of technological installation on the environment, examination of occupational exposure, and clinical analysis. Conventional methods are usually labor intensive, time consuming, and susceptible to interferences. The hyphenated techniques, in which separation method is coupled with multidimensional detectors, have become useful alternatives. The main advantages of those techniques consist in extremely low detection and quantification limits, insignificant interference, influence as well as high precision and repeatability of the determinations. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different hyphenated techniques used for arsenic, antimony, and thallium species analysis, in different clinical, environmental and food matrices.

  11. Application of Hyphenated Techniques in Speciation Analysis of Arsenic, Antimony, and Thallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Rajmund; Szopa, Sebastian; Jabłońska, Magdalena; Łyko, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that metals and metalloids have a strong impact on the environment, the methods of their determination and speciation have received special attention in recent years. Arsenic, antimony, and thallium are important examples of such toxic elements. Their speciation is especially important in the environmental and biomedical fields because of their toxicity, bioavailability, and reactivity. Recently, speciation analytics has been playing a unique role in the studies of biogeochemical cycles of chemical compounds, determination of toxicity and ecotoxicity of selected elements, quality control of food products, control of medicines and pharmaceutical products, technological process control, research on the impact of technological installation on the environment, examination of occupational exposure, and clinical analysis. Conventional methods are usually labor intensive, time consuming, and susceptible to interferences. The hyphenated techniques, in which separation method is coupled with multidimensional detectors, have become useful alternatives. The main advantages of those techniques consist in extremely low detection and quantification limits, insignificant interference, influence as well as high precision and repeatability of the determinations. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different hyphenated techniques used for arsenic, antimony, and thallium species analysis, in different clinical, environmental and food matrices. PMID:22654649

  12. Migration of antimony from PET containers into regulated EU food simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, María; Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Cámara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2013-11-15

    Antimony migration from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers into aqueous (distilled water, 3% acetic acid, 10% and 20% ethanol) and fatty food simulants (vegetable oil), as well as into vinegar, was studied. Test conditions were according to the recent European Regulation 10/2011 (EU, 2011). Sb migration was assayed by ICP-MS and HG-AFS. The results showed that Sb migration values ranged from 0.5 to 1.2μg Sb/l, which are far below the maximum permissible migration value for Sb, 40μg Sb/kg, (EU, Regulation 10/2011). Parameters as temperature and bottle re-use influence were studied. To assess toxicity, antimony speciation was performed by HPLC-ICP-MS and HG-AFS. While Sb(V) was the only species detected in aqueous simulants, an additional species (Sb-acetate complex) was measured in wine vinegar. Unlike most of the studies reported in the literature, migration tests were based on the application of the EU directive, which enables comparison and harmonisation of results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimonial Therapy Induces Circulating Proinflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Gur, Selahaddin; Gurel, Mehmet S.; Bulut, Vedat; Ulukanligil, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between antimonial therapy and circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy by using pentavalent antimonium salts (Glucantime) for 3 weeks. Circulating plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined for CL patients and healthy subjects before and 3 weeks after the treatment was started. Plasma IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α levels were significantly higher for pretreatment CL patients than for healthy subjects. Proinflammatory cytokines significantly increased after 21 days postinfection compared to levels for the pretreatment patients. These increments were approximately 3-fold for IL-1β and TNF-α levels, 10-fold for IL-6 levels, and 20-fold for IL-8 levels in patients with CL. Taken together these results indicate that circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels were increased in patients with CL as a consequence of host defense strategies, and antimonial therapy may induce these cytokines by affecting the macrophage or other components of the host defense system. PMID:12438329

  14. Meglumine antimoniate is more effective than sodium stibogluconate in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilova, Yavuz; Surucu, Hacer Altın; Ardic, Nurittin; Aksoy, Mustafa; Yesilova, Abdullah; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2016-01-01

    Sodium stibogluconate (SSG, Pentostam) and meglumine antimoniate (MA, Glucantime) are two antimonials that are widely used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), but the relative efficacies of these treatments are not clear. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of intralesional SSG with intralesional MA therapy in the treatment of CL. One month after completion of the therapy, 1431 of 1728 patients (82%) who received intralesional MA showed complete clinical cure compared to 1157 of 1728 patients (67%) in the SSG group. Patients who did not respond to the first round of therapy were re-administered the same treatment but with twice weekly injections. Following completion of the second course of therapy, 237 of 297 patients (80%) in the MA group and 407 of 561 patients (72%) in the SSG group healed their lesions by 1-month post-treatment. At both times, the differences in cure rates between MA and SSG groups were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Cure rates in the MA group were always significantly higher than SSG groups irrespective of other parameters including age, gender, lesion site and type of lesion. Intralesional MA is more effective than intralesional SSG in the treatment of CL.

  15. Growth of antimony doped P-type zinc oxide nanowires for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Pradel, Ken

    2016-09-27

    In a method of growing p-type nanowires, a nanowire growth solution of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO.sub.3).sub.2), hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and polyethylenemine (800 M.sub.w PEI) is prepared. A dopant solution to the growth solution, the dopant solution including an equal molar ration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), glycolic acid (C.sub.2H.sub.4O.sub.3) and antimony acetate (Sb(CH.sub.3COO).sub.3) in water is prepared. The dopant solution and the growth solution combine to generate a resulting solution that includes antimony to zinc in a ratio of between 0.2% molar to 2.0% molar, the resulting solution having a top surface. An ammonia solution is added to the resulting solution. A ZnO seed layer is applied to a substrate and the substrate is placed into the top surface of the resulting solution with the ZnO seed layer facing downwardly for a predetermined time until Sb-doped ZnO nanowires having a length of at least 5 .mu.m have grown from the ZnO seed layer.

  16. High levels of antimony in dust from e-waste recycling in southeastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Xiangyang; Li, Zhonggen; Zhuang, Xiaochun; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2011-01-01

    Environmental contamination due to uncontrolled e-waste recycling is an emerging global issue. Antimony (Sb) is a toxic element used in semiconductor components and flame retardants for circuit board within electronic equipment. When e-waste is recycled, Sb is released and contaminates the surrounding environment; however, few studies have characterized the extent of this problem. In this study, we investigated Sb and arsenic (As) distributions in indoor dust from 13 e-waste recycling villages in Guiyu, Guangdong Province, southeastern China. Results revealed significantly elevated concentrations of Sb (6.1-232 mg/kg) in dust within all villages, which were 3.9-147 times higher than those from the non e-waste sites, indicating e-waste recycling was an important source of Sb pollution. On the contrary, As concentrations (5.4-17.7 mg/kg) in e-waste dusts were similar to reference values from the control sites. Therefore, dusts emitted from e-waste recycling may be characterized by high Sb/As ratios, which may help identify the contamination due to the e-waste recycling activities. - Highlights: → Antimony and arsenic concentrations in dust from e-waste recycling were investigated. → E-waste recycling is an important emerging source of Sb pollution. → Sb/As ratios may help identify the e-waste contamination.

  17. Antimony trioxide-induced apoptosis is dependent on SEK1/JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Koren K; Davison, Kelly; Colombo, Myrian; Colosimo, April L; Diaz, Zuanel; Padovani, Alessandra M S; Guo, Qi; Scrivens, P James; Gao, Wenli; Mader, Sylvie; Miller, Wilson H

    2006-01-05

    Very little is known concerning the toxicity of antimony, despite its commercial use as a flame retardant and medical use as a treatment for parasitic infections. Our previous studies show that antimony trioxide (Sb(2)O(3)) induces growth inhibition in patient-derived acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines, a disease in which a related metal, arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), is used clinically. However, signaling pathways initiated by Sb(2)O(3) treatment remain undefined. Here, we show that Sb(2)O(3) treatment of APL cells is associated with increased apoptosis as well as differentiation markers. Sb(2)O(3)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) correlated with increased apoptosis. In addition, when we decreased the buffering capacity of the cell by depleting glutathione, ROS production and apoptosis was enhanced. Arsenic-resistant APL cells with increased glutathione levels exhibited increased cross-resistance to Sb(2)O(3). Based on studies implicating c-jun kinase (JNK) in the mediation of the response to As(2)O(3), we investigated the role for JNK in Sb(2)O(3)-induced apoptosis. Sb(2)O(3) activates JNK and its downstream target, AP-1. In fibroblasts with a genetic deletion in SEK1, an upstream regulator of JNK, Sb(2)O(3)-induced growth inhibition as well as JNK activation was decreased. These data suggest roles for ROS and the SEK1/JNK pathway in the cytotoxicity associated with Sb(2)O(3) exposure.

  18. Leaching of the antimony and accompanying of elements Sb2S3 in the alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Remeteiová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the laboratory investigation of alkaline leaching of stibnite that is an important mineral occuring in the antimony-bearing raw materials. The following components were present in stibnite: Sb2S3, SiO2, ZnS, FeS2. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of composition of the aqueous alkaline leaching medium (1 % NaOH, 1 % NaOH + 1 % Na2S2O3, 1 % NaOH + 1 % Na2S on the recoveries of Sb, Fe, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and Hg. The antimony recoveries in the leaching solutions NaOH and NaOH + Na2S2O3 solutions were lower in comparison with the leaching in NaOH + Na2S. The Fe, Pb, Zn recoveries in alkaline solutions were found to decrease in the following order: Fe, Pb, Zn. The mercury recovery in the leaching test with the solution containing 1 % NaOH+1 % Na2S was 3,7 %.

  19. Evaluation of antimony microparticles supported on biochar for application in the voltammetric determination of paraquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaerd, Ava; de Oliveira, Paulo R; Mangrich, Antonio S; Bergamini, Márcio F; Marcolino-Junior, Luiz H

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the construction and application of carbon paste electrodes modified with biochar and antimony microparticles (SbBCPE) for voltammetric determination of paraquat using a simple and sensitive procedure based on voltammetric stripping analysis. Some parameters such as amount of biochar and antimony used in the composition of the carbon paste and instrumental parameters were examined in detail. Under optimized conditions, an analytical curve was obtained for paraquat determination employing SbBCPE, which showed a linear response ranging from 0.2 to 2.9 μmol L(-1), with limit of detection and quantification of 34 nmol L(-1) and 113 nmol L(-1), respectively, after paraquat pre-concentration of 120 s. The repeatability study presented a RSD=2.0% for 10 consecutive measurements using the same electrode surface and the reproducibility study showed a RSD=2.7% for measurements with 10 different electrode surfaces. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for paraquat determination in tap water and citric fruit juice spiked samples and good recoveries were obtained without any sample pre-treatment, showing its promising analytical performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of antimony in nail and hair by thermal neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Yukio; Ishida, Norio

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of antimony in nail and hair was determined by thermal neutron activation analysis. Samples were collected from the workers of an antimony refinery, inhabitants near the refinery, and residents in control area. They were irradiated by Kyoto University 5000 kW Reactor for 1 h, and cooled for 30 to 100 days. After cooling, the concentration of Sb in nail and hair was estimated by measuring the intensity of γ-ray from 124 Sb of the samples, then the samples were washed by 0.1 % aqueous solution of nonionic surface active agent in an ultrasonic cleaner. The γ-ray spectrometry was done again (after washing). The concentration of Sb in nail before washing was 730 ppm for the workers, 2.46 ppm for habitants near the refinery, and 0.19 ppm for the control; after washing, it became 230 ppm for the workers, 0.63 ppm for habitants, and 0.09 ppm for the control. The concentration of Sb in hair before and after washing was 222 ppm and 196 ppm for the workers, and 0.21 ppm and 0.15 ppm for the control, respectively. (author)

  1. Distributions and impact factors of antimony in topsoils and moss in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Nan; Sun Liguang; He Xin; You Kehua; Zhou Xin; Long Nanye

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of antimony (Sb) in topsoil and moss (Dicranum angustum) in disturbed and undisturbed areas, as well as coal and gangue, in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic was examined. Results show that the weathering of coal bed could not contribute to the increase of Sb concentrations in topsoil and moss in the study area. The distribution of Sb is partially associated with traffic and historical mining activities. The occurrence of the maximum Sb concentration is due to the contribution of human activities. In addition, the decrease of Sb content in topsoil near the coastline may be caused by the washing of seawater. Compared with topsoils, moss could be a useful tool for monitoring Sb in both highly and lightly polluted areas. - Highlights: ► We examined the distribution of antimony in topsoil and moss in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic. ► The distribution of Sb is associated with traffic and historical mining activities. ► The weathering of coal bed cannot lead to the Sb increase in the surface environment. ► The distribution of Sb in moss could reflect the accumulation of Sb pollution. ► Moss can be a useful tool for monitoring Sb in highly and lightly polluted areas. - The distribution of Sb in Ny-Ålesund is partially associated with traffic and historical mining activities, and moss can be a useful tool for monitoring Sb in both highly and lightly polluted areas.

  2. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Domizzi, Gladys; Vigna, Gustavo L.

    2007-01-01

    Zr-2.5 Nb alloy from CANDU pressure tubes are prone to failure by hydrogen intake. One of the degradation mechanisms is delayed hydride cracking, which is characterized by the velocity of cracking. In this work, we study the effect of beta zirconium phase transformation over delayed hydride cracking velocity in Zr-2.5 Nb alloy from pressure tubes. Acoustic emission technique was used for cracking detection. (author) [es

  3. Current Compensation of Hydrogen Ion Beam Extracted from PIG with Metal-Hydride Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisko, V.N.; Sereda, I.N.; Klochko, E.V.; Tseluyko, A.F.; Afanas'eva, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of extracted hydrogen ion beam compensation from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode that sufficiently widens the possible field of applying plasma sources of such type is found. The evolution of energy distribution function of ions extracted along the axial direction from reflective discharge with metal-hydride cathode depending on external parameters of the discharge is investigated. The electron distribution functions which compensate hydrogen ion beam are determined

  4. Standardized hydrogen storage module with high utilization factor based on metal hydride-graphite composites

    OpenAIRE

    Bürger, Inga; Dieterich, Mila; Pohlmann, Carsten; Röntzsch, Lars; Linder, Marc

    2017-01-01

    In view of hydrogen based backup power systems or small-scale power2gas units, hydrogen storages based on metal hydrides offer a safe and reliable solution. By using Hydralloy C5 as suitable hydride forming alloy, the present tank design guarantees very simple operating conditions: pressures between 4 bar and 30 bar, temperatures between 15 C and 40 C and minimal efforts for thermal management in combination with fast and constant charging and discharging capabilities. The modular...

  5. Dehydrogenation in lithium borohydride/conventional metal hydride composite based on a mutual catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.B.; Shi, Qing; Vegge, Tejs

    2009-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of LiBH4 ball-milled with hydrogenated 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V alloy was investigated. It was found that there is a mutual catalysis between the two hydrides, lowering the temperature of hydrogen release from both hydrides. In the case of 1h milled LiBH4/40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V...

  6. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages

    OpenAIRE

    Stitt , C. A.; Harker , N. J.; Hallam , K. R.; Paraskevoulakos , C.; Banos , A.; Rennie , S.; Jowsey , J.; Scott , T. B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reacta...

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopy, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange in high-spin iron(II) hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Thomas R; Bill, Eckhard; MacLeod, K Cory; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-03-03

    Very few hydride complexes are known in which the metals have a high-spin electronic configuration. We describe the characterization of several high-spin iron(II) hydride/deuteride isotopologues and their exchange reactions with one another and with H2/D2. Though the hydride/deuteride signal is not observable in NMR spectra, the choice of isotope has an influence on the chemical shifts of distant protons in the dimers through the paramagnetic isotope effect on chemical shift. This provides the first way to monitor the exchange of H and D in the bridging positions of these hydride complexes. The rate of exchange depends on the size of the supporting ligand, and this is consistent with the idea that H2/D2 exchange into the hydrides occurs through the dimeric complexes rather than through a transient monomer. The understanding of H/D exchange mechanisms in these high-spin iron hydride complexes may be relevant to postulated nitrogenase mechanisms.

  8. Investigation of the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, M.I.

    1981-12-01

    To investigate the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4 tubes, deformation tests under pressure of samples hydrided in autoclave and of samples containing iodine were carried out, in order to simulate the fission product. The same tests were carried out in samples without hydride and iodine contents that were used as reference samples in the temperature range of 650 0 C-950 0 C. The hydrided samples and the samples containing iodine tested at 650 0 C and 750 0 C showed a higher ductility than the samples of reference. The hydrided samples tested at 850 0 C and 950 0 C showed a higher embritlement than the samples of reference and than the samples containing iodine tested at the same temperatures. A mechanical test has been developed to investigate the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4 tubes. The mechanical test were carried out at room temperature. At room temperature the hydrition decreased the ductility of zircaloy-4. At room temperature the sample containing iodine showed a higher ductility than the sample without iodine. The combined action of hydrogen and iodine at room temperature enhanced the embrittlment of the samples zircaloy-4. (Author) [pt

  9. Hydrogen charging, hydrogen content analysis and metallographic examination of hydride in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Kishore, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Roychowdhury, S.; Srivastava, D.; Sinha, T.K.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.; Gopalan, B.; Kameswaran, R.; Sheelvantra, Smita S.

    2003-12-01

    Gaseous and electrolytic hydrogen charging techniques for introducing controlled amount of hydrogen in zirconium alloy is described. Zr-1wt%Nb fuel tube, zircaloy-2 pressure tube and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube samples were charged with up to 1000 ppm of hydrogen by weight using one of the aforementioned methods. These hydrogen charged Zr-alloy samples were analyzed for estimating the total hydrogen content using inert gas fusion technique. Influence of sample surface preparation on the estimated hydrogen content is also discussed. In zirconium alloys, hydrogen in excess of the terminal solid solubility precipitates out as brittle hydride phase, which acquire platelet shaped morphology due to its accommodation in the matrix and can make the host matrix brittle. The F N number, which represents susceptibility of Zr-alloy tubes to hydride embrittlement was measured from the metallographs. The volume fraction of the hydride phase, platelet size, distribution, interplatelet spacing and orientation were examined metallographically using samples sliced along the radial-axial and radial-circumferential plane of the tubes. It was observed that hydride platelet length increases with increase in hydrogen content. Considering the metallographs generated by Materials Science Division as standard, metallographs prepared by the IAEA round robin participants for different hydrogen concentration was compared. It is felt that hydride micrographs can be used to estimate not only that approximate hydrogen concentration of the sample but also its size, distribution and orientation which significantly affect the susceptibility to hydride embrittlement of these alloys. (author)

  10. Effects of Hydride Rim on Ductility of Zircaloy-4 using Ring Compression Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, So-Young; Kim, Ho-A; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Yong-Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The objective of this preliminary study is to form hydride rim around the cladding outside wall typically observed for high burnup fuel cladding. In addition, ring compression test (RCT) that simulates pinch-type loading subjected to cladding during SNF transportation is conducted to investigate separate effects of hydride rim on mechanical properties of the cladding. In this preliminary study, in order to simulate high burnup fuel cladding, hydride rim was attempted to form around the cladding outside wall. Encapsulated 150 mm long Zircaloy-4 tube which was plated with nickel at outer surface was used and then it charged with hydrogen using gaseous hydrogenation method. Finally, hydride rim whose thickness is 0-95 μm at outer cladding surface was successively formed. On the other hand, ring compression tests which simulate pinch-type loading were conducted to investigate the mechanical property degradation depending on the hydride rim thickness. The results showed that as the thickness increases, the specimen ruptured earlier and fracture strain decreases. These results demonstrate that the hydride rim deteriorates the ductility of zirconium alloy cladding.

  11. Influence of Milling Conditions on the Hydriding Properties of Mg-C Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Stoyadinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg75 at.%, CB25 at.% (CB: carbon black composites were synthesized at different ball milling conditions (milling energy, milling duration, and environment and their hydriding properties were characterized by high-pressure DSC. The SEM observations revealed that the samples consist of 5–15 μm Mg particles, surrounded and in some cases coated by carbon particles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the Mg phase of all as-obtained composite powders is nanocrystalline with average crystallite size in the range 20–30 nm, depending on the milling conditions. The best hydriding properties, expressed in low-temperature hydriding (below 150°C and improved cycle life, showed the composites milled at dry conditions. This is obviously due mainly to the successful Mg surface protection by the carbon. Additional decrease of the hydriding temperature (<100°C was achieved applying higher-energy milling, but at the same time the cycling stability deteriorated, due to the extremely fine particles and microstructure achieved under these conditions. The composites milled in the presence of heptane showed rapid capacity decline during cycling as well. The observed difference in the hydriding behavior of the Mg-CB composites is attributed to the different coating efficiency of the carbon milled under different conditions with Mg, which is supposed to protect magnesium from oxidation and plays a catalytic role for the hydriding reaction.

  12. AB{sub 2} metal hydrides for high-pressure and narrow temperature interval applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstroem, M.T.; Vanhanen, J.P.; Lund, P.D. [Helsinki Univ. of Technol., Hut (Finland). Dept. of Eng. Phys. and Math.

    1998-05-01

    AB{sub 2}-based metal hydrides have been studied in order to find high-capacity, low-hysteresis alloy-hydrogen systems for high-pressure applications with strict thermal boundary conditions. TiCrMn{sub 1-3x}Fe{sub 2x}V{sub x} (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 or 0.2) and Ti{sub 1-y}Zr{sub y}(Cr{sub z}Mn{sub 1-z}){sub 2} (y=0.05 or 0.15 and z=0.5 or 0.6) alloys have been synthesized and characterised by XRD, ICP spectrometry and volumetric PCI measurements. In addition, the PCIs of two commercial (GfE) alloys, Hydralloy C2 and Hydralloy C0, have been measured and a PDSC study on Hydralloy C2 has been performed, in order to assess the feasibility of their basic hydriding properties for narrow temperature interval applications. In the Fe and V containing alloy-hydrogen systems, hysteresis can be overcome at the cost of reduced hydriding capacity, while in the Zr-containing hydrides, at the temperatures of this study (-80 to 60 C), hysteresis is not completely eliminated but the hydriding capacity remains good also at high temperatures. The interplay between these properties of hydrides is discussed, as well as the role of materials characteristics in specially constrained applications. (orig.) 17 refs.

  13. Morphology study on the depleted uranium as hydriding/dehydriding cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dong-you, E-mail: dongyou@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun; Kang, Hyun-Goo; Chang, Min Ho; Oh, Yun Hee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kweon Ho; Woo, Yoon Myung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is one of the strongest candidates as a getter material of hydrogen isotopes in the nuclear fusion reactor. In this work, small DU lump specimen with 99.8% purity was prepared for observation of morphology variation as hydriding/dehydriding cycles. Hydriding/dehydriding of DU was carried out more than 10 cycles for powder preparation. The pulverized DU specimen was safely handled in the glove box under Argon gas condition to minimize contact with oxygen and humidity. The morphology change according to hydriding/dehydriding cycles was observed by visual cell reactor, optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The first hydriding of the small DU sample has progressed slowly with surface enlargement and volume expansion as time passes. After third hydriding/dehydriding cycles, most of DU was pulverized. The powder fineness of DU developed as hydriding/dehydriding cycle progresses. But the agglomerates of fine DU particles were observed. It was confirmed that the DU particles exist as porous agglomerates. And the particle agglomerate shows poor fluidity and even has the cohesive force.

  14. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  15. Experimental study of a metal hydride driven braided artificial pneumatic muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoff, Alexandra; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental study of a new actuation system that couples a braided artificial pneumatic muscle (BAPM) with a metal hydride driven hydrogen compressor to create a compact, lightweight, noiseless system capable of high forces and smooth actuation. The results indicate that the metal hydride-BAPM system has relatively good second law efficiency average of 30% over the desorption cycle. The thermal efficiency is low, due mainly to the highly endothermic chemical reaction that releases the stored hydrogen gas from the metal hydride. The force to metal hydride weight is very high (~14 000 NForce/kgMH) considering that this system has not been optimized to use the minimum amount of metal hydride required for a full actuation stroke of the fluidic muscle. Also, a thermodynamic model for the complete system is developed. The analysis is restricted in some aspects concerning the complexity of the hydriding/dehydriding chemical process of the system and the three-dimensional geometry of the reactor, but it provides a useful comparison to other actuation devices and clearly reveals the parameters necessary for optimization of the actuation system in future work. The system shows comparable work output and has the benefits of biological muscle-like properties for potential use in robotic systems.

  16. Glass and antimony electrodes for long-term pH monitoring: a dynamic in vitro comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, W. P.; Smout, A. J.; Kooiman, J. C.; Lamers, C. B.; Gues, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of combined glass microelectrodes with monocrystalline and polycrystalline antimony electrodes with external reference in a 24-h dynamic in vitro study. DESIGN AND METHODS: In an artificial stomach, the pH of the contents titrated from pH1-7 and back by NaOH and

  17. Ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring: a comparison between antimony, ISFET, and glass pH electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmink, Gerrit J. M.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Oors, Jac; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Ambulatory oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring is a widely used test to evaluate patients with reflux symptoms. Several types of pH electrodes are available: antimony, ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET), and glass electrodes. These pH electrodes have not been compared

  18. Health and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals pollution in an antimony mining region: a case study from South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jiang-Chi; Min, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Pang, Zhi-Hua; Liang, Yan-Jie; Ke, Yong

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, international research on the toxicity of the heavy metal, antimony, has gradually changed focus from early medical and pharmacological toxicology to environmental toxicology and ecotoxicology. However, little research has been conducted for sources identification and risk management of heavy metals pollution by long-term antimony mining activities. In this study, a large number of investigations were conducted on the temporal and spatial distribution of antimony and related heavy metal contaminants (lead, zinc, and arsenic), as well as on the exposure risks for the population for the Yuxi river basin in the Hunan province, China. The scope of the investigations included mine water, waste rock, tailings, agricultural soil, surface water, river sediments, and groundwater sources of drinking water. Health and ecological risks from exposure to heavy metal pollution were evaluated. The main pollution sources of heavy metals in the Yuxi River basin were analyzed. Remediation programs and risk management strategies for heavy metal pollution were consequently proposed. This article provides a scientific basis for the risk assessment and management of heavy metal pollution caused by antimony basin ore mining.

  19. Comparative phytotoxicity of methylated and inorganic arsenic- and antimony species to Lemna minor, Wolffia arrhiza and Selenastrum capricornutum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duester, L.; van der Geest, H.G.; Moelleken, S.; Hirner, A.V.; Kueppers, K.

    2011-01-01

    The alkylation of metalloids through the transfer of methyl groups is an important factor in the biogeochemical cycling of elements like arsenic and antimony. In the environment, many different organic and inorganic forms of these elements can therefore be found in soils, sediments or organisms.

  20. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  1. Trapping of hydride forming elements within miniature electrothermal devices: part 1. Investigation of collection of arsenic and selenium hydrides on a molybdenum foil strip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Gucer, S.; Selecká, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2004), s. 487-495 ISSN 0584-8547. [CSI. Presymposium on Sample Introduction in Atomic Spectrometry /33./. Zaragoza, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Project s: GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Grant - others:Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK)(TR) NATO-PC B Advanced Fellowship- Project No. 304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : Arsenic hydride generation * Selenium hydride generation * Molybdenum foil trap Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.086, year: 2004

  2. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (<100nm diameter) and ball-milled silicon powder (325 mesh). The increase in rate upon decreasing the particle size to 10 nm was even greater than would be expected based upon the increase in surface area. While specific surface area increased by a factor of 6 in going from <100 nm to ˜10 nm particles, the hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  3. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83 wt. %)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600 °C–1 h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt. %), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ∼10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900 °C–1 h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450 °C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1 h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1 h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e = 20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1

  4. Reaction Kinetics with Hydrogen and Temperature Dependence of the Hydriding Rate for a Magnesium-Based Nickel Iron Oxide Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Baek, Sung Hwan; Park, Hye Ryoung

    2012-01-01

    A 71.5 wt%Mg-23.5 wt%Ni-5 wt%Fe 2 O 3 (Mg-23.5Ni-5Fe 2 O 3 ) sample was prepared by a quite simple process, reactive mechanical grinding, and its hydriding and dehydriding properties were then investigated. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni and Fe 2 O 3 is considered to facilitate nucleation and shorten the diffusion distances of the hydrogen atoms. After the hydriding-dehydriding cycling, the Mg-23.5Ni-5Fe 2 O 3 sample contained Mg 2 Ni phase. Expansion and contraction of the hydride-forming materials (Mg and Mg 2 Ni) with the hydriding and dehydriding reactions are also considered to increase the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the mixture by forming defects and cracks leading to the fragmentation of the particles. The temperature dependence of the hydriding rate of the sample is discussed.

  5. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  6. American cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis resistant to meglumine antimoniate, but with good response to pentamidine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Fernandes Pimentel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a Brazilian soldier with cutaneous leishmaniasis. The lesion relapsed following two systemic treatments with meglumine antimoniate. The patient was treated with amphotericin B, which was interrupted due to poor tolerance. Following isolation of Leishmania sp., six intralesional infiltrations of meglumine antimoniate resulted in no response. Leishmania sp promastigotes were again isolated. The patient was submitted to intramuscular 4mg/kg pentamidine. Parasites from the first and second biopsies were identified as Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis; those isolated from the first biopsy were more sensitive to meglumine antimoniate in vitro than those isolated from the second biopsy. No relapse was observed.

  7. Speciation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in meglumine antimoniate pharmaceutical formulations by PSA using carbon nanotube electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vivian Silva; Santos, Wilney de Jesus Rodrigues; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2009-09-08

    A new and simple electroanalytical method for speciation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in pharmaceutical formulation by potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) using a multiwall carbon nanotube paste electrode was developed. All instrumental and chemical parameters influencing the performance of the method were carefully assessed and optimized. Trivalent antimony was determined in acid medium (pH 3.6) under the optimized condition (deposition potential of -0.7 V, deposition time of 180 s, ionic strength of 0.3M and oxidant mercury concentration of 10 mg l(-1)). Total antimony was determined after quantitative reduction of Sb(V) with l-cysteine (1.5%, w/v) and its concentration was calculated from difference between the total antimony and Sb(III). The developed method provided two distinct linear calibration one ranging from 10 up to 50 microg l(-1) and other from 100 up to 800 microg l(-1) with respective correlation coefficient of 0.9978 and 0.9993, presenting a detection limit of 6.2 microg l(-1). Repeatability for the six independent samples expressed in terms of relative standard deviation was found to be 3.01 and 1.39% for 40.0 and 300.0 microg l(-1) antimony concentration, respectively. Results on the effect of foreign substances [Al(III), Mg(II), Fe(III), Cd(II), Zn(II) and meglumine] on analytical signal of antimony showed no interference even using high content of foreign ions in the analyte:interferent ratio up to 1:100. The proposed method was successfully applied for the speciation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in pharmaceutical formulation and the accuracy was assessed from addition and recovery tests as well as comparing with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) technique used as reference analytical method.

  8. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  9. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should

  10. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J; Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R

    2014-10-16

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this

  11. Effect of hydrides on the ductile-brittle transition in stress-relieved, recrystallized and beta-treated zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelchat, J.; Barcelo, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the influence of δ-hydrides on the mechanical properties of three heat treated cold-rolled Zircaloy-4 sheets (stress-relieved, recrystallized and β treated), tested at room temperature and 350 0 C. Smooth tensile specimens of two thicknesses: 0.5 and 3.1 mm, containing different hydride volume fractions, up to 18% (about 1400 ppm H), have been tested. Metallographic and fractographic analysis were carried out in order to examine the fracture morphology near and on the fracture surface, and to determine the evolution of the fracture mechanism of hydrides as a function of temperature, hydride orientation and volume fraction

  12. Hydride Microstructure at the Metal-Oxide Interface of Zircaloy-4 from H.B. Robinson Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N [ORNL; Edmondson, Philip D [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the hydride rim microstructure at the metal-oxide interface of Zircaloy-4 cladding segment removed from H.B. Robinson Nuclear Reactor by utilizing high resolution electron microscopy techniques with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the NSUF Rapid Turnout Experiment program. A complex stacking and orientation of hydride platelets has been observed below the sub-oxide layer. Furthermore, radial hydride platelets have been observed. EDS signals of both Fe and Cr has been reduced within hydrides whereas EDS signal of Sn is unaffected.

  13. Hydrides formation In Zircaloy-4 irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, P; Flores, A V; Vicente Alvarez, M A; Banchik, A.D; Tolley, A; Condo, A; Santisteban, J R

    2012-01-01

    Under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original properties. Two phenomena of significant consequences for the integrity of the components are hydrogen uptake and radiation damage, since both contribute to the material fragilization. In the case of the Atucha I nuclear power reactor, the cooling channels, Zircaloy-4 tubular structural components about 6 meters long, were designed to withstand the entire lifetime of the reactor. Inside them, fuel elements 5.3 meters long are located. The fuel elements are cooled by a heavy water flow which circulates from the bottom (250 o ) to the top of the reactor (305 o C). The channels are affected by a fast neutron flux (En>1 Mev), increasing from a nominal value of 1.35 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the bottom to 1.69 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the top, reaching a maximum value of 3.76 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the center of the channels. However, due to the reactor operating conditions, they are replaced after about 10 effective full power years, time at which they reach 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 at the most neutronically active regions of the reactor. Studies on cooling channels are meaningful from many points of view. The channels are structural components which do not work under internal pressure or any other type of structural stress. The typical temperature of the cladding tubes in the reactor is about 350 o C, at which many types of irradiation defects are annealed [1]. The temperature range of the cooling channels lies between 200 o C-235 o C (outer foil of the channels) and 260 o C-300 o C (internal tube), a difference which makes the defect recovery kinetics slower. In the present context, following the program developed in the research contract 15810, we continue with the work started on the effects of the radiation on the hydride formation focusing on the dislocation loops in the zirconium matrix and its possible role as preferential sites for hydride

  14. Accommodation stresses in hydride precipitates by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J R; Vicente, M A; Vizcaino, P; Banchik, A D; Almer, J

    2012-01-01

    Hydride-forming materials (Zr, Ti, Nb, etc) are affected by a sub-critical crack growth mechanism that involves the diffusion of H to the stressed region ahead of a crack, followed by nucleation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip [1]. The phenomenon is intermittent, with the crack propagating through the hydride and stopping when it reaches the matrix. By repeating these processes, the crack propagates through a component at a rate that is highly dependent on the temperature history of the component. Most research effort to understand this phenomenon has occurred within the nuclear industry, as it affects the safe operation of pressure tubes (Zr2.5%Nb) and the long-term storage of nuclear fuel (Zircaloy cladding). Stress-induced hydride formation is a consequence of the volume dilatation that accompanies hydride formation (of the order of 15%), which is elastoplastically accommodated by the matrix and precipitate. Compressive stresses are expected within hydride precipitates due to the constraint imposed by the matrix. Such 'accommodation' stresses are essential ingredients in all theoretical models developed to assess the crack growth rate dependence on operational variables such as temperature, applied stress intensity factor, or overall H concentration [2]. Yet little experimental information is available about the magnitude and directionality of such accommodation stresses. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction is the only technique capable of quantifying such stresses. Here we briefly describe the fundaments of the technique, when used through an area detector placed in transmission geometry. The results of the experiments have allowed us to produce a comprehensive picture about the magnitude and origin of accommodation stresses in δ zirconium hydride platelets (author)

  15. Proton and hydride affinities in excited states: magnitude reversals in proton and hydride affinities between the lowest singlet and triplet states of annulenyl and benzannulenyl anions and cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Martin; Ottosson, Henrik; Kilså, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    electron counting rules for aromaticity in the two states. Using quantum chemical calculations at the G3(MP2)//(U)B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level we have examined the validity of this hypothesis for eight proton and eight hydride addition reactions of anions and cations, respectively, of annulenyl...

  16. High-Frequency H-1 NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn-II and Pb-II Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb-II Hydrides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 20 (2016), s. 10302-10309 ISSN 0020-1669 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrides of TlI and PbII * high-frequency 1H chemical shifts * relativistic effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  17. Novel antimony doped tin oxide/carbon aerogel as efficient electrocatalytic filtration membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimeng Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile method was developed to prepare antimony doped tin oxide (Sb-SnO2/carbon aerogel (CA for use as an electrocatalytic filtration membrane. The preparation process included synthesis of a precursor sol, impregnation, and thermal decomposition. The Sb-SnO2, which was tetragonal in phase with an average crystallite size of 10.8 nm, was uniformly distributed on the CA surface and firmly attached via carbon-oxygen-tin chemical bonds. Preliminary filtration tests indicated that the Sb-SnO2/CA membrane had a high rate of total organic carbon removal for aqueous tetracycline owing to its high current efficiency and electrode stability.

  18. Synthesis and optical properties of antimony oxide glasses doped with holmium trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunatha, S.; Eraiah, B., E-mail: eraiah@rediffmail.com [Department of physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru – 560 056. India (India)

    2016-05-06

    Holmium doped lithium-antimony-lead borate glasses having 1 mol% AgNO{sub 3} with composition 50B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20PbO-25Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-5Li{sub 2}O have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.10 eV to 3.31 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 2.28 eV to 3.00 eV. The refractive indexes have been calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz formula and the calculated values in the range of 2.31 to 2.37.

  19. Mid-infrared optical properties of chalcogenide glasses within tin-antimony-selenium ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruiqiang; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yicong; Song, Baoan; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Xianghua; Ji, Wei

    2017-10-16

    In this work, we investigated the mid-infrared (MIR) optical properties of selenide (Se-based) chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) within an As- and Ge-free system, namely the environment-friendly and low-cost tin-antimony-selenium (Sn-Sb-Se, SSS) ternary system, which has not been systematically studied to the best of our knowledge. As compared to ChGs within those conventional Se-based systems, SSS ChGs were found to exhibit extended infrared transmittance range as well as larger linear refractive index (n 0 ). Femtosecond Z-scan measurements show the presence of evident three-photon absorption from Urbach absorption of the SSS ChGs at MIR wavelength, which resonantly enhanced the nonlinear refractive behavior and resulted in large nonlinear refractive index (n 2 ).

  20. Microbial diversity and community structure in an antimony-rich tailings dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Xiao, Qingxiang; Sun, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    To assess the impact of antimony (Sb) on microbial community structure, 12 samples were taken from an Sb tailings pile in Guizhou Province, Southwest China. All 12 samples exhibited elevated Sb concentrations, but the mobile and bioaccessible fractions were small in comparison to total Sb concentrations. Besides the geochemical analyses, microbial communities inhabiting the tailing samples were characterized to investigate the interplay between the microorganisms and environmental factors in mine tailings. In all samples, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the most dominant phyla. At the genus level, Thiobacillus, Limnobacter, Nocardioides, Lysobacter, Phormidium, and Kaistobacter demonstrated relatively high abundances. The two most abundant genera, Thiobacillus and Limnobacter, are characterized as sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria, respectively, while the genus Lysobacter contains arsenic (As)-resistant bacteria. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicates that TOC and the sulfate to sulfide ratio strongly shaped the microbial communities, suggesting the influence of the environmental factors in the indigenous microbial communities.

  1. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4; Influence de l'orientation des hydrures sur les modes de deformation, d'endommagement et de rupture du zircaloy-4 hydrure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racine, A

    2005-09-15

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  2. The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series: Prospects for optoelectronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, John J.; Allen, Jeremy P.; Scanlon, David O.; Watson, Graeme W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, density functional theory is used to evaluate the electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series. Analysis of the electronic density of states and charge density shows that asymmetric density, or ‘lone pairs’, forms on the Sb III cations in the distorted oxide, sulphide and selenide materials. The asymmetric density progressively weakens down the series, due to the increase in energy of valence p states from O to Te, and is absent for Sb 2 Te 3 . The fundamental and optical band gaps were calculated and Sb 2 O 3 , Sb 2 S 3 and Sb 2 Se 3 have indirect band gaps, while Sb 2 Te 3 was calculated to have a direct band gap at Γ. The band gaps are also seen to reduce from Sb 2 O 3 to Sb 2 Te 3 . The optical band gap for Sb 2 O 3 makes it a candidate as a transparent conducting oxide, while Sb 2 S 3 and Sb 2 Se 3 have suitable band gaps for thin film solar cell absorbers. - Graphical abstract: A schematic illustrating the interaction between the Sb III cations and the chalcogenide anions and the change in their respective energy levels down the series. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of the antimony chalcogenide series is modelled using DFT. • Asymmetric density is present on distorted systems and absent on the symmetric telluride system. • Asymmetric density is formed from the mixing of Sb 5s and anion p states, where the anti-bonding combination is stabilised by the Sb 5p states. • The asymmetric density weakens down the series due to the increase in energy of chalcogenide p states. • The increase in energy of the anion p states reduces the fundamental and optical band gaps

  3. Successful treatment of feline leishmaniosis using a combination of allopurinol and N-methyl-glucamine antimoniate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alexandra Basso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary This work describes the diagnosis and successful treatment of a 2-year-old domestic cat infected with Leishmania species and presenting fever, and ulcerative and nodular skin lesions after being treated for pyodermatitis for 1 year without clinical improvement. After anamnesis the cat was submitted to a complete clinical examination. Blood was collected for determination of haematological and biochemical parameters, detection of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, feline coronavirus (FCoV and Leishmania amastigotes. Fine-needle aspiration puncture from the skin nodules was also performed. After definitive diagnosis the animal was treated and followed up over a 2 year period. The animal tested negative for FIV-specific antibodies, FeLV antigen and feline coronavirus RNA. Leishmania amastigotes in the skin nodules were confirmed by cytology and molecular diagnosis. Treatment was initiated with allopurinol, resulting in a slight clinical improvement. Thus, N-methyl-glucamine antimoniate was added and administered for 30 days, with complete closure of the ulcerative lesions in the hindlimbs requiring a surgical approach. Close monitoring of the patient in the following 24 months indicated that combined therapy was safe and clinical cure was achieved without further relapses or side effects. Relevance and novel information Considering the increasing number of feline leishmaniosis cases and the inconsistent results of most therapeutic protocols described in the literature, the use of new approaches, especially in refractory cases, is essential. Although the use of allopurinol and N-methyl-glucamine antimoniate is off-label in cats, in this case the combination treatment was followed by an extensive analytical monitoring, supporting their safety and effectiveness.

  4. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  5. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'Kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2016-05-01

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy.

  6. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Metal Borohydrides Synthesized from Metal Borides and Metal Hydrides Alexander Fogha, Sanna Sommera, Kasper T. Møllera, T. R. Jensena aCenter for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Chemistry Department, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000...... Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...... and Ca(BH4)2, respectively [3,4]. An attempt to synthesize alkali and alkaline earth metal borohydrides from various borides by ball milling under high hydrogen pressure is presented here. MgB2, AlB2 and CaB6 have been milled with MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) at p(H2) = 110 bar for 24 hours. All samples were...

  7. Alternatives for metal hydride storage bed heating and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, I.A.; Ramirez, F.B.; Koonce, J.E.; Ward, D.E.; Heung, L.K.; Weimer, M.; Berkebile, W.; French, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen isotopes with the storage bed hydride material is exothermic during absorption and endothermic during desorption. Therefore, storage bed operation requires a cooling system to remove heat during absorption, and a heating system to add the heat needed for desorption. Three storage bed designs and their associated methods of heating and cooling and accountability are presented within. The first design is the current RTF (Replacement Tritium Facility) nitrogen heating and cooling system. The second design uses natural convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. This design is referred to as the Naturally Cooled/Electrically Heated (NCEH) design. The third design uses forced convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. The design is referred to as the Forced Convection Cooled/Electrically Heated (FCCEH) design. In this report the operation, storage bed design, and equipment required for heating, cooling, and accountability of each design are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each design are listed and discussed. Based on the information presented within, it is recommended that the NCEH design be selected for further development

  8. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  9. Aluminum hydride cations stabilized by weakly coordinating carbaalanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasch, Andreas; Roesky, Herbert W; Noltemeyer, Mathias; Schmidt, Hans-Georg

    2005-08-08

    The reactions of t-BuCCLi with a mixture of AlH(3).NMe(3) and ClAlH(2).NMe(3) in boiling toluene with the addition of [t-BuCH(2)(Bzl)NMe(2)]Cl, or a bulky beta-diketimine instead, and [n-Bu(4)N]Cl led to the carbaalanates [H(2)Al(NMe(3))(2)](2)[(AlH)(8)(CCH(2)t-Bu)(6)], 3, and [n-Bu(4)N](2)[(AlH)(8)(CCH(2)t-Bu)(6)], 4, respectively. The reaction of Me(3)N.Al(CCt-Bu)(3) 5 and AlH(3).NMe(3) in boiling toluene yielded [H(n-Bu)Al(NMe(3))(2)][(AlH)(7)(AlNMe(3))(CCH(2)t-Bu)(6)], 6, in trace amounts. The single-crystal X-ray structures of 3 and 6 are reported. The compounds 3, 4, and 6 consist of well-separated ion pairs introducing carbaalanates as weakly coordinating anions and stabilizing aluminum hydride cations.

  10. Studying aluminum hydride by means of thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milekhin, Yu. M.; Koptelov, A. A.; Matveev, A. A.; Baranets, Yu. N.; Bakulin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical reactions and physical transformations that occur upon heating aluminum hydride (AlH3, alane), stored for 25 years, in the temperature range of 50-1200°C in an atmosphere of nitrogen, argon, and air are studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The heat of thermal decomposition and the hydrogen content are determined for the AlH3 samples and are found to be 318 ± 25 J/g and 9.32 ± 0.24 wt %, respectively. It is established that the estimated enthalpy of formation of AlH3 in stoichiometric composition (Δf H ≈ -10.3 kJ/mol) agrees with the literature data. After the release of hydrogen, the mass of the precipitate increases by 0.5 ± 0.3%, relative to the initial mass of the AlH3 samples; the most likely reason for this effect is the adsorption of nitrogen (argon) in the micropores and mesopores that form. Thermal phenomena associated with the crystallization of the amorphous aluminum that forms after hydrogen is released from the alane particles are analyzed. It is established that the aluminum contained in initial AlH3 samples is almost completely transformed into aluminum nitride and oxide (AlN and Al3O3) upon heating to 1200°C in nitrogen and air, respectively.

  11. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  12. Hydrogen storage in lithium hydride: A theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banger, Suman; Nayak, Vikas; Verma, U. P.

    2018-04-01

    First principles calculations have been carried out to analyze structural stability of lithium hydride (LiH) in NaCl phase using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Calculations have been extended to physiosorbed H-atom compounds LiH·H2, LiH·3H2 and LiH·4H2. The obtained results are discussed in the paper. The results for LiH are in excellent agreement with earlier reported data. The obtained direct energy band gap of LiH is 3.0 eV which is in excellent agreement with earlier reported theoretical band gap. The electronic band structure plots of the hydrogen adsorbed compounds show metallic behavior. The elastic constants, anisotropy factor, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and cohesive energies of all the compounds are calculated. Calculation of the optical spectra such as the real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, optical reflectivity, absorption coefficient, optical conductivity, refractive index, extinction coefficient and electron energy loss are performed for the energy range 0-15 eV. The obtained results for LiH·H2, LiH·3H2 and LiH·4H2, are reported for the first time. This study has been made in search of materials for hydrogen storage. It is concluded that LiH is a promising material for hydrogen storage.

  13. Delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizarro, Luis M.; Fernandez, Silvia; Lafont, Claudio; Mizrahi, Rafael; Haddad, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Crack propagation rates, grown by the delayed hydride cracking mechanism, were measured in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding, according to a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During the first stage of the program a Round Robin Testing was performed on fuel cladding samples provided by Studsvik (Sweden), of the type used in PWR reactors. Crack growth in the axial direction is obtained through the specially developed 'pin load testing' (PLT) device. In these tests, crack propagation rates were determined at 250 C degrees on several samples of the material described above, obtaining a mean value of about 2.5 x 10 -8 m s -1 . The results were analyzed and compared satisfactorily with those obtained by the other laboratories participating in the CRP. At the present moment, similar tests on CANDU and Atucha I type fuel cladding are being performed. It is thought that the obtained results will give valuable information concerning the analysis of possible failures affecting fuel cladding under reactor operation. (author) [es

  14. Toxicity Assessments of Antimony, Barium, Beryllium, and Manganese for Development of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (ECO-SSL) Using Earthworm (Eisenia Fetida) Benchmark Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simini, Michael

    2002-01-01

    ... soil that supports relatively high bioavailability of barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), manganese (Mn), and antimony (Sb). For the metals tested, cocoon production was a more sensitive endpoint than was survival...

  15. Low and high-pressure hydriding of V-0.5at.%C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, Joshua [University of Nevada, Reno, M.S. 388, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Chandra, Dhanesh, E-mail: dchandra@unr.ed [University of Nevada, Reno, M.S. 388, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Coleman, Michael; Sharma, Archana; Cathey, William N. [University of Nevada, Reno, M.S. 388, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Paglieri, Stephen N. [TDA Research, Inc., 12345 W. 52nd Ave., Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 (United States); Wermer, Joseph R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-C927, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 79-24, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lynch, Franklin E. [HCI, 12400 Dumont Way, Littleton, CO 80125 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The low-pressure hydriding characteristics of V-0.5at.%C alloy were determined in this study. There are several prior reports on the pressure-composition-temperature (p-c-T) isotherms and stability of the low-pressure vanadium hydride phases (V{sub 2}H or beta{sub 1}), and of vanadium alloyed with transition elements, but there are no reports on the hydrides of V-C alloys. The thermodynamic properties of the vanadium did not change significantly with the addition of carbon. In addition to low-pressure studies on V-0.5at.%C, we also performed high-pressure studies on V{sub 2}H reversible VH reversible VH{sub 2} (beta{sub 1} reversible beta{sub 2} reversible gamma) hydrides, including thermal cycling (778 cycles) between the beta and gamma phases. Thermal cycling between VH reversible VH{sub 2} increased the pressure hysteresis. The effects of thermal cycling (4000 cycles) on the absorption and desorption isotherms of V-0.5at.%C and on the H/M ratios for the beta{sub 1}-, beta{sub 2}- and gamma-phase hydrides are also presented. There was minimal decrepitation (pulverization) of the alloy; decrepitation of the V-0.5at.%C alloy was dramatically less than that of pure vanadium.

  16. Behavior and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under RIA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saux, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and simulate the mechanical behaviour and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated (in pressurized water reactors) cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under reactivity initiated accident conditions. A model is proposed to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material as a function of temperature (from 20 C up to 1100 C), strain rate (from 3.10 -4 s -1 up to 5 s -1 ), fluence (from 0 up to 1026 n.m -2 ) and irradiation conditions. Axial tensile, hoop tensile, expansion due to compression and hoop plane strain tensile tests are performed at 25 C, 350 C and 480 C in order to analyse the anisotropic plastic and failure properties of the non-irradiated material hydrided up to 1200 ppm. Material strength and strain hardening depend on temperature and hydrogen in solid solution and precipitated hydride contents. Plastic anisotropy is not significantly modified by hydrogen. The material is embrittled by hydrides at room temperature. The plastic strain that leads to hydride cracking decreases with increasing hydrogen content. The material ductility, which increases with increasing temperature, is not deteriorated by hydrogen at 350 C and 480 C. Macroscopic fracture modes and damage mechanisms depend on specimen geometry, temperature and hydrogen content. A Gurson type model is finally proposed to describe both the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior and the ductile fracture of the material as a function of temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  17. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellouin-De-Menibus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author) [fr

  18. Numerical simulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in metal hydride-based hydrogen storage reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumar, P.; Ramana, S. Venkata

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical investigation of two-dimensional heat and mass transfer during absorption of hydrogen in a cylindrical metal hydride bed containing MmNi 6.4 Al 0.4 is presented. By considering the variation in cooling fluid temperature along the axial direction (variable wall temperature), the changes in hydrogen concentration, hydride equilibrium pressure, and average hydride bed temperature at different axial locations are presented. The average bed temperature profiles and hydrogen storage capacities at different supply pressures showed good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. As the absorption progresses, the change in cooling fluid temperature along the axial direction is found to decrease and becomes unchanged at the end of the absorption process. The effect of variable wall temperature on hydrogen absorption rate for different supply pressures and hydride bed thicknesses are presented. The effect of variable wall temperature on absorption time is found to be significant for the hydride beds of thickness of above 7.5 mm. For a supply pressure of 20 bar, the maximum difference in absorption time between variable wall temperature and constant wall temperature boundary conditions is about 300 s for 17.5 mm bed thickness

  19. Characterization of a U-Mo alloy subjected to direct hydriding of the gamma phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, Silvia N.; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S.

    2003-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has imposed the need to develop plate-type fuel elements based on high density uranium compounds, such as U-Mo alloys. One of the steps in the fabrication of the fuel elements is the pulverization of the fissile material. In the case of the U-Mo alloys, the pulverization can be accomplished through hydriding - dehydriding. Two alternative methods of the hydriding-dehydriding process, namely the selective hydriding in alpha phase (HS-alpha) and the massive hydriding in gamma phase (HM-gamma) are currently being studied at the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. The HM-gamma method was reproduced at laboratory scale starting from a U-7 wt % Mo alloy. The hydrided and dehydrided materials were characterized using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction. These results are compared with previous results of the HS-alpha method. (author)

  20. Kinetic behaviour of low-Co AB5-type metal hydride electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tliha, M.; Boussami, S.; Mathlouthi, H.; Lamloumi, J.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of the LaNi 3.55 Mn 0.4 Al 0.3 Co 0.4 Fe 0.35 metal hydride, used as a negative electrode in the nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries, was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different state of charge (SOC). Impedance measurements were performed in the frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 mHz. Electrochemical impedance spectrum of the metal hydride electrode was interpreted by an equivalent circuit including the different electrochemical processes taking place on the interface between the MH electrode and the electrolyte. Electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the charge-transfer resistance R tc , the exchange current density I 0 and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient D H were determined at different state of charge. The results of EIS measurements indicate that the electrochemical reaction activity of the LaNi 3.55 Mn 0.4 Al 0.3 Co 0.4 Fe 0.35 metal hydride electrode was markedly improved with increasing state of charge (SOC). The transformation α-β is probably a limiting step in the mechanisms of hydrogenation of metal hydride electrode.

  1. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-08

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques.

  2. Effects of electron doping on the stability of the metal hydride NaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Amezcua, M. A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; de la Peña-Seaman, O.; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K. P.

    2017-04-01

    Alkali and alkali-earth metal hydrides have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities, but due to their high thermodynamic stability, they possess high dehydrogenation temperatures which may be reduced by transforming these compounds into less stable states/configurations. We present a systematic computational study of the electron doping effects on the stability of the alkali metal hydride NaH substituted with Mg, using the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the alloy Na1-x Mg x H. The phonon dispersions were studied paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure taking into account the zero point energy contribution. We found that substitution of Na by Mg in the hydride invokes a reduction of the frequencies, leading to dynamical instabilities for Mg content of 25%. The microscopic origin of these instabilities could be related to the formation of ellipsoidal Fermi surfaces centered at the L point due to the metallization of the hydride by the Mg substitution. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, thermodynamic properties like heat capacities, vibrational entropies and vibrational free energies as a function of temperature at zero pressure are obtained. These properties determine an upper temperature for the thermodynamic stability of the hydride, which decreases from 600 K for NaH to 300 K at 20% Mg concentration. This significant reduction of the stability range indicates that dehydrogenation could be favoured by electron doping of NaH.

  3. Experimental study of a metal hydride driven braided artificial pneumatic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderhoff, Alexandra; Kim, Kwang J

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the experimental study of a new actuation system that couples a braided artificial pneumatic muscle (BAPM) with a metal hydride driven hydrogen compressor to create a compact, lightweight, noiseless system capable of high forces and smooth actuation. The results indicate that the metal hydride–BAPM system has relatively good second law efficiency average of 30% over the desorption cycle. The thermal efficiency is low, due mainly to the highly endothermic chemical reaction that releases the stored hydrogen gas from the metal hydride. The force to metal hydride weight is very high (∼14 000 N Force /kg MH ) considering that this system has not been optimized to use the minimum amount of metal hydride required for a full actuation stroke of the fluidic muscle. Also, a thermodynamic model for the complete system is developed. The analysis is restricted in some aspects concerning the complexity of the hydriding/dehydriding chemical process of the system and the three-dimensional geometry of the reactor, but it provides a useful comparison to other actuation devices and clearly reveals the parameters necessary for optimization of the actuation system in future work. The system shows comparable work output and has the benefits of biological muscle-like properties for potential use in robotic systems

  4. Research on measurement of residual stresses of hemispherical lithium hydride by blind-hole method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Lin, E-mail: linbo@caep.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box: 919-71, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Kaihui, He [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, 15B, Fuxing Rd, 100862 Beijing (China); Dongwei, Shan; Weicai, Yang; Yonggang, Chi; Mei, Liu; Jun, Shen [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box: 919-71, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The residual stresses of sintered and machined lithium hydride of SR40 hyper-hemispherical and SR30 inner hemispherical sample were measured by blind-hole method. • The nearly 45 degrees direction residual stresses of SR40 hyper-hemisphere and SR30 inner hemisphere are the greatest stresses on spherical surface of lithium hydride samples. • The radial residual stress σ{sub r} of SR40 hyper-hemispherical and SR30 inner hemispherical sample is compressive stress and the circumferential residual stress σ{sub t} is tensile stress. - Abstract: The released strains of sintered and machined lithium hydride of SR40 hyper-hemispherical and SR30 inner hemispherical sample could be shown in the measuring process by blind-hole method. The residual stresses of lithium hydride sample were calculated with the formulas of residual stress and released strains. The results show that the nearly 45 degrees direction residual stresses of SR40 hyper-hemisphere and SR30 inner hemisphere are the greatest stresses on spherical surface of lithium hydride samples. The radial residual stress σ{sub r} of SR40 hyper-hemispherical and SR30 inner hemispherical sample is compressive stress and the circumferential residual stress σ{sub t} is tensile stress.

  5. Differential pulse polarographic determination of trace antimony in standard biological samples after preconcentration using 2-nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taher, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    A highly selective, rapid and economical differential polarographic method has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of antimony in various standard alloys and biological samples after of its 2-naphthol-4 sulfonic acid tetradecyl dimethylbenzylammonium chloride on microcrystalline naphthalene in the ph range of 7.5-11.0. After filtration, the solid mass is shaken with 8-10 ml of 1 M hydrochloric acid (with preconcentration factor of 10) and antimony is determined by differential pulse polarography. Antimony can alternatively be quantitatively absorbed on 2-nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid tetradecyl dimethylbenzylammonium-naphthalene absorbed packed in a column (with preconcentration factor of 30) and determined similarly. In this case, 1.5 μg of antimony can be concentrated in a column from 300 ml of aqueous sample, where its concentration is as low as 5 ng/ml. Characterization of the electro active process included an examination of the degree of reversibility. The results show that the irreversibility of antimony. Various parameters such as the effect of ph, volume of aqueous phase, HCl concentration, reagent concentration, naphthalene concentration, shaking time and interference of a number of metal ions on the determination of antimony have been studied in detail to optimize the conditions for determination in standard alloys and standard biological samples

  6. Remediation of antimony-rich mine waters: Assessment of antimony removal and shifts in the microbial community of an onsite field-scale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Kalin, Margarete; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Ning, Zengping; Liu, Tong; Sun, Min; Zhao, Yanlong; Wu, Shiliang; Mao, Jianzhong; Xiao, Tangfu

    2016-08-01

    An on-site field-scale bioreactor for passive treatment of antimony (Sb) contamination was installed downstream of an active Sb mine in Southwest China, and operated for one year (including a six month monitoring period). This bioreactor consisted of five treatment units, including one pre-aerobic cell, two aerobic cells, and two microaerobic cells. With the aerobic cells inoculated with indigenous mine water microflora, the bioreactor removed more than 90% of total soluble Sb and 80% of soluble antimonite (Sb(III)). An increase in pH and decrease of oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) was also observed along the flow direction. High-throughput sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene variable (V4) region revealed that taxonomically diverse microbial communities developed in the bioreactor. Metal (loid)-oxidizing bacteria including Ferrovum, Thiomonas, Gallionella, and Leptospirillum, were highly enriched in the bioreactor cells where the highest total Sb and Sb(III) removal occurred. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that a suite of in situ physicochemical parameters including pH and Eh were substantially correlated with the overall microbial communities. Based on an UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean) tree and PCoA (Principal Coordinates Analysis), the microbial composition of each cell was distinct, indicating these in situ physicochemical parameters had an effect in shaping the indigenous microbial communities. Overall, this study was the first to employ a field-scale bioreactor to treat Sb-rich mine water onsite and, moreover, the findings suggest the feasibility of the bioreactor in removing elevated Sb from mine waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Flow Method for Chemiluminescence Determination of Antimony(III) and Antimony(V) Using a Rhodamine B-Cetyltrimethylammonium Chloride Reversed Micelle System Following On-Line Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Ishizaka, Shoji; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow method, based on the combination of on-line solvent extraction with reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence (CL) detection using rhodamine B (RB), was developed for the determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in aqueous samples. The on-line extraction procedure involved ion-pair formation of the antimony(V) chloro-complex anion with the protonated RBH(+) ion and its extraction from an aqueous hydrochloric acid solution into toluene, followed by phase separation using a microporous membrane. When in a flow cell of a detector, the ion-pair in the extract driven was mixed with the reversed micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water (0.60 mol dm(-3) H2SO4) containing cerium(IV), its uptake by the reversed micelles and the subsequent CL oxidation of RB with Ce(IV) occurred easily, then the produced CL signal was measured. Using the proposed flow method under the optimized experimental conditions, a detection limit (DL) of 0.35 μmol dm(-3) and a linear calibration graph with a dynamic range from DL to 16 μmol dm(-3) were obtained for Sb(V) with a precision of 1.4% relative standard deviation (n = 5) at the Sb(V) concentration of 8.2 μmol dm(-3). The present method was successfully applied to the determination of Sb(V) in water samples and to the differential determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in copper electrolyte industrial samples, where total antimony Sb(III) + Sb(V) was determined after oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) with Ce(IV) and Sb(III) was calculated by difference, for which the DL was almost the same as that for Sb(V).

  8. Cyanide and antimony thermodynamic database for the aqueous species and solids for the EPA-MINTEQ geochemical code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Thermodynamic data for aqueous species and solids that contain cyanide and antimony were tabulated from several commonly accepted, published sources of thermodynamic data and recent journal article. The review does not include gases or organic complexes of either antimony or cyanide, nor does the review include the sulfur compounds of cyanide. The basic thermodynamic data, ΔG/sub f,298//sup o/, ΔH/sub f,298//sup o/, and S/sub f//sup o/ values, were chosen to represent each solid phase and aqueous species for which data were available in the appropriate standard state. From these data the equilibrium constants (log K/sub r,298//sup o/) and enthalpies of reaction (ΔH/sub r,298//sup o/) at 298 K (25/degree/C) were calculated for reactions involving the formation of these aqueous species and solids from the basic components. 34 refs., 14 tabs

  9. First report of the use of meglumine antimoniate for treatment of canine leishmaniasis in a pregnant dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Groppetti, Debora; Perego, Roberta; Grieco, Valeria; Ferro, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Canine leishmaniasis during pregnancy is rarely reported, even in countries where the infection in dogs is endemic. The authors report a case of a 4 yr old bitch with leishmaniasis treated with meglumine antimoniate during pregnancy. The pregnancy and delivery were normal and the bitch presented improvement of the infection during treatment. Three puppies died within 2 days of birth and tested negative via real-time PCR for L. infantum. The two surviving puppies were followed clinically, serologically, and by real-time PCR until 1 yr of age with no evidence of congenital leishmaniasis. L. infantum DNA was detected with real-time PCR analysis of uterine tissue from the bitch at the time of ovariohysterectomy. PCR analysis was performed after an ovariohysterectomy of the bitch that was performed two months after parturition. Meglumine antimoniate use in the pregnant bitch may have prevented vertical transmission of leishmaniasis.

  10. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development: palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

  12. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  13. A model for hydride-induced embrittlement in zirconium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeppling, D.; Massih, A.R.; Staahle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The critical stress intensity factor for hydrided zirconium-alloys is calculated using a Dugdale type model for a finite crack. The hydride platelets are assumed to surround the ends of the crack. They are located in the process region of the crack tip. The model is used to calculate the temperature dependence of the critical stress intensity factor and the results are compared with measurements performed on Zr-2.5Nb and Zircaloy. The model in general describes the experimental data satisfactorily, nevertheless, it gives implausible results for a certain range of temperatures. The deficiency is attributed to the lack of appropriate constitutive relations for the hydrided zirconium-based alloys. (orig.)

  14. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Morten B.; Meggouh, Mariem; Moury, Romain; Peinecke, Kateryna; Felderhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability. PMID:28793541

  15. Determination of the population of octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.M.; Gogava, V.V.; Shilo, S.I.; Biryukova, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of neutron investigations of ZrHsub(1.66), ZrHsub(1.75) and ZrHsub(1.98) zirconium hydrides are presented. Investigations were conducted using plane polycrystal samples by multidetector system of scattered neutron detection. Neutron diffraction method was used to determine the number of interstitial hydrogen atoms in interstitials of the lattice cell in the case of statistic atom distribution. The numbers of interstitial atoms in octahedral interstitials for zirconium hydrides were determined experimentally; the difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms in octa- and tetrahedral interstitials was determined as well. It is shown that experimentally determined difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms, occupying octa- and tetrahedral positions in investigated zirconium hydrides results at room temperature in the pretailing occupation of tetrahedral interstitials by hydrogen atoms (85-90%); the occupation number grows with temperature decrease and the ordering of interstitial vacancies with formation of hydrogen superstructure takes place at low temperatures

  16. Manufacturing and investigation of U-Mo LEU fuel granules by hydride-dehydride processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetskiy, Y.A.; Trifonov, Y.I.; Mitrofanov, A.V.; Samarin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of hydride-dehydride processing for comminution of U-Mo alloys with Mo content in the range 1.9/9.2% have been performed. Some regularities of the process as a function of Mo content have been determined as well as some parameters elaborated. Hydride-dehydride processing has been shown to provide necessary phase and chemical compositions of U-Mo fuel granules to be used in disperse fuel elements for research reactors. Pin type disperse mini-fuel elements for irradiation tests in the loop of 'MIR' reactor (Dmitrovgrad) have been fabricated using U-Mo LEU fuel granules obtained by hydride-dehydride processing. Irradiation tests of these mini-fuel elements loaded to 4 g U tot /cm 3 are planned to start by the end of this year. (author)

  17. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  18. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  19. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  20. Room temperature and thermal decomposition of magnesium hydride/deuteride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares, J.R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Macia, M.D.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Ferrer, I.J.; Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Lab. de Materiales de Interes en Energias Renovables

    2010-07-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) can be considered an interesting material to store hydrogen as long as two main drawbacks were solved: (i) its high stability and (ii) slow (de)hydriding kinetics. In that context, magnesium hydride films are an excellent model system to investigate the influence of structure, morphology and dimensionality on kinetic and thermodynamic properties. In the present work, we show that desorption mechanism of Pd-capped MgH{sub 2} at room temperature is controlled by a bidimensional interphase mechanism and a similar rate step limiting mechanism is observed during thermal decomposition of MgH{sub 2}. This mechanism is different to that occurring in bulk MgH{sub 2} (nucleation and growth) and obtained activation energies are lower than those reported in bulk MgH{sub 2}. We also investigated the Pd-capping properties upon H-absorption/desorption by means of RBS and isotope experiments. (orig.)